Get behind grieving mum's bid to ban looped blind cords

Bournemouth Echo: PETITION: Annette Latimer‘s daughter Lucy died after getting tangled in a blind cord PETITION: Annette Latimer‘s daughter Lucy died after getting tangled in a blind cord

“WE need your help.”

That’s the message to all Dorset mums, dads, grandparents and teachers from the grieving mum of a two-year-old toddler killed by a blind cord.

The Daily Echo is backing Annette Latimer’s crusade to ban looped blind cords in the UK before another child is killed.

So far the tragic toll stands at 27 children and now Annette wants action to stop any future tragedies.

Since the campaign was launched 12 days ago the petition has had 596 more signatures but with a target of 100,000 there is a long way to go.

Click here to add your name to the e-petition

Annette said: “We have had a tremendous response and just hearing that parents have read the article, gone home and secured their blinds is great.

“If that has saved the life of just one child then I am happy.

“But that is not enough and what i need is to push forward and get an all out ban – that is the only way we can be sure that this won’t happen again.”

Now, Annette has taken advice from campaigners in the United States and is in the process of setting up a campaigning charity called Parents for Blind Cord Safety UK.

This she hopes will help to get into the European commission for standardisation technical committee meetings to help with getting the unsafe blinds banned for good.

But in order to do that she needs a website set up and is calling on web companies to help her set one up.

She added: “If anyone has the capabilities or experience in setting up a website for us or has experience in setting up a campaigning charity please get in touch.

“The more support we can get the better and please remember to spread the word.”

If you can help the campaign by setting up a website or offer any other expertise please contact Annette on legacy4lucy@outlook.com

To see how you can get involved with the Legacy for Lucy campaign on Facebook visit facebook.com/ legacyforlucyban.

 

Comments (10)

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6:41am Thu 5 Dec 13

Huey says...

Instead of banning them why not put a warning on them? Few households have young children, so why ban them for the rest of the population? Shouldn't parents be educated about how to keep their kids safe instead of banning anything that may be a danger? What will be next?
Instead of banning them why not put a warning on them? Few households have young children, so why ban them for the rest of the population? Shouldn't parents be educated about how to keep their kids safe instead of banning anything that may be a danger? What will be next? Huey

6:50am Thu 5 Dec 13

Bmth2 says...

It's very sad that her daughter died in this way however banning the cord is not the way to go. While we're at it lets ban knives, fire, cars and anything else that's ever been a danger... The answer is to not but blinds with looped cords if you have a baby, or (as you should be anyway) always keep an eye on your baby!
It's very sad that her daughter died in this way however banning the cord is not the way to go. While we're at it lets ban knives, fire, cars and anything else that's ever been a danger... The answer is to not but blinds with looped cords if you have a baby, or (as you should be anyway) always keep an eye on your baby! Bmth2

8:00am Thu 5 Dec 13

RageAgainstTheMachine says...

Huey wrote:
Instead of banning them why not put a warning on them? Few households have young children, so why ban them for the rest of the population? Shouldn't parents be educated about how to keep their kids safe instead of banning anything that may be a danger? What will be next?
They DO have clear instructions on them and have safety information in every pack and always have a little plastic thing so the blind cord can be placed high up and tied so cannot be easily accessed.
I recently moved and found my bathroom light pull really long! So even though I don't have small visitors common sense made me knot it up really high.
I am so sorry for this mother and her loss however I don't believe they need to be banned
[quote][p][bold]Huey[/bold] wrote: Instead of banning them why not put a warning on them? Few households have young children, so why ban them for the rest of the population? Shouldn't parents be educated about how to keep their kids safe instead of banning anything that may be a danger? What will be next?[/p][/quote]They DO have clear instructions on them and have safety information in every pack and always have a little plastic thing so the blind cord can be placed high up and tied so cannot be easily accessed. I recently moved and found my bathroom light pull really long! So even though I don't have small visitors common sense made me knot it up really high. I am so sorry for this mother and her loss however I don't believe they need to be banned RageAgainstTheMachine

8:06am Thu 5 Dec 13

BournemouthMum says...

Tragic though it is that the child died, banning them completely is a bit extreme. Quite a few of these incidents have been reported in the media, so surely it is up to parents of small children to ensure that they use an alternative window covering?
Tragic though it is that the child died, banning them completely is a bit extreme. Quite a few of these incidents have been reported in the media, so surely it is up to parents of small children to ensure that they use an alternative window covering? BournemouthMum

8:10am Thu 5 Dec 13

Lisanova says...

Huey, they do have earnings on them, but once removed and installed the warnings are easily forgotten as , like you say , few have toddlers . This means the blinds may be installed in houses families move into or visit , or people may go on to have children years after installing them. The difference in looped and separate cords will make no difference to the function of the blind for you.

Bmth2 there are lots of regulations around the items you mention to stop harm , you have to be 18 to buy a knife or blade , cars have 100's of safety regulations on their production and laws governing the way they are used.

Any person with a baby will keep them tied or remove them from their house on reading this article , but for those who just didn't realise, must the punishment be the loss of a child? This is what is happening time and time again, year in year out, needlessly.
Huey, they do have earnings on them, but once removed and installed the warnings are easily forgotten as , like you say , few have toddlers . This means the blinds may be installed in houses families move into or visit , or people may go on to have children years after installing them. The difference in looped and separate cords will make no difference to the function of the blind for you. Bmth2 there are lots of regulations around the items you mention to stop harm , you have to be 18 to buy a knife or blade , cars have 100's of safety regulations on their production and laws governing the way they are used. Any person with a baby will keep them tied or remove them from their house on reading this article , but for those who just didn't realise, must the punishment be the loss of a child? This is what is happening time and time again, year in year out, needlessly. Lisanova

9:56am Thu 5 Dec 13

ragj195 says...

If you are a parent with young children how about just taking them down!
If you are a parent with young children how about just taking them down! ragj195

10:23am Thu 5 Dec 13

stevesuk says...

Its a tragic story, but rather than calling for a ban (which I can't see ever happening anyway), how about using the goodwill and support here to start a recognised and persistent awareness campaign? Create a website, social media interest, publicity etc. In fact, this article in the Echo will already have raised awareness with other parents of young children who may not have realised the potential danger. There are so many nondescript objects in a typical household that a toddler would find lethal, I think that raising awareness and making parents think about these dangers is much more valuable than a ban on the future sale of one item.
Its a tragic story, but rather than calling for a ban (which I can't see ever happening anyway), how about using the goodwill and support here to start a recognised and persistent awareness campaign? Create a website, social media interest, publicity etc. In fact, this article in the Echo will already have raised awareness with other parents of young children who may not have realised the potential danger. There are so many nondescript objects in a typical household that a toddler would find lethal, I think that raising awareness and making parents think about these dangers is much more valuable than a ban on the future sale of one item. stevesuk

3:06pm Thu 5 Dec 13

hamworthygirl says...

Such a sad story i feel for the family must be so hard to get through each day for them. I had blinds fitted in my conservatory and the man advised getting the special pull cords that break if there is any weight on them, so if a child gets caught they automatically break. It seems its one of though things sometimes as families we dont think about to keep our children safe like fish ponds and windows without locks.
Such a sad story i feel for the family must be so hard to get through each day for them. I had blinds fitted in my conservatory and the man advised getting the special pull cords that break if there is any weight on them, so if a child gets caught they automatically break. It seems its one of though things sometimes as families we dont think about to keep our children safe like fish ponds and windows without locks. hamworthygirl

4:16pm Sat 28 Dec 13

rickycl98 says...

As window covering installers and window covering professionals in the US and Canada, we do all we can to make sure that folks "know" of this hidden household danger. The reason why these window blind cords are so dangerous to little ones is because a subset of parents do not know that dangling cords are a potential danger. Looking for opportunities to teach is each of our responsibilities....
and sharing the ABC's video (Awareness of Blind Cord Safety) will continue to reduce the incident rate. Share Video "I Once was Blind" on YouTube: http://youtu.be/IbCg
O5AjSWk
As window covering installers and window covering professionals in the US and Canada, we do all we can to make sure that folks "know" of this hidden household danger. The reason why these window blind cords are so dangerous to little ones is because a subset of parents do not know that dangling cords are a potential danger. Looking for opportunities to teach is each of our responsibilities.... and sharing the ABC's video (Awareness of Blind Cord Safety) will continue to reduce the incident rate. Share Video "I Once was Blind" on YouTube: http://youtu.be/IbCg O5AjSWk rickycl98

4:20pm Sat 28 Dec 13

rickycl98 says...

stevesuk wrote:
Its a tragic story, but rather than calling for a ban (which I can't see ever happening anyway), how about using the goodwill and support here to start a recognised and persistent awareness campaign? Create a website, social media interest, publicity etc. In fact, this article in the Echo will already have raised awareness with other parents of young children who may not have realised the potential danger. There are so many nondescript objects in a typical household that a toddler would find lethal, I think that raising awareness and making parents think about these dangers is much more valuable than a ban on the future sale of one item.
http://abcsafety.tum
blr.com/
[quote][p][bold]stevesuk[/bold] wrote: Its a tragic story, but rather than calling for a ban (which I can't see ever happening anyway), how about using the goodwill and support here to start a recognised and persistent awareness campaign? Create a website, social media interest, publicity etc. In fact, this article in the Echo will already have raised awareness with other parents of young children who may not have realised the potential danger. There are so many nondescript objects in a typical household that a toddler would find lethal, I think that raising awareness and making parents think about these dangers is much more valuable than a ban on the future sale of one item.[/p][/quote]http://abcsafety.tum blr.com/ rickycl98

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