Dorset Police remind criminals of penalties to compensate victims

Bournemouth Echo: Dorset Police remind criminals of penalties to compensate victims Dorset Police remind criminals of penalties to compensate victims

CRIMINALS in Dorset are being reminded they could be stripped of their assets to compensate their victims following another success under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002.

Last month a burglar was forced to hand over an estimated £2,820-worth of jewellery to repay one of his burglary victims.

Derek Tulloch, 47, of Bournemouth, pleaded guilty to two dwelling burglaries at Bournemouth Crown Court on Friday, November 22.

He was sentenced to a 12-month drug rehabilitation requirement and a six-month supervision order and Dorset Police secured a Confiscation Order against him.

The judge ordered that once the jewellery was sold, the money should be used to compensate one of his victims.

DS Andrew Kennard, of the Economic Crime Unit, said: “This is an excellent example of how Dorset Police can help take assets away from criminals, and more importantly, compensate the victims of crime.”

Comments (1)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

9:53am Thu 26 Dec 13

roguetrader666 says...

And then there's the reality. I remember the marine police catching a prolific thief , caught with a garage full of boat parts, having previous convictions for similar. What happened to these stolen goods? They had to give them back to him because they couldn't prove they weren't his, despite him having no receipts or the like. In the country as a whole it costs more in legal fees and wages to seize assets than the amount received back. A professional burglar can commit 35 burglaries on average before getting caught. The featured toe rag was charged with two, but how many more was he guilty of? Giving him a custodial sentence would have been the best deterrent. His conditional discharge means he's probably already stolen items the value of the jewellery, and then some.
And then there's the reality. I remember the marine police catching a prolific thief , caught with a garage full of boat parts, having previous convictions for similar. What happened to these stolen goods? They had to give them back to him because they couldn't prove they weren't his, despite him having no receipts or the like. In the country as a whole it costs more in legal fees and wages to seize assets than the amount received back. A professional burglar can commit 35 burglaries on average before getting caught. The featured toe rag was charged with two, but how many more was he guilty of? Giving him a custodial sentence would have been the best deterrent. His conditional discharge means he's probably already stolen items the value of the jewellery, and then some. roguetrader666

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree