Inquest to be held into death of motorcyclist killed in collision with horse on A31

Inquest to be held into death of motorcyclist killed in collision with horse on A31

Inquest to be held into death of motorcyclist killed in collision with horse on A31

First published in News

AN inquest into the death of a motorcyclist killed when his bike collided with a runaway pony on a Hampshire dual carriageway sparking traffic chaos across the region is due to be held today.

Daniel Robins was one of two riders in collision with the animal on the A31 westbound carriageway at Picket Post near Ringwood.

The 31-year-old from Bournemouth was pronounced dead at Royal Bournemouth Hospital shortly after the collision.

Police closed the westbound carriageway for seven hours while they investigated the tragedy.

Hundreds of drivers were stranded in their cars with no food or water or access to toilets.

The other rider, a 47-year-old man from Broadstone, was taken by ambulance to Southampton General Hospital after suffering serious injuries.

The pony died at the scene.

Before the collision, at 6.15pm on Janurary 22, both riders were held in a queue of traffic while police responded to reports of the pony loose on the carriageway.

Officers were advising motorists to proceed with caution regarding the possibility of animals in the road.

The police handling of the incident was initially referred to the Independent Police Complaints Commission.

But the organisation decided not to investigate the incident itself and allowed Hampshire police to carry out its own inquiry.

Police have defended their actions in dealing with the crash but say they will be looking to see what lessons they can learn.

The family of Mr Robins, a former pupil of Hardley School, Holbury, have since pleaded for the speed limit to be reduced on the notorious section of road.

Comments (5)

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12:14pm Mon 30 Jun 14

BarrHumbug says...

It appears that the police re opened the road despite not actually having dealt with the situation that caused them to close it in the first place?

They may well have been under great pressure to do so but outcome of this resulted in the tragic loss of life of one road user.
It appears that the police re opened the road despite not actually having dealt with the situation that caused them to close it in the first place? They may well have been under great pressure to do so but outcome of this resulted in the tragic loss of life of one road user. BarrHumbug
  • Score: 0

12:58pm Mon 30 Jun 14

sc61 says...

BarrHumbug wrote:
It appears that the police re opened the road despite not actually having dealt with the situation that caused them to close it in the first place?

They may well have been under great pressure to do so but outcome of this resulted in the tragic loss of life of one road user.
There is no practical way they could be absolutely sure that there were no animals on the loose - there aren't 7 foot high fences all the way along the A31 - so what were they supposed to do? Shut the road for 24 hours just in case?
[quote][p][bold]BarrHumbug[/bold] wrote: It appears that the police re opened the road despite not actually having dealt with the situation that caused them to close it in the first place? They may well have been under great pressure to do so but outcome of this resulted in the tragic loss of life of one road user.[/p][/quote]There is no practical way they could be absolutely sure that there were no animals on the loose - there aren't 7 foot high fences all the way along the A31 - so what were they supposed to do? Shut the road for 24 hours just in case? sc61
  • Score: 8

2:09pm Mon 30 Jun 14

MotorbikeSam says...

the police were advising motorists to proceed with caution regarding the possibility of animals in the road. one would presume that advice would also have been give to the two bikers ? if that way the case Mr Robins was the instigator of his own downfall ! as for Mr Robins family pleading for a reduced speed limit on this road.... .... which is the way it goes, when you know someone who dies call for a reduced speed limit, I am fortunate if not as yet having lost a loved on to a speeding road used which is why I advocate a limit of 50mph on the A31 not that the majority of bikers would take a blind bit of notice!
the police were advising motorists to proceed with caution regarding the possibility of animals in the road. one would presume that advice would also have been give to the two bikers ? if that way the case Mr Robins was the instigator of his own downfall ! as for Mr Robins family pleading for a reduced speed limit on this road.... .... which is the way it goes, when you know someone who dies call for a reduced speed limit, I am fortunate if not as yet having lost a loved on to a speeding road used which is why I advocate a limit of 50mph on the A31 not that the majority of bikers would take a blind bit of notice! MotorbikeSam
  • Score: 2

3:37pm Mon 30 Jun 14

sc61 says...

MotorbikeSam wrote:
the police were advising motorists to proceed with caution regarding the possibility of animals in the road. one would presume that advice would also have been give to the two bikers ? if that way the case Mr Robins was the instigator of his own downfall ! as for Mr Robins family pleading for a reduced speed limit on this road.... .... which is the way it goes, when you know someone who dies call for a reduced speed limit, I am fortunate if not as yet having lost a loved on to a speeding road used which is why I advocate a limit of 50mph on the A31 not that the majority of bikers would take a blind bit of notice!
Quoting from the other article on exactly the same subject the echo have posted, presumably to increase advertising revenue:-

"PC Stark said she had spoken to Mr Robins just minutes before at the top of the road block."

At the end of the day, having used this stretch of road commuting to work for over a decade, there is always a chance an animal will appear from nowhere - deer in particular - so one drives accordingly and hopes lady luck is with you. Obviously those on two wheels are going to be more at risk.
[quote][p][bold]MotorbikeSam[/bold] wrote: the police were advising motorists to proceed with caution regarding the possibility of animals in the road. one would presume that advice would also have been give to the two bikers ? if that way the case Mr Robins was the instigator of his own downfall ! as for Mr Robins family pleading for a reduced speed limit on this road.... .... which is the way it goes, when you know someone who dies call for a reduced speed limit, I am fortunate if not as yet having lost a loved on to a speeding road used which is why I advocate a limit of 50mph on the A31 not that the majority of bikers would take a blind bit of notice![/p][/quote]Quoting from the other article on exactly the same subject the echo have posted, presumably to increase advertising revenue:- "PC Stark said she had spoken to Mr Robins just minutes before at the top of the road block." At the end of the day, having used this stretch of road commuting to work for over a decade, there is always a chance an animal will appear from nowhere - deer in particular - so one drives accordingly and hopes lady luck is with you. Obviously those on two wheels are going to be more at risk. sc61
  • Score: 7

4:00pm Mon 30 Jun 14

millicent1 says...

I was in the queue, about 11 cars behind the accident, and I can assure you that the police did NOT advise me, or anyone else for that matter, to drive with caution after they're re-opened the carriageway. I had no idea there was a horse loose and put my foot down on the accelerator in the same way as others must have done. What really scares me is that it could have so easily been me who ploughed into the horse,as the carriageway was completely dark in front of me. Given that we had all been sitting in the 1st queue for about 3/4 hr, and none of us knew why, we were all tired, hungry and cold and so most people just simply put their foot down on the accelerator when the reopened the carriageway, it wasn't just me. The police were busy looking in the bushes with torch lights when I passed them, little did I know what it was they were looking for.
I was in the queue, about 11 cars behind the accident, and I can assure you that the police did NOT advise me, or anyone else for that matter, to drive with caution after they're re-opened the carriageway. I had no idea there was a horse loose and put my foot down on the accelerator in the same way as others must have done. What really scares me is that it could have so easily been me who ploughed into the horse,as the carriageway was completely dark in front of me. Given that we had all been sitting in the 1st queue for about 3/4 hr, and none of us knew why, we were all tired, hungry and cold and so most people just simply put their foot down on the accelerator when the reopened the carriageway, it wasn't just me. The police were busy looking in the bushes with torch lights when I passed them, little did I know what it was they were looking for. millicent1
  • Score: 2

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