HAVE YOUR SAY: No ban for 'zero hours' contracts

Bournemouth Echo: Business Secretary Vince Cable Business Secretary Vince Cable

The Government is launching a consultation on zero hours contracts but will not ban them because they offer ''welcome flexibility'' for some workers.

Business Secretary Vince Cable said the contracts had a place in the labour market even though there had been evidence of abuse.

The 12-week consultation will include the possibility of banning companies from imposing ''exclusivity contracts'' which offer no guarantee of work and stop people working for another company.

Business groups welcomed the announcement, and the decision against a ban, but union leaders said the Government was ''desperately short on solutions'' to curb the use of zero hours contracts, under which people don't know if they have work from one week to the next.

Mr Cable said: ''A growing number of employers and individuals today are using zero hour contracts. While for many people they offer a welcome flexibility to accommodate childcare or top up monthly earnings, for others it is clear that there has been evidence of abuse around this type of employment which can offer limited employment rights and job security.

''We believe they have a place in today's labour market and are not proposing to ban them outright, but we also want to make sure that people are getting a fair deal.

''Our research this summer gave us a much needed insight into both the positive and negative aspects of zero hours contracts. Our consultation will now focus on tackling the key concerns that were raised, such as exclusivity clauses and how to provide workers with more protection.

''We don't think that people should be tied exclusively to one employer if it unfairly stops them from boosting their income when they are not getting enough work to earn a living. We also want to give employees and employers more guidance and advice on these types of employment contracts.

''Employers need flexible workforces and people should have the choice in how they work. But this shouldn't be at the expense of fairness and transparency.''

John Wastnage, head of employment at the British Chambers of Commerce, said: ''Zero hours contracts are valued by many workers and employers, but there isn't a clear definition of what they are or how they should work.

''We welcome the Government's consultation as an opportunity to ensure best practice, but without jeopardising employment opportunities. Much of the negativity surrounding zero hours contracts misunderstands the vital role they can play in creating jobs.

''For example, they can be beneficial for students, older workers or those with caring duties who don't want to be constrained by a fixed contract, and they allow employers to experiment with new services or markets.''

Alexander Ehmann of the Institute of Directors, said: ''The IoD is pleased that the Government has recognised the important contribution that zero hours contracts have made in keeping people in employment and offering flexible ways for employers to manage fluctuations in demand.

''This consultation underlines how important a varied and flexible labour market is to our economy, and quite how out of touch those arguing for an indiscriminate ban on this casual form of work were.''

TUC general secretary Frances O'Grady said: ''The growth of zero hours contracts is one of the reasons why so many hard-working people are fearful for their jobs and struggling to make ends meet, in spite of the recovery.

''But while the Government has identified some of the problems faced by those with zero job security, it's desperately short on solutions to curb the use of these contracts.

''Through the consultation, the TUC and unions will propose tougher action in order to tackle abuse of zero hours contracts, which can leave people not knowing how much they'll be earning from one week to the next.''

Mick Rix, national officer of the GMB union, said: ''This snails-pace reaction to what is clearly an urgent problem will not bring any Christmas cheer to exploited low paid workers on zero hour contracts and similar contracts offering employment insecurity.

''It is regrettable that the Government is not outlawing the use of zero hour contracts even though it admits there is abuse.''

Shadow business secretary Chuka Umunna said: ''Under David Cameron the use of zero hours contracts has proliferated, leaving hundreds of thousands of people insecure at work and worried about whether they will be able to put food on the table for their children.

''Ministers have failed to act on this worrying rise in zero hours contracts. ''Having spent months saying they will investigate, all that has emerged is a consultation on proposals which do not go far enough to tackle exploitation and bad practice.

''Labour would act to outlaw the exploitative use of zero hours contracts.''

Comments (19)

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10:31am Thu 19 Dec 13

Ziggy starburst says...

They are completely wrong. There is nothing good about them for workers. It's pure exploitation. This clapped out country is becoming like china. Were winning the race to the bottom with preference being given to big business over workers dignity and living standards. For proof do this look at the companies that widely use them. There is a difference between "flexibility" (touted by the govt and the companies that operate them) and shackling workers to be on call 7 days a week. I'm sure the usual echo posters, with good jobs and social working hours will pile in with "get into the real world" but if this zero hour business continues they will become the norm and could impact the economy in years to come. How can a zero hour worker get a mortgage? Impossible. They are simply there to boost multi billion companies profits even more, thus taking even more money out of circulation to leave normal working class people once again scrabbling around for the crumbs.
They are completely wrong. There is nothing good about them for workers. It's pure exploitation. This clapped out country is becoming like china. Were winning the race to the bottom with preference being given to big business over workers dignity and living standards. For proof do this look at the companies that widely use them. There is a difference between "flexibility" (touted by the govt and the companies that operate them) and shackling workers to be on call 7 days a week. I'm sure the usual echo posters, with good jobs and social working hours will pile in with "get into the real world" but if this zero hour business continues they will become the norm and could impact the economy in years to come. How can a zero hour worker get a mortgage? Impossible. They are simply there to boost multi billion companies profits even more, thus taking even more money out of circulation to leave normal working class people once again scrabbling around for the crumbs. Ziggy starburst

10:39am Thu 19 Dec 13

Sir Beachy Head says...

They are a great way for the government to manipulate the real unemployment figures.
They are a great way for the government to manipulate the real unemployment figures. Sir Beachy Head

11:04am Thu 19 Dec 13

steelpaul says...

Ziggy starburst wrote:
They are completely wrong. There is nothing good about them for workers. It's pure exploitation. This clapped out country is becoming like china. Were winning the race to the bottom with preference being given to big business over workers dignity and living standards. For proof do this look at the companies that widely use them. There is a difference between "flexibility" (touted by the govt and the companies that operate them) and shackling workers to be on call 7 days a week. I'm sure the usual echo posters, with good jobs and social working hours will pile in with "get into the real world" but if this zero hour business continues they will become the norm and could impact the economy in years to come. How can a zero hour worker get a mortgage? Impossible. They are simply there to boost multi billion companies profits even more, thus taking even more money out of circulation to leave normal working class people once again scrabbling around for the crumbs.
couldnt disagree with you more, the decision to ban the exclusivity which companies set is spot on as this is where peopel were getting shafted but the company I work for has around 60% of the staff on zero hour contracts, they all get plenty of hours and they all get their accrued holiday paid every three months. In two years of working here ive never once heard a single comment against the zero hour contract, most actually like the fact that they are free to pick and chosse when they work.

The problem is that there are many people out their that abuse the zero hour contract, as long as the loop holes get closed to stop abuse then I dont see a problem. You blame the multi billion pound companies but the truth is, the majority of those that abuse the zero hour contracts are small businesses.
[quote][p][bold]Ziggy starburst[/bold] wrote: They are completely wrong. There is nothing good about them for workers. It's pure exploitation. This clapped out country is becoming like china. Were winning the race to the bottom with preference being given to big business over workers dignity and living standards. For proof do this look at the companies that widely use them. There is a difference between "flexibility" (touted by the govt and the companies that operate them) and shackling workers to be on call 7 days a week. I'm sure the usual echo posters, with good jobs and social working hours will pile in with "get into the real world" but if this zero hour business continues they will become the norm and could impact the economy in years to come. How can a zero hour worker get a mortgage? Impossible. They are simply there to boost multi billion companies profits even more, thus taking even more money out of circulation to leave normal working class people once again scrabbling around for the crumbs.[/p][/quote]couldnt disagree with you more, the decision to ban the exclusivity which companies set is spot on as this is where peopel were getting shafted but the company I work for has around 60% of the staff on zero hour contracts, they all get plenty of hours and they all get their accrued holiday paid every three months. In two years of working here ive never once heard a single comment against the zero hour contract, most actually like the fact that they are free to pick and chosse when they work. The problem is that there are many people out their that abuse the zero hour contract, as long as the loop holes get closed to stop abuse then I dont see a problem. You blame the multi billion pound companies but the truth is, the majority of those that abuse the zero hour contracts are small businesses. steelpaul

12:02pm Thu 19 Dec 13

MrEdge says...

Ziggy starburst wrote:
They are completely wrong. There is nothing good about them for workers. It's pure exploitation. This clapped out country is becoming like china. Were winning the race to the bottom with preference being given to big business over workers dignity and living standards. For proof do this look at the companies that widely use them. There is a difference between "flexibility" (touted by the govt and the companies that operate them) and shackling workers to be on call 7 days a week. I'm sure the usual echo posters, with good jobs and social working hours will pile in with "get into the real world" but if this zero hour business continues they will become the norm and could impact the economy in years to come. How can a zero hour worker get a mortgage? Impossible. They are simply there to boost multi billion companies profits even more, thus taking even more money out of circulation to leave normal working class people once again scrabbling around for the crumbs.
This has to be satire right? Otherwise, the lack of understanding in your post is quite frightening.
[quote][p][bold]Ziggy starburst[/bold] wrote: They are completely wrong. There is nothing good about them for workers. It's pure exploitation. This clapped out country is becoming like china. Were winning the race to the bottom with preference being given to big business over workers dignity and living standards. For proof do this look at the companies that widely use them. There is a difference between "flexibility" (touted by the govt and the companies that operate them) and shackling workers to be on call 7 days a week. I'm sure the usual echo posters, with good jobs and social working hours will pile in with "get into the real world" but if this zero hour business continues they will become the norm and could impact the economy in years to come. How can a zero hour worker get a mortgage? Impossible. They are simply there to boost multi billion companies profits even more, thus taking even more money out of circulation to leave normal working class people once again scrabbling around for the crumbs.[/p][/quote]This has to be satire right? Otherwise, the lack of understanding in your post is quite frightening. MrEdge

12:23pm Thu 19 Dec 13

BmthNewshound says...

I couldn't disagree more with Ziggy Starburst.
.
Zero hours contracts provide thousands of jobs that wouldn't otherwise be created. Its easy to blame big business but many zero hours contracts are in the retail and leisure/hospitality sector where customers are demanding lower and lower prices. Employers in these sectors can't afford to have staff sitting around doing nothing as the constant drive by customers for them to reduce prices means that they also have to reduce costs to remain profitable. As a small business owner I have a zero hours contact, no one guarantees me a minimum hours work so why should I be expected to guarantee hours for anyone who works for me ?.
I couldn't disagree more with Ziggy Starburst. . Zero hours contracts provide thousands of jobs that wouldn't otherwise be created. Its easy to blame big business but many zero hours contracts are in the retail and leisure/hospitality sector where customers are demanding lower and lower prices. Employers in these sectors can't afford to have staff sitting around doing nothing as the constant drive by customers for them to reduce prices means that they also have to reduce costs to remain profitable. As a small business owner I have a zero hours contact, no one guarantees me a minimum hours work so why should I be expected to guarantee hours for anyone who works for me ?. BmthNewshound

12:53pm Thu 19 Dec 13

skydriver says...

It's a great pity the same type on contract can't be put on MPs and members of the Lords. Rather than just popping in to clock on and claim our money.
Maybe just maybe one of these noble people , if they read such papers as the Echo,would like to comment.
It's a great pity the same type on contract can't be put on MPs and members of the Lords. Rather than just popping in to clock on and claim our money. Maybe just maybe one of these noble people , if they read such papers as the Echo,would like to comment. skydriver

1:02pm Thu 19 Dec 13

fedupwithjobsworths says...

All Council staff should be put on zero hours contracts
All Council staff should be put on zero hours contracts fedupwithjobsworths

1:11pm Thu 19 Dec 13

Marty Caine UKIP says...

They should definitely ban zero hour contracts, they should also ban employment agencies and then we might just get the jobs market working properly in this country. The only employment agency needed is the Job center, because they will give people the chance to apply for jobs on an even basis, whereas the employment agencies will give the jobs to those who will create them the highest profit.

For those of you who have commented on zero hour contracts being a good thing, how is any person supposed to budget their life if they are unsure on what the will earn, of course the deficit they incur will undoubtedly fall on the benefits system and this will then lead to higher taxes for us all, so even those who gain from zero hour will eventually lose as well.
They should definitely ban zero hour contracts, they should also ban employment agencies and then we might just get the jobs market working properly in this country. The only employment agency needed is the Job center, because they will give people the chance to apply for jobs on an even basis, whereas the employment agencies will give the jobs to those who will create them the highest profit. For those of you who have commented on zero hour contracts being a good thing, how is any person supposed to budget their life if they are unsure on what the will earn, of course the deficit they incur will undoubtedly fall on the benefits system and this will then lead to higher taxes for us all, so even those who gain from zero hour will eventually lose as well. Marty Caine UKIP

1:28pm Thu 19 Dec 13

sarahlt says...

The zero hour contract is a joke how can you live waiting to be called into work. Gone are the days when you had full time contracts saves companies paying holiday,sick pay etc. They give you loads of hours to start with regulary then with no notice they take them away from you and expect you to be able to pay rent,bills,food etc and the goverement are happy with that. Well they should try working like that and see how many of them manage.
The zero hour contract is a joke how can you live waiting to be called into work. Gone are the days when you had full time contracts saves companies paying holiday,sick pay etc. They give you loads of hours to start with regulary then with no notice they take them away from you and expect you to be able to pay rent,bills,food etc and the goverement are happy with that. Well they should try working like that and see how many of them manage. sarahlt

2:15pm Thu 19 Dec 13

muscliffman says...

Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
They should definitely ban zero hour contracts, they should also ban employment agencies and then we might just get the jobs market working properly in this country. The only employment agency needed is the Job center, because they will give people the chance to apply for jobs on an even basis, whereas the employment agencies will give the jobs to those who will create them the highest profit.

For those of you who have commented on zero hour contracts being a good thing, how is any person supposed to budget their life if they are unsure on what the will earn, of course the deficit they incur will undoubtedly fall on the benefits system and this will then lead to higher taxes for us all, so even those who gain from zero hour will eventually lose as well.
Totally agree, these 'zero hours' contracts only serve the interests of some less reputable employers and most certainly serve well those politicians interested in manipulating employment figures - downward.

For as long as I can remember we have had mutually beneficial 'casual' contracts/agreements where an employee may agree to work (or not) as and when invited by any number of employers - common in catering, transport and undoubtedly elsewhere. So why was there ever a need to introduce this idea of a 'zero hours contract' because it serves no useful purpose to workers (try getting finance on one!) and only hinders and restricts staff who would be far better suited working in the traditional way - as a 'casual'.
[quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: They should definitely ban zero hour contracts, they should also ban employment agencies and then we might just get the jobs market working properly in this country. The only employment agency needed is the Job center, because they will give people the chance to apply for jobs on an even basis, whereas the employment agencies will give the jobs to those who will create them the highest profit. For those of you who have commented on zero hour contracts being a good thing, how is any person supposed to budget their life if they are unsure on what the will earn, of course the deficit they incur will undoubtedly fall on the benefits system and this will then lead to higher taxes for us all, so even those who gain from zero hour will eventually lose as well.[/p][/quote]Totally agree, these 'zero hours' contracts only serve the interests of some less reputable employers and most certainly serve well those politicians interested in manipulating employment figures - downward. For as long as I can remember we have had mutually beneficial 'casual' contracts/agreements where an employee may agree to work (or not) as and when invited by any number of employers - common in catering, transport and undoubtedly elsewhere. So why was there ever a need to introduce this idea of a 'zero hours contract' because it serves no useful purpose to workers (try getting finance on one!) and only hinders and restricts staff who would be far better suited working in the traditional way - as a 'casual'. muscliffman

4:03pm Thu 19 Dec 13

Bournefre says...

''Exclusivity contracts'' don't sound like a good idea but I don't understand how a "zero hours contract" is much different to the casual bar job I had when I was 18. At 20 I was 'promoted' to bar manager and also found them useful - someone called in sick and I could call in cover.
''Exclusivity contracts'' don't sound like a good idea but I don't understand how a "zero hours contract" is much different to the casual bar job I had when I was 18. At 20 I was 'promoted' to bar manager and also found them useful - someone called in sick and I could call in cover. Bournefre

4:40pm Thu 19 Dec 13

jinglebell says...

The beneficial reasons given for retaining zero hour contracts are spurious as far as workers are concerned. Students, retired people and those with various family commitments used to be offered "casual worker" contracts. What is happening now is an abundance of companies are using them to make it cheaper for themselves, whilst workers are in a state of constant worry.
As for working for more than one employer, you have always been allowed to do so, but with some employment rights.
With jobs short on the ground, people take the jobs in sheer desperation, but you dare not ask for more certainty about your hours; you leave yourself open to no hours the follow week.
These should be renamed, "NO EMPLOYMENT RIGHT CONTRACTS".
How keen would our M.P.'s be on these contracts if they had one - basically they would only get paid if they turned up and clocked in at the office or Houses of Parliament debates etc.?
The beneficial reasons given for retaining zero hour contracts are spurious as far as workers are concerned. Students, retired people and those with various family commitments used to be offered "casual worker" contracts. What is happening now is an abundance of companies are using them to make it cheaper for themselves, whilst workers are in a state of constant worry. As for working for more than one employer, you have always been allowed to do so, but with some employment rights. With jobs short on the ground, people take the jobs in sheer desperation, but you dare not ask for more certainty about your hours; you leave yourself open to no hours the follow week. These should be renamed, "NO EMPLOYMENT RIGHT CONTRACTS". How keen would our M.P.'s be on these contracts if they had one - basically they would only get paid if they turned up and clocked in at the office or Houses of Parliament debates etc.? jinglebell

9:59pm Thu 19 Dec 13

Ziggy starburst says...

MrEdge wrote:
Ziggy starburst wrote:
They are completely wrong. There is nothing good about them for workers. It's pure exploitation. This clapped out country is becoming like china. Were winning the race to the bottom with preference being given to big business over workers dignity and living standards. For proof do this look at the companies that widely use them. There is a difference between "flexibility" (touted by the govt and the companies that operate them) and shackling workers to be on call 7 days a week. I'm sure the usual echo posters, with good jobs and social working hours will pile in with "get into the real world" but if this zero hour business continues they will become the norm and could impact the economy in years to come. How can a zero hour worker get a mortgage? Impossible. They are simply there to boost multi billion companies profits even more, thus taking even more money out of circulation to leave normal working class people once again scrabbling around for the crumbs.
This has to be satire right? Otherwise, the lack of understanding in your post is quite frightening.
You're either retired or not on a zero hour contract then? As long as you're ok. I have a very clear understanding of zero hour contracts. I work with people who are forced to take them and it's deeply unpleasant. If you get a visit from a ghost next week, don't be surprised
[quote][p][bold]MrEdge[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Ziggy starburst[/bold] wrote: They are completely wrong. There is nothing good about them for workers. It's pure exploitation. This clapped out country is becoming like china. Were winning the race to the bottom with preference being given to big business over workers dignity and living standards. For proof do this look at the companies that widely use them. There is a difference between "flexibility" (touted by the govt and the companies that operate them) and shackling workers to be on call 7 days a week. I'm sure the usual echo posters, with good jobs and social working hours will pile in with "get into the real world" but if this zero hour business continues they will become the norm and could impact the economy in years to come. How can a zero hour worker get a mortgage? Impossible. They are simply there to boost multi billion companies profits even more, thus taking even more money out of circulation to leave normal working class people once again scrabbling around for the crumbs.[/p][/quote]This has to be satire right? Otherwise, the lack of understanding in your post is quite frightening.[/p][/quote]You're either retired or not on a zero hour contract then? As long as you're ok. I have a very clear understanding of zero hour contracts. I work with people who are forced to take them and it's deeply unpleasant. If you get a visit from a ghost next week, don't be surprised Ziggy starburst

10:16pm Thu 19 Dec 13

glendower2909 says...

Ziggy starburst wrote:
They are completely wrong. There is nothing good about them for workers. It's pure exploitation. This clapped out country is becoming like china. Were winning the race to the bottom with preference being given to big business over workers dignity and living standards. For proof do this look at the companies that widely use them. There is a difference between "flexibility" (touted by the govt and the companies that operate them) and shackling workers to be on call 7 days a week. I'm sure the usual echo posters, with good jobs and social working hours will pile in with "get into the real world" but if this zero hour business continues they will become the norm and could impact the economy in years to come. How can a zero hour worker get a mortgage? Impossible. They are simply there to boost multi billion companies profits even more, thus taking even more money out of circulation to leave normal working class people once again scrabbling around for the crumbs.
I am a poster and work and mainly social hours however I agree 100% that there is no place for zero hours contracts in the uk.

Either employ someone on a living wage or don't.
[quote][p][bold]Ziggy starburst[/bold] wrote: They are completely wrong. There is nothing good about them for workers. It's pure exploitation. This clapped out country is becoming like china. Were winning the race to the bottom with preference being given to big business over workers dignity and living standards. For proof do this look at the companies that widely use them. There is a difference between "flexibility" (touted by the govt and the companies that operate them) and shackling workers to be on call 7 days a week. I'm sure the usual echo posters, with good jobs and social working hours will pile in with "get into the real world" but if this zero hour business continues they will become the norm and could impact the economy in years to come. How can a zero hour worker get a mortgage? Impossible. They are simply there to boost multi billion companies profits even more, thus taking even more money out of circulation to leave normal working class people once again scrabbling around for the crumbs.[/p][/quote]I am a poster and work and mainly social hours however I agree 100% that there is no place for zero hours contracts in the uk. Either employ someone on a living wage or don't. glendower2909

10:27pm Thu 19 Dec 13

glendower2909 says...

BmthNewshound wrote:
I couldn't disagree more with Ziggy Starburst.
.
Zero hours contracts provide thousands of jobs that wouldn't otherwise be created. Its easy to blame big business but many zero hours contracts are in the retail and leisure/hospitality sector where customers are demanding lower and lower prices. Employers in these sectors can't afford to have staff sitting around doing nothing as the constant drive by customers for them to reduce prices means that they also have to reduce costs to remain profitable. As a small business owner I have a zero hours contact, no one guarantees me a minimum hours work so why should I be expected to guarantee hours for anyone who works for me ?.
Garbage. If there is a job to do then business will employ someone. Naive to suggest that if there were no zero contracts that business would not pay someone to do a job. Of course they would but the only difference being that they would have to commit to paying someone a wage. Nothing wrong with that. Zero contracts are an exploitation and again I will state no vested interest as I have a salaried job and no experience of zero contracts perse. Just an inate belief that it is wrong to expect
[quote][p][bold]BmthNewshound[/bold] wrote: I couldn't disagree more with Ziggy Starburst. . Zero hours contracts provide thousands of jobs that wouldn't otherwise be created. Its easy to blame big business but many zero hours contracts are in the retail and leisure/hospitality sector where customers are demanding lower and lower prices. Employers in these sectors can't afford to have staff sitting around doing nothing as the constant drive by customers for them to reduce prices means that they also have to reduce costs to remain profitable. As a small business owner I have a zero hours contact, no one guarantees me a minimum hours work so why should I be expected to guarantee hours for anyone who works for me ?.[/p][/quote]Garbage. If there is a job to do then business will employ someone. Naive to suggest that if there were no zero contracts that business would not pay someone to do a job. Of course they would but the only difference being that they would have to commit to paying someone a wage. Nothing wrong with that. Zero contracts are an exploitation and again I will state no vested interest as I have a salaried job and no experience of zero contracts perse. Just an inate belief that it is wrong to expect glendower2909

10:29pm Thu 19 Dec 13

glendower2909 says...

People to be on beck and call for no remuneration.

Sorry for disjointed post must have pushed submit in error
People to be on beck and call for no remuneration. Sorry for disjointed post must have pushed submit in error glendower2909

11:02pm Thu 19 Dec 13

West Howe Sean says...

BmthNewshound wrote:
I couldn't disagree more with Ziggy Starburst.
.
Zero hours contracts provide thousands of jobs that wouldn't otherwise be created. Its easy to blame big business but many zero hours contracts are in the retail and leisure/hospitality sector where customers are demanding lower and lower prices. Employers in these sectors can't afford to have staff sitting around doing nothing as the constant drive by customers for them to reduce prices means that they also have to reduce costs to remain profitable. As a small business owner I have a zero hours contact, no one guarantees me a minimum hours work so why should I be expected to guarantee hours for anyone who works for me ?.
You are way off the mark here.
I subsidise bad employers with my taxes, which are used to pay Tax Credits and Housing Benefit.
There are too many employers who are secondary benefit scroungers. They are able to take money out of the business because they are scrounging off the tax payer by relying on benefits to top up low wages.
Some employers have developed business plans that are only viable because of my subsidy.
Todays benefit scroungers are rogue employers.
[quote][p][bold]BmthNewshound[/bold] wrote: I couldn't disagree more with Ziggy Starburst. . Zero hours contracts provide thousands of jobs that wouldn't otherwise be created. Its easy to blame big business but many zero hours contracts are in the retail and leisure/hospitality sector where customers are demanding lower and lower prices. Employers in these sectors can't afford to have staff sitting around doing nothing as the constant drive by customers for them to reduce prices means that they also have to reduce costs to remain profitable. As a small business owner I have a zero hours contact, no one guarantees me a minimum hours work so why should I be expected to guarantee hours for anyone who works for me ?.[/p][/quote]You are way off the mark here. I subsidise bad employers with my taxes, which are used to pay Tax Credits and Housing Benefit. There are too many employers who are secondary benefit scroungers. They are able to take money out of the business because they are scrounging off the tax payer by relying on benefits to top up low wages. Some employers have developed business plans that are only viable because of my subsidy. Todays benefit scroungers are rogue employers. West Howe Sean

12:43am Fri 20 Dec 13

Stop Press says...

No rights, no guarantees, no holiday, no job security, no sick pay, no mortgage, no bank loans, no future, no way!
No rights, no guarantees, no holiday, no job security, no sick pay, no mortgage, no bank loans, no future, no way! Stop Press

12:23am Sat 21 Dec 13

helenatkins2003 says...

Stop Press wrote:
No rights, no guarantees, no holiday, no job security, no sick pay, no mortgage, no bank loans, no future, no way!
I manage a care agency. All our staff are on zero hours contracts. They all have rights, they all have plenty of work as this industry is crying out for staff, they all get holiday pay, this industry is a safe industry to be in so there is job security for them as long as they do the job properly (as with any job), they do get sick pay, they can and do get mortgages as they can evidence regular income followed up by a reference from me, yes they can get bank loans and also rent property and it gives both them and us flexibility. In this industry it works well. We have a lot of part time staff who juggle this job with child care. They need reduced hours in school holidays and there are lots of school holidays. There is, without doubt, a place for zero hours contracts as long as employers don't abuse them.
[quote][p][bold]Stop Press[/bold] wrote: No rights, no guarantees, no holiday, no job security, no sick pay, no mortgage, no bank loans, no future, no way![/p][/quote]I manage a care agency. All our staff are on zero hours contracts. They all have rights, they all have plenty of work as this industry is crying out for staff, they all get holiday pay, this industry is a safe industry to be in so there is job security for them as long as they do the job properly (as with any job), they do get sick pay, they can and do get mortgages as they can evidence regular income followed up by a reference from me, yes they can get bank loans and also rent property and it gives both them and us flexibility. In this industry it works well. We have a lot of part time staff who juggle this job with child care. They need reduced hours in school holidays and there are lots of school holidays. There is, without doubt, a place for zero hours contracts as long as employers don't abuse them. helenatkins2003

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