Worth talking to your neighbours

TWO hundred years old is no age at all – at least if you’re a town.

That fact goes some way to explaining why the boroughs of Poole and Christchurch get jittery whenever a merger with Bournemouth is mooted.

It’s not hard to detect concern that the young upstart of the south coast would end up dominating any partnership with its neighbours.

Today, we report on the quiet launch of a campaign to create a “united conurbation” of the three towns. Supporters say the idea would reduce costs and make local government more efficient.

It is 15 years since Bournemouth and Poole became “unitary authorities”, taking on functions such as education and social services. And in these straitened times, surely bold ideas for reform should be considered.

A full merger may be too much for the ancient boroughs to take. But they should at least consider what the youngster next door has to say.

Comments (3)

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12:20am Sun 4 Nov 12

portia6 says...

We should unite and become stronger!
We should unite and become stronger! portia6

12:31pm Sun 4 Nov 12

Ebb Tide says...

See also the 'stream of consciousness' associated with "Campaign launched to merge Bournemouth Christchurch and Poole" timed @ 12.00pm on Friday 2nd November 2012.

You may not wish to miss the suggested names for such a merged locality !!

Has 'localism' the ability to prevent a merged organisation becoming too bureaucratic and even more remote from "the electorate" and their social and economic needs ? Experience suggests that unrestrained larger organisations become stronger at resisting change - even when change is needed !!
See also the 'stream of consciousness' associated with "Campaign launched to merge Bournemouth Christchurch and Poole" timed @ 12.00pm on Friday 2nd November 2012. You may not wish to miss the suggested names for such a merged locality !! Has 'localism' the ability to prevent a merged organisation becoming too bureaucratic and even more remote from "the electorate" and their social and economic needs ? Experience suggests that unrestrained larger organisations become stronger at resisting change - even when change is needed !! Ebb Tide

6:21pm Sun 4 Nov 12

s-pb2 says...

No we should not unite. each council have different working practices and use different companies to carry out their work, use different pay scales to pay their workers, have different policies for the various councils functions. Any merger will prove extremely expensive in having to conform to one system when different computer systems etc are being used as well. The confusion would affect our already underesourced and overstretched services given to our elderly, those with learning disabilities, the disabled and vulnerable children. It wont cut down on offices either as Ive heard there isnt enough accommodation for council workers as it is already.
No we should not unite. each council have different working practices and use different companies to carry out their work, use different pay scales to pay their workers, have different policies for the various councils functions. Any merger will prove extremely expensive in having to conform to one system when different computer systems etc are being used as well. The confusion would affect our already underesourced and overstretched services given to our elderly, those with learning disabilities, the disabled and vulnerable children. It wont cut down on offices either as Ive heard there isnt enough accommodation for council workers as it is already. s-pb2

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