School leavers given chance to enter world of insurance thanks to apprenticeship scheme

Bournemouth Echo: TEAMWORK: Susan Reeves, standing, human resources director of Alan and Thomas Insurance Group, with apprentices Autum Chamberlain and Nick Magee TEAMWORK: Susan Reeves, standing, human resources director of Alan and Thomas Insurance Group, with apprentices Autum Chamberlain and Nick Magee

AN INSURANCE specialist has played a key part in an industry-wide campaign to find bright recruits through a new apprenticeship scheme.

The idea was originally devised by Susan Reeves, human resources director for Poole-based Alan and Thomas Insurance Group.

It was then adopted and launched by Brokerbility, a network of 37 UK brokers of which Alan and Thomas represents the South and South West.

The 18-month scheme will give school leavers an alternative to university and recruitment and will begin immediately.

It will lead to a recognised qualification from the Chartered Insurance Institute and will offer apprentices mentoring and coaching, as well as networking opportunities and hands-on work experience.

Susan Reeves said: “I’m delighted that the scheme has been met with an enthusiastic response from our fellow Brokerbility brokers and they have committed to employing at least 20 apprentices within the first year. “It has taken a lot of hard work to get to this stage but I’m pleased to have been able to work with Brokerbility to get the idea off the ground and launched across the industry.

“There is a real shortage of talented individuals coming into our industry so we have created this opportunity for school leavers who might not have considered a career in insurance before. Not only will they acquire a recognised qualification at the end of the apprenticeship but they will have gained some valuable work experience in both an office and broking environment. This experience will put them one step ahead of university graduates who may not necessarily have been exposed to practical work experience.”

Comments (4)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

12:16pm Tue 22 Apr 14

Morrigan says...

A great idea and one I am sure will be popular - but hardly anything new.

When I left school in the late 70's, almost every office used to take on "office junior's" and train them up to progress through the ranks so to speak. Sadly these days, most employers want someone with experience - and young people cannot get experience without first being given a job. It's a vicious circle ......

I would hope many more offices will follow suit and start employing youngsters straight out of school. It certainly helped me when starting as a "junior" in an office - as I later worked my way up to becoming a legal secretary within four years of leaving school.
A great idea and one I am sure will be popular - but hardly anything new. When I left school in the late 70's, almost every office used to take on "office junior's" and train them up to progress through the ranks so to speak. Sadly these days, most employers want someone with experience - and young people cannot get experience without first being given a job. It's a vicious circle ...... I would hope many more offices will follow suit and start employing youngsters straight out of school. It certainly helped me when starting as a "junior" in an office - as I later worked my way up to becoming a legal secretary within four years of leaving school. Morrigan
  • Score: 1

1:48pm Tue 22 Apr 14

Azphreal says...

How much will they get paid? Apprentic pay is below minimum wage.
How much will they get paid? Apprentic pay is below minimum wage. Azphreal
  • Score: 1

1:56pm Tue 22 Apr 14

Morrigan says...

Azphreal wrote:
How much will they get paid? Apprentic pay is below minimum wage.
Low pay is better than none surely? Plus learning on the job has always meant a lower wage - but in the end with hard work, rewards can be reaped as in my case - On leaving school at 16 I went from £12 a week wages for 9 - 5.30pm in 1979 to over £18,000 by 1983 - which was a hell of a wage in those days!

I bought my own home outright at the age of just 24 and have never been out of work apart from maternity leave - so low wage and long hours worked fine for me and can do for anyone else if they are prepared to put in the effort and accept a lower wage and find themselves IN work, rather than sit around on their backside playing computer games all day and being OUT of work .....
[quote][p][bold]Azphreal[/bold] wrote: How much will they get paid? Apprentic pay is below minimum wage.[/p][/quote]Low pay is better than none surely? Plus learning on the job has always meant a lower wage - but in the end with hard work, rewards can be reaped as in my case - On leaving school at 16 I went from £12 a week wages for 9 - 5.30pm in 1979 to over £18,000 by 1983 - which was a hell of a wage in those days! I bought my own home outright at the age of just 24 and have never been out of work apart from maternity leave - so low wage and long hours worked fine for me and can do for anyone else if they are prepared to put in the effort and accept a lower wage and find themselves IN work, rather than sit around on their backside playing computer games all day and being OUT of work ..... Morrigan
  • Score: 0

2:04am Wed 23 Apr 14

misplacedspaniard says...

Morrigan wrote:
Azphreal wrote:
How much will they get paid? Apprentic pay is below minimum wage.
Low pay is better than none surely? Plus learning on the job has always meant a lower wage - but in the end with hard work, rewards can be reaped as in my case - On leaving school at 16 I went from £12 a week wages for 9 - 5.30pm in 1979 to over £18,000 by 1983 - which was a hell of a wage in those days!

I bought my own home outright at the age of just 24 and have never been out of work apart from maternity leave - so low wage and long hours worked fine for me and can do for anyone else if they are prepared to put in the effort and accept a lower wage and find themselves IN work, rather than sit around on their backside playing computer games all day and being OUT of work .....
Even if you earnt twice £80000 these days you'd still struggle to get onto the property ladder let alone pay off your mortgage outright. And the older generation think THEYVE got it hard.
[quote][p][bold]Morrigan[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Azphreal[/bold] wrote: How much will they get paid? Apprentic pay is below minimum wage.[/p][/quote]Low pay is better than none surely? Plus learning on the job has always meant a lower wage - but in the end with hard work, rewards can be reaped as in my case - On leaving school at 16 I went from £12 a week wages for 9 - 5.30pm in 1979 to over £18,000 by 1983 - which was a hell of a wage in those days! I bought my own home outright at the age of just 24 and have never been out of work apart from maternity leave - so low wage and long hours worked fine for me and can do for anyone else if they are prepared to put in the effort and accept a lower wage and find themselves IN work, rather than sit around on their backside playing computer games all day and being OUT of work .....[/p][/quote]Even if you earnt twice £80000 these days you'd still struggle to get onto the property ladder let alone pay off your mortgage outright. And the older generation think THEYVE got it hard. misplacedspaniard
  • Score: -1

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree