Compostable carrier bags handed out to supermarket customers as part of trial

Bournemouth Echo: Compostable carrier bags handed out to supermarket customers as part of trial Compostable carrier bags handed out to supermarket customers as part of trial

Dorset shoppers will be among the first to trial lightweight compostable carrier bags.

From today customers at Co-operative food stores in Highcliffe, Corfe Mullen, Colehill, Wareham, Sandford and Wimborne will be handed the bags, which can be used to carry shopping home and then re-used as food waste caddy liners.

It is the first time a large-scale food retailer has given shoppers the option of alternative carrier bags with a specific second use.

The stores have been selected as the local authority has a food recycling scheme which requires householders to use compostable bags for food waste.

The new bags, together with their food waste contents, can be turned into compost.

Julian Rickman, the chain’s regional operations manager in East Dorset, said: “Every compostable carrier bag used is one less conventional plastic shopping bag in circulation. We believe they will have a significant impact on the number of plastic bags which end up in landfill sites every year.”

Comments (10)

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4:25pm Wed 15 Jan 14

jobsworthwatch says...

What about all the other plastic packaging that cocoons just about everything we buy.
What about all the other plastic packaging that cocoons just about everything we buy. jobsworthwatch

5:02pm Wed 15 Jan 14

kalebmoledirt says...

The easiest way to get a feel good factor and do your bit is stop using plastic bags .It's nice looking down your nose at them wrecking the planet
The easiest way to get a feel good factor and do your bit is stop using plastic bags .It's nice looking down your nose at them wrecking the planet kalebmoledirt

5:22pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Lucky Rich says...

Brilliant idea ,lets hope its copied by the others.& all the old type ones you see blown in to corners or in trees are stopped.
Brilliant idea ,lets hope its copied by the others.& all the old type ones you see blown in to corners or in trees are stopped. Lucky Rich

5:55pm Wed 15 Jan 14

Phixer says...

Sainsburys was using bio-degrable plastic carrier bags in Sussex during the late 1970's - hardly a 'new' idea.

What is wrong with a choice of paper bags which have been widely used in the US for decades? Perfectly acceptable for the many that drive to the supermarket.
Sainsburys was using bio-degrable plastic carrier bags in Sussex during the late 1970's - hardly a 'new' idea. What is wrong with a choice of paper bags which have been widely used in the US for decades? Perfectly acceptable for the many that drive to the supermarket. Phixer

8:24pm Wed 15 Jan 14

billy bumble says...

An excellent marketing ploy by the Co-op and one which is sure to translate into additional sales - which is of course the intention

While outwardly appealing to Green consciences ( and how many of us have REALLY got one of those? ) they are in effect saying

"Shop with us , get our bags for free and you won't have to spend money those other approved compostible bags"

It is of course a win win as it will decrease the use of those hideous plastic bags
An excellent marketing ploy by the Co-op and one which is sure to translate into additional sales - which is of course the intention While outwardly appealing to Green consciences ( and how many of us have REALLY got one of those? ) they are in effect saying "Shop with us , get our bags for free and you won't have to spend money those other approved compostible bags" It is of course a win win as it will decrease the use of those hideous plastic bags billy bumble

9:45pm Wed 15 Jan 14

rozmister says...

Phixer wrote:
Sainsburys was using bio-degrable plastic carrier bags in Sussex during the late 1970's - hardly a 'new' idea.

What is wrong with a choice of paper bags which have been widely used in the US for decades? Perfectly acceptable for the many that drive to the supermarket.
Biodegradable and compostable are two different things. Biodegradable means it will break down quicker in a landfill than normal plastic bags which could still be 60 or 70 years. The compostable ones break down in the composting process (at home or in a food waste system) which means they take like weeks to break down.

Why destroy loads of trees to make paper bags? It's just swapping one environmentally damaging type of bag for another.
[quote][p][bold]Phixer[/bold] wrote: Sainsburys was using bio-degrable plastic carrier bags in Sussex during the late 1970's - hardly a 'new' idea. What is wrong with a choice of paper bags which have been widely used in the US for decades? Perfectly acceptable for the many that drive to the supermarket.[/p][/quote]Biodegradable and compostable are two different things. Biodegradable means it will break down quicker in a landfill than normal plastic bags which could still be 60 or 70 years. The compostable ones break down in the composting process (at home or in a food waste system) which means they take like weeks to break down. Why destroy loads of trees to make paper bags? It's just swapping one environmentally damaging type of bag for another. rozmister

7:40am Thu 16 Jan 14

we-shall-see says...

I am in a total confusion over the carrier bag lark ……. we are told not to use plastic bags and go for alternatives such as hessian - many of which are sold at the checkouts of almost every major supermarket, and yet I read a while ago, that the production and growth of hemp/hessian is far worse for the environment in the long run because of the impact of cutting down trees to expand growth areas ……

Can anyone clarify? I mean *really* clarify, not blind us with bull-shine and political spin?!
I am in a total confusion over the carrier bag lark ……. we are told not to use plastic bags and go for alternatives such as hessian - many of which are sold at the checkouts of almost every major supermarket, and yet I read a while ago, that the production and growth of hemp/hessian is far worse for the environment in the long run because of the impact of cutting down trees to expand growth areas …… Can anyone clarify? I mean *really* clarify, not blind us with bull-shine and political spin?! we-shall-see

11:16am Thu 16 Jan 14

Chris the plumber says...

soon supermarkets will have to charge 5p for a carrier bag, its the EU`s idea to reduce the use of plastic bags. and we should rebel against such a tax
and to say the existing carrier bags don't degrade is rubbish I hung a Tesco carrier bag full washed used glass jars in my garden shed 12 months ago..
all the jars are on the floor and the bag now goes to dust if touched
soon supermarkets will have to charge 5p for a carrier bag, its the EU`s idea to reduce the use of plastic bags. and we should rebel against such a tax and to say the existing carrier bags don't degrade is rubbish I hung a Tesco carrier bag full washed used glass jars in my garden shed 12 months ago.. all the jars are on the floor and the bag now goes to dust if touched Chris the plumber

11:50am Thu 16 Jan 14

BarrHumbug says...

I wish it would stop raining......
I wish it would stop raining...... BarrHumbug

12:59pm Thu 16 Jan 14

topofall says...

Hope these bags decompose better than the ones we have bought in the past to use in our compost bin. The bin is still full of the **** things years later.
Hope these bags decompose better than the ones we have bought in the past to use in our compost bin. The bin is still full of the **** things years later. topofall

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