Bournemouth EchoCouncils defend use of 'cash cows' camera cars (From Bournemouth Echo)

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Bournemouth and Poole councils justify using camera cars following reports of a possible ban

Bournemouth Echo: CHARGES: Bournemouth Borough Council’s camera car CHARGES: Bournemouth Borough Council’s camera car

BOURNEMOUTH and Poole councils have defended their use of camera cars following reports that a ban on using cameras to enforce fines may be announced next month.

Last September local government secretary Eric Pickles labelled camera cars “cash cows”, saying he wanted to curb “overzealous” local authorities which use them to maximise their income from parking fines.

Under new laws due to be announced next month, councils would have to rely on traffic wardens for enforcement and parking penalty charges would be capped.

Bournemouth Council leader John Beesley said the authority receives £5million a year in revenue from parking fees and charges, of which £800,000 comes from penalty charges – including camera car penalties.

“So clearly the lion’s share comes from parking fees we receive from our car parks, which I’m pleased to say offer some of the best value parking in the south coast,” he said.

“In fact, this is the fourth successive year where there has either been no increase in any parking charges whatsoever, or where any small increases have been balanced off against reductions.

“The safety of our local residents is of paramount importance to us, which is why our camera car usage focuses primarily on pedestrian crossings, bus stops, bus lanes and school entrances.”

The Borough of Poole issued 2,423 penalty charge notices from its camera car in the financial year 2012/13.

Cabinet member for transport Ian Potter, below, said the vehicle only recorded parking infringements at school zigzags, bus stops, taxi ranks and no loading/waiting areas as these areas were “difficult to enforce by civil enforcement officers”.

“Since its introduction in September 2011 the camera safety car has been proved an efficient and effective means of improving road safety,” he added.

“The council’s use of the camera car fully conforms to the government’s guidance and legislation relating to CCTV enforcement.

“We will await the full details of Eric Pickles’ proposals, and any implications these may have for Poole, with interest.”

Official opinion on camera cars is different at the other end of the county, where West Dorset District Council has ruled out their use.

A spokesman for the authority said the vehicles were “contrary to the spirit of fair and common sense on-street traffic management”.

Comments (12)

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12:28pm Fri 28 Mar 14

High Treason says...

They should use them at schools, amazing how selfish some parents are when dropping off or collecting their children. It is only when a child dies will something be done.
They should use them at schools, amazing how selfish some parents are when dropping off or collecting their children. It is only when a child dies will something be done. High Treason
  • Score: 8

12:44pm Fri 28 Mar 14

WfrpDice says...

I don't really see what all the fuss is about,
It's just like speed cameras or parking wardens -

If you drive and park within the law - You have nothing to worry about.
I don't really see what all the fuss is about, It's just like speed cameras or parking wardens - If you drive and park within the law - You have nothing to worry about. WfrpDice
  • Score: 5

12:57pm Fri 28 Mar 14

bourne free says...

Lets get more of them ,hopefully people will learn to park properly and stop being so lazy !
Lets get more of them ,hopefully people will learn to park properly and stop being so lazy ! bourne free
  • Score: -1

1:13pm Fri 28 Mar 14

master plan says...

High Treason wrote:
They should use them at schools, amazing how selfish some parents are when dropping off or collecting their children. It is only when a child dies will something be done.
When they were bought and shown off in a council press release they said these cars are to help schools. Yet I have never ever seen them near a school and tend to see them more at weekends. Take the other day one of these was prowling around the car park at baiter on a Sunday. It was strange because it looked to me they was looking at every car.
[quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: They should use them at schools, amazing how selfish some parents are when dropping off or collecting their children. It is only when a child dies will something be done.[/p][/quote]When they were bought and shown off in a council press release they said these cars are to help schools. Yet I have never ever seen them near a school and tend to see them more at weekends. Take the other day one of these was prowling around the car park at baiter on a Sunday. It was strange because it looked to me they was looking at every car. master plan
  • Score: 5

5:15pm Fri 28 Mar 14

Hessenford says...

“Since its introduction in September 2011 the camera safety car has been proved an efficient and effective means of improving road safety,” he added.
.
No it hasn't, its just been used to raise revenue, no safety is put in jeopardy because a car stops for 10 seconds to drop someone off or pick someone up.
“Since its introduction in September 2011 the camera safety car has been proved an efficient and effective means of improving road safety,” he added. . No it hasn't, its just been used to raise revenue, no safety is put in jeopardy because a car stops for 10 seconds to drop someone off or pick someone up. Hessenford
  • Score: 1

5:34pm Fri 28 Mar 14

boardsandphotos says...

Hessenford wrote:
“Since its introduction in September 2011 the camera safety car has been proved an efficient and effective means of improving road safety,” he added.
.
No it hasn't, its just been used to raise revenue, no safety is put in jeopardy because a car stops for 10 seconds to drop someone off or pick someone up.
Well that would very much depend on where the person stopped. Right on the corner of a junction for example, making it impossible for a car to pull out safely. The yellow lines are there for a reason.
[quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: “Since its introduction in September 2011 the camera safety car has been proved an efficient and effective means of improving road safety,” he added. . No it hasn't, its just been used to raise revenue, no safety is put in jeopardy because a car stops for 10 seconds to drop someone off or pick someone up.[/p][/quote]Well that would very much depend on where the person stopped. Right on the corner of a junction for example, making it impossible for a car to pull out safely. The yellow lines are there for a reason. boardsandphotos
  • Score: 0

6:52pm Fri 28 Mar 14

Hessenford says...

boardsandphotos wrote:
Hessenford wrote:
“Since its introduction in September 2011 the camera safety car has been proved an efficient and effective means of improving road safety,” he added.
.
No it hasn't, its just been used to raise revenue, no safety is put in jeopardy because a car stops for 10 seconds to drop someone off or pick someone up.
Well that would very much depend on where the person stopped. Right on the corner of a junction for example, making it impossible for a car to pull out safely. The yellow lines are there for a reason.
In certain places I would agree but there have been many absolutely fines sent to people for stopping where there is no danger to anyone just to drop people off, its legalised theft, just the same as cowboy clampers, and I for one hope that all councils are ordered to scrap these vehicles whose only purpose is to rake in money.
[quote][p][bold]boardsandphotos[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: “Since its introduction in September 2011 the camera safety car has been proved an efficient and effective means of improving road safety,” he added. . No it hasn't, its just been used to raise revenue, no safety is put in jeopardy because a car stops for 10 seconds to drop someone off or pick someone up.[/p][/quote]Well that would very much depend on where the person stopped. Right on the corner of a junction for example, making it impossible for a car to pull out safely. The yellow lines are there for a reason.[/p][/quote]In certain places I would agree but there have been many absolutely fines sent to people for stopping where there is no danger to anyone just to drop people off, its legalised theft, just the same as cowboy clampers, and I for one hope that all councils are ordered to scrap these vehicles whose only purpose is to rake in money. Hessenford
  • Score: 1

7:15pm Fri 28 Mar 14

sea poole says...

Hessenford -When you suggest scrapping these cars, could you also throw in councillors as well...?
Hessenford -When you suggest scrapping these cars, could you also throw in councillors as well...? sea poole
  • Score: 4

10:09pm Fri 28 Mar 14

MrPitiful says...

Every morning, the narrow road outside our local school on West Cliff,( ST Michaels ) there is usually around 10-20 cars double parking on double yellow lines, with parents and children risking life and limb trying to cross the road with limited visibility.

The camera car come round now and again - once a fortnight at most. It does a couple of quick circles round the block and that is it. The next day, the same cars are parking in the same spots as they have done for as long as one can remember.

They also have the odd Community Support Police officer or traffic warden standing there on some days but they just observe as opposed to dishing out tickets.

The point being, it seems these cars are pointless overall. They certainly aren't a deterrent where they are meant to be. Are ethey just another waste of money?
Every morning, the narrow road outside our local school on West Cliff,( ST Michaels ) there is usually around 10-20 cars double parking on double yellow lines, with parents and children risking life and limb trying to cross the road with limited visibility. The camera car come round now and again - once a fortnight at most. It does a couple of quick circles round the block and that is it. The next day, the same cars are parking in the same spots as they have done for as long as one can remember. They also have the odd Community Support Police officer or traffic warden standing there on some days but they just observe as opposed to dishing out tickets. The point being, it seems these cars are pointless overall. They certainly aren't a deterrent where they are meant to be. Are ethey just another waste of money? MrPitiful
  • Score: 3

11:08pm Fri 28 Mar 14

Hessenford says...

sea poole wrote:
Hessenford -When you suggest scrapping these cars, could you also throw in councillors as well...?
Yep
[quote][p][bold]sea poole[/bold] wrote: Hessenford -When you suggest scrapping these cars, could you also throw in councillors as well...?[/p][/quote]Yep Hessenford
  • Score: 2

7:46am Sat 29 Mar 14

skydriver says...

Next month they will be scrapped, so what will happen to the cameras,
Next month they will be scrapped, so what will happen to the cameras, skydriver
  • Score: 1

8:48am Sun 30 Mar 14

dorsetspeed says...

WfrpDice wrote:
I don't really see what all the fuss is about,
It's just like speed cameras or parking wardens -

If you drive and park within the law - You have nothing to worry about.
When the law is perverted to make money in the pretence of delivering safety we all have plenty to worry about whether we offend or not .
[quote][p][bold]WfrpDice[/bold] wrote: I don't really see what all the fuss is about, It's just like speed cameras or parking wardens - If you drive and park within the law - You have nothing to worry about.[/p][/quote]When the law is perverted to make money in the pretence of delivering safety we all have plenty to worry about whether we offend or not . dorsetspeed
  • Score: 2

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