Teenager Ceejay Broadhead ‘almost three times’ over drink drive limit when car hit lamp post

Bournemouth Echo: SCENE: Burley Road in Bransgore after a road traffic collision which killed Ceejay Broadhead SCENE: Burley Road in Bransgore after a road traffic collision which killed Ceejay Broadhead

A TEENAGER killed in a crash was almost three times the drink drive limit when his car ploughed into a lamp post.

Ceejay Broadhead from Bournemouth was not wearing a seatbelt at the time of the collision, which took place in Bransgore on August 15 last year, an inquest heard.

His brother Myles was among the first on the scene of the accident after hearing the crash while walking from village pub the Carpenter’s Arms, where they had been playing drinking games with friends.

An inquest into the former Ringwood School pupil’s death heard how his brother screamed: “Ceejay, what have you done?” when he found the wreckage.

Southampton Coroner’s Court was told how the 19-year-old had driven to catch up with friends after leaving the pub, but had lost control of the Ford Focus and ploughed into the phone mast in Burley Road.

It was heard that his friends had tried to stop him from driving but he cycled on a friend’s bike back to an address in Poplar Close where he had left his blue Ford Focus.

He then drove to catch up with the others, who were heading to another house nearby in the village.

It is not known why Ceejay, who lived in Southbourne, decided to drive the short distance and what led him to lose control of the car along the 30mph stretch of road.

A post mortem found there was 223 milligrammes of alcohol in 100 millilitres of blood – 2.8 times the drink-drive limit.

PC Jonathon Peace said there were ‘a number of possibilities’ why Ceejay lost control of the car.

He said: “Excess speed and alcohol consumption are both key issues that have contributed to the collision.

“There was no real reason for Mr Broadhead to drive his car and as a result of this poor decision he has paid the ultimate price and loss of his life.”

Determining a verdict of accidental death, deputy coroner for Southampton Gordon Denton said: “If there is any redeeming feature of this tragic accident is that no-one else was hurt.

“Don’t drink and drive has a very true and tragic meaning and I trust that is one of the lessons that will be learnt from it.”

Ceejay’s family paid tribute to the “joyful” teenager following the inquest.

“It does not get any easier,” they said.

“He brought so much joy into our lives. But we celebrate him and while we miss him every day, we live our lives in his honour. He was so popular, and the family continue to support his close friends, who, like us, have been left devastated by his death.”

Comments (34)

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6:14am Tue 20 May 14

master plan says...

The poor lad has paid the price for his decision.
But to blame poor parenting is an absolute joke!
The poor lad has paid the price for his decision. But to blame poor parenting is an absolute joke! master plan
  • Score: 45

6:30am Tue 20 May 14

Theo63 says...

Whilst this is a tragic story I echo the comments that thankfully no-one else was involved in the accident but my thought go out to his family and friends.

A few years ago when my daughter was 17/18 she had been to several parties where teenagers (sorry to say boys) had been drinking all night and thought nothing of driving home the next morning when they would have been over the alcohol limit.

I must admit I always did the driving and she was not allowed to take her car to parties, but no matter how much you instill things into teenagers there is sometimes a point where they still do things their own way!

Poor lad simply made a bad decision. Perhaps his friends could have done more to stop him? Who knows.
Whilst this is a tragic story I echo the comments that thankfully no-one else was involved in the accident but my thought go out to his family and friends. A few years ago when my daughter was 17/18 she had been to several parties where teenagers (sorry to say boys) had been drinking all night and thought nothing of driving home the next morning when they would have been over the alcohol limit. I must admit I always did the driving and she was not allowed to take her car to parties, but no matter how much you instill things into teenagers there is sometimes a point where they still do things their own way! Poor lad simply made a bad decision. Perhaps his friends could have done more to stop him? Who knows. Theo63
  • Score: 32

7:57am Tue 20 May 14

Theo63 says...

joeinpoole wrote:
I am truly amazed that the majority opinion here appears to be that the parents have no expectation of influence over the behaviour of their children.

I am currently in Maryland, USA and I can tell you that we have a lot to learn.

Britain is becoming a nation of chavs with nobody taking responsibility for their actions and, most certainly, parents taking no responsibility for their offspring.

I can't believe how low Britain has sunk in moral fortitude over the last 40 years. It's disgusting.
I do agree that many people don't take responsibility for their actions and have little sense of commitment or morals.

I think we did a pretty good job parenting our daughter who is almost 22. She graduated last year, has a good job and is living independently. Over the years we have also received lots of comments on how sensible, mature and polite she is BUT I still don't believe any parent can put hand on heart and say: "my little Jonny would NEVER do that!"

Our daughter never succumbed to peer pressure she has always had a mind of her own. This doesn't make like easy for you, it's often the hard route as she found on many occasions when she wouldn't get involved with gossip! These words spoken to her by a matron at her school have always stuck in my head: "You may not be taking the easy route now, but by the time you reach 21 you will realise it was the correct route!"

Despite all this it has made her o she is today!
[quote][p][bold]joeinpoole[/bold] wrote: I am truly amazed that the majority opinion here appears to be that the parents have no expectation of influence over the behaviour of their children. I am currently in Maryland, USA and I can tell you that we have a lot to learn. Britain is becoming a nation of chavs with nobody taking responsibility for their actions and, most certainly, parents taking no responsibility for their offspring. I can't believe how low Britain has sunk in moral fortitude over the last 40 years. It's disgusting.[/p][/quote]I do agree that many people don't take responsibility for their actions and have little sense of commitment or morals. I think we did a pretty good job parenting our daughter who is almost 22. She graduated last year, has a good job and is living independently. Over the years we have also received lots of comments on how sensible, mature and polite she is BUT I still don't believe any parent can put hand on heart and say: "my little Jonny would NEVER do that!" Our daughter never succumbed to peer pressure she has always had a mind of her own. This doesn't make like easy for you, it's often the hard route as she found on many occasions when she wouldn't get involved with gossip! These words spoken to her by a matron at her school have always stuck in my head: "You may not be taking the easy route now, but by the time you reach 21 you will realise it was the correct route!" Despite all this it has made her o she is today! Theo63
  • Score: 17

8:21am Tue 20 May 14

Hafnkg4678 says...

...and whilst we're on the subject of respect (or a lack of it), I'm not sure if some of the people who have posted comments above realise how hypocritical they've been.

Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but to make comments and assumptions like "poor parenting to blame", "I bet he had done it before" and "he grew up with no respect for the law", and posting them on a public website where his grieving family could be reading them, is frankly disgusting.

Maybe it's true that young people these days have "a total disregard for anything or anyone" (I personally disagree... I am 20 y/o and hate being put in that category..), but this is absolutely not the place to voice opinions like that- I would argue that you are showing a total disregard for his family. Many of the above comments are extremely disrespectful (and to be honest totally arrogant to think that your opinion is so valuable that the Internet needs to know about it...!).

Please think about the boy's family, they don't need to be told what their son did wrong, they themselves have done nothing wrong and have been punished in the worst way imaginable. I really hope some of the writers of the above comments realise how inappropriate and unnecessary they have been, being so scathing of someone they never knew.

Time and place, people. Shameful.
...and whilst we're on the subject of respect (or a lack of it), I'm not sure if some of the people who have posted comments above realise how hypocritical they've been. Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but to make comments and assumptions like "poor parenting to blame", "I bet he had done it before" and "he grew up with no respect for the law", and posting them on a public website where his grieving family could be reading them, is frankly disgusting. Maybe it's true that young people these days have "a total disregard for anything or anyone" (I personally disagree... I am 20 y/o and hate being put in that category..), but this is absolutely not the place to voice opinions like that- I would argue that you are showing a total disregard for his family. Many of the above comments are extremely disrespectful (and to be honest totally arrogant to think that your opinion is so valuable that the Internet needs to know about it...!). Please think about the boy's family, they don't need to be told what their son did wrong, they themselves have done nothing wrong and have been punished in the worst way imaginable. I really hope some of the writers of the above comments realise how inappropriate and unnecessary they have been, being so scathing of someone they never knew. Time and place, people. Shameful. Hafnkg4678
  • Score: 75

9:15am Tue 20 May 14

alasdair1967 says...

Yet another tragic and avoidable death,however how many people can honestly say they have never driven whilst over the limit ? how many people have had a heavy session the night before had a full nights sleep got up and jumped in there car thinking they where safe to drive ,I learnt my lesson whilst in Germany I had a few drinks the night before was involved in a collision on the way to work no fault of mine , fortunately for me it was not a heavy session although there was still alcohol in my system it still registered on the breathalyser luckily enough insufficient to fail the test
Yet another tragic and avoidable death,however how many people can honestly say they have never driven whilst over the limit ? how many people have had a heavy session the night before had a full nights sleep got up and jumped in there car thinking they where safe to drive ,I learnt my lesson whilst in Germany I had a few drinks the night before was involved in a collision on the way to work no fault of mine , fortunately for me it was not a heavy session although there was still alcohol in my system it still registered on the breathalyser luckily enough insufficient to fail the test alasdair1967
  • Score: 5

9:17am Tue 20 May 14

Nats1086 says...

Very sad to hear, my thoughts are with the family. RIP Ceejay!
Very sad to hear, my thoughts are with the family. RIP Ceejay! Nats1086
  • Score: 16

9:53am Tue 20 May 14

JlcPl24 says...

Hafnkg4678 wrote:
...and whilst we're on the subject of respect (or a lack of it), I'm not sure if some of the people who have posted comments above realise how hypocritical they've been.

Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but to make comments and assumptions like "poor parenting to blamewell said...... couldn't agree more. RIP Ceejay xx
[quote][p][bold]Hafnkg4678[/bold] wrote: ...and whilst we're on the subject of respect (or a lack of it), I'm not sure if some of the people who have posted comments above realise how hypocritical they've been. Everyone is entitled to their opinion, but to make comments and assumptions like "poor parenting to blamewell said...... couldn't agree more. RIP Ceejay xx JlcPl24
  • Score: -3

10:02am Tue 20 May 14

FNS-man says...

High Treason wrote:
joeinpoole wrote: I am truly amazed that the majority opinion here appears to be that the parents have no expectation of influence over the behaviour of their children. I am currently in Maryland, USA and I can tell you that we have a lot to learn. Britain is becoming a nation of chavs with nobody taking responsibility for their actions and, most certainly, parents taking no responsibility for their offspring. I can't believe how low Britain has sunk in moral fortitude over the last 40 years. It's disgusting.
That is because it is a "ME ME" society. Many expect the state to dish out money to the lazy. Single girls get pregnant, get benefits, get home, get furnishings, get fed and keep on breeding. We have millions claiming disability who get everything plus a new car. We whine and claim compensation for anything we can and even get prosecuted if we happen to repeat an old "now considered racist" nursery rhyme. We have a police force who claim compensation if they trip over a a kerb stone. We have a justice system where you get 2 years for killing someone with a single punch but more if groped a woman 30 years ago. We allow anyone into the UK so they can beg, steal and sleep in underpasses in major cities. Society as it is will go into total meltdown and hopefully I will have passed on before then.
Poor lad. We've all done stupid things, and he's paid for it with his life. Luckily no-one else was hurt.

Reading about the Roman empire recently, they were complaining about the lack of morals of the young generation two thousand years ago, so it's really not a new complaint; nor one with any more basis in fact now than it was then. Let me guess: you're a middle-aged white bloke, you read the Daily Mail, and are going to vote UKIP.
[quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]joeinpoole[/bold] wrote: I am truly amazed that the majority opinion here appears to be that the parents have no expectation of influence over the behaviour of their children. I am currently in Maryland, USA and I can tell you that we have a lot to learn. Britain is becoming a nation of chavs with nobody taking responsibility for their actions and, most certainly, parents taking no responsibility for their offspring. I can't believe how low Britain has sunk in moral fortitude over the last 40 years. It's disgusting.[/p][/quote]That is because it is a "ME ME" society. Many expect the state to dish out money to the lazy. Single girls get pregnant, get benefits, get home, get furnishings, get fed and keep on breeding. We have millions claiming disability who get everything plus a new car. We whine and claim compensation for anything we can and even get prosecuted if we happen to repeat an old "now considered racist" nursery rhyme. We have a police force who claim compensation if they trip over a a kerb stone. We have a justice system where you get 2 years for killing someone with a single punch but more if groped a woman 30 years ago. We allow anyone into the UK so they can beg, steal and sleep in underpasses in major cities. Society as it is will go into total meltdown and hopefully I will have passed on before then.[/p][/quote]Poor lad. We've all done stupid things, and he's paid for it with his life. Luckily no-one else was hurt. Reading about the Roman empire recently, they were complaining about the lack of morals of the young generation two thousand years ago, so it's really not a new complaint; nor one with any more basis in fact now than it was then. Let me guess: you're a middle-aged white bloke, you read the Daily Mail, and are going to vote UKIP. FNS-man
  • Score: -2

11:13am Tue 20 May 14

DorsetKnobber says...

High Treason wrote:
joeinpoole wrote:
I am truly amazed that the majority opinion here appears to be that the parents have no expectation of influence over the behaviour of their children.

I am currently in Maryland, USA and I can tell you that we have a lot to learn.

Britain is becoming a nation of chavs with nobody taking responsibility for their actions and, most certainly, parents taking no responsibility for their offspring.

I can't believe how low Britain has sunk in moral fortitude over the last 40 years. It's disgusting.
That is because it is a "ME ME" society. Many expect the state to dish out money to the lazy. Single girls get pregnant, get benefits, get home, get furnishings, get fed and keep on breeding. We have millions claiming disability who get everything plus a new car. We whine and claim compensation for anything we can and even get prosecuted if we happen to repeat an old "now considered racist" nursery rhyme. We have a police force who claim compensation if they trip over a a kerb stone. We have a justice system where you get 2 years for killing someone with a single punch but more if groped a woman 30 years ago. We allow anyone into the UK so they can beg, steal and sleep in underpasses in major cities. Society as it is will go into total meltdown and hopefully I will have passed on before then.
"single girls get pregnant, get benefits, get home, get furnishings, get fed and keep on breeding" somewhat miraculous that all this happens without a man being involved. And god forbid men who groped women 30 years ago shoud be brought to justice. Another woman-hater! These boards are full of em... you are literally the walking talking embodiment of the daily mail.
[quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]joeinpoole[/bold] wrote: I am truly amazed that the majority opinion here appears to be that the parents have no expectation of influence over the behaviour of their children. I am currently in Maryland, USA and I can tell you that we have a lot to learn. Britain is becoming a nation of chavs with nobody taking responsibility for their actions and, most certainly, parents taking no responsibility for their offspring. I can't believe how low Britain has sunk in moral fortitude over the last 40 years. It's disgusting.[/p][/quote]That is because it is a "ME ME" society. Many expect the state to dish out money to the lazy. Single girls get pregnant, get benefits, get home, get furnishings, get fed and keep on breeding. We have millions claiming disability who get everything plus a new car. We whine and claim compensation for anything we can and even get prosecuted if we happen to repeat an old "now considered racist" nursery rhyme. We have a police force who claim compensation if they trip over a a kerb stone. We have a justice system where you get 2 years for killing someone with a single punch but more if groped a woman 30 years ago. We allow anyone into the UK so they can beg, steal and sleep in underpasses in major cities. Society as it is will go into total meltdown and hopefully I will have passed on before then.[/p][/quote]"single girls get pregnant, get benefits, get home, get furnishings, get fed and keep on breeding" somewhat miraculous that all this happens without a man being involved. And god forbid men who groped women 30 years ago shoud be brought to justice. Another woman-hater! These boards are full of em... you are literally the walking talking embodiment of the daily mail. DorsetKnobber
  • Score: -10

11:25am Tue 20 May 14

rozmister says...

High Treason wrote:
joeinpoole wrote:
I am truly amazed that the majority opinion here appears to be that the parents have no expectation of influence over the behaviour of their children.

I am currently in Maryland, USA and I can tell you that we have a lot to learn.

Britain is becoming a nation of chavs with nobody taking responsibility for their actions and, most certainly, parents taking no responsibility for their offspring.

I can't believe how low Britain has sunk in moral fortitude over the last 40 years. It's disgusting.
That is because it is a "ME ME" society. Many expect the state to dish out money to the lazy. Single girls get pregnant, get benefits, get home, get furnishings, get fed and keep on breeding. We have millions claiming disability who get everything plus a new car. We whine and claim compensation for anything we can and even get prosecuted if we happen to repeat an old "now considered racist" nursery rhyme. We have a police force who claim compensation if they trip over a a kerb stone. We have a justice system where you get 2 years for killing someone with a single punch but more if groped a woman 30 years ago. We allow anyone into the UK so they can beg, steal and sleep in underpasses in major cities. Society as it is will go into total meltdown and hopefully I will have passed on before then.
Those who 'groped' a woman 30 years ago - do you mean the high profile celebrities being brought to justice? They are accused of molesting CHILDREN with a lot of forethought. Grooming young vulnerable women and using their power to ensure they stayed quiet, it's a lot more premeditated than a heat of the moment punch hence the longer sentence.

This story is about drink driving not your pet hates in society, benefit claimants and immigration have nothing to do with one foolish split second decision made by a teenager.

I'm part of the younger generation and I won't have one drink and drive because I've seen the impact a car crash can have however I've made plenty of stupid decisions especially when I was still a teenager. Most young people grow up into fine citizens despite these mistakes, unfortunately a few don't.
[quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]joeinpoole[/bold] wrote: I am truly amazed that the majority opinion here appears to be that the parents have no expectation of influence over the behaviour of their children. I am currently in Maryland, USA and I can tell you that we have a lot to learn. Britain is becoming a nation of chavs with nobody taking responsibility for their actions and, most certainly, parents taking no responsibility for their offspring. I can't believe how low Britain has sunk in moral fortitude over the last 40 years. It's disgusting.[/p][/quote]That is because it is a "ME ME" society. Many expect the state to dish out money to the lazy. Single girls get pregnant, get benefits, get home, get furnishings, get fed and keep on breeding. We have millions claiming disability who get everything plus a new car. We whine and claim compensation for anything we can and even get prosecuted if we happen to repeat an old "now considered racist" nursery rhyme. We have a police force who claim compensation if they trip over a a kerb stone. We have a justice system where you get 2 years for killing someone with a single punch but more if groped a woman 30 years ago. We allow anyone into the UK so they can beg, steal and sleep in underpasses in major cities. Society as it is will go into total meltdown and hopefully I will have passed on before then.[/p][/quote]Those who 'groped' a woman 30 years ago - do you mean the high profile celebrities being brought to justice? They are accused of molesting CHILDREN with a lot of forethought. Grooming young vulnerable women and using their power to ensure they stayed quiet, it's a lot more premeditated than a heat of the moment punch hence the longer sentence. This story is about drink driving not your pet hates in society, benefit claimants and immigration have nothing to do with one foolish split second decision made by a teenager. I'm part of the younger generation and I won't have one drink and drive because I've seen the impact a car crash can have however I've made plenty of stupid decisions especially when I was still a teenager. Most young people grow up into fine citizens despite these mistakes, unfortunately a few don't. rozmister
  • Score: 4

11:29am Tue 20 May 14

Controversial But True says...

As hard as it is to sympathise with acts of mindless stupididy, we should nevertheless at least spare a thought for his family, who upon reading these comments, will feel sickened. Let them mourn.

Why do Echo readers like to rub salt into wounds?

You're all so perfect!
As hard as it is to sympathise with acts of mindless stupididy, we should nevertheless at least spare a thought for his family, who upon reading these comments, will feel sickened. Let them mourn. Why do Echo readers like to rub salt into wounds? You're all so perfect! Controversial But True
  • Score: 24

11:32am Tue 20 May 14

SpookyMinx says...

My heart goes out to his family & friends. We teach our children what is right & what is wrong but unfortunately despite this they sometimes make silly decisions & in this case it has destroyed a family & his own young life. So sad. R.I.P.
My heart goes out to his family & friends. We teach our children what is right & what is wrong but unfortunately despite this they sometimes make silly decisions & in this case it has destroyed a family & his own young life. So sad. R.I.P. SpookyMinx
  • Score: 5

11:46am Tue 20 May 14

Pbroadhead says...

Yet another example of some shoddy reporting from the Echo.

I am Ceejay's brother and before many of you jump to such judgemental conclusions perhaps it is worth noting some of the facts from the inquest which for some reason the Echo has chosen to completely misreport.

Ceejay had been at the pub not to do "drinking games" but to join friends who had been watching the England game.

He had left his car at a friends and after leaving they all started walking back to the friend's house. Ceejay decided to borrow a friend's bike to check that it was still ok for them all to stay at their friend's house. He had told no one he was going to drive back and no one "urged him not to drive" as they had no idea.

Upon arriving at the friend's house he made the spontaneous and flawed decision to jump in the car and drive back the short distance to where his other friends were. This was a silly mistake that was spur of the moment and resulted in this tragic accident.

He was a good boy who had made sensible preparations who then made a poor last minute judgement after a few drinks. For those of you who do not know the situation to characterise this accident as a result of bad parenting and a stupid boy disregarding the urges of sensible friends and the law really need to take a step back and look at your own lives and decisions. Judge as you would like to be judged.

A bit of respect for a family greiving for their young son would not go amiss. Get off your high horses and show some compassion.
Yet another example of some shoddy reporting from the Echo. I am Ceejay's brother and before many of you jump to such judgemental conclusions perhaps it is worth noting some of the facts from the inquest which for some reason the Echo has chosen to completely misreport. Ceejay had been at the pub not to do "drinking games" but to join friends who had been watching the England game. He had left his car at a friends and after leaving they all started walking back to the friend's house. Ceejay decided to borrow a friend's bike to check that it was still ok for them all to stay at their friend's house. He had told no one he was going to drive back and no one "urged him not to drive" as they had no idea. Upon arriving at the friend's house he made the spontaneous and flawed decision to jump in the car and drive back the short distance to where his other friends were. This was a silly mistake that was spur of the moment and resulted in this tragic accident. He was a good boy who had made sensible preparations who then made a poor last minute judgement after a few drinks. For those of you who do not know the situation to characterise this accident as a result of bad parenting and a stupid boy disregarding the urges of sensible friends and the law really need to take a step back and look at your own lives and decisions. Judge as you would like to be judged. A bit of respect for a family greiving for their young son would not go amiss. Get off your high horses and show some compassion. Pbroadhead
  • Score: 82

12:20pm Tue 20 May 14

uberbloke says...

>A bit of respect for a family greiving for their young son would not go amiss. Get off your high horses and show some compassion.

You are posting on the Echo comment board, so I suspect your plea will go unregarded
>A bit of respect for a family greiving for their young son would not go amiss. Get off your high horses and show some compassion. You are posting on the Echo comment board, so I suspect your plea will go unregarded uberbloke
  • Score: 0

1:14pm Tue 20 May 14

a real supporter says...

Pbroadhead wrote:
Yet another example of some shoddy reporting from the Echo. I am Ceejay's brother and before many of you jump to such judgemental conclusions perhaps it is worth noting some of the facts from the inquest which for some reason the Echo has chosen to completely misreport. Ceejay had been at the pub not to do "drinking games" but to join friends who had been watching the England game. He had left his car at a friends and after leaving they all started walking back to the friend's house. Ceejay decided to borrow a friend's bike to check that it was still ok for them all to stay at their friend's house. He had told no one he was going to drive back and no one "urged him not to drive" as they had no idea. Upon arriving at the friend's house he made the spontaneous and flawed decision to jump in the car and drive back the short distance to where his other friends were. This was a silly mistake that was spur of the moment and resulted in this tragic accident. He was a good boy who had made sensible preparations who then made a poor last minute judgement after a few drinks. For those of you who do not know the situation to characterise this accident as a result of bad parenting and a stupid boy disregarding the urges of sensible friends and the law really need to take a step back and look at your own lives and decisions. Judge as you would like to be judged. A bit of respect for a family greiving for their young son would not go amiss. Get off your high horses and show some compassion.
Without wishing to sound like any of the regular commentators on here. I would point out it is still illegal and not a good idea to ride a bicycle, even a distance of 5 minutes, when 3 x over the drink drive limit. The journey also included the main Ringwood Road, which is not a great road to ride a bicycle on when your judgement has been impaired by alchohol. You all knew what he had had to drink yet it was considered OK (funny even) to let him ride a bike. No high horse just a realistic point and as a father of 2 boys I have plenty of compassion for everybody involved.
[quote][p][bold]Pbroadhead[/bold] wrote: Yet another example of some shoddy reporting from the Echo. I am Ceejay's brother and before many of you jump to such judgemental conclusions perhaps it is worth noting some of the facts from the inquest which for some reason the Echo has chosen to completely misreport. Ceejay had been at the pub not to do "drinking games" but to join friends who had been watching the England game. He had left his car at a friends and after leaving they all started walking back to the friend's house. Ceejay decided to borrow a friend's bike to check that it was still ok for them all to stay at their friend's house. He had told no one he was going to drive back and no one "urged him not to drive" as they had no idea. Upon arriving at the friend's house he made the spontaneous and flawed decision to jump in the car and drive back the short distance to where his other friends were. This was a silly mistake that was spur of the moment and resulted in this tragic accident. He was a good boy who had made sensible preparations who then made a poor last minute judgement after a few drinks. For those of you who do not know the situation to characterise this accident as a result of bad parenting and a stupid boy disregarding the urges of sensible friends and the law really need to take a step back and look at your own lives and decisions. Judge as you would like to be judged. A bit of respect for a family greiving for their young son would not go amiss. Get off your high horses and show some compassion.[/p][/quote]Without wishing to sound like any of the regular commentators on here. I would point out it is still illegal and not a good idea to ride a bicycle, even a distance of 5 minutes, when 3 x over the drink drive limit. The journey also included the main Ringwood Road, which is not a great road to ride a bicycle on when your judgement has been impaired by alchohol. You all knew what he had had to drink yet it was considered OK (funny even) to let him ride a bike. No high horse just a realistic point and as a father of 2 boys I have plenty of compassion for everybody involved. a real supporter
  • Score: -9

1:31pm Tue 20 May 14

user_name says...

Pbroadhead wrote:
Yet another example of some shoddy reporting from the Echo.

I am Ceejay's brother and before many of you jump to such judgemental conclusions perhaps it is worth noting some of the facts from the inquest which for some reason the Echo has chosen to completely misreport.

Ceejay had been at the pub not to do "drinking games" but to join friends who had been watching the England game.

He had left his car at a friends and after leaving they all started walking back to the friend's house. Ceejay decided to borrow a friend's bike to check that it was still ok for them all to stay at their friend's house. He had told no one he was going to drive back and no one "urged him not to drive" as they had no idea.

Upon arriving at the friend's house he made the spontaneous and flawed decision to jump in the car and drive back the short distance to where his other friends were. This was a silly mistake that was spur of the moment and resulted in this tragic accident.

He was a good boy who had made sensible preparations who then made a poor last minute judgement after a few drinks. For those of you who do not know the situation to characterise this accident as a result of bad parenting and a stupid boy disregarding the urges of sensible friends and the law really need to take a step back and look at your own lives and decisions. Judge as you would like to be judged.

A bit of respect for a family greiving for their young son would not go amiss. Get off your high horses and show some compassion.
Well said. Particularly your last paragraph. I know I made some pretty stupid decisions when I was that age. It wasn't a fault of bad parenting. It was me being young and feeling invincible. I am sorry you have lost your brother in this way.
[quote][p][bold]Pbroadhead[/bold] wrote: Yet another example of some shoddy reporting from the Echo. I am Ceejay's brother and before many of you jump to such judgemental conclusions perhaps it is worth noting some of the facts from the inquest which for some reason the Echo has chosen to completely misreport. Ceejay had been at the pub not to do "drinking games" but to join friends who had been watching the England game. He had left his car at a friends and after leaving they all started walking back to the friend's house. Ceejay decided to borrow a friend's bike to check that it was still ok for them all to stay at their friend's house. He had told no one he was going to drive back and no one "urged him not to drive" as they had no idea. Upon arriving at the friend's house he made the spontaneous and flawed decision to jump in the car and drive back the short distance to where his other friends were. This was a silly mistake that was spur of the moment and resulted in this tragic accident. He was a good boy who had made sensible preparations who then made a poor last minute judgement after a few drinks. For those of you who do not know the situation to characterise this accident as a result of bad parenting and a stupid boy disregarding the urges of sensible friends and the law really need to take a step back and look at your own lives and decisions. Judge as you would like to be judged. A bit of respect for a family greiving for their young son would not go amiss. Get off your high horses and show some compassion.[/p][/quote]Well said. Particularly your last paragraph. I know I made some pretty stupid decisions when I was that age. It wasn't a fault of bad parenting. It was me being young and feeling invincible. I am sorry you have lost your brother in this way. user_name
  • Score: 21

1:47pm Tue 20 May 14

Pbroadhead says...

a real supporter wrote:
Pbroadhead wrote:
Yet another example of some shoddy reporting from the Echo. I am Ceejay's brother and before many of you jump to such judgemental conclusions perhaps it is worth noting some of the facts from the inquest which for some reason the Echo has chosen to completely misreport. Ceejay had been at the pub not to do "drinking games" but to join friends who had been watching the England game. He had left his car at a friends and after leaving they all started walking back to the friend's house. Ceejay decided to borrow a friend's bike to check that it was still ok for them all to stay at their friend's house. He had told no one he was going to drive back and no one "urged him not to drive" as they had no idea. Upon arriving at the friend's house he made the spontaneous and flawed decision to jump in the car and drive back the short distance to where his other friends were. This was a silly mistake that was spur of the moment and resulted in this tragic accident. He was a good boy who had made sensible preparations who then made a poor last minute judgement after a few drinks. For those of you who do not know the situation to characterise this accident as a result of bad parenting and a stupid boy disregarding the urges of sensible friends and the law really need to take a step back and look at your own lives and decisions. Judge as you would like to be judged. A bit of respect for a family greiving for their young son would not go amiss. Get off your high horses and show some compassion.
Without wishing to sound like any of the regular commentators on here. I would point out it is still illegal and not a good idea to ride a bicycle, even a distance of 5 minutes, when 3 x over the drink drive limit. The journey also included the main Ringwood Road, which is not a great road to ride a bicycle on when your judgement has been impaired by alchohol. You all knew what he had had to drink yet it was considered OK (funny even) to let him ride a bike. No high horse just a realistic point and as a father of 2 boys I have plenty of compassion for everybody involved.
Should a 19 yr old lad ride a bike up the road after a few hours at the pub? No. Will it happen on a daily basis. Of course. Again, there is a constant need to judge. He's paid the price for a moment or two of poor judgement, why pick holes over it?
I bet your boys have done worse but that is called being young. It doesn't mean one should gloat and shake one's head knowingly when tragedy strikes.
[quote][p][bold]a real supporter[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Pbroadhead[/bold] wrote: Yet another example of some shoddy reporting from the Echo. I am Ceejay's brother and before many of you jump to such judgemental conclusions perhaps it is worth noting some of the facts from the inquest which for some reason the Echo has chosen to completely misreport. Ceejay had been at the pub not to do "drinking games" but to join friends who had been watching the England game. He had left his car at a friends and after leaving they all started walking back to the friend's house. Ceejay decided to borrow a friend's bike to check that it was still ok for them all to stay at their friend's house. He had told no one he was going to drive back and no one "urged him not to drive" as they had no idea. Upon arriving at the friend's house he made the spontaneous and flawed decision to jump in the car and drive back the short distance to where his other friends were. This was a silly mistake that was spur of the moment and resulted in this tragic accident. He was a good boy who had made sensible preparations who then made a poor last minute judgement after a few drinks. For those of you who do not know the situation to characterise this accident as a result of bad parenting and a stupid boy disregarding the urges of sensible friends and the law really need to take a step back and look at your own lives and decisions. Judge as you would like to be judged. A bit of respect for a family greiving for their young son would not go amiss. Get off your high horses and show some compassion.[/p][/quote]Without wishing to sound like any of the regular commentators on here. I would point out it is still illegal and not a good idea to ride a bicycle, even a distance of 5 minutes, when 3 x over the drink drive limit. The journey also included the main Ringwood Road, which is not a great road to ride a bicycle on when your judgement has been impaired by alchohol. You all knew what he had had to drink yet it was considered OK (funny even) to let him ride a bike. No high horse just a realistic point and as a father of 2 boys I have plenty of compassion for everybody involved.[/p][/quote]Should a 19 yr old lad ride a bike up the road after a few hours at the pub? No. Will it happen on a daily basis. Of course. Again, there is a constant need to judge. He's paid the price for a moment or two of poor judgement, why pick holes over it? I bet your boys have done worse but that is called being young. It doesn't mean one should gloat and shake one's head knowingly when tragedy strikes. Pbroadhead
  • Score: 17

2:00pm Tue 20 May 14

UTCVerwood97 says...

joeinpoole wrote:
master plan wrote:
The poor lad has paid the price for his decision.
But to blame poor parenting is an absolute joke!
Why?

When I was 19 my parents taught me to obey the law and I wouldn't have even dreamed of driving a vehicle whilst 3x over the limit.

Are we supposed to believe that, 30 years on, somehow parents no longer are able to influence their offspring? Nonsense.
I think that it is ridiculous that the echo allow users to comment on articles of this nature. All it does is allow the internet trolls to come out and post malicious comments under the anonymity of their username, which is quite simply cowardly and extremely disrespectful to all those that knew Ceejay or any other poor soul that passes away in this kind of fashion. In future the Daily Echo ought to **** whether to enable a comments section on an article with this kind of sensitive nature, in order to prevent quite frankly appallingly offensive comments. R.I.P Ceejay
[quote][p][bold]joeinpoole[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: The poor lad has paid the price for his decision. But to blame poor parenting is an absolute joke![/p][/quote]Why? When I was 19 my parents taught me to obey the law and I wouldn't have even dreamed of driving a vehicle whilst 3x over the limit. Are we supposed to believe that, 30 years on, somehow parents no longer are able to influence their offspring? Nonsense.[/p][/quote]I think that it is ridiculous that the echo allow users to comment on articles of this nature. All it does is allow the internet trolls to come out and post malicious comments under the anonymity of their username, which is quite simply cowardly and extremely disrespectful to all those that knew Ceejay or any other poor soul that passes away in this kind of fashion. In future the Daily Echo ought to **** whether to enable a comments section on an article with this kind of sensitive nature, in order to prevent quite frankly appallingly offensive comments. R.I.P Ceejay UTCVerwood97
  • Score: 12

5:05pm Tue 20 May 14

TheRealMedia says...

alasdair1967 wrote:
Yet another tragic and avoidable death,however how many people can honestly say they have never driven whilst over the limit ? how many people have had a heavy session the night before had a full nights sleep got up and jumped in there car thinking they where safe to drive ,I learnt my lesson whilst in Germany I had a few drinks the night before was involved in a collision on the way to work no fault of mine , fortunately for me it was not a heavy session although there was still alcohol in my system it still registered on the breathalyser luckily enough insufficient to fail the test
How dare you judge others by your own low standards? I can tell you without any shadow of doubt that I have NEVER driven whilst over the limit, and I am sure that I am not alone. In fact, I'm sure that there are many many others who would agree with me.
[quote][p][bold]alasdair1967[/bold] wrote: Yet another tragic and avoidable death,however how many people can honestly say they have never driven whilst over the limit ? how many people have had a heavy session the night before had a full nights sleep got up and jumped in there car thinking they where safe to drive ,I learnt my lesson whilst in Germany I had a few drinks the night before was involved in a collision on the way to work no fault of mine , fortunately for me it was not a heavy session although there was still alcohol in my system it still registered on the breathalyser luckily enough insufficient to fail the test[/p][/quote]How dare you judge others by your own low standards? I can tell you without any shadow of doubt that I have NEVER driven whilst over the limit, and I am sure that I am not alone. In fact, I'm sure that there are many many others who would agree with me. TheRealMedia
  • Score: -9

5:59pm Tue 20 May 14

Michelle*87 says...

Christ!!!! If you have nothing nice or supportive to say - Don't say anything at all!! Disrespectful bunch of opinionated morons!! This was a human being, a young boy that WAS a good boy and DID have loving family & friends that guided him so before you verbally vomit your opinions all over the internet try and engage that one single half brain cell you (hopefully) have...Step back and ask yourselves how you would feel if it was your son, brother, uncle etc?? Because it could have just as easily been!!!! One wrong decision and your condemned by people that don't even know you and have no right to even speak on the matter!!! ''To judge someone else does not define who they are...But speaks volumes about the type of person YOU are'' Go and do something useful with your time!!!! :-D
Christ!!!! If you have nothing nice or supportive to say - Don't say anything at all!! Disrespectful bunch of opinionated morons!! This was a human being, a young boy that WAS a good boy and DID have loving family & friends that guided him so before you verbally vomit your opinions all over the internet try and engage that one single half brain cell you (hopefully) have...Step back and ask yourselves how you would feel if it was your son, brother, uncle etc?? Because it could have just as easily been!!!! One wrong decision and your condemned by people that don't even know you and have no right to even speak on the matter!!! ''To judge someone else does not define who they are...But speaks volumes about the type of person YOU are'' Go and do something useful with your time!!!! :-D Michelle*87
  • Score: 10

7:25pm Tue 20 May 14

Wageslave says...

Pbroadhead wrote:
Yet another example of some shoddy reporting from the Echo.

I am Ceejay's brother and before many of you jump to such judgemental conclusions perhaps it is worth noting some of the facts from the inquest which for some reason the Echo has chosen to completely misreport.

Ceejay had been at the pub not to do "drinking games" but to join friends who had been watching the England game.

He had left his car at a friends and after leaving they all started walking back to the friend's house. Ceejay decided to borrow a friend's bike to check that it was still ok for them all to stay at their friend's house. He had told no one he was going to drive back and no one "urged him not to drive" as they had no idea.

Upon arriving at the friend's house he made the spontaneous and flawed decision to jump in the car and drive back the short distance to where his other friends were. This was a silly mistake that was spur of the moment and resulted in this tragic accident.

He was a good boy who had made sensible preparations who then made a poor last minute judgement after a few drinks. For those of you who do not know the situation to characterise this accident as a result of bad parenting and a stupid boy disregarding the urges of sensible friends and the law really need to take a step back and look at your own lives and decisions. Judge as you would like to be judged.

A bit of respect for a family greiving for their young son would not go amiss. Get off your high horses and show some compassion.
"Drunk driving is no accident " (Mothers against Drunk Drivers)
[quote][p][bold]Pbroadhead[/bold] wrote: Yet another example of some shoddy reporting from the Echo. I am Ceejay's brother and before many of you jump to such judgemental conclusions perhaps it is worth noting some of the facts from the inquest which for some reason the Echo has chosen to completely misreport. Ceejay had been at the pub not to do "drinking games" but to join friends who had been watching the England game. He had left his car at a friends and after leaving they all started walking back to the friend's house. Ceejay decided to borrow a friend's bike to check that it was still ok for them all to stay at their friend's house. He had told no one he was going to drive back and no one "urged him not to drive" as they had no idea. Upon arriving at the friend's house he made the spontaneous and flawed decision to jump in the car and drive back the short distance to where his other friends were. This was a silly mistake that was spur of the moment and resulted in this tragic accident. He was a good boy who had made sensible preparations who then made a poor last minute judgement after a few drinks. For those of you who do not know the situation to characterise this accident as a result of bad parenting and a stupid boy disregarding the urges of sensible friends and the law really need to take a step back and look at your own lives and decisions. Judge as you would like to be judged. A bit of respect for a family greiving for their young son would not go amiss. Get off your high horses and show some compassion.[/p][/quote]"Drunk driving is no accident " (Mothers against Drunk Drivers) Wageslave
  • Score: -4

7:51pm Tue 20 May 14

Pbroadhead says...

Wageslave wrote:
Pbroadhead wrote:
Yet another example of some shoddy reporting from the Echo.

I am Ceejay's brother and before many of you jump to such judgemental conclusions perhaps it is worth noting some of the facts from the inquest which for some reason the Echo has chosen to completely misreport.

Ceejay had been at the pub not to do "drinking games" but to join friends who had been watching the England game.

He had left his car at a friends and after leaving they all started walking back to the friend's house. Ceejay decided to borrow a friend's bike to check that it was still ok for them all to stay at their friend's house. He had told no one he was going to drive back and no one "urged him not to drive" as they had no idea.

Upon arriving at the friend's house he made the spontaneous and flawed decision to jump in the car and drive back the short distance to where his other friends were. This was a silly mistake that was spur of the moment and resulted in this tragic accident.

He was a good boy who had made sensible preparations who then made a poor last minute judgement after a few drinks. For those of you who do not know the situation to characterise this accident as a result of bad parenting and a stupid boy disregarding the urges of sensible friends and the law really need to take a step back and look at your own lives and decisions. Judge as you would like to be judged.

A bit of respect for a family greiving for their young son would not go amiss. Get off your high horses and show some compassion.
"Drunk driving is no accident " (Mothers against Drunk Drivers)
You know what, I'm bored of the persistent need for those to cast assertions in such tragic situations. Drinking and driving is a terrible idea. We get that. But judging a 19 yr old boy for a flawed decision taken which cost him his life is not only in poor taste, but unnecessary. The definition of accident is an unforeseen or unplanned event. We've suffered enough without anymore holier than thou preaching what we all "should" do in a perfect world. I would love to see how these perfect people live their lives.
My little brother was a great boy and would have been a wonderful man save for one silly error. Leave it at that you judgemental and unfeeling so-called human beings.
Thinking of you Ceejay xx
[quote][p][bold]Wageslave[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Pbroadhead[/bold] wrote: Yet another example of some shoddy reporting from the Echo. I am Ceejay's brother and before many of you jump to such judgemental conclusions perhaps it is worth noting some of the facts from the inquest which for some reason the Echo has chosen to completely misreport. Ceejay had been at the pub not to do "drinking games" but to join friends who had been watching the England game. He had left his car at a friends and after leaving they all started walking back to the friend's house. Ceejay decided to borrow a friend's bike to check that it was still ok for them all to stay at their friend's house. He had told no one he was going to drive back and no one "urged him not to drive" as they had no idea. Upon arriving at the friend's house he made the spontaneous and flawed decision to jump in the car and drive back the short distance to where his other friends were. This was a silly mistake that was spur of the moment and resulted in this tragic accident. He was a good boy who had made sensible preparations who then made a poor last minute judgement after a few drinks. For those of you who do not know the situation to characterise this accident as a result of bad parenting and a stupid boy disregarding the urges of sensible friends and the law really need to take a step back and look at your own lives and decisions. Judge as you would like to be judged. A bit of respect for a family greiving for their young son would not go amiss. Get off your high horses and show some compassion.[/p][/quote]"Drunk driving is no accident " (Mothers against Drunk Drivers)[/p][/quote]You know what, I'm bored of the persistent need for those to cast assertions in such tragic situations. Drinking and driving is a terrible idea. We get that. But judging a 19 yr old boy for a flawed decision taken which cost him his life is not only in poor taste, but unnecessary. The definition of accident is an unforeseen or unplanned event. We've suffered enough without anymore holier than thou preaching what we all "should" do in a perfect world. I would love to see how these perfect people live their lives. My little brother was a great boy and would have been a wonderful man save for one silly error. Leave it at that you judgemental and unfeeling so-called human beings. Thinking of you Ceejay xx Pbroadhead
  • Score: 19

8:12pm Tue 20 May 14

Understated says...

i feel sorry for his family, their loss will be a heavy burden. i hope they can find some peace of mind after what happened and do not listen to those nasties who are blaming them, they are not at fault for what happened, its an accident and grief will make them feel responsible, they will be questioning the "what ifs" and "if only" but nothing will bring him back to them.

the people posting disrespectful comments would be thinking twice if their full names and addresses were on display instead of an anonymous name. if you are unconfortable with the thought of your identity being revealed with your comments, then you should be thinking twice about what you are saying. words hurt regardless of how they are said. being anonymous protects you, not the people reading it.

i guess you dont want the world or your friends and family and colleagues seeing what a nasty person you are when youre behind a computer screen. this isnt a place to blame people, vent your frustrations out at your own mirror and stop taking it out on those who are already suffering enough.
i feel sorry for his family, their loss will be a heavy burden. i hope they can find some peace of mind after what happened and do not listen to those nasties who are blaming them, they are not at fault for what happened, its an accident and grief will make them feel responsible, they will be questioning the "what ifs" and "if only" but nothing will bring him back to them. the people posting disrespectful comments would be thinking twice if their full names and addresses were on display instead of an anonymous name. if you are unconfortable with the thought of your identity being revealed with your comments, then you should be thinking twice about what you are saying. words hurt regardless of how they are said. being anonymous protects you, not the people reading it. i guess you dont want the world or your friends and family and colleagues seeing what a nasty person you are when youre behind a computer screen. this isnt a place to blame people, vent your frustrations out at your own mirror and stop taking it out on those who are already suffering enough. Understated
  • Score: 6

8:36pm Tue 20 May 14

JamesBond0070 says...

Back in Christmas 1961, I was working for Flight Refuelling Ltd., as a design draughtsman at their office at the then Tarrent Ruston airfield. On the last day of work before the Christmas break, there was an office party where the drinks were freely available, and I not used to alcohol at that time, and incidentally still not used to it, much exceeded my body's limit. I had to ride home to Sark Road, Upper Parkstone. The memories of that ride while fighting to stay awake and in control of my big 700cc motorcycle, and of the many times i narrowly avoided crashing, have stayed with me up to today, and will never leave me. I was very, very lucky that day to have survived and also learnt a extremely sobering lesson.
Back in Christmas 1961, I was working for Flight Refuelling Ltd., as a design draughtsman at their office at the then Tarrent Ruston airfield. On the last day of work before the Christmas break, there was an office party where the drinks were freely available, and I not used to alcohol at that time, and incidentally still not used to it, much exceeded my body's limit. I had to ride home to Sark Road, Upper Parkstone. The memories of that ride while fighting to stay awake and in control of my big 700cc motorcycle, and of the many times i narrowly avoided crashing, have stayed with me up to today, and will never leave me. I was very, very lucky that day to have survived and also learnt a extremely sobering lesson. JamesBond0070
  • Score: -2

8:53pm Tue 20 May 14

alasdair1967 says...

TheRealMedia wrote:
alasdair1967 wrote:
Yet another tragic and avoidable death,however how many people can honestly say they have never driven whilst over the limit ? how many people have had a heavy session the night before had a full nights sleep got up and jumped in there car thinking they where safe to drive ,I learnt my lesson whilst in Germany I had a few drinks the night before was involved in a collision on the way to work no fault of mine , fortunately for me it was not a heavy session although there was still alcohol in my system it still registered on the breathalyser luckily enough insufficient to fail the test
How dare you judge others by your own low standards? I can tell you without any shadow of doubt that I have NEVER driven whilst over the limit, and I am sure that I am not alone. In fact, I'm sure that there are many many others who would agree with me.
Low standards ! As a vehicle mechanic my job depends on me holding a full driving licence and I have NEVER driven a vehicle directly following alcohol consumption ie deliberately drunk and drove that incident in Germany was a wake up call ,so you are telling me you have NEVER been out and drunk in the evening and drove the following morning I believe there are more people caught the following morning thinking they where safe to drive who would never ever consider drinking and driving
[quote][p][bold]TheRealMedia[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alasdair1967[/bold] wrote: Yet another tragic and avoidable death,however how many people can honestly say they have never driven whilst over the limit ? how many people have had a heavy session the night before had a full nights sleep got up and jumped in there car thinking they where safe to drive ,I learnt my lesson whilst in Germany I had a few drinks the night before was involved in a collision on the way to work no fault of mine , fortunately for me it was not a heavy session although there was still alcohol in my system it still registered on the breathalyser luckily enough insufficient to fail the test[/p][/quote]How dare you judge others by your own low standards? I can tell you without any shadow of doubt that I have NEVER driven whilst over the limit, and I am sure that I am not alone. In fact, I'm sure that there are many many others who would agree with me.[/p][/quote]Low standards ! As a vehicle mechanic my job depends on me holding a full driving licence and I have NEVER driven a vehicle directly following alcohol consumption ie deliberately drunk and drove that incident in Germany was a wake up call ,so you are telling me you have NEVER been out and drunk in the evening and drove the following morning I believe there are more people caught the following morning thinking they where safe to drive who would never ever consider drinking and driving alasdair1967
  • Score: -1

9:00pm Tue 20 May 14

alasdair1967 says...

alasdair1967 wrote:
TheRealMedia wrote:
alasdair1967 wrote:
Yet another tragic and avoidable death,however how many people can honestly say they have never driven whilst over the limit ? how many people have had a heavy session the night before had a full nights sleep got up and jumped in there car thinking they where safe to drive ,I learnt my lesson whilst in Germany I had a few drinks the night before was involved in a collision on the way to work no fault of mine , fortunately for me it was not a heavy session although there was still alcohol in my system it still registered on the breathalyser luckily enough insufficient to fail the test
How dare you judge others by your own low standards? I can tell you without any shadow of doubt that I have NEVER driven whilst over the limit, and I am sure that I am not alone. In fact, I'm sure that there are many many others who would agree with me.
Low standards ! As a vehicle mechanic my job depends on me holding a full driving licence and I have NEVER driven a vehicle directly following alcohol consumption ie deliberately drunk and drove that incident in Germany was a wake up call ,so you are telling me you have NEVER been out and drunk in the evening and drove the following morning I believe there are more people caught the following morning thinking they where safe to drive who would never ever consider drinking and driving
I would also like to add I have held a full HGV/CAR licence since 1988 WITH ZERO MOTOR CONVICTIONS ZERO POINTS so how dare you accuse me of having low standards idiot !!!
[quote][p][bold]alasdair1967[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]TheRealMedia[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alasdair1967[/bold] wrote: Yet another tragic and avoidable death,however how many people can honestly say they have never driven whilst over the limit ? how many people have had a heavy session the night before had a full nights sleep got up and jumped in there car thinking they where safe to drive ,I learnt my lesson whilst in Germany I had a few drinks the night before was involved in a collision on the way to work no fault of mine , fortunately for me it was not a heavy session although there was still alcohol in my system it still registered on the breathalyser luckily enough insufficient to fail the test[/p][/quote]How dare you judge others by your own low standards? I can tell you without any shadow of doubt that I have NEVER driven whilst over the limit, and I am sure that I am not alone. In fact, I'm sure that there are many many others who would agree with me.[/p][/quote]Low standards ! As a vehicle mechanic my job depends on me holding a full driving licence and I have NEVER driven a vehicle directly following alcohol consumption ie deliberately drunk and drove that incident in Germany was a wake up call ,so you are telling me you have NEVER been out and drunk in the evening and drove the following morning I believe there are more people caught the following morning thinking they where safe to drive who would never ever consider drinking and driving[/p][/quote]I would also like to add I have held a full HGV/CAR licence since 1988 WITH ZERO MOTOR CONVICTIONS ZERO POINTS so how dare you accuse me of having low standards idiot !!! alasdair1967
  • Score: -1

7:50am Wed 21 May 14

Lord Spring says...

Many a reader of posts on this article will be at a lost to understand where the parenting issue has arisen from due to the fact. the first original post has been removed. So it does not quite make sense to leave responses to that poster only to confuse people who would not have seen the removed post.
Many a reader of posts on this article will be at a lost to understand where the parenting issue has arisen from due to the fact. the first original post has been removed. So it does not quite make sense to leave responses to that poster only to confuse people who would not have seen the removed post. Lord Spring
  • Score: -1

4:54pm Wed 21 May 14

TheRealMedia says...

alasdair1967 wrote:
alasdair1967 wrote:
TheRealMedia wrote:
alasdair1967 wrote:
Yet another tragic and avoidable death,however how many people can honestly say they have never driven whilst over the limit ? how many people have had a heavy session the night before had a full nights sleep got up and jumped in there car thinking they where safe to drive ,I learnt my lesson whilst in Germany I had a few drinks the night before was involved in a collision on the way to work no fault of mine , fortunately for me it was not a heavy session although there was still alcohol in my system it still registered on the breathalyser luckily enough insufficient to fail the test
How dare you judge others by your own low standards? I can tell you without any shadow of doubt that I have NEVER driven whilst over the limit, and I am sure that I am not alone. In fact, I'm sure that there are many many others who would agree with me.
Low standards ! As a vehicle mechanic my job depends on me holding a full driving licence and I have NEVER driven a vehicle directly following alcohol consumption ie deliberately drunk and drove that incident in Germany was a wake up call ,so you are telling me you have NEVER been out and drunk in the evening and drove the following morning I believe there are more people caught the following morning thinking they where safe to drive who would never ever consider drinking and driving
I would also like to add I have held a full HGV/CAR licence since 1988 WITH ZERO MOTOR CONVICTIONS ZERO POINTS so how dare you accuse me of having low standards idiot !!!
You asserted that many people drink and drive by being over the limit the next morning - and admitted to coming close to it yourself - describing yourself as "fortunate". Therefore, at that particular time, you had low standards of awareness. Fact.
Why am I am idiot for saying that I think you are wrong about other people and their drinking habits? I am actually very responsible about the amount of alcohol consumed. If that makes me an idiot, I am happy to continue in ignorance.

Your low standards are as a result of assuming that others act like you have previously done. It would appear that you may have learnt your lesson, but, arrogantly assume that others had to make your (near) mistakes to learn in the first place! You are wrong to suggest that it is a majority of people who act without consideration for others regarding alcohol (or,indeed, their own welfare). Well, you are wrong unless you back it up with hard and fast statistics.

It is unfortunate what happened to this lad, but, he made his choice, and now his unfortunate family has to bear the consequences, sadly. No-one in their right mind would have wanted these consequences.

However, I just wonder how many people posting on here would be sympathetic if the out of control car had ploughed into innocent other road users? Would you be, Alisdair, or would you be calling for the driver's head?
[quote][p][bold]alasdair1967[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alasdair1967[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]TheRealMedia[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alasdair1967[/bold] wrote: Yet another tragic and avoidable death,however how many people can honestly say they have never driven whilst over the limit ? how many people have had a heavy session the night before had a full nights sleep got up and jumped in there car thinking they where safe to drive ,I learnt my lesson whilst in Germany I had a few drinks the night before was involved in a collision on the way to work no fault of mine , fortunately for me it was not a heavy session although there was still alcohol in my system it still registered on the breathalyser luckily enough insufficient to fail the test[/p][/quote]How dare you judge others by your own low standards? I can tell you without any shadow of doubt that I have NEVER driven whilst over the limit, and I am sure that I am not alone. In fact, I'm sure that there are many many others who would agree with me.[/p][/quote]Low standards ! As a vehicle mechanic my job depends on me holding a full driving licence and I have NEVER driven a vehicle directly following alcohol consumption ie deliberately drunk and drove that incident in Germany was a wake up call ,so you are telling me you have NEVER been out and drunk in the evening and drove the following morning I believe there are more people caught the following morning thinking they where safe to drive who would never ever consider drinking and driving[/p][/quote]I would also like to add I have held a full HGV/CAR licence since 1988 WITH ZERO MOTOR CONVICTIONS ZERO POINTS so how dare you accuse me of having low standards idiot !!![/p][/quote]You asserted that many people drink and drive by being over the limit the next morning - and admitted to coming close to it yourself - describing yourself as "fortunate". Therefore, at that particular time, you had low standards of awareness. Fact. Why am I am idiot for saying that I think you are wrong about other people and their drinking habits? I am actually very responsible about the amount of alcohol consumed. If that makes me an idiot, I am happy to continue in ignorance. Your low standards are as a result of assuming that others act like you have previously done. It would appear that you may have learnt your lesson, but, arrogantly assume that others had to make your (near) mistakes to learn in the first place! You are wrong to suggest that it is a majority of people who act without consideration for others regarding alcohol (or,indeed, their own welfare). Well, you are wrong unless you back it up with hard and fast statistics. It is unfortunate what happened to this lad, but, he made his choice, and now his unfortunate family has to bear the consequences, sadly. No-one in their right mind would have wanted these consequences. However, I just wonder how many people posting on here would be sympathetic if the out of control car had ploughed into innocent other road users? Would you be, Alisdair, or would you be calling for the driver's head? TheRealMedia
  • Score: -2

5:32pm Wed 21 May 14

TheRealMedia says...

PS It seems inappropriate that the targeted ad at the foot of this page is about a model of the late Ayrton Senna's Honda at the moment.

Also, I wanted to edit my above post above by amending the last paragraph to read:
However, I just wonder how many people posting on here would be sympathetic if AN out of control car driven by a person more than 3 times over the limit had ploughed into innocent other road users? Would you, Alisdair, be advocating compassion for the driver??
PS It seems inappropriate that the targeted ad at the foot of this page is about a model of the late Ayrton Senna's Honda at the moment. Also, I wanted to edit my above post above by amending the last paragraph to read: However, I just wonder how many people posting on here would be sympathetic if AN out of control car driven by a person more than 3 times over the limit had ploughed into innocent other road users? Would you, Alisdair, be advocating compassion for the driver?? TheRealMedia
  • Score: -1

6:35pm Wed 21 May 14

elliefer says...

I went to school with Ceejay and was in his class every year up until we went our separate ways to senior school. So I'm not going to pretend that we were best mates or anything, but when I found out on my way home from London after a great day out with a friend I was absolutely shocked and didn't believe it at first.

I was at the time really unhappy with where my life was headed and this tragic event made me realise that anything can happen to anyone. If he was anything like the boy I knew 10 years ago he would say live life to the fullest.

I would never post on these sites, I didn't even leave a comment on his facebook page. However, after seeing the hate on here and everyone getting all political on here I wanted the Broadheads to know that the opinions that matter are the people who knew that Ceejay was a good lad. He made an error that a lot of people my age and older do and every one is paying the price so there Iis no need to say hurtful comments. I have learned never to take the chance that he did. It's nothing to do with bad parenting or that he was an out of control teenager, alcohol makes you feel invincible.

I hope that these words are of some comfort to the Broadheads and extended families. He was a good lad when I knew him and people always spoke positively of him since losing contact.

R.I.P Ceejay
I went to school with Ceejay and was in his class every year up until we went our separate ways to senior school. So I'm not going to pretend that we were best mates or anything, but when I found out on my way home from London after a great day out with a friend I was absolutely shocked and didn't believe it at first. I was at the time really unhappy with where my life was headed and this tragic event made me realise that anything can happen to anyone. If he was anything like the boy I knew 10 years ago he would say live life to the fullest. I would never post on these sites, I didn't even leave a comment on his facebook page. However, after seeing the hate on here and everyone getting all political on here I wanted the Broadheads to know that the opinions that matter are the people who knew that Ceejay was a good lad. He made an error that a lot of people my age and older do and every one is paying the price so there Iis no need to say hurtful comments. I have learned never to take the chance that he did. It's nothing to do with bad parenting or that he was an out of control teenager, alcohol makes you feel invincible. I hope that these words are of some comfort to the Broadheads and extended families. He was a good lad when I knew him and people always spoke positively of him since losing contact. R.I.P Ceejay elliefer
  • Score: 4

6:57pm Wed 21 May 14

alasdair1967 says...

TheRealMedia wrote:
alasdair1967 wrote:
alasdair1967 wrote:
TheRealMedia wrote:
alasdair1967 wrote:
Yet another tragic and avoidable death,however how many people can honestly say they have never driven whilst over the limit ? how many people have had a heavy session the night before had a full nights sleep got up and jumped in there car thinking they where safe to drive ,I learnt my lesson whilst in Germany I had a few drinks the night before was involved in a collision on the way to work no fault of mine , fortunately for me it was not a heavy session although there was still alcohol in my system it still registered on the breathalyser luckily enough insufficient to fail the test
How dare you judge others by your own low standards? I can tell you without any shadow of doubt that I have NEVER driven whilst over the limit, and I am sure that I am not alone. In fact, I'm sure that there are many many others who would agree with me.
Low standards ! As a vehicle mechanic my job depends on me holding a full driving licence and I have NEVER driven a vehicle directly following alcohol consumption ie deliberately drunk and drove that incident in Germany was a wake up call ,so you are telling me you have NEVER been out and drunk in the evening and drove the following morning I believe there are more people caught the following morning thinking they where safe to drive who would never ever consider drinking and driving
I would also like to add I have held a full HGV/CAR licence since 1988 WITH ZERO MOTOR CONVICTIONS ZERO POINTS so how dare you accuse me of having low standards idiot !!!
You asserted that many people drink and drive by being over the limit the next morning - and admitted to coming close to it yourself - describing yourself as "fortunate". Therefore, at that particular time, you had low standards of awareness. Fact.
Why am I am idiot for saying that I think you are wrong about other people and their drinking habits? I am actually very responsible about the amount of alcohol consumed. If that makes me an idiot, I am happy to continue in ignorance.

Your low standards are as a result of assuming that others act like you have previously done. It would appear that you may have learnt your lesson, but, arrogantly assume that others had to make your (near) mistakes to learn in the first place! You are wrong to suggest that it is a majority of people who act without consideration for others regarding alcohol (or,indeed, their own welfare). Well, you are wrong unless you back it up with hard and fast statistics.

It is unfortunate what happened to this lad, but, he made his choice, and now his unfortunate family has to bear the consequences, sadly. No-one in their right mind would have wanted these consequences.

However, I just wonder how many people posting on here would be sympathetic if the out of control car had ploughed into innocent other road users? Would you be, Alisdair, or would you be calling for the driver's head?
As recently reported in this very newspaper only last week the motorcyclist killed the following morning twice the legal limit having been drinking the previous day on his way to work as a delivery driver ,so yes it is evident other people do drive the following morning whilst over the limit
[quote][p][bold]TheRealMedia[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alasdair1967[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alasdair1967[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]TheRealMedia[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alasdair1967[/bold] wrote: Yet another tragic and avoidable death,however how many people can honestly say they have never driven whilst over the limit ? how many people have had a heavy session the night before had a full nights sleep got up and jumped in there car thinking they where safe to drive ,I learnt my lesson whilst in Germany I had a few drinks the night before was involved in a collision on the way to work no fault of mine , fortunately for me it was not a heavy session although there was still alcohol in my system it still registered on the breathalyser luckily enough insufficient to fail the test[/p][/quote]How dare you judge others by your own low standards? I can tell you without any shadow of doubt that I have NEVER driven whilst over the limit, and I am sure that I am not alone. In fact, I'm sure that there are many many others who would agree with me.[/p][/quote]Low standards ! As a vehicle mechanic my job depends on me holding a full driving licence and I have NEVER driven a vehicle directly following alcohol consumption ie deliberately drunk and drove that incident in Germany was a wake up call ,so you are telling me you have NEVER been out and drunk in the evening and drove the following morning I believe there are more people caught the following morning thinking they where safe to drive who would never ever consider drinking and driving[/p][/quote]I would also like to add I have held a full HGV/CAR licence since 1988 WITH ZERO MOTOR CONVICTIONS ZERO POINTS so how dare you accuse me of having low standards idiot !!![/p][/quote]You asserted that many people drink and drive by being over the limit the next morning - and admitted to coming close to it yourself - describing yourself as "fortunate". Therefore, at that particular time, you had low standards of awareness. Fact. Why am I am idiot for saying that I think you are wrong about other people and their drinking habits? I am actually very responsible about the amount of alcohol consumed. If that makes me an idiot, I am happy to continue in ignorance. Your low standards are as a result of assuming that others act like you have previously done. It would appear that you may have learnt your lesson, but, arrogantly assume that others had to make your (near) mistakes to learn in the first place! You are wrong to suggest that it is a majority of people who act without consideration for others regarding alcohol (or,indeed, their own welfare). Well, you are wrong unless you back it up with hard and fast statistics. It is unfortunate what happened to this lad, but, he made his choice, and now his unfortunate family has to bear the consequences, sadly. No-one in their right mind would have wanted these consequences. However, I just wonder how many people posting on here would be sympathetic if the out of control car had ploughed into innocent other road users? Would you be, Alisdair, or would you be calling for the driver's head?[/p][/quote]As recently reported in this very newspaper only last week the motorcyclist killed the following morning twice the legal limit having been drinking the previous day on his way to work as a delivery driver ,so yes it is evident other people do drive the following morning whilst over the limit alasdair1967
  • Score: 0

7:08pm Wed 21 May 14

alasdair1967 says...

TheRealMedia wrote:
alasdair1967 wrote:
alasdair1967 wrote:
TheRealMedia wrote:
alasdair1967 wrote:
Yet another tragic and avoidable death,however how many people can honestly say they have never driven whilst over the limit ? how many people have had a heavy session the night before had a full nights sleep got up and jumped in there car thinking they where safe to drive ,I learnt my lesson whilst in Germany I had a few drinks the night before was involved in a collision on the way to work no fault of mine , fortunately for me it was not a heavy session although there was still alcohol in my system it still registered on the breathalyser luckily enough insufficient to fail the test
How dare you judge others by your own low standards? I can tell you without any shadow of doubt that I have NEVER driven whilst over the limit, and I am sure that I am not alone. In fact, I'm sure that there are many many others who would agree with me.
Low standards ! As a vehicle mechanic my job depends on me holding a full driving licence and I have NEVER driven a vehicle directly following alcohol consumption ie deliberately drunk and drove that incident in Germany was a wake up call ,so you are telling me you have NEVER been out and drunk in the evening and drove the following morning I believe there are more people caught the following morning thinking they where safe to drive who would never ever consider drinking and driving
I would also like to add I have held a full HGV/CAR licence since 1988 WITH ZERO MOTOR CONVICTIONS ZERO POINTS so how dare you accuse me of having low standards idiot !!!
You asserted that many people drink and drive by being over the limit the next morning - and admitted to coming close to it yourself - describing yourself as "fortunate". Therefore, at that particular time, you had low standards of awareness. Fact.
Why am I am idiot for saying that I think you are wrong about other people and their drinking habits? I am actually very responsible about the amount of alcohol consumed. If that makes me an idiot, I am happy to continue in ignorance.

Your low standards are as a result of assuming that others act like you have previously done. It would appear that you may have learnt your lesson, but, arrogantly assume that others had to make your (near) mistakes to learn in the first place! You are wrong to suggest that it is a majority of people who act without consideration for others regarding alcohol (or,indeed, their own welfare). Well, you are wrong unless you back it up with hard and fast statistics.

It is unfortunate what happened to this lad, but, he made his choice, and now his unfortunate family has to bear the consequences, sadly. No-one in their right mind would have wanted these consequences.

However, I just wonder how many people posting on here would be sympathetic if the out of control car had ploughed into innocent other road users? Would you be, Alisdair, or would you be calling for the driver's head?
Last year there was a 4% increase of people being arrested for drink driving the morning after google it the same as I did the figures are out there and quite frightening
[quote][p][bold]TheRealMedia[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alasdair1967[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alasdair1967[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]TheRealMedia[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alasdair1967[/bold] wrote: Yet another tragic and avoidable death,however how many people can honestly say they have never driven whilst over the limit ? how many people have had a heavy session the night before had a full nights sleep got up and jumped in there car thinking they where safe to drive ,I learnt my lesson whilst in Germany I had a few drinks the night before was involved in a collision on the way to work no fault of mine , fortunately for me it was not a heavy session although there was still alcohol in my system it still registered on the breathalyser luckily enough insufficient to fail the test[/p][/quote]How dare you judge others by your own low standards? I can tell you without any shadow of doubt that I have NEVER driven whilst over the limit, and I am sure that I am not alone. In fact, I'm sure that there are many many others who would agree with me.[/p][/quote]Low standards ! As a vehicle mechanic my job depends on me holding a full driving licence and I have NEVER driven a vehicle directly following alcohol consumption ie deliberately drunk and drove that incident in Germany was a wake up call ,so you are telling me you have NEVER been out and drunk in the evening and drove the following morning I believe there are more people caught the following morning thinking they where safe to drive who would never ever consider drinking and driving[/p][/quote]I would also like to add I have held a full HGV/CAR licence since 1988 WITH ZERO MOTOR CONVICTIONS ZERO POINTS so how dare you accuse me of having low standards idiot !!![/p][/quote]You asserted that many people drink and drive by being over the limit the next morning - and admitted to coming close to it yourself - describing yourself as "fortunate". Therefore, at that particular time, you had low standards of awareness. Fact. Why am I am idiot for saying that I think you are wrong about other people and their drinking habits? I am actually very responsible about the amount of alcohol consumed. If that makes me an idiot, I am happy to continue in ignorance. Your low standards are as a result of assuming that others act like you have previously done. It would appear that you may have learnt your lesson, but, arrogantly assume that others had to make your (near) mistakes to learn in the first place! You are wrong to suggest that it is a majority of people who act without consideration for others regarding alcohol (or,indeed, their own welfare). Well, you are wrong unless you back it up with hard and fast statistics. It is unfortunate what happened to this lad, but, he made his choice, and now his unfortunate family has to bear the consequences, sadly. No-one in their right mind would have wanted these consequences. However, I just wonder how many people posting on here would be sympathetic if the out of control car had ploughed into innocent other road users? Would you be, Alisdair, or would you be calling for the driver's head?[/p][/quote]Last year there was a 4% increase of people being arrested for drink driving the morning after google it the same as I did the figures are out there and quite frightening alasdair1967
  • Score: 0

8:37pm Wed 21 May 14

TheRealMedia says...

Alasdair

I am not saying that there are NO people who drink, and then drive the following morning whilst still under the influence. I am only too aware of it, from what I have seen too. However, your original comment more than implied it was a MAJORITY who do that, or have done it. That, I believe, is not a correct assertion. Perhaps you didn't mean it quite so literally, and, maybe I took it as such. An idiot though, I am not. Far from it.

It is a worrying trend that you have highlighted though, none the less. The dangers of drink driving are widely publicised - sadly, through stories such as this one too,

Through my particular line of work, I have researched a lot about fatal (and serious non-fatal) car accidents, especially involving the younger driver age group, and so maybe I am more aware than most, but, surely, no-one who is driving today can be as blind as to not know the general principal that driving and alcohol do not mix . There is only so much education that can be given though - and not everyone will pay attention - the "it won't happen to me" scenario, or, "I won't get caught, it'll be alright" . That said, alcohol in the system can lead to people making individually rash decisions.

By the way, not all accidents involving young people are drink related - distraction is a huge problem. Similarly, far from all drink-drive convictions are confined to the young age group. In 2011, roughly half the convictions were in 17-30 age group, and only a small percentage in the over-60s. Interesting, when I read those stats the first time, it struck me that it meant that about half are in the 30-60 age group therefore.

I think that over the last few years, there has been a steady decline in the overall number of drink-drive convictions, but it is still over 50000 a year in England and Wales.
Alasdair I am not saying that there are NO people who drink, and then drive the following morning whilst still under the influence. I am only too aware of it, from what I have seen too. However, your original comment more than implied it was a MAJORITY who do that, or have done it. That, I believe, is not a correct assertion. Perhaps you didn't mean it quite so literally, and, maybe I took it as such. An idiot though, I am not. Far from it. It is a worrying trend that you have highlighted though, none the less. The dangers of drink driving are widely publicised - sadly, through stories such as this one too, Through my particular line of work, I have researched a lot about fatal (and serious non-fatal) car accidents, especially involving the younger driver age group, and so maybe I am more aware than most, but, surely, no-one who is driving today can be as blind as to not know the general principal that driving and alcohol do not mix . There is only so much education that can be given though - and not everyone will pay attention - the "it won't happen to me" scenario, or, "I won't get caught, it'll be alright" . That said, alcohol in the system can lead to people making individually rash decisions. By the way, not all accidents involving young people are drink related - distraction is a huge problem. Similarly, far from all drink-drive convictions are confined to the young age group. In 2011, roughly half the convictions were in 17-30 age group, and only a small percentage in the over-60s. Interesting, when I read those stats the first time, it struck me that it meant that about half are in the 30-60 age group therefore. I think that over the last few years, there has been a steady decline in the overall number of drink-drive convictions, but it is still over 50000 a year in England and Wales. TheRealMedia
  • Score: 0

9:03pm Wed 21 May 14

luckyathope5 says...

For goodness sake people ! Ceejay paid the ultimate price for a moment of misjudgement (alcohol does tend to do to this!)
My son was there that night, Ceejay was his friend. I had the pleasure of meeting Ceejay several times, a lovely gentle boy. The price has been paid, his family and friends are still suffering and the effects of that night have been felt widely. The great shame here is that the 'system' has failed those who are left. The police services found themselves "unable to find a service provider" to help Ceejays friends who desperately tried to save him that dreadful night. They were deeply traumatised and indeed still are.
A beautiful family who are devastated and will never recover, how dare anyone suggest this amazing group of people be chastised by those who no nothing of them!!!!
For goodness sake people ! Ceejay paid the ultimate price for a moment of misjudgement (alcohol does tend to do to this!) My son was there that night, Ceejay was his friend. I had the pleasure of meeting Ceejay several times, a lovely gentle boy. The price has been paid, his family and friends are still suffering and the effects of that night have been felt widely. The great shame here is that the 'system' has failed those who are left. The police services found themselves "unable to find a service provider" to help Ceejays friends who desperately tried to save him that dreadful night. They were deeply traumatised and indeed still are. A beautiful family who are devastated and will never recover, how dare anyone suggest this amazing group of people be chastised by those who no nothing of them!!!! luckyathope5
  • Score: 7

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