More warning signs needed

Bournemouth Echo: More warning signs needed More warning signs needed

THE A338 Spur Road is such a busy route that any incident – no matter how small – is likely to cause traffic jams.

So the inspection work being carried out on the major road’s safety barrier yesterday was always going to cause large tailbacks. Dorset highways bosses were facing a no-win situation.

Although the necessary work was advertised in advance, there are inevitably going to be motorists that don’t see it.

The answer in the future may be improved signage on the day and along the route beforehand.

Comments (3)

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11:55am Wed 4 Dec 13

muscliffman says...

I understand what you mean but should we not be reviewing the basics here not the signage. Generally the many 'incidents' you refer to on the A338 do not themselves cause the massive delays and sometimes closures, it is the authorities reactions to them - it seems often avoidably - that does.

The closure yesterday of one lane of the A338 in a weekday morning peak (frankly someone at DCC should be sacked for that!) however advertised would be an enormous problem. But was it necessary at all, what does closing off a lane like this with lightweight bollards really achieve in safety terms - I am serious, what? A controlled car at 70mph presents no danger whatsoever to workers off the road itself and on the central reservation, an out of control one at speed is not going to be stopped because of some plastic cones and a few feet of empty tarmac. I realise this will confuse the Health & Safety jobsworths but I am simply suggesting the application of a little old fashioned common sense!
I understand what you mean but should we not be reviewing the basics here not the signage. Generally the many 'incidents' you refer to on the A338 do not themselves cause the massive delays and sometimes closures, it is the authorities reactions to them - it seems often avoidably - that does. The closure yesterday of one lane of the A338 in a weekday morning peak (frankly someone at DCC should be sacked for that!) however advertised would be an enormous problem. But was it necessary at all, what does closing off a lane like this with lightweight bollards really achieve in safety terms - I am serious, what? A controlled car at 70mph presents no danger whatsoever to workers off the road itself and on the central reservation, an out of control one at speed is not going to be stopped because of some plastic cones and a few feet of empty tarmac. I realise this will confuse the Health & Safety jobsworths but I am simply suggesting the application of a little old fashioned common sense! muscliffman

7:43pm Wed 4 Dec 13

one-way-switch says...

You clearly have never worked in an environment where this is a needed. Would you want to have to go and tell a family that a loved one will not be returning after working in such an environment? I suspect not. What is disruption for some is needed for others.
You clearly have never worked in an environment where this is a needed. Would you want to have to go and tell a family that a loved one will not be returning after working in such an environment? I suspect not. What is disruption for some is needed for others. one-way-switch

12:16am Thu 5 Dec 13

muscliffman says...

one-way-switch wrote:
You clearly have never worked in an environment where this is a needed. Would you want to have to go and tell a family that a loved one will not be returning after working in such an environment? I suspect not. What is disruption for some is needed for others.
And there goes common sense and with respect in comes the modern emotive nonsense! I have spent my life in transport, including attending roadside heavy vehicle recovery, so I do have plenty of experience of the risks out there in such an environment and more.

This is about public highway staff working on grass verges/reservations beside the carriageways - NOT even on them. I applaud any sensible safety measure in a workplace, but I repeat exactly what serious risk to these workers is avoided by these bureaucratic 'risk assessment' generated lane closures? Because the only way to guarantee removing all risk to these (not actually on the highway) workers is by total road closures - and please don't put that idea in the Council H&S jobsworth's heads!
[quote][p][bold]one-way-switch[/bold] wrote: You clearly have never worked in an environment where this is a needed. Would you want to have to go and tell a family that a loved one will not be returning after working in such an environment? I suspect not. What is disruption for some is needed for others.[/p][/quote]And there goes common sense and with respect in comes the modern emotive nonsense! I have spent my life in transport, including attending roadside heavy vehicle recovery, so I do have plenty of experience of the risks out there in such an environment and more. This is about public highway staff working on grass verges/reservations beside the carriageways - NOT even on them. I applaud any sensible safety measure in a workplace, but I repeat exactly what serious risk to these workers is avoided by these bureaucratic 'risk assessment' generated lane closures? Because the only way to guarantee removing all risk to these (not actually on the highway) workers is by total road closures - and please don't put that idea in the Council H&S jobsworth's heads! muscliffman

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