VIDEO: Forget university, apprenticeships are a good career move – Nick Clegg denounces “snobbery” on visit to Cobham

Bournemouth Echo: On a visit to Cobham PLC’s head offices Nick Clegg voiced support for apprenticeships On a visit to Cobham PLC’s head offices Nick Clegg voiced support for apprenticeships

APPRENTICESHIPS should be considered as good a career option as going to university, deputy prime minister Nick Clegg said on a visit to Dorset.

The Liberal Democrat leader met apprentices at Cobham and said Britain’s “barely disguised snobbery” towards apprenticeships had held the country back.

He said more than 1.8million apprenticeships had been created during the current Parliament, more than under any other government in living memory.

“I get the impression we’re also turning a page on what was a barely disguised snobbery that an occupational qualification wasn’t as good as a higher education qualification,” he said.

“I’ve always felt that attitude has held the country back.

“You should put these two routes – vocational and higher education – on the same pedestal and I think we’re doing that.

“We’re slowly getting there.”

Mr Clegg was given a tour of the Cobham site at Brook Road, Wimborne before talking to people who have successfully completed apprenticeships.

He was told that many schools did not properly promote apprenticeships as a career option and instead were focused solely on pupils applying to go to university.

Cobham apprenticeships take four years to complete, with employees earning a wage and working alongside experienced staff to gain job-specific skills and work towards nationally recognised qualifications.

Apprentices from Cobham won the Brathay Apprentice Challenge in 2012 and were runners-up in 2013 and were presented with their certificates by Mr Clegg.

Mr Clegg said: “Young people working alongside older folk with more experience will learn more from just doing the job rather than learning about it from a book.

“We’ve taken this older idea and we are now putting it into these 21st century sites like Cobham. It’s a wonderful merge of the old and new.”

Comments (9)

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2:37pm Mon 14 Jul 14

Townee says...

It might be a great idea but you don't get to cause havoc for 4 years in someone else's town. Then complain that you are in debt.
It might be a great idea but you don't get to cause havoc for 4 years in someone else's town. Then complain that you are in debt. Townee
  • Score: 0

3:33pm Mon 14 Jul 14

sprintervanman says...

Whilst i respect those who wish to further their education and go to College or University full time, there is that forthcoming danger that many youngsters are leaving further Education and then finding themselves one of many, qualified but chasing prospects with the 1000's of others. Encouragement in fields such as Building, Electrical,Plumbing etc, the jobs that need to be filled as more and more people take to computer based work and shy away from what would be seen as a dirty manual Career.An apprenticeship in these areas will mean when these guys/girls have finished training they will find themselves straight into the job market and on a pretty good wage compared to the over qualified waiting at the job center for jobs that may never appear.
Whilst i respect those who wish to further their education and go to College or University full time, there is that forthcoming danger that many youngsters are leaving further Education and then finding themselves one of many, qualified but chasing prospects with the 1000's of others. Encouragement in fields such as Building, Electrical,Plumbing etc, the jobs that need to be filled as more and more people take to computer based work and shy away from what would be seen as a dirty manual Career.An apprenticeship in these areas will mean when these guys/girls have finished training they will find themselves straight into the job market and on a pretty good wage compared to the over qualified waiting at the job center for jobs that may never appear. sprintervanman
  • Score: 3

4:36pm Mon 14 Jul 14

Townee says...

Why do manual work when you can study for 4 years in a subject no one needs for a job.
Why do manual work when you can study for 4 years in a subject no one needs for a job. Townee
  • Score: 0

4:58pm Mon 14 Jul 14

BmthNewshound says...

I'm cringing as I say it but I agree with Nick. I feel sorry for youngsters because they are pushed into going to university because their secondary schools are partly judged on how many of their students go on to university. It was Labour who wanted more young people to go to university to cover up their failure to deal with the problem of youth unemployment. New worthless degree courses were introduced to enable even the most mediocre student could make it onto a course.
I'm cringing as I say it but I agree with Nick. I feel sorry for youngsters because they are pushed into going to university because their secondary schools are partly judged on how many of their students go on to university. It was Labour who wanted more young people to go to university to cover up their failure to deal with the problem of youth unemployment. New worthless degree courses were introduced to enable even the most mediocre student could make it onto a course. BmthNewshound
  • Score: 0

5:19pm Mon 14 Jul 14

Marty Caine UKIP says...

BmthNewshound wrote:
I'm cringing as I say it but I agree with Nick. I feel sorry for youngsters because they are pushed into going to university because their secondary schools are partly judged on how many of their students go on to university. It was Labour who wanted more young people to go to university to cover up their failure to deal with the problem of youth unemployment. New worthless degree courses were introduced to enable even the most mediocre student could make it onto a course.
Providing the apprenticeship is done in a decent working environment and the youngsters finish the course with enough hands on experience to progress in the job market, then I am all for it but unfortunately a lot of the apprenticeships are catered far more for cheap labour and manipulation of youth unemployment figures and that I find extremely distasteful. Three to four years of working below minimum wage to simply end up back on the scrapheap is not going to help them is it.
[quote][p][bold]BmthNewshound[/bold] wrote: I'm cringing as I say it but I agree with Nick. I feel sorry for youngsters because they are pushed into going to university because their secondary schools are partly judged on how many of their students go on to university. It was Labour who wanted more young people to go to university to cover up their failure to deal with the problem of youth unemployment. New worthless degree courses were introduced to enable even the most mediocre student could make it onto a course.[/p][/quote]Providing the apprenticeship is done in a decent working environment and the youngsters finish the course with enough hands on experience to progress in the job market, then I am all for it but unfortunately a lot of the apprenticeships are catered far more for cheap labour and manipulation of youth unemployment figures and that I find extremely distasteful. Three to four years of working below minimum wage to simply end up back on the scrapheap is not going to help them is it. Marty Caine UKIP
  • Score: 0

6:05pm Mon 14 Jul 14

sprintervanman says...

Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
BmthNewshound wrote:
I'm cringing as I say it but I agree with Nick. I feel sorry for youngsters because they are pushed into going to university because their secondary schools are partly judged on how many of their students go on to university. It was Labour who wanted more young people to go to university to cover up their failure to deal with the problem of youth unemployment. New worthless degree courses were introduced to enable even the most mediocre student could make it onto a course.
Providing the apprenticeship is done in a decent working environment and the youngsters finish the course with enough hands on experience to progress in the job market, then I am all for it but unfortunately a lot of the apprenticeships are catered far more for cheap labour and manipulation of youth unemployment figures and that I find extremely distasteful. Three to four years of working below minimum wage to simply end up back on the scrapheap is not going to help them is it.
Considering most of my generation became qualified in trades through the YTS scheme for their £28.50 a week and went on to become well paid Tradesmen, i don't think any of them felt hard done by or fit for the scrap heap.Where's the next generation of those trades people going to come from when all the youngsters are told if they are not on top wack from word go they will be fit for the scrap heap.We started at the bottom and worked are way up......is teaching the new workforce of today that is what happens in the real working world so wrong.
[quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BmthNewshound[/bold] wrote: I'm cringing as I say it but I agree with Nick. I feel sorry for youngsters because they are pushed into going to university because their secondary schools are partly judged on how many of their students go on to university. It was Labour who wanted more young people to go to university to cover up their failure to deal with the problem of youth unemployment. New worthless degree courses were introduced to enable even the most mediocre student could make it onto a course.[/p][/quote]Providing the apprenticeship is done in a decent working environment and the youngsters finish the course with enough hands on experience to progress in the job market, then I am all for it but unfortunately a lot of the apprenticeships are catered far more for cheap labour and manipulation of youth unemployment figures and that I find extremely distasteful. Three to four years of working below minimum wage to simply end up back on the scrapheap is not going to help them is it.[/p][/quote]Considering most of my generation became qualified in trades through the YTS scheme for their £28.50 a week and went on to become well paid Tradesmen, i don't think any of them felt hard done by or fit for the scrap heap.Where's the next generation of those trades people going to come from when all the youngsters are told if they are not on top wack from word go they will be fit for the scrap heap.We started at the bottom and worked are way up......is teaching the new workforce of today that is what happens in the real working world so wrong. sprintervanman
  • Score: 2

6:30pm Mon 14 Jul 14

Hawkstone says...

Apprenticeships are definitely a good option, even for the more academic student. My daughter left the grammar school in year 11 which was unusual and was offered 4 apprenticeships. She opted for the one that suited her career direction. In the last 7 years she has complete her HNC, Foundation degree and recently completed her Bachelor of Engineering degree with First Class honours. She is earning a very healthy salary and has no university debt. As long as the apprentice scheme is well run and in areas of work that will be of use to the country then they are the way forward for many students.
Apprenticeships are definitely a good option, even for the more academic student. My daughter left the grammar school in year 11 which was unusual and was offered 4 apprenticeships. She opted for the one that suited her career direction. In the last 7 years she has complete her HNC, Foundation degree and recently completed her Bachelor of Engineering degree with First Class honours. She is earning a very healthy salary and has no university debt. As long as the apprentice scheme is well run and in areas of work that will be of use to the country then they are the way forward for many students. Hawkstone
  • Score: 3

4:29am Tue 15 Jul 14

random dude says...

I agree with Clegg, I'm an unemployed graduate and if any school/college leavers are reading this I would strongly advise them to consider work based training like apprenticeships over higher education.

Even as recently as I was at the point of choosing, apprenticeships were considered the inferior path and back then there was very few of them about outside trades. Youngsters are lucky to have more options now.

Times have changed and degrees are no longer worth what they were to our parents generation. Employers now are far more interested in work experience than education. Don't let yourself be fooled into the higher education pipe dream that a nice cosy job will be waiting for you upon graduation. There is a pretty good chance you'll end up more or less bullied into a non-graduate level job that nobody else wants and will be expected to re-train accordingly.

Degrees are worth it for the fortunate proportion that beat the extreme competition for proper graduate jobs. For the rest of us, giving up on 4 years of potential earnings and paying back the cost out of any future success we might have in spite of higher education is a massive mistake.

Try to be objective about what your teachers and advisers are telling you too. They are repeating what the government is telling them to and there is a reasonable chance by the time you come out the other end that a different government or economy is around. The goalposts may well have moved and any carrot dangled in front of you to get you into further education may well turn out to not be as promised.

....and before some bozo suggests it, I didn't do a micky mouse degree!
I agree with Clegg, I'm an unemployed graduate and if any school/college leavers are reading this I would strongly advise them to consider work based training like apprenticeships over higher education. Even as recently as I was at the point of choosing, apprenticeships were considered the inferior path and back then there was very few of them about outside trades. Youngsters are lucky to have more options now. Times have changed and degrees are no longer worth what they were to our parents generation. Employers now are far more interested in work experience than education. Don't let yourself be fooled into the higher education pipe dream that a nice cosy job will be waiting for you upon graduation. There is a pretty good chance you'll end up more or less bullied into a non-graduate level job that nobody else wants and will be expected to re-train accordingly. Degrees are worth it for the fortunate proportion that beat the extreme competition for proper graduate jobs. For the rest of us, giving up on 4 years of potential earnings and paying back the cost out of any future success we might have in spite of higher education is a massive mistake. Try to be objective about what your teachers and advisers are telling you too. They are repeating what the government is telling them to and there is a reasonable chance by the time you come out the other end that a different government or economy is around. The goalposts may well have moved and any carrot dangled in front of you to get you into further education may well turn out to not be as promised. ....and before some bozo suggests it, I didn't do a micky mouse degree! random dude
  • Score: 0

5:47am Tue 15 Jul 14

random dude says...

sprintervanman wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
BmthNewshound wrote:
I'm cringing as I say it but I agree with Nick. I feel sorry for youngsters because they are pushed into going to university because their secondary schools are partly judged on how many of their students go on to university. It was Labour who wanted more young people to go to university to cover up their failure to deal with the problem of youth unemployment. New worthless degree courses were introduced to enable even the most mediocre student could make it onto a course.
Providing the apprenticeship is done in a decent working environment and the youngsters finish the course with enough hands on experience to progress in the job market, then I am all for it but unfortunately a lot of the apprenticeships are catered far more for cheap labour and manipulation of youth unemployment figures and that I find extremely distasteful. Three to four years of working below minimum wage to simply end up back on the scrapheap is not going to help them is it.
Considering most of my generation became qualified in trades through the YTS scheme for their £28.50 a week and went on to become well paid Tradesmen, i don't think any of them felt hard done by or fit for the scrap heap.Where's the next generation of those trades people going to come from when all the youngsters are told if they are not on top wack from word go they will be fit for the scrap heap.We started at the bottom and worked are way up......is teaching the new workforce of today that is what happens in the real working world so wrong.
That's not what he/she said at all. Minimum wage or less is not "top whack". Most youngsters are happy and eager to start at the bottom. The problems occur when they make sacrifices like going into further education or less than minimum wage jobs to get industry experience and then finding at the end of their education that there isn't any chance to take the next step. Dangling the prospect of a decent job in the industry infront of youngsters when many won't get that chance is exploitative whether it's a recruiter looking for cheap labour or an MP trying to massage unemployment figures. Guess what what you hear after going through these educational processes.... "why don't you get a job at Costa?"....or......"
I hear McDonalds is recruiting".
[quote][p][bold]sprintervanman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BmthNewshound[/bold] wrote: I'm cringing as I say it but I agree with Nick. I feel sorry for youngsters because they are pushed into going to university because their secondary schools are partly judged on how many of their students go on to university. It was Labour who wanted more young people to go to university to cover up their failure to deal with the problem of youth unemployment. New worthless degree courses were introduced to enable even the most mediocre student could make it onto a course.[/p][/quote]Providing the apprenticeship is done in a decent working environment and the youngsters finish the course with enough hands on experience to progress in the job market, then I am all for it but unfortunately a lot of the apprenticeships are catered far more for cheap labour and manipulation of youth unemployment figures and that I find extremely distasteful. Three to four years of working below minimum wage to simply end up back on the scrapheap is not going to help them is it.[/p][/quote]Considering most of my generation became qualified in trades through the YTS scheme for their £28.50 a week and went on to become well paid Tradesmen, i don't think any of them felt hard done by or fit for the scrap heap.Where's the next generation of those trades people going to come from when all the youngsters are told if they are not on top wack from word go they will be fit for the scrap heap.We started at the bottom and worked are way up......is teaching the new workforce of today that is what happens in the real working world so wrong.[/p][/quote]That's not what he/she said at all. Minimum wage or less is not "top whack". Most youngsters are happy and eager to start at the bottom. The problems occur when they make sacrifices like going into further education or less than minimum wage jobs to get industry experience and then finding at the end of their education that there isn't any chance to take the next step. Dangling the prospect of a decent job in the industry infront of youngsters when many won't get that chance is exploitative whether it's a recruiter looking for cheap labour or an MP trying to massage unemployment figures. Guess what what you hear after going through these educational processes.... "why don't you get a job at Costa?"....or......" I hear McDonalds is recruiting". random dude
  • Score: -1

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