Hottest day for eight years in Springbourne

Picture by Geoffzzzzz on Twitter

Picture by Geoffzzzzz on Twitter

First published in News
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SIZZLING temperatures saw Bournemouth enjoy its hottest day for more than a year today - with Springbourne recording the highest temperatures for eight years.

In Springbourne the temperature peaked at 29.9, the highest since July 19, 2006, according to local weather forecaster Jim Smith, who has been recording temperatures there since October 2000.

The mercury soared to a sweltering 30.3C at the Met Office's weather station at Hurn - the highest temperature recorded there since July 18 last year, the middle of the offical heatwave.

Sun-worshipers were in heaven as they poured to the beach to bask in the searing sunshine, while others desperately sought shade and cooled themselves off with ice-creams and drinks.

The temperature has been gradually climbing all week, with 26C recorded on Monday, 28.6C on Tuesday and 28.7C yesterday.

The weather is forecast to remains hot and dry tomorrow and through the weekend before becoming cooler at the start of next week.

On Wednesday the Met Office issued a yellow weather warning for thunderstorms for Dorset however the failed to materialise. 

Comments (13)

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5:12pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Sir Beachy Head says...

Springbourne or Southbourne, basically similar apart from the lack of sea in one and lack of drugs in the other.
Springbourne or Southbourne, basically similar apart from the lack of sea in one and lack of drugs in the other. Sir Beachy Head
  • Score: -1

5:13pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Lord Spring says...

In Southbourne the temperature peaked at 29.9, the highest since July 19, 2006, according to local weather forecaster Jim Smith, who has been recording temperatures there since October 2000.

Have you moved from Springbourne Jim
In Southbourne the temperature peaked at 29.9, the highest since July 19, 2006, according to local weather forecaster Jim Smith, who has been recording temperatures there since October 2000. Have you moved from Springbourne Jim Lord Spring
  • Score: 6

5:32pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Jim_Springbourne says...

haha no ! I guess it was a typo now corrected. And I'd hardly describe myself as a 'forecaster' ;)
haha no ! I guess it was a typo now corrected. And I'd hardly describe myself as a 'forecaster' ;) Jim_Springbourne
  • Score: 5

5:45pm Thu 24 Jul 14

muscliffman says...

I see "On Wednesday the Met Office issued a yellow weather warning for thunderstorms for Dorset however the failed to materialise. "

So basically just like virtually every 'warning' and 'alert' they ever issue. For instance what happened to last Saturday's storms, which they were warning us about for the previous two days whilst even 'upgrading' the level of the alert!
I see "On Wednesday the Met Office issued a yellow weather warning for thunderstorms for Dorset however the failed to materialise. " So basically just like virtually every 'warning' and 'alert' they ever issue. For instance what happened to last Saturday's storms, which they were warning us about for the previous two days whilst even 'upgrading' the level of the alert! muscliffman
  • Score: 5

5:50pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Hessenford says...

All these alerts were a waste of time then, torrential rain and thunderstorms, I think the met office need some new technology and staff who can perform their job correctly.
All these alerts were a waste of time then, torrential rain and thunderstorms, I think the met office need some new technology and staff who can perform their job correctly. Hessenford
  • Score: 3

6:27pm Thu 24 Jul 14

vwbournie says...

who cares, its nice weather , enjoy it!!
who cares, its nice weather , enjoy it!! vwbournie
  • Score: 3

6:35pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Ralph Horris says...

I've got Betty Swollocks.
I've got Betty Swollocks. Ralph Horris
  • Score: 7

6:46pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Jim_Springbourne says...

Hessenford wrote:
All these alerts were a waste of time then, torrential rain and thunderstorms, I think the met office need some new technology and staff who can perform their job correctly.
Easy to say the alerts were a waste of time in hindsight.

In the last 24 hours there were storms in the Channel off Exeter/Plymouth, and there are currently clusters of storms over Cornwall and just over the water in northern France as I type this.

The weather setup (as it is) had potential for these storms to crack off anywhere - the hard part is forecasting exactly where (i.e. you can't!)
We got away with it yesterday/today, some places not too far away from here, didn't.
So, as far as I am concerned, the warnings were entirely justified. I just wish the Met Office expressed the risk as a percentage more prominently, for example, put a yellow warning out but with a caveat that there is only a 20% risk of storms.
[quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: All these alerts were a waste of time then, torrential rain and thunderstorms, I think the met office need some new technology and staff who can perform their job correctly.[/p][/quote]Easy to say the alerts were a waste of time in hindsight. In the last 24 hours there were storms in the Channel off Exeter/Plymouth, and there are currently clusters of storms over Cornwall and just over the water in northern France as I type this. The weather setup (as it is) had potential for these storms to crack off anywhere - the hard part is forecasting exactly where (i.e. you can't!) We got away with it yesterday/today, some places not too far away from here, didn't. So, as far as I am concerned, the warnings were entirely justified. I just wish the Met Office expressed the risk as a percentage more prominently, for example, put a yellow warning out but with a caveat that there is only a 20% risk of storms. Jim_Springbourne
  • Score: 6

6:52pm Thu 24 Jul 14

poole boy2 says...

Ralph Horris wrote:
I've got Betty Swollocks.
What ever floats your boat !! ha ha ha.
[quote][p][bold]Ralph Horris[/bold] wrote: I've got Betty Swollocks.[/p][/quote]What ever floats your boat !! ha ha ha. poole boy2
  • Score: 1

7:11pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Rasta dude says...

vwbournie wrote:
who cares, its nice weather , enjoy it!!
That's the ticket enjoy it while it lasts just think of the last few terrible summers we have had bring on the ice-creams
[quote][p][bold]vwbournie[/bold] wrote: who cares, its nice weather , enjoy it!![/p][/quote]That's the ticket enjoy it while it lasts just think of the last few terrible summers we have had bring on the ice-creams Rasta dude
  • Score: 1

9:59pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Bournesouthmouth Downpokes says...

Rasta dude wrote:
vwbournie wrote:
who cares, its nice weather , enjoy it!!
That's the ticket enjoy it while it lasts just think of the last few terrible summers we have had bring on the ice-creams
Why this comment got a thumbs down is beyond me, some real sad cases around.

Anyways, a thumbs up from me for sure!!
[quote][p][bold]Rasta dude[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]vwbournie[/bold] wrote: who cares, its nice weather , enjoy it!![/p][/quote]That's the ticket enjoy it while it lasts just think of the last few terrible summers we have had bring on the ice-creams[/p][/quote]Why this comment got a thumbs down is beyond me, some real sad cases around. Anyways, a thumbs up from me for sure!! Bournesouthmouth Downpokes
  • Score: 3

10:30pm Thu 24 Jul 14

Hessenford says...

Jim_Springbourne wrote:
Hessenford wrote:
All these alerts were a waste of time then, torrential rain and thunderstorms, I think the met office need some new technology and staff who can perform their job correctly.
Easy to say the alerts were a waste of time in hindsight.

In the last 24 hours there were storms in the Channel off Exeter/Plymouth, and there are currently clusters of storms over Cornwall and just over the water in northern France as I type this.

The weather setup (as it is) had potential for these storms to crack off anywhere - the hard part is forecasting exactly where (i.e. you can't!)
We got away with it yesterday/today, some places not too far away from here, didn't.
So, as far as I am concerned, the warnings were entirely justified. I just wish the Met Office expressed the risk as a percentage more prominently, for example, put a yellow warning out but with a caveat that there is only a 20% risk of storms.
How does that work then, the climate change monkeys keep bleating that we are either all going to drown or burn to death in the next 50 years but the met office find it impossible to predict the next days weather with any certainty.
[quote][p][bold]Jim_Springbourne[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: All these alerts were a waste of time then, torrential rain and thunderstorms, I think the met office need some new technology and staff who can perform their job correctly.[/p][/quote]Easy to say the alerts were a waste of time in hindsight. In the last 24 hours there were storms in the Channel off Exeter/Plymouth, and there are currently clusters of storms over Cornwall and just over the water in northern France as I type this. The weather setup (as it is) had potential for these storms to crack off anywhere - the hard part is forecasting exactly where (i.e. you can't!) We got away with it yesterday/today, some places not too far away from here, didn't. So, as far as I am concerned, the warnings were entirely justified. I just wish the Met Office expressed the risk as a percentage more prominently, for example, put a yellow warning out but with a caveat that there is only a 20% risk of storms.[/p][/quote]How does that work then, the climate change monkeys keep bleating that we are either all going to drown or burn to death in the next 50 years but the met office find it impossible to predict the next days weather with any certainty. Hessenford
  • Score: 0

7:13am Fri 25 Jul 14

esquisquirrel says...

Hessenford wrote:
Jim_Springbourne wrote:
Hessenford wrote:
All these alerts were a waste of time then, torrential rain and thunderstorms, I think the met office need some new technology and staff who can perform their job correctly.
Easy to say the alerts were a waste of time in hindsight.

In the last 24 hours there were storms in the Channel off Exeter/Plymouth, and there are currently clusters of storms over Cornwall and just over the water in northern France as I type this.

The weather setup (as it is) had potential for these storms to crack off anywhere - the hard part is forecasting exactly where (i.e. you can't!)
We got away with it yesterday/today, some places not too far away from here, didn't.
So, as far as I am concerned, the warnings were entirely justified. I just wish the Met Office expressed the risk as a percentage more prominently, for example, put a yellow warning out but with a caveat that there is only a 20% risk of storms.
How does that work then, the climate change monkeys keep bleating that we are either all going to drown or burn to death in the next 50 years but the met office find it impossible to predict the next days weather with any certainty.
Climate is a long-term thing, and uses data going back tens, even hundreds of years to predict long term trends in things like temperature. It is predicted globally, and then the general trend can be applied to smaller areas like continents and countries.

Weather is more short term, and far more localised. Forecasters may only have the last few days worth of synoptic charts and weather patterns in order to predict the next few days. Forecasters are also expected to produce very localised forecasts - as you've seen, the warning for storms didn't happen in Bournemouth, but parts of the South and East of England did see some.

So yes, more data to draw on and more generalised areas do make for easier predictions and models. Hope that helps!
[quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Jim_Springbourne[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: All these alerts were a waste of time then, torrential rain and thunderstorms, I think the met office need some new technology and staff who can perform their job correctly.[/p][/quote]Easy to say the alerts were a waste of time in hindsight. In the last 24 hours there were storms in the Channel off Exeter/Plymouth, and there are currently clusters of storms over Cornwall and just over the water in northern France as I type this. The weather setup (as it is) had potential for these storms to crack off anywhere - the hard part is forecasting exactly where (i.e. you can't!) We got away with it yesterday/today, some places not too far away from here, didn't. So, as far as I am concerned, the warnings were entirely justified. I just wish the Met Office expressed the risk as a percentage more prominently, for example, put a yellow warning out but with a caveat that there is only a 20% risk of storms.[/p][/quote]How does that work then, the climate change monkeys keep bleating that we are either all going to drown or burn to death in the next 50 years but the met office find it impossible to predict the next days weather with any certainty.[/p][/quote]Climate is a long-term thing, and uses data going back tens, even hundreds of years to predict long term trends in things like temperature. It is predicted globally, and then the general trend can be applied to smaller areas like continents and countries. Weather is more short term, and far more localised. Forecasters may only have the last few days worth of synoptic charts and weather patterns in order to predict the next few days. Forecasters are also expected to produce very localised forecasts - as you've seen, the warning for storms didn't happen in Bournemouth, but parts of the South and East of England did see some. So yes, more data to draw on and more generalised areas do make for easier predictions and models. Hope that helps! esquisquirrel
  • Score: 0

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