UPDATE: Drivers stuck for hours on A31 slam Hampshire Police over severe gridlock

Drivers stuck for hours on A31 slam Hampshire Police over severe gridlock

Drivers stuck for hours on A31 slam Hampshire Police over severe gridlock

First published in News
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DRIVERS trapped in queues for hours in the aftermath of Wednesday's fatal crash on the A31 have criticised Hampshire Police for their handling of the situation.

Hundreds of motorists were stuck in queues for several hours after two motorcyclists collided with a horse near Ringwood at around 6pm, leaving one dead and the other with serious injuries.

Full story of the fatal crash on the A31 last night here 

The incident took place on the westbound part of the dual carriageway, just half a mile from the Picket Post services.

The road was part closed, but eventually a route was cleared by officers and cars were guided slowly past the debris.

Others were forced to do U-turns in the road and drive back up the carriageway.

One driver, Tracy Jordan, described the operation as a “shambles”.

“I think first thing to say is of course condolences to the family of the poor motorcyclist, and my thoughts are with everyone affected,” she said.

“I joined the A31 at about 5.45pm and got home to Ringwood at midnight.

“The exercise to release motorists was a shambles.

“We were aware that a major incident had occurred by 7pm. Why did the police not start to release motorists from the back at that stage?

“Obviously mobile reception on that stretch is patchy, and no information was distributed so some motorists took matters into their own hands and turned and headed back through the queues, making matters worse.

“But when we did finally get turned, there was no police guidance on where to go or even to turn off at junction 1. I was amazed there wasn't another accident.”

Like many other drivers Mark Fudge didn’t get home until the early hours of Thursday morning.

“As a motorcyclist myself I really feel for the two riders’ families, but the police need to answer some serious questions on their handling of the initial and subsequent situations,” he said.

Fiorna Jessop said: “It was very unpleasant and quite frightening and am appalled at the lack of concern for stranded motorists by the police.”

And Jenny Jay echoed her thoughts: “Being a lone female I did not feel safe on a pitch black road in the middle of the forest but it appears the police couldn't have cared less about anyone trapped.

Hannah Wright said there were elderly people among those on her coach left without food, water or facilities nearby.

Carole Statham, Ken Wilson and Matthew Shannon all emailed to say they were disappointed with the lack of information about what was happening, with the latter saying it was five and half hours before officers appeared to say what was going on.

Alan Phillips said: “Some nearby drivers even walked all the way to police cordon, but came away with only the most 'sanitised' information, nothing of any real help.”
Tracy Jordan described the whole incident as a “shambles”.

“When we did finally get turned, there was no police guidance on where to go or even to turn off at junction one,” she said.

“I was amazed there wasn’t another accident.”

Mike Habgood said: “I'm sure there were many drivers, young, old or alone, who were no longer able to fully concentrate on the remainder of their journey, in the dark, on roads they were not familiar with.”

All the drivers who contacted the Daily Echo expressed their condolences for the victims of the crash, and some questioned why police had allowed the traffic to flow again after it had been stopped during the initial search for the horse.

Adam Wilson said his wife was in a car at the scene of the crash.

“She openly blames the police for knowing there was a horse on the road and presuming the road was clear,” he said.

David De La Haye said: “At the end of the day, yes we were all cold, hungry, tired and arrived home very late, yet one rider will never do that again.

“Having stopped due to police trying to ‘catch’ a loose horse, why was the road re-opened when the horse clearly had not been made safe.”

Comments (24)

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10:39am Thu 23 Jan 14

speedy231278 says...

Typical shambles from the Police. With such a serious incident, it's not exactly rocket science to shut the road behind the incident to prevent further backlog, and reverse all the car trapped behind it.

Best wishes to the families of those involved. It seems once again the main headline will not be the tragedy of the incident, but how poorly the Police dealt with the aftermath.
Typical shambles from the Police. With such a serious incident, it's not exactly rocket science to shut the road behind the incident to prevent further backlog, and reverse all the car trapped behind it. Best wishes to the families of those involved. It seems once again the main headline will not be the tragedy of the incident, but how poorly the Police dealt with the aftermath. speedy231278
  • Score: 26

10:45am Thu 23 Jan 14

Old Colonial says...

A major fatal incident at night on a road with limited access or turn offs. If these critical commentators who the Echo seems fit to waste column inches on are so b****y smart why don't they................
..

Oh it's not worth it.
A major fatal incident at night on a road with limited access or turn offs. If these critical commentators who the Echo seems fit to waste column inches on are so b****y smart why don't they................ .. Oh it's not worth it. Old Colonial
  • Score: -21

10:57am Thu 23 Jan 14

Baysider says...

"Oh I know", thinks someone at The Echo, "we could have yet another thread running about last night's accident but this time we'll spin it so everyone feels it's now okay to slag off the police as we've had at least 12 hours since the guy died. That's way plenty of time for our readers to be respectful and they must be it itching to have a go at the authorities handling of such a difficult situation..."

Sad on so many levels.
"Oh I know", thinks someone at The Echo, "we could have yet another thread running about last night's accident but this time we'll spin it so everyone feels it's now okay to slag off the police as we've had at least 12 hours since the guy died. That's way plenty of time for our readers to be respectful and they must be it itching to have a go at the authorities handling of such a difficult situation..." Sad on so many levels. Baysider
  • Score: 0

11:32am Thu 23 Jan 14

PokesdownMark says...

I think we should be able to discuss how the traffic situation is handled without is being assumed disrespectful. There are simple questions that can be asked to see if it was handled well. Messages to the M27 matrix signs are recorded and time logged. So what message was posted and when? When were the M27 junctions closed? Why 1 and then 2? Better to shut both in future? What radio traffic announcements were there? Do we need emergency peak time traffic lights at Emery Down? Its possible these actions were all as good and as timely as possible. But if there is a potential room for improvement it seems like a good idea to ask the questions.
I think we should be able to discuss how the traffic situation is handled without is being assumed disrespectful. There are simple questions that can be asked to see if it was handled well. Messages to the M27 matrix signs are recorded and time logged. So what message was posted and when? When were the M27 junctions closed? Why 1 and then 2? Better to shut both in future? What radio traffic announcements were there? Do we need emergency peak time traffic lights at Emery Down? Its possible these actions were all as good and as timely as possible. But if there is a potential room for improvement it seems like a good idea to ask the questions. PokesdownMark
  • Score: 21

12:25pm Thu 23 Jan 14

TGF96 says...

It takes time to turn cars around! how do the people stuck in the traffic know what the police were doing miles back up the road? The police could have started turning cars around as soon as their main priority had been dealt with (the accident) but with the thousands of cars it just took so long.
It takes time to turn cars around! how do the people stuck in the traffic know what the police were doing miles back up the road? The police could have started turning cars around as soon as their main priority had been dealt with (the accident) but with the thousands of cars it just took so long. TGF96
  • Score: 12

12:42pm Thu 23 Jan 14

Dorset Outsider says...

Old Colonial wrote:
A major fatal incident at night on a road with limited access or turn offs. If these critical commentators who the Echo seems fit to waste column inches on are so b****y smart why don't they................

..

Oh it's not worth it.
I agree.
[quote][p][bold]Old Colonial[/bold] wrote: A major fatal incident at night on a road with limited access or turn offs. If these critical commentators who the Echo seems fit to waste column inches on are so b****y smart why don't they................ .. Oh it's not worth it.[/p][/quote]I agree. Dorset Outsider
  • Score: 7

12:46pm Thu 23 Jan 14

alasdair1967 says...

A man has died and all the echo can do is publish criticism over the whole incident yes drivers where inconvenienced ,but a family is grieving for a lost loved one, three stories on the same incident is inexcusable
A man has died and all the echo can do is publish criticism over the whole incident yes drivers where inconvenienced ,but a family is grieving for a lost loved one, three stories on the same incident is inexcusable alasdair1967
  • Score: 8

12:49pm Thu 23 Jan 14

Dorset Outsider says...

So the police are at fault for a crap road, and for an accident? Sorry I forgot that Hampshire consisted of more than 1 road for officers to deal with. The manpower required to tell every single driver the state of play in a 6+ mile tailback must be phonomenal. What do you expect? Just let everyone drive past an accident scene complete with blood and debris? Or 2 clear up the evidence and never find out what caused it? Some people need to open their eyes to a wider situation than just them in their car going from a2b. What suggestions do we have on a realistic way to have dealt with it?? Bearing in mind that,the accident takes priority over stationary cars. And two serious casualties are more important than your journey home.
So the police are at fault for a crap road, and for an accident? Sorry I forgot that Hampshire consisted of more than 1 road for officers to deal with. The manpower required to tell every single driver the state of play in a 6+ mile tailback must be phonomenal. What do you expect? Just let everyone drive past an accident scene complete with blood and debris? Or 2 clear up the evidence and never find out what caused it? Some people need to open their eyes to a wider situation than just them in their car going from a2b. What suggestions do we have on a realistic way to have dealt with it?? Bearing in mind that,the accident takes priority over stationary cars. And two serious casualties are more important than your journey home. Dorset Outsider
  • Score: 10

12:58pm Thu 23 Jan 14

thevoiceofreason1 says...

first thing to say is of course condolences to the family of the poor motorcyclist, and my thoughts are with everyone affected,
i am not being disrespectful to the people involved.

BUT police in other counties seem to manage much better than dorset and hampshire police,in my experience they would close a rd for a tea break.
they are empowered to do it so they do.
i counted 11 ambulances,6 paramedics and roughly 15 police vehicles passing me..seems a little over the top for this situation..strangely no fire service.

i fully understand where they believe there may be a fatality they need to investigate as such,but they have no though for the literally thousands of people stuck with no idea whats going on apart from incomplete information from some idiot on radio solent.
Surely there has to be a better way!
first thing to say is of course condolences to the family of the poor motorcyclist, and my thoughts are with everyone affected, i am not being disrespectful to the people involved. BUT police in other counties seem to manage much better than dorset and hampshire police,in my experience they would close a rd for a tea break. they are empowered to do it so they do. i counted 11 ambulances,6 paramedics and roughly 15 police vehicles passing me..seems a little over the top for this situation..strangely no fire service. i fully understand where they believe there may be a fatality they need to investigate as such,but they have no though for the literally thousands of people stuck with no idea whats going on apart from incomplete information from some idiot on radio solent. Surely there has to be a better way! thevoiceofreason1
  • Score: -7

1:04pm Thu 23 Jan 14

lorenzo truvu says...

The real tragedy was the death of one rider and the serious injuries now threatening the life of another. I, among the vast majority of those trapped in the aftermath, I'm sure, were grateful to be cold, miserable, uninformed and alive and uninjured. There must also be a measure of sympathy for the horse and its owner.
However, it is of course correct to question what action the police were taking to alleviate the traffic gridlock without risking being accused of 'police bashing.'
Without critical comment, the police and emergency services are unlikely to develop a strategy that will result in a better outcome than a ten mile queue of cars, vans and lorries, sitting in ignorance in the cold for up to 7 hours!
The real tragedy was the death of one rider and the serious injuries now threatening the life of another. I, among the vast majority of those trapped in the aftermath, I'm sure, were grateful to be cold, miserable, uninformed and alive and uninjured. There must also be a measure of sympathy for the horse and its owner. However, it is of course correct to question what action the police were taking to alleviate the traffic gridlock without risking being accused of 'police bashing.' Without critical comment, the police and emergency services are unlikely to develop a strategy that will result in a better outcome than a ten mile queue of cars, vans and lorries, sitting in ignorance in the cold for up to 7 hours! lorenzo truvu
  • Score: 13

1:05pm Thu 23 Jan 14

Dorset Outsider says...

thevoiceofreason1 wrote:
first thing to say is of course condolences to the family of the poor motorcyclist, and my thoughts are with everyone affected,
i am not being disrespectful to the people involved.

BUT police in other counties seem to manage much better than dorset and hampshire police,in my experience they would close a rd for a tea break.
they are empowered to do it so they do.
i counted 11 ambulances,6 paramedics and roughly 15 police vehicles passing me..seems a little over the top for this situation..strangely no fire service.

i fully understand where they believe there may be a fatality they need to investigate as such,but they have no though for the literally thousands of people stuck with no idea whats going on apart from incomplete information from some idiot on radio solent.
Surely there has to be a better way!
And you suggest...? Hants and Dorset police forces are both running at max capacity with everyone having had pay cuts and 'unpaid overtime' together in the same year. No recruiting for several years. I wish we could hear the family of the injured party comment on the police response. Plus in a tailback that long how DO you tell people about what's happening??? It would take 5 hours just to walk it with a megaphone!
[quote][p][bold]thevoiceofreason1[/bold] wrote: first thing to say is of course condolences to the family of the poor motorcyclist, and my thoughts are with everyone affected, i am not being disrespectful to the people involved. BUT police in other counties seem to manage much better than dorset and hampshire police,in my experience they would close a rd for a tea break. they are empowered to do it so they do. i counted 11 ambulances,6 paramedics and roughly 15 police vehicles passing me..seems a little over the top for this situation..strangely no fire service. i fully understand where they believe there may be a fatality they need to investigate as such,but they have no though for the literally thousands of people stuck with no idea whats going on apart from incomplete information from some idiot on radio solent. Surely there has to be a better way![/p][/quote]And you suggest...? Hants and Dorset police forces are both running at max capacity with everyone having had pay cuts and 'unpaid overtime' together in the same year. No recruiting for several years. I wish we could hear the family of the injured party comment on the police response. Plus in a tailback that long how DO you tell people about what's happening??? It would take 5 hours just to walk it with a megaphone! Dorset Outsider
  • Score: 11

1:08pm Thu 23 Jan 14

thevoiceofreason1 says...

Dorset Outsider wrote:
So the police are at fault for a crap road, and for an accident? Sorry I forgot that Hampshire consisted of more than 1 road for officers to deal with. The manpower required to tell every single driver the state of play in a 6+ mile tailback must be phonomenal. What do you expect? Just let everyone drive past an accident scene complete with blood and debris? Or 2 clear up the evidence and never find out what caused it? Some people need to open their eyes to a wider situation than just them in their car going from a2b. What suggestions do we have on a realistic way to have dealt with it?? Bearing in mind that,the accident takes priority over stationary cars. And two serious casualties are more important than your journey home.
casualties were gone at least 4 hours before the rd was opened.
what about babies unfed and in the cold,older people struggling to keep warm and going hungry,people such as diabetics that may need timed medication or people who had just enough fuel to get to the services so they could not run there vehicles to keep warm.how hard would it have been for the police to drive back down the rd with a tannoy informing people of the situation? 1 car and 2 people? i do anything upto 70,000 miles a year and you just do not see this elsewhere
[quote][p][bold]Dorset Outsider[/bold] wrote: So the police are at fault for a crap road, and for an accident? Sorry I forgot that Hampshire consisted of more than 1 road for officers to deal with. The manpower required to tell every single driver the state of play in a 6+ mile tailback must be phonomenal. What do you expect? Just let everyone drive past an accident scene complete with blood and debris? Or 2 clear up the evidence and never find out what caused it? Some people need to open their eyes to a wider situation than just them in their car going from a2b. What suggestions do we have on a realistic way to have dealt with it?? Bearing in mind that,the accident takes priority over stationary cars. And two serious casualties are more important than your journey home.[/p][/quote]casualties were gone at least 4 hours before the rd was opened. what about babies unfed and in the cold,older people struggling to keep warm and going hungry,people such as diabetics that may need timed medication or people who had just enough fuel to get to the services so they could not run there vehicles to keep warm.how hard would it have been for the police to drive back down the rd with a tannoy informing people of the situation? 1 car and 2 people? i do anything upto 70,000 miles a year and you just do not see this elsewhere thevoiceofreason1
  • Score: 6

2:19pm Thu 23 Jan 14

jezebellow says...

I'm struggling to understand the sequence of events. Does anyone know whether the police opened the road again even though the pony was still on the carriageway?
I'm struggling to understand the sequence of events. Does anyone know whether the police opened the road again even though the pony was still on the carriageway? jezebellow
  • Score: 1

2:27pm Thu 23 Jan 14

Tango Charlie says...

I feel sorry for the person who had to break the bad news to the relatives.
I feel sorry for the person who had to break the bad news to the relatives. Tango Charlie
  • Score: 10

2:56pm Thu 23 Jan 14

Lucy Lastick says...

Any driver who turned around and drove the wrong way down the carriageway without being told to do so by the police should be prosecuted for dangerous driving.
Any driver who turned around and drove the wrong way down the carriageway without being told to do so by the police should be prosecuted for dangerous driving. Lucy Lastick
  • Score: 8

3:41pm Thu 23 Jan 14

M0Z says...

When I was younger the priority was always to get the roads open again as quickly as possible, but the attitude today is completely the opposite. I could understand if there was a credible belief of wrongdoing or a major health & safety issue that warranted extensive evidence gathering on the road surface – but surely this was just a genuine accident? Tragic, but they happen. My brother once hit a large stag, but was fortunately OK. It happens.

The knock-on effect is enormous though. I’ve worked in an international capacity where I was organising regular meetings for people from many countries. We gave up arranging them in the UK because transport was so unreliable. Stockholm and Brussels could cope with several feet of snow better than the UK could handle a bit of drizzle – and the roads certainly don’t get closed for hours after an accident.

Multiply my actions by many thousands of other business people doing the same, the cost to the UK economy must be massive. That means lower tax receipts to the Treasury to fund the NHS, and probably many more consequential deaths as a result. We need more joined-up thinking. A transport policy that regularly closes trunk roads for long periods and/or reduces speed limits for no sensible reason (other than speed camera revenue) is, in my view, mistaken and will ultimately cause great harm to the UK. I think politicians only add up the cost for the hours of interruption, not the wider costs of subsequent avoidance. Keep the UK moving.
When I was younger the priority was always to get the roads open again as quickly as possible, but the attitude today is completely the opposite. I could understand if there was a credible belief of wrongdoing or a major health & safety issue that warranted extensive evidence gathering on the road surface – but surely this was just a genuine accident? Tragic, but they happen. My brother once hit a large stag, but was fortunately OK. It happens. The knock-on effect is enormous though. I’ve worked in an international capacity where I was organising regular meetings for people from many countries. We gave up arranging them in the UK because transport was so unreliable. Stockholm and Brussels could cope with several feet of snow better than the UK could handle a bit of drizzle – and the roads certainly don’t get closed for hours after an accident. Multiply my actions by many thousands of other business people doing the same, the cost to the UK economy must be massive. That means lower tax receipts to the Treasury to fund the NHS, and probably many more consequential deaths as a result. We need more joined-up thinking. A transport policy that regularly closes trunk roads for long periods and/or reduces speed limits for no sensible reason (other than speed camera revenue) is, in my view, mistaken and will ultimately cause great harm to the UK. I think politicians only add up the cost for the hours of interruption, not the wider costs of subsequent avoidance. Keep the UK moving. M0Z
  • Score: 2

4:30pm Thu 23 Jan 14

chris68 says...

i drove past m27 sign at 3am and was still saying was closed from j2-j1 but carried on and was totally clear without a car on the road.
i drove past m27 sign at 3am and was still saying was closed from j2-j1 but carried on and was totally clear without a car on the road. chris68
  • Score: 2

5:42pm Thu 23 Jan 14

M0Z says...

Big problem here seems to be lack of information to the motorists. Since most cars have a radio of some description, why don’t the emergency services use a standard frequency to locally broadcast updates? It would be simple for emergency vehicles to have a transmitter that could reach several miles, repeating a loop announcement that could be updated as events unfold. I’ve got smartphone apps that do this, but as others have mentioned this part of the A31 is weak on Internet signal.
Big problem here seems to be lack of information to the motorists. Since most cars have a radio of some description, why don’t the emergency services use a standard frequency to locally broadcast updates? It would be simple for emergency vehicles to have a transmitter that could reach several miles, repeating a loop announcement that could be updated as events unfold. I’ve got smartphone apps that do this, but as others have mentioned this part of the A31 is weak on Internet signal. M0Z
  • Score: 1

5:58pm Thu 23 Jan 14

moost says...

chris68 wrote:
i drove past m27 sign at 3am and was still saying was closed from j2-j1 but carried on and was totally clear without a car on the road.
Perfect example.....put all the signs you want out and idiots ignore them!!!! Now you understand why police don't put signs out and rely on people to read them.....they won't. Instead of just saying police should do something come up with a solution, you will then realise there is little you can do!
[quote][p][bold]chris68[/bold] wrote: i drove past m27 sign at 3am and was still saying was closed from j2-j1 but carried on and was totally clear without a car on the road.[/p][/quote]Perfect example.....put all the signs you want out and idiots ignore them!!!! Now you understand why police don't put signs out and rely on people to read them.....they won't. Instead of just saying police should do something come up with a solution, you will then realise there is little you can do! moost
  • Score: 2

9:28pm Thu 23 Jan 14

Silver fox 66 says...

Having been in a similar situation on an Autobahn in Germany this Summer the way their police handled the situation was very effective.
The queue was about 10 miles but a group of police systematically worked their way through the backlog of vehicles turning them round in groups. We were told to drive back the opposite way. Once there we were directed off into a small village where we followed a diversion they had set up.
Eventually lead back on to the Autobahn some 20 miles further away. All in all this took about 2 hours.
A terrible event and obviously we sympathise with the family at this time.
Having been in a similar situation on an Autobahn in Germany this Summer the way their police handled the situation was very effective. The queue was about 10 miles but a group of police systematically worked their way through the backlog of vehicles turning them round in groups. We were told to drive back the opposite way. Once there we were directed off into a small village where we followed a diversion they had set up. Eventually lead back on to the Autobahn some 20 miles further away. All in all this took about 2 hours. A terrible event and obviously we sympathise with the family at this time. Silver fox 66
  • Score: -1

11:10pm Thu 23 Jan 14

Abc1970 says...

Tracy Jordan described the whole incident as a “shambles”. I wonder if this woman would feel the same if this was her son, husband, brother or dad. People need to get a grip and take a reality check, a 31 year old man has been killed, so what if you were inconvenienced while the police DID THEIR JOB, some poor family now have to come to terms with this. You got home safely in the end, 2 people didn't and one never will. Think about that before moaning. If the police came along, shrugged their shoulders, said never mind and left, you would all moan about that as well.
Tracy Jordan described the whole incident as a “shambles”. I wonder if this woman would feel the same if this was her son, husband, brother or dad. People need to get a grip and take a reality check, a 31 year old man has been killed, so what if you were inconvenienced while the police DID THEIR JOB, some poor family now have to come to terms with this. You got home safely in the end, 2 people didn't and one never will. Think about that before moaning. If the police came along, shrugged their shoulders, said never mind and left, you would all moan about that as well. Abc1970
  • Score: 1

4:41am Fri 24 Jan 14

chris68 says...

moost wrote:
chris68 wrote:
i drove past m27 sign at 3am and was still saying was closed from j2-j1 but carried on and was totally clear without a car on the road.
Perfect example.....put all the signs you want out and idiots ignore them!!!! Now you understand why police don't put signs out and rely on people to read them.....they won't. Instead of just saying police should do something come up with a solution, you will then realise there is little you can do!
Who are calling an idot?
It was 3am so WHY would the sign say road closed when it was clear?
How many police accident signs have you seen on the side of the road that they cant be bothered to retrieve?
The accident happened around 9 hour previous and yes i do listen to travel reports on the radio which stated that the road had been re-opened. My point being that this was perfect example of NOT keeping the public aware of the situation with all the money being spent on overhead motorway signs that they cant update.
[quote][p][bold]moost[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]chris68[/bold] wrote: i drove past m27 sign at 3am and was still saying was closed from j2-j1 but carried on and was totally clear without a car on the road.[/p][/quote]Perfect example.....put all the signs you want out and idiots ignore them!!!! Now you understand why police don't put signs out and rely on people to read them.....they won't. Instead of just saying police should do something come up with a solution, you will then realise there is little you can do![/p][/quote]Who are calling an idot? It was 3am so WHY would the sign say road closed when it was clear? How many police accident signs have you seen on the side of the road that they cant be bothered to retrieve? The accident happened around 9 hour previous and yes i do listen to travel reports on the radio which stated that the road had been re-opened. My point being that this was perfect example of NOT keeping the public aware of the situation with all the money being spent on overhead motorway signs that they cant update. chris68
  • Score: -2

5:45pm Fri 24 Jan 14

iseestupidpeople says...

I don't get it at all. The traffic was held up in the hope of finding the horse. The bikers were in this traffic jam. I can only surmise that they felt they had to let the traffic go through to prevent angry motorists but they were advised to travel with caution. It's a shame the bikers weren't that diligent and it sadly resulted in the loss of one of their lives. If the traffic had been held up longer there would still be two bikers returning to their families. What a shame some are so impatient and don't trust the polices judgement.
I don't get it at all. The traffic was held up in the hope of finding the horse. The bikers were in this traffic jam. I can only surmise that they felt they had to let the traffic go through to prevent angry motorists but they were advised to travel with caution. It's a shame the bikers weren't that diligent and it sadly resulted in the loss of one of their lives. If the traffic had been held up longer there would still be two bikers returning to their families. What a shame some are so impatient and don't trust the polices judgement. iseestupidpeople
  • Score: 2

1:02am Sat 25 Jan 14

TJ 28++ says...

Abc1970 wrote:
Tracy Jordan described the whole incident as a “shambles”. I wonder if this woman would feel the same if this was her son, husband, brother or dad. People need to get a grip and take a reality check, a 31 year old man has been killed, so what if you were inconvenienced while the police DID THEIR JOB, some poor family now have to come to terms with this. You got home safely in the end, 2 people didn't and one never will. Think about that before moaning. If the police came along, shrugged their shoulders, said never mind and left, you would all moan about that as well.
As the person quoted, I feel I have to respond to this. Firstly I recognise that a tragedy has occurred from what appears to be a freak accident and more needs to be done to stop more accidents occurring on this road. Nothing should overshadow this. However as pokesdown mark so eloquently put, I don't think this should stop questions being asked about how things were handled in the aftermath of the accident. Actions taken by the police 5 hours after the incident were inadequate and as quoted, I think they were lucky not to have more accidents to deal with. Yes it was a pain to not be able to reach my young children, but I accepted this as clearly an accident investigation needed to happen. I know I was lucky to be able to get home that night - I can assure you I spent all six hours in the queue thinking that. However I don't think it is disrespectful to then ask if it could be managed in a better way.
[quote][p][bold]Abc1970[/bold] wrote: Tracy Jordan described the whole incident as a “shambles”. I wonder if this woman would feel the same if this was her son, husband, brother or dad. People need to get a grip and take a reality check, a 31 year old man has been killed, so what if you were inconvenienced while the police DID THEIR JOB, some poor family now have to come to terms with this. You got home safely in the end, 2 people didn't and one never will. Think about that before moaning. If the police came along, shrugged their shoulders, said never mind and left, you would all moan about that as well.[/p][/quote]As the person quoted, I feel I have to respond to this. Firstly I recognise that a tragedy has occurred from what appears to be a freak accident and more needs to be done to stop more accidents occurring on this road. Nothing should overshadow this. However as pokesdown mark so eloquently put, I don't think this should stop questions being asked about how things were handled in the aftermath of the accident. Actions taken by the police 5 hours after the incident were inadequate and as quoted, I think they were lucky not to have more accidents to deal with. Yes it was a pain to not be able to reach my young children, but I accepted this as clearly an accident investigation needed to happen. I know I was lucky to be able to get home that night - I can assure you I spent all six hours in the queue thinking that. However I don't think it is disrespectful to then ask if it could be managed in a better way. TJ 28++
  • Score: 0

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