Dorset explorer Col John Blashford-Snell identifies link between Pacific and Atlantic

Bournemouth Echo: GOING WITH THE FLOW: This canyon could mark an ancient waterway GOING WITH THE FLOW: This canyon could mark an ancient waterway

A NORTH Dorset explorer has discovered evidence of an ancient water route connecting the Pacific and Atlantic oceans.

Col John Blashford-Snell made the breakthrough on his recent trip to the Central American country of Nicaragua.

It is believed the route, which encompasses rivers, a lake and flood plains, would be more ancient than the Panama Canal.

The research focused on the strip of west-coast land separating Lake Nicaragua from the Pacific. A local fisherman told how he managed to cross the strip on a temporary lake created during wet season floods.

“It seems likely that even if early cartographers did not see this lake, they were told about it by the indigenous people and thus drew a channel on their maps,” said Col Blashford-Snell.

“I’m sure this is how the story of a legendary route between the oceans started.”

Clear evidence of flooding was found at the site of the supposed lake by the expedition team.

Col Blashford-Snell is now considering a waterborne crossing of Nicaragua, from ocean to ocean, to establish the ancient route.

The waterway research taps into a wider theory proposed by writer Gavin Menzies, who asked the celebrated explorer to undertake the expedition.

Ancient maps indicate a channel crossing Central America, and Chinese DNA and artefacts have also been found in the region.

Local history also tells of a Chinese presence and European explorers recorded Chinese wrecks.

Several areas were found by the team where rivers flowing east to Lake Nicaragua and west to the Pacific rose within a few hundred yards of each other.

One site between two rivers indicated possible walls of an in-filled canal.

Comments (3)

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7:27pm Sun 14 Feb 10

X Old Bill says...

He is following in the footsteps of the Surveys of 1870 to 1875 commissioned by Ulysses S Grant.
The result recommended that a canal, if built, should be cut though Nicaragua.
Following De Lesseps' failure the USA were still minded to use their preferred route but political lobbying by parties with financial interests persuaded them to go for Panama, even though little of the French workings were used.
He is following in the footsteps of the Surveys of 1870 to 1875 commissioned by Ulysses S Grant. The result recommended that a canal, if built, should be cut though Nicaragua. Following De Lesseps' failure the USA were still minded to use their preferred route but political lobbying by parties with financial interests persuaded them to go for Panama, even though little of the French workings were used. X Old Bill
  • Score: 0

8:52am Mon 15 Feb 10

The-Bleeding-Obvious says...

The Col also led a successful expedition to cross the Darien Gap in Panama in1972. Equipement for this expedition was designed at Mexe in Christchurch.
The Col also led a successful expedition to cross the Darien Gap in Panama in1972. Equipement for this expedition was designed at Mexe in Christchurch. The-Bleeding-Obvious
  • Score: 0

3:58pm Tue 16 Feb 10

no vested interest says...

So the above article recognise's that there is some sort of connection between the Atlantic and the Pacific however old.This comment might seem I have my articles mixed up but why not support efforts to stop the islands of the Pacific disappearing under the rising sea levels,even in East Stoke,who really lives there? Protest groups in Dorset railing against Wind Farms in East Stoke?Well there's more electricity pylons you can throw a stick at so why not help to get rid of them too.
The rising sea levels in the Pacific islands is happening now and it will have an effect up your end in your life times and your childrens.I always thought it was only the landed gentry and the rich who lived in the Dorset countryside,their interests have always been moribund and selfish anyway.So whats so wrong with Wind Farms,they certainly look alot better than electricty pylons and far less dangerous than nuclear power stations at Winfrith.
Yes there is a connection between Hemisphere's and Oceans,not just in Central America,if you support the future of the planet in all parts of it,then use this article/comment as a metaphor for helping those that are the living the result of the ignorance of the protesters of East Stoke and their ilk.We all live on the same planet,even West Stoke and cosy old England and of course those of us in the Pacific,you choose to ignore it at your own peril.
So the above article recognise's that there is some sort of connection between the Atlantic and the Pacific however old.This comment might seem I have my articles mixed up but why not support efforts to stop the islands of the Pacific disappearing under the rising sea levels,even in East Stoke,who really lives there? Protest groups in Dorset railing against Wind Farms in East Stoke?Well there's more electricity pylons you can throw a stick at so why not help to get rid of them too. The rising sea levels in the Pacific islands is happening now and it will have an effect up your end in your life times and your childrens.I always thought it was only the landed gentry and the rich who lived in the Dorset countryside,their interests have always been moribund and selfish anyway.So whats so wrong with Wind Farms,they certainly look alot better than electricty pylons and far less dangerous than nuclear power stations at Winfrith. Yes there is a connection between Hemisphere's and Oceans,not just in Central America,if you support the future of the planet in all parts of it,then use this article/comment as a metaphor for helping those that are the living the result of the ignorance of the protesters of East Stoke and their ilk.We all live on the same planet,even West Stoke and cosy old England and of course those of us in the Pacific,you choose to ignore it at your own peril. no vested interest
  • Score: 0

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