Westbourne shopkeeper Janice Southwell pays tribute to victims of Hillsborough disaster with commemorative window display

Bournemouth Echo: PAYING HER RESPECTS: Liverpool fan Janice Southwell PAYING HER RESPECTS: Liverpool fan Janice Southwell

A DEDICATED Liverpool supporter has marked the 25th anniversary of the Hillsborough disaster with a commemorative display in her shop window. On April 15, 1989, 96 Liverpool fans were killed at Hillsborough stadium in Sheffield during an FA Cup semi-final match against Nottingham Forest.

Janice Southwell, who owns A La Card in Westbourne, said she remains haunted by the scenes and wanted to pay tribute in some way to those who lost their lives.

“I vividly recall watching the game on television 25 years ago,” she added.

“I remember the players’ reactions on the pitch. It was just horrendous.”

At the weekend, all games played in the FA Cup, Premier League and Football League were delayed by seven minutes to mark the anniversary. A poignant reminder of the moment the match on that fateful day was called off as it became clear something terrible was happening in the stands.

“It was many years ago now, so it is more important than ever that the memory of those who died is kept alive,” added Janice.

“At this time of year the memories always come back.”

She also recounted the anguish experienced by fans, who had initially been implicated by some as the cause of the tragedy.

After years of public inquiries, on September 12, 2012, the Hillsborough Independent Panel concluded no Liverpool fans were responsible in any way for the disaster. A lack of police control was blamed.

“It wasn’t the fans fault.

“They have been through so much,” added Janice.

Comments (15)

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8:58am Tue 15 Apr 14

contric says...

over the top in my opinion if you want to mark this tragic event why not have a moment of quiet contemplation and prayer as opposed to some display in westbourne
over the top in my opinion if you want to mark this tragic event why not have a moment of quiet contemplation and prayer as opposed to some display in westbourne contric
  • Score: -19

10:07am Tue 15 Apr 14

*Mills says...

Can't believe the comments made on this story. This lady is paying respect how she wishes in her own shop! 96 innocent lives lost and a big part of this tragedy is the awful way all of those families have been treated over the years. It has taken over their lives and taken an unimaginable toll on them. Maybe you should put yourself in their shoes. Lovely to see this lady remembering innocent victims and as she is a Liverpool supporter it is understandable that she wishes to do this.
Can't believe the comments made on this story. This lady is paying respect how she wishes in her own shop! 96 innocent lives lost and a big part of this tragedy is the awful way all of those families have been treated over the years. It has taken over their lives and taken an unimaginable toll on them. Maybe you should put yourself in their shoes. Lovely to see this lady remembering innocent victims and as she is a Liverpool supporter it is understandable that she wishes to do this. *Mills
  • Score: 16

10:29am Tue 15 Apr 14

scrumpyjack says...

*Mills wrote:
Can't believe the comments made on this story. This lady is paying respect how she wishes in her own shop! 96 innocent lives lost and a big part of this tragedy is the awful way all of those families have been treated over the years. It has taken over their lives and taken an unimaginable toll on them. Maybe you should put yourself in their shoes. Lovely to see this lady remembering innocent victims and as she is a Liverpool supporter it is understandable that she wishes to do this.
You're kind of missing peoples point. Yes it is terrible/awful etc but there is such a thing as Tragedy Fatigue. Especially when we are footing the bill and they are just going over old ground.

So people react to news stories as this because (like Stephen Lawrence) we feel we have been told enough times about how bad it was.

August 1989: An interim report by Lord Justice Taylor says police were at fault for failing to close off a tunnel leading to pens for supporters, failing to control the build-up of fans outside the stadium, and their slow reaction to the tragedy.

January 1990: Lord Taylor’s report recommends the removal of terrace fences and the introduction of all-seater stadiums.

April 1990: Inquests into the victims’ deaths begin.

August 1990: The director of public prosecutions finds there is insufficient evidence to bring criminal charges against the police or any other individual, group or body.

March 1991: Inquests into the deaths return a verdict of accidental death for the victims, ruling they were all dead by 3.15pm.

March 1993: Tony Bland, 22, becomes the 96th and final victim of the tragedy when he is taken off life support after four years in a persistent vegetative state.

June 1997: Home Secretary Jack Straw orders evidence to be re-scrutinised.

August 1998: After Straw rules out a new inquiry, the Hillsborough Family Support Group brings private manslaughter charges against Duckenfield and his deputy, Superintendent Bernard Murray, who were both in charge that day.

July 2000: Following a six-week trial, a jury finds Murray not guilty of manslaughter and fails to reach a verdict on Duckenfield. The judge refused a retrial, saying that a fair trial for Duckenfield would be impossible.

April 2009: The Hillsborough Independent Panel is set up in the wake of the 20th anniversary of the tragedy.

October 2011: MPs agree that all government papers should be handed over to an independent panel.

September 2012: The report of the Hillsborough Independent Panel finds police orchestrated a cover-up, falsified documents and blamed innocent supporters. It says the lives of 41 fans could have been saved and clears supporters of any wrongdoing or blame for the disaster, prompting a public apology from Prime Minster David Cameron.

October 2012: The IPCC police watchdog and director of public prosecutions announce they will both launch inquiries into possible crimes committed by police involved in the disaster.

December 2012: Following the cover-up revelations, the High Court quashes the original coroner’s verdicts.

March 2014: Fresh inquests into the death begin in Warrington and are expected to last for several months.

And so it trundles on and on at a cost (of tens of millions each time there is another inquest) and for what? So the families can be told again the police were in the wrong and not the deceased?

That, in my opinion, is the reason for the "oh god not again" tone of a lot of people.
[quote][p][bold]*Mills[/bold] wrote: Can't believe the comments made on this story. This lady is paying respect how she wishes in her own shop! 96 innocent lives lost and a big part of this tragedy is the awful way all of those families have been treated over the years. It has taken over their lives and taken an unimaginable toll on them. Maybe you should put yourself in their shoes. Lovely to see this lady remembering innocent victims and as she is a Liverpool supporter it is understandable that she wishes to do this.[/p][/quote]You're kind of missing peoples point. Yes it is terrible/awful etc but there is such a thing as Tragedy Fatigue. Especially when we are footing the bill and they are just going over old ground. So people react to news stories as this because (like Stephen Lawrence) we feel we have been told enough times about how bad it was. August 1989: An interim report by Lord Justice Taylor says police were at fault for failing to close off a tunnel leading to pens for supporters, failing to control the build-up of fans outside the stadium, and their slow reaction to the tragedy. January 1990: Lord Taylor’s report recommends the removal of terrace fences and the introduction of all-seater stadiums. April 1990: Inquests into the victims’ deaths begin. August 1990: The director of public prosecutions finds there is insufficient evidence to bring criminal charges against the police or any other individual, group or body. March 1991: Inquests into the deaths return a verdict of accidental death for the victims, ruling they were all dead by 3.15pm. March 1993: Tony Bland, 22, becomes the 96th and final victim of the tragedy when he is taken off life support after four years in a persistent vegetative state. June 1997: Home Secretary Jack Straw orders evidence to be re-scrutinised. August 1998: After Straw rules out a new inquiry, the Hillsborough Family Support Group brings private manslaughter charges against Duckenfield and his deputy, Superintendent Bernard Murray, who were both in charge that day. July 2000: Following a six-week trial, a jury finds Murray not guilty of manslaughter and fails to reach a verdict on Duckenfield. The judge refused a retrial, saying that a fair trial for Duckenfield would be impossible. April 2009: The Hillsborough Independent Panel is set up in the wake of the 20th anniversary of the tragedy. October 2011: MPs agree that all government papers should be handed over to an independent panel. September 2012: The report of the Hillsborough Independent Panel finds police orchestrated a cover-up, falsified documents and blamed innocent supporters. It says the lives of 41 fans could have been saved and clears supporters of any wrongdoing or blame for the disaster, prompting a public apology from Prime Minster David Cameron. October 2012: The IPCC police watchdog and director of public prosecutions announce they will both launch inquiries into possible crimes committed by police involved in the disaster. December 2012: Following the cover-up revelations, the High Court quashes the original coroner’s verdicts. March 2014: Fresh inquests into the death begin in Warrington and are expected to last for several months. And so it trundles on and on at a cost (of tens of millions each time there is another inquest) and for what? So the families can be told again the police were in the wrong and not the deceased? That, in my opinion, is the reason for the "oh god not again" tone of a lot of people. scrumpyjack
  • Score: 13

11:57am Tue 15 Apr 14

dorsetjack says...

Of course she is a dedicated Liverpool fan, she comes from Westbourne after all.
Of course she is a dedicated Liverpool fan, she comes from Westbourne after all. dorsetjack
  • Score: -9

12:49pm Tue 15 Apr 14

KitKatPuss says...

This lady is showing her respects as a Liverpool fan by creating a display in her shop....so why all the disparaging comments by some people here? She is remembering what happened and this is her right as it's her shop! I think it is good that people still remember and talk about what happened all those years ago....society needs to remembers these events so that they don't happen again.
This lady is showing her respects as a Liverpool fan by creating a display in her shop....so why all the disparaging comments by some people here? She is remembering what happened and this is her right as it's her shop! I think it is good that people still remember and talk about what happened all those years ago....society needs to remembers these events so that they don't happen again. KitKatPuss
  • Score: 11

1:08pm Tue 15 Apr 14

AndyAFCB says...

JFT96
JFT96 AndyAFCB
  • Score: 7

1:11pm Tue 15 Apr 14

Norman Stansfield says...

AndyAFCB wrote:
JFT96
Andy, define the 'J' for me please? When do we reach a time when 'J' happens? This inquiry? The next? The one after that? Not a single one out of that 96 will be coming back, no matter how many inquests / public inquiries are had. 25 years : time to move on.....
[quote][p][bold]AndyAFCB[/bold] wrote: JFT96[/p][/quote]Andy, define the 'J' for me please? When do we reach a time when 'J' happens? This inquiry? The next? The one after that? Not a single one out of that 96 will be coming back, no matter how many inquests / public inquiries are had. 25 years : time to move on..... Norman Stansfield
  • Score: -3

1:17pm Tue 15 Apr 14

kingstonpaul says...

I was at Fulham on Saturday, and the crowd observed a minute's silence. A stadium of 25,000 spectators fell completely silent, it was poignant, respectful and the right response. Pure class.
Unlike the bovine clapping we had to endure the following day ay the FA semi-final at Wembley. I don't understand this fetish for clapping people that are deceased, it is utterly moronic. My hunch is that lots of people feel awkward with silence.
I guess this lady is entitled to her display, although it does ring a little bit of 'synthetic grief'.
I was at Fulham on Saturday, and the crowd observed a minute's silence. A stadium of 25,000 spectators fell completely silent, it was poignant, respectful and the right response. Pure class. Unlike the bovine clapping we had to endure the following day ay the FA semi-final at Wembley. I don't understand this fetish for clapping people that are deceased, it is utterly moronic. My hunch is that lots of people feel awkward with silence. I guess this lady is entitled to her display, although it does ring a little bit of 'synthetic grief'. kingstonpaul
  • Score: 12

1:25pm Tue 15 Apr 14

AndyAFCB says...

Norman Stansfield wrote:
AndyAFCB wrote: JFT96
Andy, define the 'J' for me please? When do we reach a time when 'J' happens? This inquiry? The next? The one after that? Not a single one out of that 96 will be coming back, no matter how many inquests / public inquiries are had. 25 years : time to move on.....
It will keep going until the truth finally comes out, those families involved deserve some kind of justice. I would think it would bring closure to a lot of them involved.

Nobody should go to a football match and not return.
[quote][p][bold]Norman Stansfield[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]AndyAFCB[/bold] wrote: JFT96[/p][/quote]Andy, define the 'J' for me please? When do we reach a time when 'J' happens? This inquiry? The next? The one after that? Not a single one out of that 96 will be coming back, no matter how many inquests / public inquiries are had. 25 years : time to move on.....[/p][/quote]It will keep going until the truth finally comes out, those families involved deserve some kind of justice. I would think it would bring closure to a lot of them involved. Nobody should go to a football match and not return. AndyAFCB
  • Score: 10

2:22pm Tue 15 Apr 14

Norman Stansfield says...

AndyAFCB wrote:
Norman Stansfield wrote:
AndyAFCB wrote: JFT96
Andy, define the 'J' for me please? When do we reach a time when 'J' happens? This inquiry? The next? The one after that? Not a single one out of that 96 will be coming back, no matter how many inquests / public inquiries are had. 25 years : time to move on.....
It will keep going until the truth finally comes out, those families involved deserve some kind of justice. I would think it would bring closure to a lot of them involved.

Nobody should go to a football match and not return.
One more go Andy. What possibly, remains to 'come out'. There have been inquiries upon enquiries. We know what happened. Why more? Asking the same questions, getting the same answers. Futile.
[quote][p][bold]AndyAFCB[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Norman Stansfield[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]AndyAFCB[/bold] wrote: JFT96[/p][/quote]Andy, define the 'J' for me please? When do we reach a time when 'J' happens? This inquiry? The next? The one after that? Not a single one out of that 96 will be coming back, no matter how many inquests / public inquiries are had. 25 years : time to move on.....[/p][/quote]It will keep going until the truth finally comes out, those families involved deserve some kind of justice. I would think it would bring closure to a lot of them involved. Nobody should go to a football match and not return.[/p][/quote]One more go Andy. What possibly, remains to 'come out'. There have been inquiries upon enquiries. We know what happened. Why more? Asking the same questions, getting the same answers. Futile. Norman Stansfield
  • Score: -6

2:49pm Tue 15 Apr 14

JackJohnson says...

kingstonpaul wrote:
I was at Fulham on Saturday, and the crowd observed a minute's silence. A stadium of 25,000 spectators fell completely silent, it was poignant, respectful and the right response. Pure class.
Unlike the bovine clapping we had to endure the following day ay the FA semi-final at Wembley. I don't understand this fetish for clapping people that are deceased, it is utterly moronic. My hunch is that lots of people feel awkward with silence.
I guess this lady is entitled to her display, although it does ring a little bit of 'synthetic grief'.
It's only 'synthetic' in the mind of anyone who has no respect for the people who lost their lives as well as for their friends, relatives and colleagues. 96 people died, some of who could have been saved.

Hundreds, possibly thousands lost relatives, friends or work colleagues that day.

The police, it would seem, treated the victims, and their families, like scum. They falsified evidence and altered their own notebooks to cover up what really happened. So much will have been lost or destroyed, but isn't it time we got to as much of the truth as possible? If a policeman falsified evidence about Hillsborough he's a bent copper. Where else has he falsified evidence?

This lady's memorial will, at least, remind some people how corrupt the police can be when it comes to covering their own backs. Something none of us can afford to forget.
[quote][p][bold]kingstonpaul[/bold] wrote: I was at Fulham on Saturday, and the crowd observed a minute's silence. A stadium of 25,000 spectators fell completely silent, it was poignant, respectful and the right response. Pure class. Unlike the bovine clapping we had to endure the following day ay the FA semi-final at Wembley. I don't understand this fetish for clapping people that are deceased, it is utterly moronic. My hunch is that lots of people feel awkward with silence. I guess this lady is entitled to her display, although it does ring a little bit of 'synthetic grief'.[/p][/quote]It's only 'synthetic' in the mind of anyone who has no respect for the people who lost their lives as well as for their friends, relatives and colleagues. 96 people died, some of who could have been saved. Hundreds, possibly thousands lost relatives, friends or work colleagues that day. The police, it would seem, treated the victims, and their families, like scum. They falsified evidence and altered their own notebooks to cover up what really happened. So much will have been lost or destroyed, but isn't it time we got to as much of the truth as possible? If a policeman falsified evidence about Hillsborough he's a bent copper. Where else has he falsified evidence? This lady's memorial will, at least, remind some people how corrupt the police can be when it comes to covering their own backs. Something none of us can afford to forget. JackJohnson
  • Score: 10

4:56pm Tue 15 Apr 14

pauls55 says...

I wonder if some of these callous people posting their trite comments would have the nerve to reproduce them on the Liverpool Echo web-site. No, ...didn't think so.
I wonder if some of these callous people posting their trite comments would have the nerve to reproduce them on the Liverpool Echo web-site. No, ...didn't think so. pauls55
  • Score: 5

8:40am Wed 16 Apr 14

High Treason says...

Sadly there are those who will continue to want another enquiry until they get "the fans were not in any way to blame" result. I wonder if the reaction would be the same if it was a southern football club.
Sadly there are those who will continue to want another enquiry until they get "the fans were not in any way to blame" result. I wonder if the reaction would be the same if it was a southern football club. High Treason
  • Score: 0

11:50am Wed 16 Apr 14

BarrHumbug says...

To be fair to her she isn't calling for justice or another inquest, she's just remembering those lost, in the same way we do on remembrance sunday.
Being 25 years its also a milestone date, i'm sure she probably doesn't go to this effort every year?
To be fair to her she isn't calling for justice or another inquest, she's just remembering those lost, in the same way we do on remembrance sunday. Being 25 years its also a milestone date, i'm sure she probably doesn't go to this effort every year? BarrHumbug
  • Score: 5

1:13pm Wed 16 Apr 14

kingstonpaul says...

JackJohnson wrote:
kingstonpaul wrote:
I was at Fulham on Saturday, and the crowd observed a minute's silence. A stadium of 25,000 spectators fell completely silent, it was poignant, respectful and the right response. Pure class.
Unlike the bovine clapping we had to endure the following day ay the FA semi-final at Wembley. I don't understand this fetish for clapping people that are deceased, it is utterly moronic. My hunch is that lots of people feel awkward with silence.
I guess this lady is entitled to her display, although it does ring a little bit of 'synthetic grief'.
It's only 'synthetic' in the mind of anyone who has no respect for the people who lost their lives as well as for their friends, relatives and colleagues. 96 people died, some of who could have been saved.

Hundreds, possibly thousands lost relatives, friends or work colleagues that day.

The police, it would seem, treated the victims, and their families, like scum. They falsified evidence and altered their own notebooks to cover up what really happened. So much will have been lost or destroyed, but isn't it time we got to as much of the truth as possible? If a policeman falsified evidence about Hillsborough he's a bent copper. Where else has he falsified evidence?

This lady's memorial will, at least, remind some people how corrupt the police can be when it comes to covering their own backs. Something none of us can afford to forget.
Actually Jack, I have utmost respect and regard for those losing their lives and the loved ones left behind. Which is why I find dignified silence the most fitting tribute. And I certainly don't need you to brief me on the disaster and the circumstances of its aftermath. Of course it has been a shameful episode and one day hopefully there will be full redresss for the families. Personally I am considerably more touched by Roberto Martinez's poignant speech yesterday at Anfield than by the shrine at this lady's card shop.
[quote][p][bold]JackJohnson[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kingstonpaul[/bold] wrote: I was at Fulham on Saturday, and the crowd observed a minute's silence. A stadium of 25,000 spectators fell completely silent, it was poignant, respectful and the right response. Pure class. Unlike the bovine clapping we had to endure the following day ay the FA semi-final at Wembley. I don't understand this fetish for clapping people that are deceased, it is utterly moronic. My hunch is that lots of people feel awkward with silence. I guess this lady is entitled to her display, although it does ring a little bit of 'synthetic grief'.[/p][/quote]It's only 'synthetic' in the mind of anyone who has no respect for the people who lost their lives as well as for their friends, relatives and colleagues. 96 people died, some of who could have been saved. Hundreds, possibly thousands lost relatives, friends or work colleagues that day. The police, it would seem, treated the victims, and their families, like scum. They falsified evidence and altered their own notebooks to cover up what really happened. So much will have been lost or destroyed, but isn't it time we got to as much of the truth as possible? If a policeman falsified evidence about Hillsborough he's a bent copper. Where else has he falsified evidence? This lady's memorial will, at least, remind some people how corrupt the police can be when it comes to covering their own backs. Something none of us can afford to forget.[/p][/quote]Actually Jack, I have utmost respect and regard for those losing their lives and the loved ones left behind. Which is why I find dignified silence the most fitting tribute. And I certainly don't need you to brief me on the disaster and the circumstances of its aftermath. Of course it has been a shameful episode and one day hopefully there will be full redresss for the families. Personally I am considerably more touched by Roberto Martinez's poignant speech yesterday at Anfield than by the shrine at this lady's card shop. kingstonpaul
  • Score: 0

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