Telling the stories of people from our area who lost their lives

One of the fallen Alfred Barrett

One of the fallen Alfred Barrett

First published in News
Last updated
by , Chief Reporter

TODAY marks 100 years since the world was plunged into the horror of the First World War.

In the Daily Echo, we are marking the anniversary by telling the stories of people from our area who lost their lives and those who lived through the conflict.

The Echo’s commemorative cover today shows images of just some of those from the area who fought in the great War.

They are Herbert Elsworth, who served in India with the Second Battalion Dorsetshire Regiment in 1911 and saw action in Mesopotamia – now Iraq – however he died of dysentery on July 16, 1916, aged 29.

Joseph Cox, from Somerton in Somerset, joined the 11th Cheshire Regiment. It was one of various regiments billeted in Bournemouth during the war.

Athelstan George, from Westbourne, joined the 1st Dorset Regiment in Belfast. In April 1914 Lt George gained his Aero Certificate to fly a Bristol Biplane.

William Wellman, from Poole, joined the army in June 1914, aged 17. He survived the war, but died early in the Second World War.

Alfred Barrett, from Moordown, served in the Royal Engineers and was killed in action in June 1916, aged 40.

Walter Bailey served with the Hampshire Regiment in First World War. He was educated at Bournemouth School, going to the front in 1915.

Walter John Read served in the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry and was killed in August 1917.

Reginald Seth Lockyer was a driver in the Royal Army Service Corps. He was killed in July 1915.

Roland Henry Peck, from Moordown, was a member of the Royal Flying Corps, the forerunner of the RAF. He died in March 1916.

John Reginald Turner, as part of the 1st Dorsetshire Regiment, took part in the first major action of the British Expeditionary Force at the Battle of Mons. He saw further action at the Battle of the Marne.

William Henry Birch, from Poole, served in the Army Veterinary Corps.

Albert William Clapp, from Branksome, served in the Royal Navy.

Robert Henry Parke survived the war and was the oldest resident of Lytchett Matravers when he died aged 96 in 1978.

Edwin Elsworth, stepbrother of Herbert Elsworth, with his brother Frederick volunteered to fight for his country, joining the Dorset Yeomanry and going to Egypt together – although Frederick was under age.

Comments (12)

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7:20am Mon 4 Aug 14

BSJC says...

Thank you all, in both world wars.
Thank you all, in both world wars. BSJC
  • Score: 6

7:23am Mon 4 Aug 14

BSJC says...

Thank you all,.
Thank you all,. BSJC
  • Score: 5

7:55am Mon 4 Aug 14

Marshwood says...

Lake brothers from POOLE. Commerated on the plaque in St James' church. Originally in the church which stood where McDonalds is now.
There were 3 brothers,all served with the 2nd Battalion of the Dorset Regiment. Henry is listed as died on 22/04/16 and is commerated on the Basra memorial in Iraq. George is listed as died on 06/08/18 and is buried in Ramleh War Cemetery, Israel. The 3rd brother, Frank was discharged wounded.

RESPECT.
Lake brothers from POOLE. Commerated on the plaque in St James' church. Originally in the church which stood where McDonalds is now. There were 3 brothers,all served with the 2nd Battalion of the Dorset Regiment. Henry is listed as died on 22/04/16 and is commerated on the Basra memorial in Iraq. George is listed as died on 06/08/18 and is buried in Ramleh War Cemetery, Israel. The 3rd brother, Frank was discharged wounded. RESPECT. Marshwood
  • Score: 5

9:26am Mon 4 Aug 14

Lord Spring says...

Will the Echo be publishing a copy of Obituary notices for the next 4 years each day of local men that had fallen on the 100 year anniversary of the announcement they had fallen.

Or will this current fanfare be soon forgotten like so may war memorials that are discarded when buildings are demolished.
Will the Echo be publishing a copy of Obituary notices for the next 4 years each day of local men that had fallen on the 100 year anniversary of the announcement they had fallen. Or will this current fanfare be soon forgotten like so may war memorials that are discarded when buildings are demolished. Lord Spring
  • Score: 1

9:45am Mon 4 Aug 14

Lord Spring says...

"Alfred Barrett, from Moordown, served in the Royal Engineers and was killed in action in June 1916, aged 40. "

As he is buried locally he was not killed in action as very few bodies were repatriated . Died of wounds or natural causes would be more correct

BARRETT, ALFRED GEORGE
Rank:Sapper
Service No:51816
Date of Death:26/06/1916 Age:40
Regiment/Service:Roy
al Engineers 130th Field Coy.
Grave Reference:Row 2. 28.
Cemetery:THROOP UNITED REFORMED CHURCH
Additional Information:Son of R. M. Barrett; husband of Lovedy Barrett, of 64, Brassey Rd., Winton, Bournemouth Born at Moordown.
"Alfred Barrett, from Moordown, served in the Royal Engineers and was killed in action in June 1916, aged 40. " As he is buried locally he was not killed in action as very few bodies were repatriated . Died of wounds or natural causes would be more correct BARRETT, ALFRED GEORGE Rank:Sapper Service No:51816 Date of Death:26/06/1916 Age:40 Regiment/Service:Roy al Engineers 130th Field Coy. Grave Reference:Row 2. 28. Cemetery:THROOP UNITED REFORMED CHURCH Additional Information:Son of R. M. Barrett; husband of Lovedy Barrett, of 64, Brassey Rd., Winton, Bournemouth Born at Moordown. Lord Spring
  • Score: 1

12:45pm Mon 4 Aug 14

Arjay says...

Lord Spring wrote:
"Alfred Barrett, from Moordown, served in the Royal Engineers and was killed in action in June 1916, aged 40. "

As he is buried locally he was not killed in action as very few bodies were repatriated . Died of wounds or natural causes would be more correct

BARRETT, ALFRED GEORGE
Rank:Sapper
Service No:51816
Date of Death:26/06/1916 Age:40
Regiment/Service:Roy

al Engineers 130th Field Coy.
Grave Reference:Row 2. 28.
Cemetery:THROOP UNITED REFORMED CHURCH
Additional Information:Son of R. M. Barrett; husband of Lovedy Barrett, of 64, Brassey Rd., Winton, Bournemouth Born at Moordown.
Alfred George Barrettt died on 26th June 1916, at Queen Mary's Military Hospital, Blackburn, of an infection following surgery performed in Rouen,France.
He was laid to rest on 1st July 1916 -- on the same day as the Battle of the Somme began -- at Throop Congregational Church.
His gravestone can still be found in the churchyard there.
As Lord Spring says, only very few bodies were returned from France - and only then in the very early days of the conflict.
After that, if you died in France, your remains stayed in France -regardless of rank
Only the wounded - or the very ill - were returned to England. Those who subsequently died here were of course buried here.
[quote][p][bold]Lord Spring[/bold] wrote: "Alfred Barrett, from Moordown, served in the Royal Engineers and was killed in action in June 1916, aged 40. " As he is buried locally he was not killed in action as very few bodies were repatriated . Died of wounds or natural causes would be more correct BARRETT, ALFRED GEORGE Rank:Sapper Service No:51816 Date of Death:26/06/1916 Age:40 Regiment/Service:Roy al Engineers 130th Field Coy. Grave Reference:Row 2. 28. Cemetery:THROOP UNITED REFORMED CHURCH Additional Information:Son of R. M. Barrett; husband of Lovedy Barrett, of 64, Brassey Rd., Winton, Bournemouth Born at Moordown.[/p][/quote]Alfred George Barrettt died on 26th June 1916, at Queen Mary's Military Hospital, Blackburn, of an infection following surgery performed in Rouen,France. He was laid to rest on 1st July 1916 -- on the same day as the Battle of the Somme began -- at Throop Congregational Church. His gravestone can still be found in the churchyard there. As Lord Spring says, only very few bodies were returned from France - and only then in the very early days of the conflict. After that, if you died in France, your remains stayed in France -regardless of rank Only the wounded - or the very ill - were returned to England. Those who subsequently died here were of course buried here. Arjay
  • Score: 2

1:39pm Mon 4 Aug 14

Lord Spring says...

An extract from the Great War Forum.

Repatriation from a war zone was banned from mid-1915. Prior to that time only a handful of officers were repatriated to the UK due to relatives having to pay the cost. The ban was put in place mainly because of the logistical, health and morale problems the return of thousands of bodies would create. The cost would have been irrelevant as it would be borne by the relatives - presumably.

A tiny number of men were repatriated to Canada from war zones after the war through illicit means and also, of course, the Unknown Soldiers.

To date, I have traced only 27 British men repatriated from a war zone during the war - all before the ban was instituted. In addition there were a handful returned after the war including the Unknown Soldier, a merchant seaman and three men from India.

The ban did not apply to Canadians etc who died in the UK and quite a few of these were returned home. I am currently researching those Canadians so returned home from the UK and USA. Only one Australian was ever repatriated plus their Unknown Soldier. A few South Africans were also returned home from German South West Africa. No NZs were returned other than their recent Unknown Soldier.


There is one repatriation buried in Dorset at Parnham House, Beaminster that of William Barnard Rhodes-Moorhouse who awarded the VC posthumously won in Flanders .
I
An extract from the Great War Forum. Repatriation from a war zone was banned from mid-1915. Prior to that time only a handful of officers were repatriated to the UK due to relatives having to pay the cost. The ban was put in place mainly because of the logistical, health and morale problems the return of thousands of bodies would create. The cost would have been irrelevant as it would be borne by the relatives - presumably. A tiny number of men were repatriated to Canada from war zones after the war through illicit means and also, of course, the Unknown Soldiers. To date, I have traced only 27 British men repatriated from a war zone during the war - all before the ban was instituted. In addition there were a handful returned after the war including the Unknown Soldier, a merchant seaman and three men from India. The ban did not apply to Canadians etc who died in the UK and quite a few of these were returned home. I am currently researching those Canadians so returned home from the UK and USA. Only one Australian was ever repatriated plus their Unknown Soldier. A few South Africans were also returned home from German South West Africa. No NZs were returned other than their recent Unknown Soldier. There is one repatriation buried in Dorset at Parnham House, Beaminster that of William Barnard Rhodes-Moorhouse who awarded the VC posthumously won in Flanders . I Lord Spring
  • Score: 1

1:53pm Mon 4 Aug 14

pete woodley says...

Lord Spring wrote:
An extract from the Great War Forum.

Repatriation from a war zone was banned from mid-1915. Prior to that time only a handful of officers were repatriated to the UK due to relatives having to pay the cost. The ban was put in place mainly because of the logistical, health and morale problems the return of thousands of bodies would create. The cost would have been irrelevant as it would be borne by the relatives - presumably.

A tiny number of men were repatriated to Canada from war zones after the war through illicit means and also, of course, the Unknown Soldiers.

To date, I have traced only 27 British men repatriated from a war zone during the war - all before the ban was instituted. In addition there were a handful returned after the war including the Unknown Soldier, a merchant seaman and three men from India.

The ban did not apply to Canadians etc who died in the UK and quite a few of these were returned home. I am currently researching those Canadians so returned home from the UK and USA. Only one Australian was ever repatriated plus their Unknown Soldier. A few South Africans were also returned home from German South West Africa. No NZs were returned other than their recent Unknown Soldier.


There is one repatriation buried in Dorset at Parnham House, Beaminster that of William Barnard Rhodes-Moorhouse who awarded the VC posthumously won in Flanders .
I
My father served with the Canadian Field Artillery in WW1,and i have his diary that he took with him (30 PAGES) describing some of the battles,and his return to Canada.
[quote][p][bold]Lord Spring[/bold] wrote: An extract from the Great War Forum. Repatriation from a war zone was banned from mid-1915. Prior to that time only a handful of officers were repatriated to the UK due to relatives having to pay the cost. The ban was put in place mainly because of the logistical, health and morale problems the return of thousands of bodies would create. The cost would have been irrelevant as it would be borne by the relatives - presumably. A tiny number of men were repatriated to Canada from war zones after the war through illicit means and also, of course, the Unknown Soldiers. To date, I have traced only 27 British men repatriated from a war zone during the war - all before the ban was instituted. In addition there were a handful returned after the war including the Unknown Soldier, a merchant seaman and three men from India. The ban did not apply to Canadians etc who died in the UK and quite a few of these were returned home. I am currently researching those Canadians so returned home from the UK and USA. Only one Australian was ever repatriated plus their Unknown Soldier. A few South Africans were also returned home from German South West Africa. No NZs were returned other than their recent Unknown Soldier. There is one repatriation buried in Dorset at Parnham House, Beaminster that of William Barnard Rhodes-Moorhouse who awarded the VC posthumously won in Flanders . I[/p][/quote]My father served with the Canadian Field Artillery in WW1,and i have his diary that he took with him (30 PAGES) describing some of the battles,and his return to Canada. pete woodley
  • Score: 1

2:49pm Mon 4 Aug 14

ILOVEBOURNEMOUTH says...

Just watched the documentary The Greatest Story Never Told. Enlightening.

If anyone's interested here is the link: http://thegreatestst
orynevertold.tv/

Seek the Truth and the Truth will set us Free!
Just watched the documentary The Greatest Story Never Told. Enlightening. If anyone's interested here is the link: http://thegreatestst orynevertold.tv/ Seek the Truth and the Truth will set us Free! ILOVEBOURNEMOUTH
  • Score: 0

4:45pm Mon 4 Aug 14

Lord Spring says...

Peter you should get someone to publish it or contact
http://www.canadiang
reatwarproject.com/W
arDiaries/diaryMain.
asp

Are you aware there was mutiny of Canadians in North Wales who got fed up of being held in the UK after the war

I took this from the above link

"There is a 95-year-old legend in the North Wales town of Bodelwyddan. On some nights you can hear the sound of soldiers marching through the town, but if you look, none can be seen. The soldiers are the spirits of Canadian troops that rest in St. Margaret’s Churchyard in the town. 208 Canadian soldiers are buried there, most of them victims of the influenza epidemic that was rampant in Europe and North America in early 1919. Four of the graves are different: they are the graves of soldiers that were killed when the Canadian soldiers in the Kinmel Park Army camp mutinied in 1919."
Peter you should get someone to publish it or contact http://www.canadiang reatwarproject.com/W arDiaries/diaryMain. asp Are you aware there was mutiny of Canadians in North Wales who got fed up of being held in the UK after the war I took this from the above link "There is a 95-year-old legend in the North Wales town of Bodelwyddan. On some nights you can hear the sound of soldiers marching through the town, but if you look, none can be seen. The soldiers are the spirits of Canadian troops that rest in St. Margaret’s Churchyard in the town. 208 Canadian soldiers are buried there, most of them victims of the influenza epidemic that was rampant in Europe and North America in early 1919. Four of the graves are different: they are the graves of soldiers that were killed when the Canadian soldiers in the Kinmel Park Army camp mutinied in 1919." Lord Spring
  • Score: 1

6:43pm Mon 4 Aug 14

pete woodley says...

Thanks lord spring,very interesting about mutiny,my dad went back ok,i think but was at rhyl where kinmel camp was i believe,i must look through the diary,would you like to see it.
Thanks lord spring,very interesting about mutiny,my dad went back ok,i think but was at rhyl where kinmel camp was i believe,i must look through the diary,would you like to see it. pete woodley
  • Score: 1

1:03pm Tue 5 Aug 14

CharlieBo says...

The Echo may not be publishing a list of names of the men as they died for the next four years, but I know there is somewhere that is. They will be displaying the names of the men proven to have been born or have lived in Bournemouth on the day they fell 100 years ago, starting with Lionel Alfred Beare on 22.08.14
The Echo may not be publishing a list of names of the men as they died for the next four years, but I know there is somewhere that is. They will be displaying the names of the men proven to have been born or have lived in Bournemouth on the day they fell 100 years ago, starting with Lionel Alfred Beare on 22.08.14 CharlieBo
  • Score: 1

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