More Bournemouth schools likely to become academies under drive to ensure top ratings

Bournemouth Echo: HAPPY: Celebrations at Elm Academy HAPPY: Celebrations at Elm Academy

A DRIVE to ensure every single Bournemouth school is rated ‘good’ or ‘outstanding’ by the end of 2015 is likely to see more schools become academies.

All secondary schools in the town are already academies and eight previously maintained primary schools have also become academies. Two new schools that opened in September 2013 are both academies too, in line with government policy.

Converting to academy status means schools receive their funding directly from the Government and they become responsible for their own improvement arrangements.

As a result, the council has less money to spend on supporting schools and it has less power to intervene in how schools are run.

If most schools convert to academy status as anticipated, the council will lose £1.055m in funding and there is a risk it will not be able to afford to provide support services to any remaining maintained schools.

An updated ‘Education Improvement Strategy,’ which is due to go before cabinet on Wednesday, anticipates more schools becoming academies over the next couple of years and encourages them to support each other to raise standards.

Deputy Leader of the council Nicola Greene, cabinet member for children’s services, said: “We are proud of what has been achieved through partnership working and a strong focus on providing high quality services to children, young people and their families so that they have the best possible start in life.

“Our recent Ofsted inspection recognises the work we have already done to improve school services.

“With more schools now becoming independent it is important that we review our arrangements to reflect these changes. Working closely with schools, our ambition is that every Bournemouth school is graded as good or better by 2015.”

Comments (5)

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8:49am Wed 28 May 14

Townee says...

Changing the name doesn't mean the school will improve. What counts is the teaching staff and the head, if you give them money directly you then have to hope that the person in charge of the money know what they are doing.
I wonder how long it will be before we see that person in a school somewhere in court for fraud and stealing money.
Changing the name doesn't mean the school will improve. What counts is the teaching staff and the head, if you give them money directly you then have to hope that the person in charge of the money know what they are doing. I wonder how long it will be before we see that person in a school somewhere in court for fraud and stealing money. Townee
  • Score: 5

9:20am Wed 28 May 14

Teddy 1 says...

Hope poole schools improve too. Dreadful including those that are meant to be outstanding. Bad leadership but whats more concerning is new teachers (not all) but some, lacking in common sence which sadly cannot be learned.

Academies will not in my opinion solve the problem, it will only drive salaries up for teachers.
Hope poole schools improve too. Dreadful including those that are meant to be outstanding. Bad leadership but whats more concerning is new teachers (not all) but some, lacking in common sence which sadly cannot be learned. Academies will not in my opinion solve the problem, it will only drive salaries up for teachers. Teddy 1
  • Score: 4

10:33am Wed 28 May 14

SirBrightside says...

In reply to Teddy 1: Certainly agree that standards need to be improved, but for teaching standards to truly improve the teaching profession needs to attract candidates that are highly qualified and competent in delivering their knowledge of their particular subject and expertise. Unfortunately, the attraction is not there! Unless someone has a personal reason or motivation to inspire young students, why would they join the profession? Financially there are more attractive jobs out there with less work loads and less targets to meet. Don't get me wrong, education providers should have targets to meet and to be successful they must work very hard. But a lot of jobs outside of education finish at 5pm and may occasionally require some extra work. From personal experience of being a successful teacher, it requires me to work 7am-11pm 6 days a week and continue to work, plan, assess students work throughout half term and end of term breaks to be ready for the next school term. Unless you are inspired to inspire students, why on earth would you choose this profession? Personally I am! There are many like me in this profession who I know are so demoralised with conditions constantly changing under the current government, that they are leaving and pursuing jobs that are far easier, pay a lot more and are freeing themselves of the stress and impossible targets.

While this is the case, you are never going to attract the best potential teachers, you are going to attract sub-standard graduates with a 'Lack of common sense'! As for driving up salaries for teachers, REALLY! Academies are businesses have more control of there finances and budgets, do you really think that they are going to increase teachers salaries? That would make business sense wouldn't it! They have made it a lot harder, which when managed correctly is how it should be! But the new PRP structure also allows academies to 'Manage' there budget and potentially halt/reduce pay to teachers, when in fact they should of been given pay increases. In response to Townee: I agree with you, academies have far greater control and I would not be surprised if in the future we see directors in court for fraud of theft!
In reply to Teddy 1: Certainly agree that standards need to be improved, but for teaching standards to truly improve the teaching profession needs to attract candidates that are highly qualified and competent in delivering their knowledge of their particular subject and expertise. Unfortunately, the attraction is not there! Unless someone has a personal reason or motivation to inspire young students, why would they join the profession? Financially there are more attractive jobs out there with less work loads and less targets to meet. Don't get me wrong, education providers should have targets to meet and to be successful they must work very hard. But a lot of jobs outside of education finish at 5pm and may occasionally require some extra work. From personal experience of being a successful teacher, it requires me to work 7am-11pm 6 days a week and continue to work, plan, assess students work throughout half term and end of term breaks to be ready for the next school term. Unless you are inspired to inspire students, why on earth would you choose this profession? Personally I am! There are many like me in this profession who I know are so demoralised with conditions constantly changing under the current government, that they are leaving and pursuing jobs that are far easier, pay a lot more and are freeing themselves of the stress and impossible targets. While this is the case, you are never going to attract the best potential teachers, you are going to attract sub-standard graduates with a 'Lack of common sense'! As for driving up salaries for teachers, REALLY! Academies are businesses have more control of there finances and budgets, do you really think that they are going to increase teachers salaries? That would make business sense wouldn't it! They have made it a lot harder, which when managed correctly is how it should be! But the new PRP structure also allows academies to 'Manage' there budget and potentially halt/reduce pay to teachers, when in fact they should of been given pay increases. In response to Townee: I agree with you, academies have far greater control and I would not be surprised if in the future we see directors in court for fraud of theft! SirBrightside
  • Score: 6

12:12pm Wed 28 May 14

speedy231278 says...

Isn't the 'academy' on Herbert Avenue supposedly the worst school in the country? What difference will changing the name over the door make?
Isn't the 'academy' on Herbert Avenue supposedly the worst school in the country? What difference will changing the name over the door make? speedy231278
  • Score: 5

3:09pm Wed 28 May 14

O'Reilly says...

It is just like changing The IKEA North Circular Polythecnic to the Neasden University.....doesn
't mean squat...
It is just like changing The IKEA North Circular Polythecnic to the Neasden University.....doesn 't mean squat... O'Reilly
  • Score: 0

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