Up to 10 metres of sand lost in places at Studland due to storms - as well as damage to dunes and trees

File picture: Emma Wright, above, operations manager for the National Trust Studland, beside the erosion-riddled beach in December

File picture: Emma Wright, above, operations manager for the National Trust Studland, beside the erosion-riddled beach in December

First published in News
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A SIGNIFICANT proportion of Studand Beach has been temporarily lost to the sea following the recent storms, says the National Trust.

If you walked the length of the beach, up to ten metres of sand has been lost in places, as well as a number of trees and dunes being damaged.

The fierce conditions also caused a small landslide at Middle Beach and affected rocks surrounding one of Dorset’s most recognisable landmarks – Old Harry.

Elli MacDonald, who is working with the National Trust on the ‘Living with a Changing Coast’ project, said despite the rocks around Old Harry being affected, the chalk stack itself remains intact.

Elli, whose work is focused on how coastal change affects communities, believes the way forward at Studland is to work with the natural processes.

“We take the long view on adaptation to climate change and extreme weather,” she explained. “Coastal change is inevitable, and the forces of nature are part of the beauty and appeal of our coast, so we want to work with the natural process wherever possible.”

Although the National Trust’s long-term position is to develop a plan for the sustainable management of coastal change at Studland, in the short-term workers have been clearing debris from the beach and ensuring visitor access is maintained.

The sand lost will, most likely, be deposited back along the beach eventually, said a National Trust spokesman, but it might not necessarily be exactly where it was before.

Over time, Elli says, coastal infrastructure and facilities will be gradually ‘rolled-back’ to less vulnerable positions, while allowing nature to create new sea defences such as sand bars and dunes.

The National Trust believes that it would be futile, and ultimately accelerate the erosion process, if attempts were made to hold back the waves at Studland. Conservationists say this could hasten the loss of the beach as it would be “squeezed” between the sea and hard concrete defences.

“At Studland there will always be a beach as long as it is allowed to naturally migrate landwards,” said Elli.

Comments (9)

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11:08am Fri 21 Feb 14

PUZZLED ONE says...

Echo 'journalist' says 'Nearly 10 metres of sand lost at Studland due to storms '
I thought that sand was measured by weight. Imagine the blank looks that you would get at your friendly local builders merchants if you asked for a metre or 39.37007874015748 inches of sand!
Echo 'journalist' says 'Nearly 10 metres of sand lost at Studland due to storms ' I thought that sand was measured by weight. Imagine the blank looks that you would get at your friendly local builders merchants if you asked for a metre or 39.37007874015748 inches of sand! PUZZLED ONE
  • Score: -15

12:30pm Fri 21 Feb 14

ksouth77 says...

Those poor, poor nudists....
Those poor, poor nudists.... ksouth77
  • Score: 2

2:02pm Fri 21 Feb 14

High Treason says...

PUZZLED ONE wrote:
Echo 'journalist' says 'Nearly 10 metres of sand lost at Studland due to storms '
I thought that sand was measured by weight. Imagine the blank looks that you would get at your friendly local builders merchants if you asked for a metre or 39.37007874015748 inches of sand!
In fact with all such building materials it is sold by volume due to the moisture content. If you ordered a ton of sand it maybe only half that weight due to moisture. Therefore 10 metres should have read 10 cubic metres.
[quote][p][bold]PUZZLED ONE[/bold] wrote: Echo 'journalist' says 'Nearly 10 metres of sand lost at Studland due to storms ' I thought that sand was measured by weight. Imagine the blank looks that you would get at your friendly local builders merchants if you asked for a metre or 39.37007874015748 inches of sand![/p][/quote]In fact with all such building materials it is sold by volume due to the moisture content. If you ordered a ton of sand it maybe only half that weight due to moisture. Therefore 10 metres should have read 10 cubic metres. High Treason
  • Score: 1

2:47pm Fri 21 Feb 14

Count Mehin says...

Well, I think most of us know that 10 metres of beach was lost.
Well, I think most of us know that 10 metres of beach was lost. Count Mehin
  • Score: 13

3:40pm Fri 21 Feb 14

a.g.o.g. says...

Count Mehin wrote:
Well, I think most of us know that 10 metres of beach was lost.
Or dunes and therefore 10m more beach when normality returns?
[quote][p][bold]Count Mehin[/bold] wrote: Well, I think most of us know that 10 metres of beach was lost.[/p][/quote]Or dunes and therefore 10m more beach when normality returns? a.g.o.g.
  • Score: 3

4:11pm Fri 21 Feb 14

Ebb Tide says...

10 Metres by ? metres by ? metres of sand redistributed from 'a' to 'b'. The report was missing relevant criteria, so why bother ?

It is known that the sea moves tonnes of the material every year around Poole Bay. We are experiencing a very stormy winter but how much stormier than is usual - might have been informative. Not even sure why someone bothered with the warning tape shown in the picture - unless the NT is persisting with its irritating habit of being over-protective.

Zero out of ten !
10 Metres by ? metres by ? metres of sand redistributed from 'a' to 'b'. The report was missing relevant criteria, so why bother ? It is known that the sea moves tonnes of the material every year around Poole Bay. We are experiencing a very stormy winter but how much stormier than is usual - might have been informative. Not even sure why someone bothered with the warning tape shown in the picture - unless the NT is persisting with its irritating habit of being over-protective. Zero out of ten ! Ebb Tide
  • Score: -2

6:10pm Fri 21 Feb 14

Phixer says...

"Elli, whose work is focused on how coastal change affects communities, believes the way forward at Studland is to work with the natural processes."

So, sit back and let nature take its course. That means you have another taxpayer-funded non-job.
"Elli, whose work is focused on how coastal change affects communities, believes the way forward at Studland is to work with the natural processes." So, sit back and let nature take its course. That means you have another taxpayer-funded non-job. Phixer
  • Score: 4

11:21pm Fri 21 Feb 14

Yankee1 says...

Dunes take decades...centuries.
..to rebulid. They are gone for good.

The 'noodist meerkats' will have to parade on the beach, How embarrassing...they can be legally photographed by decent folk and their photos be placed online. How much fun that will be!

The dunes are so much nicer when the ferry is out of service ( and Bournemouth/Boscombe bedsit denizens) are out of luck.
Dunes take decades...centuries. ..to rebulid. They are gone for good. The 'noodist meerkats' will have to parade on the beach, How embarrassing...they can be legally photographed by decent folk and their photos be placed online. How much fun that will be! The dunes are so much nicer when the ferry is out of service ( and Bournemouth/Boscombe bedsit denizens) are out of luck. Yankee1
  • Score: -1

12:38pm Sat 22 Feb 14

a.g.o.g. says...

Yankee1 wrote:
Dunes take decades...centuries.

..to rebulid. They are gone for good.

The 'noodist meerkats' will have to parade on the beach, How embarrassing...they can be legally photographed by decent folk and their photos be placed online. How much fun that will be!

The dunes are so much nicer when the ferry is out of service ( and Bournemouth/Boscombe bedsit denizens) are out of luck.
Indeed Hanky-Panky?ankee 1. But many so-called decent folk are doing just that already and making a mint out of those disgusting people who buy what then is ****
[quote][p][bold]Yankee1[/bold] wrote: Dunes take decades...centuries. ..to rebulid. They are gone for good. The 'noodist meerkats' will have to parade on the beach, How embarrassing...they can be legally photographed by decent folk and their photos be placed online. How much fun that will be! The dunes are so much nicer when the ferry is out of service ( and Bournemouth/Boscombe bedsit denizens) are out of luck.[/p][/quote]Indeed Hanky-Panky?ankee 1. But many so-called decent folk are doing just that already and making a mint out of those disgusting people who buy what then is **** a.g.o.g.
  • Score: -3

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