OPINION: Sad to see my generation not thinking of the future

PROPOSALS: The BIC’s Tregonwell Hall plays host to a range of speakers on the Navitus Windfarm consultation and plans

PROPOSALS: The BIC’s Tregonwell Hall plays host to a range of speakers on the Navitus Windfarm consultation and plans

First published in Opinion

IN response to Zoe Chapman’s excellent letter of May 14, “My generation unrepresented”, may I assure her that there are some of us “seniors” out there that do support the Navitus Bay wind farm proposal.

Whilst I did not attend this meeting I can say that a similar one I attended followed the same format with the speaker in support of the wind farm being heckled and shouted down from the audience who were nearly all of my age group.

My generation and those before have for many years enjoyed the benefits of fossil fuel energy sourced from our land but these are almost depleted so we are forced to buy from other countries the fuels we need.

It is sad to say that some of my generation, all for the sake of a view, any other arguments are mere conjecture, are prepared to continue with these arrangements rather than invest in new renewable technology for future generations.

Had our forefathers not had the insight and determination to do what was required for the future needs of this country, we would not be enjoying what we have today.

Hopefully those empowered with deciding on the way forward will also realise that we need to be bold in our planning for the years ahead so that our children and their children can enjoy renewable energy and are not burdened with rising fuel costs, which we have left them as a legacy.

RAY SIMPSON, Mudeford

Comments (5)

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4:50pm Sat 17 May 14

muscliffman says...

I do not understand why this appears (at the moment) headed as an Echo Editorial 'OPINION' when in fact it appears to be a reader's letter.


Anyway....Mr Simpson says " fossil fuel energy sourced from our land but these are almost depleted so we are forced to buy from other countries the fuels we need." and it is at that point they he betrays his entire point.

Because recent well publicised discoveries of coal and shale gas under or around the UK have been estimated to offer up to a minimum of a thousand years of conventionally produced inexpensive energy - which can be as clean as we wish, given the right motivation and methods.

So the way forward for future generations has to be to re-concentrate upon these independently available, reliable and efficient traditional fuels for generation of UK power (as well as nuclear). Because these very expensive wind farms do not and cannot ever offer sensible reliability or efficiency, the very idea of any more such pointless UK installations should now be quickly discarded.
I do not understand why this appears (at the moment) headed as an Echo Editorial 'OPINION' when in fact it appears to be a reader's letter. Anyway....Mr Simpson says " fossil fuel energy sourced from our land but these are almost depleted so we are forced to buy from other countries the fuels we need." and it is at that point they he betrays his entire point. Because recent well publicised discoveries of coal and shale gas under or around the UK have been estimated to offer up to a minimum of a thousand years of conventionally produced inexpensive energy - which can be as clean as we wish, given the right motivation and methods. So the way forward for future generations has to be to re-concentrate upon these independently available, reliable and efficient traditional fuels for generation of UK power (as well as nuclear). Because these very expensive wind farms do not and cannot ever offer sensible reliability or efficiency, the very idea of any more such pointless UK installations should now be quickly discarded. muscliffman
  • Score: 0

6:22pm Sat 17 May 14

mooninpisces says...

By the "recent well publicised discoveries" of coal and gas i take it muscliffman means shale gas, accessed by fracking, and undersea coal, accessed by underground coal gasification. They are not, by any stretch of the imagination, "conventionally produced ...traditional fuels". The extent of the reserves, and their economic viability, is far from clear, and there is no evidence at all that they will offer "a minimum of a thousand years of inexpensive energy".

Mr Simpson is right in saying that traditional UK sources of fossil fuel energy are almost depleted. And of, of course, they are major producers of greenhouse gases.
By the "recent well publicised discoveries" of coal and gas i take it muscliffman means shale gas, accessed by fracking, and undersea coal, accessed by underground coal gasification. They are not, by any stretch of the imagination, "conventionally produced ...traditional fuels". The extent of the reserves, and their economic viability, is far from clear, and there is no evidence at all that they will offer "a minimum of a thousand years of inexpensive energy". Mr Simpson is right in saying that traditional UK sources of fossil fuel energy are almost depleted. And of, of course, they are major producers of greenhouse gases. mooninpisces
  • Score: 0

7:25pm Sat 17 May 14

muscliffman says...

mooninpisces wrote:
By the "recent well publicised discoveries" of coal and gas i take it muscliffman means shale gas, accessed by fracking, and undersea coal, accessed by underground coal gasification. They are not, by any stretch of the imagination, "conventionally produced ...traditional fuels". The extent of the reserves, and their economic viability, is far from clear, and there is no evidence at all that they will offer "a minimum of a thousand years of inexpensive energy".

Mr Simpson is right in saying that traditional UK sources of fossil fuel energy are almost depleted. And of, of course, they are major producers of greenhouse gases.
We chose to close most of the 'traditional' UK coal mines in the 1980's for economic reasons of the time - they certainly didn't run out of coal, it's still down there in plentiful quantities if we want to go back and get it - and I am certain that in due course we will.

Since then we have discovered huge new reserves of UK coal undersea which like shale gas will no doubt be extracted without old style manual intervention. The sooner we stop playing with expensive stop/go windmills that cannot possibly even make a useful contribution to a largely imagined man made climate problem and return to common sense energy solutions the better.
[quote][p][bold]mooninpisces[/bold] wrote: By the "recent well publicised discoveries" of coal and gas i take it muscliffman means shale gas, accessed by fracking, and undersea coal, accessed by underground coal gasification. They are not, by any stretch of the imagination, "conventionally produced ...traditional fuels". The extent of the reserves, and their economic viability, is far from clear, and there is no evidence at all that they will offer "a minimum of a thousand years of inexpensive energy". Mr Simpson is right in saying that traditional UK sources of fossil fuel energy are almost depleted. And of, of course, they are major producers of greenhouse gases.[/p][/quote]We chose to close most of the 'traditional' UK coal mines in the 1980's for economic reasons of the time - they certainly didn't run out of coal, it's still down there in plentiful quantities if we want to go back and get it - and I am certain that in due course we will. Since then we have discovered huge new reserves of UK coal undersea which like shale gas will no doubt be extracted without old style manual intervention. The sooner we stop playing with expensive stop/go windmills that cannot possibly even make a useful contribution to a largely imagined man made climate problem and return to common sense energy solutions the better. muscliffman
  • Score: 1

2:52am Sun 18 May 14

billd766 says...

muscliffman wrote:
mooninpisces wrote:
By the "recent well publicised discoveries" of coal and gas i take it muscliffman means shale gas, accessed by fracking, and undersea coal, accessed by underground coal gasification. They are not, by any stretch of the imagination, "conventionally produced ...traditional fuels". The extent of the reserves, and their economic viability, is far from clear, and there is no evidence at all that they will offer "a minimum of a thousand years of inexpensive energy".

Mr Simpson is right in saying that traditional UK sources of fossil fuel energy are almost depleted. And of, of course, they are major producers of greenhouse gases.
We chose to close most of the 'traditional' UK coal mines in the 1980's for economic reasons of the time - they certainly didn't run out of coal, it's still down there in plentiful quantities if we want to go back and get it - and I am certain that in due course we will.

Since then we have discovered huge new reserves of UK coal undersea which like shale gas will no doubt be extracted without old style manual intervention. The sooner we stop playing with expensive stop/go windmills that cannot possibly even make a useful contribution to a largely imagined man made climate problem and return to common sense energy solutions the better.
Whilst there quite possily are large reserves of coal and shale gas available how much will it cost to produce them in the first place. If it was uneconomic to dig it out 30 years ago it certainly won't be any cheaper now.
In addition you will have to find existing qualified miners to start with and then find a new generation of people willing to go to work underground in a dark and dangerous enviorenment.
Having achieved all of that then you will have to build new coal fired stations with the very latest generation of scrubbers and filters,across the country and the nimbys won't want that next door. Then build a road and rail network to service it, find somewhere to dump the ash, and the nimbys won't like taht either, and at the end of the day in perhaps 20 or 30 years you may have an electical generation system to be proud of.
Of course it will need investment and it will need to make a profit and guess who will pay for it in the end? The public.
Whilst a new system will be great inthe future, now is the time you need it. Granted you will need it in the future as well but if you don't fix now the future will be much worse.
[quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mooninpisces[/bold] wrote: By the "recent well publicised discoveries" of coal and gas i take it muscliffman means shale gas, accessed by fracking, and undersea coal, accessed by underground coal gasification. They are not, by any stretch of the imagination, "conventionally produced ...traditional fuels". The extent of the reserves, and their economic viability, is far from clear, and there is no evidence at all that they will offer "a minimum of a thousand years of inexpensive energy". Mr Simpson is right in saying that traditional UK sources of fossil fuel energy are almost depleted. And of, of course, they are major producers of greenhouse gases.[/p][/quote]We chose to close most of the 'traditional' UK coal mines in the 1980's for economic reasons of the time - they certainly didn't run out of coal, it's still down there in plentiful quantities if we want to go back and get it - and I am certain that in due course we will. Since then we have discovered huge new reserves of UK coal undersea which like shale gas will no doubt be extracted without old style manual intervention. The sooner we stop playing with expensive stop/go windmills that cannot possibly even make a useful contribution to a largely imagined man made climate problem and return to common sense energy solutions the better.[/p][/quote]Whilst there quite possily are large reserves of coal and shale gas available how much will it cost to produce them in the first place. If it was uneconomic to dig it out 30 years ago it certainly won't be any cheaper now. In addition you will have to find existing qualified miners to start with and then find a new generation of people willing to go to work underground in a dark and dangerous enviorenment. Having achieved all of that then you will have to build new coal fired stations with the very latest generation of scrubbers and filters,across the country and the nimbys won't want that next door. Then build a road and rail network to service it, find somewhere to dump the ash, and the nimbys won't like taht either, and at the end of the day in perhaps 20 or 30 years you may have an electical generation system to be proud of. Of course it will need investment and it will need to make a profit and guess who will pay for it in the end? The public. Whilst a new system will be great inthe future, now is the time you need it. Granted you will need it in the future as well but if you don't fix now the future will be much worse. billd766
  • Score: 1

12:33pm Sun 18 May 14

burgerboy says...

Saw the headline and I thought it was about The Who
Talkin bout my generation..........
..
Why don't you all fffffff ade away.............(;o
)
Saw the headline and I thought it was about The Who Talkin bout my generation.......... .. Why don't you all fffffff ade away.............(;o ) burgerboy
  • Score: 0

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