Revealed: how Hitler's armies planned to seize Christchurch

Bournemouth Echo: Revealed: how Hitler's armies planned to seize Christchurch Revealed: how Hitler's armies planned to seize Christchurch

IT’S a traditional seaside village but a rare Nazi briefing book has revealed that Highcliffe could have been a target for Nazi invasion during the Second World War.

An original book detailing Hitler’s plans to conquer Britain through invading quiet coastal towns including Highcliffe, Barton, and Christchurch has been discovered and will go under the hammer at Mullock’s Auctioneers on September 30.

“Militargoegraphiscke Angaben uber England Sudkuste” contains a large amount of colour maps showing every mile of the English southern coastline. It also reveals photographs and postcards showing landmarks across the south to make it easier for Nazi troops to identify their targets.

The book was prepared for the invasion Operation Sealion, which was only avoided due to RAF pilots winning air supremacy in the Battle of Britain.

Michael Hodges, Christchurch historian and former mayor, said: “The threat of coastal invasion was greatest in 1940 before the Battle of Britain.

“The risk to the Christchurch area was from the German 6th Army on the Cherbourg peninsular.

“It is now known that this army intended to land in Christchurch and Poole Bays to storm Bristol in order to cut off south-west England from the capital.”

Mr Hodges said that the water depth in Christchurch and Poole Bays, which were classed as anti-tank islands, would have permitted large naval units such as cruisers to approach the shore within half a mile.

He added: “People of my age will remember the threat to the local area but people my grandchildren’s age might not even know anything about it. It will come as a complete surprise to some.”

Highcliffe Sue Ryder shop volunteer, Joan Jarvie, who was a member of Coastal Command during the war, said: “That would surprise me.

“I suppose it shouldn’t considering the area’s history, but to think Highcliffe would have been one of the invasion points is a surprise.”

But Geoffrey Redfern, shopping in the seaside village, said: “I don’t think that should shock anyone.

“All the points around the coast were potential targets, especially the quieter coastal towns like Highcliffe and Christchurch.”

Comments (24)

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9:00am Thu 16 Sep 10

Mediclogan5 says...

We often here about the terrible blitz on London, Coventry and Southampton but very little about the bombings on Poole and Bournemouth, there are books of course but the southern counties were frontline targets as they were literally across the water.
Its thanks to the RAF they were held back.
We often here about the terrible blitz on London, Coventry and Southampton but very little about the bombings on Poole and Bournemouth, there are books of course but the southern counties were frontline targets as they were literally across the water. Its thanks to the RAF they were held back. Mediclogan5

9:34am Thu 16 Sep 10

Gordon Cann says...

I believe that the small pond on Queens
Park . Bournemouth was shown on a wartime German map as a major reservoir; there are still anti tank concrete blocks at the Crown Hotel in Blandford and in the hedgerow on the southern side of the Whitemill Bridge at Sturminster Marshall there is still a wartme pill -box intended , presumably ,to halt the German Army if it got that far
I believe that the small pond on Queens Park . Bournemouth was shown on a wartime German map as a major reservoir; there are still anti tank concrete blocks at the Crown Hotel in Blandford and in the hedgerow on the southern side of the Whitemill Bridge at Sturminster Marshall there is still a wartme pill -box intended , presumably ,to halt the German Army if it got that far Gordon Cann

10:09am Thu 16 Sep 10

Mediclogan5 says...

Wasn't there a Pill Box at Cemetry Junction? And Winton Rec had an Air raid shelter I believe.
Wasn't there a Pill Box at Cemetry Junction? And Winton Rec had an Air raid shelter I believe. Mediclogan5

10:10am Thu 16 Sep 10

MisterE says...

I'm only 26 and find all this history fascinating - every time I hear tales of what could have happened during the war, it makes me even more grateful for what people of that generation did for us...
I'm only 26 and find all this history fascinating - every time I hear tales of what could have happened during the war, it makes me even more grateful for what people of that generation did for us... MisterE

10:23am Thu 16 Sep 10

l'anglais says...

Very few people alive appreciate that without the intervention of the RAF 70 years ago , to stop the Luftwaffe bombing Britain into submission. Then the world would be a very different place & you would have the liberties you take for granted today.
It should never under-estimated either, the nazis error in attacking Russia.
2 out of 3 german troops were fighting on the eastern front at the time of D Day.
Very few people alive appreciate that without the intervention of the RAF 70 years ago , to stop the Luftwaffe bombing Britain into submission. Then the world would be a very different place & you would have the liberties you take for granted today. It should never under-estimated either, the nazis error in attacking Russia. 2 out of 3 german troops were fighting on the eastern front at the time of D Day. l'anglais

11:00am Thu 16 Sep 10

Lord Spring says...

Mediclogan5 wrote:
Wasn't there a Pill Box at Cemetry Junction? And Winton Rec had an Air raid shelter I believe.
Yes you are correct
[quote][p][bold]Mediclogan5[/bold] wrote: Wasn't there a Pill Box at Cemetry Junction? And Winton Rec had an Air raid shelter I believe.[/p][/quote]Yes you are correct Lord Spring

11:06am Thu 16 Sep 10

Upkeep says...

Hitler had an easy go of it until he decided to invade Great Britain. Thank you RAF for controlling the air and thank-you Royal Navy for controlling the sea.

I do hope this book gets reprinted for all of us to share.
Hitler had an easy go of it until he decided to invade Great Britain. Thank you RAF for controlling the air and thank-you Royal Navy for controlling the sea. I do hope this book gets reprinted for all of us to share. Upkeep

11:06am Thu 16 Sep 10

Lord Spring says...

Was not the Highcliffe (SRDE) area where radar was developed before moving to Malvern on Churchills orders to avoid being bombed on the next full moon after a raid on the German equvilent in France
Was not the Highcliffe (SRDE) area where radar was developed before moving to Malvern on Churchills orders to avoid being bombed on the next full moon after a raid on the German equvilent in France Lord Spring

11:07am Thu 16 Sep 10

Mediclogan5 says...

MisterE wrote:
I'm only 26 and find all this history fascinating - every time I hear tales of what could have happened during the war, it makes me even more grateful for what people of that generation did for us...
Thats a great thing to put MisterE Its great to know that a younger generation truly appreciates what was lost and selflessly given in order to keep the world free from a Nazi state. I so wish more would appreciate the same as much as you. And Thank You Lord Spring I remember trying to get in the Air Raid shelter at the rec but at the time the 'Parky' kept clearing us off it.
[quote][p][bold]MisterE[/bold] wrote: I'm only 26 and find all this history fascinating - every time I hear tales of what could have happened during the war, it makes me even more grateful for what people of that generation did for us...[/p][/quote]Thats a great thing to put MisterE Its great to know that a younger generation truly appreciates what was lost and selflessly given in order to keep the world free from a Nazi state. I so wish more would appreciate the same as much as you. And Thank You Lord Spring I remember trying to get in the Air Raid shelter at the rec but at the time the 'Parky' kept clearing us off it. Mediclogan5

12:10pm Thu 16 Sep 10

Lord Spring says...

It could have been almost a mirror invasion of our Normandy landings equal distance away, Tuckton Bridge becomes Pegasus Bridge, Lymington area becomes St Mere Eglise, leaving a large sparsely populated area with cover to break out into from an established beach head,
It could have been almost a mirror invasion of our Normandy landings equal distance away, Tuckton Bridge becomes Pegasus Bridge, Lymington area becomes St Mere Eglise, leaving a large sparsely populated area with cover to break out into from an established beach head, Lord Spring

12:40pm Thu 16 Sep 10

WOC says...

I don't appreciate the older generation always assuming younger people don't appreciate the things our grandparents et al did for us all those years ago. My grandfather died on D-Day, I am 36 and have always been fascinated with WW2.
I don't appreciate the older generation always assuming younger people don't appreciate the things our grandparents et al did for us all those years ago. My grandfather died on D-Day, I am 36 and have always been fascinated with WW2. WOC

1:31pm Thu 16 Sep 10

fabiostn says...

I am 23 and always thank the Americans for winning with us , we would not be here now but for our friends across the pond.... God Bless America.
I am 23 and always thank the Americans for winning with us , we would not be here now but for our friends across the pond.... God Bless America. fabiostn

2:23pm Thu 16 Sep 10

Bob49 says...

Whilst I don't doubt the courage of all those involved in defending Britain that summer we should not get carried away with silly myths.

.


The Germans never had any intention, or ability, to invade Britain. Whilst Britain was recruiting the Home Guard that summer Germany was actually standing down troops and sending them home. There was not the transport available to carry German troops across the channel not the naval forces to protect any that tried to cross. The heroic efforts (off Norway) by the Royal Navy had seen to that. Parachute troops were virtually unheard of any any German troops that had landed anywhere could nt have been supplied.
.

I'm sure it was a very necessary act to play up the invasion threat throughout that summer to galvanise morale - and undoubtely the populace played it's part. However we are quick to point out when Hollywood misrepresents history and argue for a more truthful historical representation.

.

It is in the interests of us all to learn from history - part of that learning does require an accurate portrayal of events
Whilst I don't doubt the courage of all those involved in defending Britain that summer we should not get carried away with silly myths. . The Germans never had any intention, or ability, to invade Britain. Whilst Britain was recruiting the Home Guard that summer Germany was actually standing down troops and sending them home. There was not the transport available to carry German troops across the channel not the naval forces to protect any that tried to cross. The heroic efforts (off Norway) by the Royal Navy had seen to that. Parachute troops were virtually unheard of any any German troops that had landed anywhere could nt have been supplied. . I'm sure it was a very necessary act to play up the invasion threat throughout that summer to galvanise morale - and undoubtely the populace played it's part. However we are quick to point out when Hollywood misrepresents history and argue for a more truthful historical representation. . It is in the interests of us all to learn from history - part of that learning does require an accurate portrayal of events Bob49

7:22pm Thu 16 Sep 10

Xchurch-man says...

Bob49 wrote:
Whilst I don't doubt the courage of all those involved in defending Britain that summer we should not get carried away with silly myths. . The Germans never had any intention, or ability, to invade Britain. Whilst Britain was recruiting the Home Guard that summer Germany was actually standing down troops and sending them home. There was not the transport available to carry German troops across the channel not the naval forces to protect any that tried to cross. The heroic efforts (off Norway) by the Royal Navy had seen to that. Parachute troops were virtually unheard of any any German troops that had landed anywhere could nt have been supplied. . I'm sure it was a very necessary act to play up the invasion threat throughout that summer to galvanise morale - and undoubtely the populace played it's part. However we are quick to point out when Hollywood misrepresents history and argue for a more truthful historical representation. . It is in the interests of us all to learn from history - part of that learning does require an accurate portrayal of events
What modern day Nazi propaganda leaflet have you been reading?
Your comments are a joke and an insult to those who died defending our country. The facts of history are well documented, the threat was very real and it nearly happened. The re-writing of history to claim the Nazis were really not a threat is just plain wrong.
What will you be claiming next, the Holocaust did not really happen?
[quote][p][bold]Bob49[/bold] wrote: Whilst I don't doubt the courage of all those involved in defending Britain that summer we should not get carried away with silly myths. . The Germans never had any intention, or ability, to invade Britain. Whilst Britain was recruiting the Home Guard that summer Germany was actually standing down troops and sending them home. There was not the transport available to carry German troops across the channel not the naval forces to protect any that tried to cross. The heroic efforts (off Norway) by the Royal Navy had seen to that. Parachute troops were virtually unheard of any any German troops that had landed anywhere could nt have been supplied. . I'm sure it was a very necessary act to play up the invasion threat throughout that summer to galvanise morale - and undoubtely the populace played it's part. However we are quick to point out when Hollywood misrepresents history and argue for a more truthful historical representation. . It is in the interests of us all to learn from history - part of that learning does require an accurate portrayal of events[/p][/quote]What modern day Nazi propaganda leaflet have you been reading? Your comments are a joke and an insult to those who died defending our country. The facts of history are well documented, the threat was very real and it nearly happened. The re-writing of history to claim the Nazis were really not a threat is just plain wrong. What will you be claiming next, the Holocaust did not really happen? Xchurch-man

7:50pm Thu 16 Sep 10

X Old Bill says...

My understanding of Operation Sealion was that it was based on a crossing at the pas de Calais. The obvious short route and the one that the Nazis believed that the Allies would use in 1944.
When the operation was drafted Cherbourg had not been taken by the Germans and the position was not fully consolidated until after the intended invasion would have taken place - So such a crossing would have been 'difficult' even if they did have the equipment to carry it out.

If anything I would suggest that the recently discovered plans would have taken effect only after the Successful Invasion and beachhead in the Dover area. More consolidation than Blitzkrieg.
My understanding of Operation Sealion was that it was based on a crossing at the pas de Calais. The obvious short route and the one that the Nazis believed that the Allies would use in 1944. When the operation was drafted Cherbourg had not been taken by the Germans and the position was not fully consolidated until after the intended invasion would have taken place - So such a crossing would have been 'difficult' even if they did have the equipment to carry it out. If anything I would suggest that the recently discovered plans would have taken effect only after the Successful Invasion and beachhead in the Dover area. More consolidation than Blitzkrieg. X Old Bill

9:45pm Thu 16 Sep 10

winton50 says...

I've got to say Bob49 that there are so many inaccuracies in your post that I wonder if you did it as a joke.

Fallschirmjagers took part in almost every German action at the start of the war including the invasion of Belgium, Norway,Denmark,Holla
nd and most notably the capture of Crete.

The Germans had a small window of opportunity but the idea that they did not want to invade is clearly a nonsense as the high command and Hitler had agreed a date.
I've got to say Bob49 that there are so many inaccuracies in your post that I wonder if you did it as a joke. Fallschirmjagers took part in almost every German action at the start of the war including the invasion of Belgium, Norway,Denmark,Holla nd and most notably the capture of Crete. The Germans had a small window of opportunity but the idea that they did not want to invade is clearly a nonsense as the high command and Hitler had agreed a date. winton50

10:01pm Thu 16 Sep 10

Bob49 says...

"The facts of history are well documented, the threat was very real and it nearly happened "

.

I would suggest you get your head out of your Boys own comic and do a bit or research - you might find some real facts.

.

One being the supposed invasion was to be carried out by Rhineland barges towed across the channel at a rate of 3 knots per hour ! It is not necessary to outline the full farcical nature of this ludicrous scheme and the inevitable failure of any such attempt by ill prepared troops with no landing equipment, back up or suitable defense. A 'wargames' exercise by nothing less than the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst in 1974 proved that conclusively.The point is there was no serious consideration or threat of an invasion.


To try and divert the argument to one of supposed insult to those who died during the war is in itself an insult to those who died in defense of not only this country but also in defense of truth.

.

Those on the other side of the channel in 1940 had been fed an endless stream of lies and proganda based all too often on myths and distortions.

.

Those who died and those who live deserve better than the nonsense you have posted up.
"The facts of history are well documented, the threat was very real and it nearly happened " . I would suggest you get your head out of your Boys own comic and do a bit or research - you might find some real facts. . One being the supposed invasion was to be carried out by Rhineland barges towed across the channel at a rate of 3 knots per hour ! It is not necessary to outline the full farcical nature of this ludicrous scheme and the inevitable failure of any such attempt by ill prepared troops with no landing equipment, back up or suitable defense. A 'wargames' exercise by nothing less than the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst in 1974 proved that conclusively.The point is there was no serious consideration or threat of an invasion. To try and divert the argument to one of supposed insult to those who died during the war is in itself an insult to those who died in defense of not only this country but also in defense of truth. . Those on the other side of the channel in 1940 had been fed an endless stream of lies and proganda based all too often on myths and distortions. . Those who died and those who live deserve better than the nonsense you have posted up. Bob49

11:41pm Thu 16 Sep 10

Lord Spring says...

X Old Bill wrote:
My understanding of Operation Sealion was that it was based on a crossing at the pas de Calais. The obvious short route and the one that the Nazis believed that the Allies would use in 1944. When the operation was drafted Cherbourg had not been taken by the Germans and the position was not fully consolidated until after the intended invasion would have taken place - So such a crossing would have been 'difficult' even if they did have the equipment to carry it out. If anything I would suggest that the recently discovered plans would have taken effect only after the Successful Invasion and beachhead in the Dover area. More consolidation than Blitzkrieg.
Difficult !!
Was D -Day a piece of cake
[quote][p][bold]X Old Bill[/bold] wrote: My understanding of Operation Sealion was that it was based on a crossing at the pas de Calais. The obvious short route and the one that the Nazis believed that the Allies would use in 1944. When the operation was drafted Cherbourg had not been taken by the Germans and the position was not fully consolidated until after the intended invasion would have taken place - So such a crossing would have been 'difficult' even if they did have the equipment to carry it out. If anything I would suggest that the recently discovered plans would have taken effect only after the Successful Invasion and beachhead in the Dover area. More consolidation than Blitzkrieg.[/p][/quote]Difficult !! Was D -Day a piece of cake Lord Spring

12:41am Fri 17 Sep 10

Xchurch-man says...

Lets have a few facts and a few bits of local history here.
It is an absolute fact that the Luftwaffe came within a very small margin of defeating the RAF during the battle of Britain, even Churchill knew that at times we were hours from defeat. Had they done so, and gained what is now known as "air superiority", which they had in all their previous European conquests,there would have been NOTHING to prevent invasion barges crossing the channel even at 1 knot had they so wished. Their stukas and u boats would have blown the Royal Navy out of the water. The importance of air superiority is only nowadays fully understood.
One thing, and one thing alone denied them this. We had a radar network linked to an effective Command, Control and Communications structure to direct our fighters. This vital military resource is nowadays well understood and valued as part of any modern Air Defence network. Had we not had this, and we were the first and only Country then to do so, it is very likely that history would have taken a very different path. Our Radar system was pioneered by Robert Watson Watt, a descendant of James Watt inventor of the steam engine. Much early work on Radar was indeed done locally at the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE) at Worth Matravers in the Purbecks. It is also a fact that much of the equipment was indeed manufactured at what was until the 80's SRDE adjacent to the old Christchurch aerodrome and DeHavilland factory.
The advantage that our Radar and control infrastructure gave the RAF was vital in assisting them to defeat the Luftwaffe, but even then only after they switched from bombing our airfields and radar sites and started bombing London, again had they not done this, history could have been very different.
So theres the real history lesson. Lets have no more of this "Germany was no threat" nonsense, William Joyce (better known as Lord Haw Haw) tried to tell us that one. He was hanged for treason.
Lets have a few facts and a few bits of local history here. It is an absolute fact that the Luftwaffe came within a very small margin of defeating the RAF during the battle of Britain, even Churchill knew that at times we were hours from defeat. Had they done so, and gained what is now known as "air superiority", which they had in all their previous European conquests,there would have been NOTHING to prevent invasion barges crossing the channel even at 1 knot had they so wished. Their stukas and u boats would have blown the Royal Navy out of the water. The importance of air superiority is only nowadays fully understood. One thing, and one thing alone denied them this. We had a radar network linked to an effective Command, Control and Communications structure to direct our fighters. This vital military resource is nowadays well understood and valued as part of any modern Air Defence network. Had we not had this, and we were the first and only Country then to do so, it is very likely that history would have taken a very different path. Our Radar system was pioneered by Robert Watson Watt, a descendant of James Watt inventor of the steam engine. Much early work on Radar was indeed done locally at the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE) at Worth Matravers in the Purbecks. It is also a fact that much of the equipment was indeed manufactured at what was until the 80's SRDE adjacent to the old Christchurch aerodrome and DeHavilland factory. The advantage that our Radar and control infrastructure gave the RAF was vital in assisting them to defeat the Luftwaffe, but even then only after they switched from bombing our airfields and radar sites and started bombing London, again had they not done this, history could have been very different. So theres the real history lesson. Lets have no more of this "Germany was no threat" nonsense, William Joyce (better known as Lord Haw Haw) tried to tell us that one. He was hanged for treason. Xchurch-man

11:06am Fri 17 Sep 10

free wessex says...

Google Shinglestreet a bit more than what if to be found
Google Shinglestreet a bit more than what if to be found free wessex

11:26am Sat 18 Sep 10

Bob49 says...

More nonsense fron christchurchman. Nonsense that has been proven by all leading historians by the analysis carried out by Sandhurst and more recently proven by released German documents.

.

The supposed Stuka threat was non existent. With sitting targets at Dunkirk, they and other German bomber, failed miserably.

.

Rather than make childish backhand comments about Lord Haw Haw you would do better to spend a bity motre time doing research and checking your facts. Using something a little more in depth than 1950's copies of Victor and the Hotspur.
More nonsense fron christchurchman. Nonsense that has been proven by all leading historians by the analysis carried out by Sandhurst and more recently proven by released German documents. . The supposed Stuka threat was non existent. With sitting targets at Dunkirk, they and other German bomber, failed miserably. . Rather than make childish backhand comments about Lord Haw Haw you would do better to spend a bity motre time doing research and checking your facts. Using something a little more in depth than 1950's copies of Victor and the Hotspur. Bob49

1:10pm Sat 18 Sep 10

Nickolai says...

Bob49 wrote:
More nonsense fron christchurchman. Nonsense that has been proven by all leading historians by the analysis carried out by Sandhurst and more recently proven by released German documents. . The supposed Stuka threat was non existent. With sitting targets at Dunkirk, they and other German bomber, failed miserably. . Rather than make childish backhand comments about Lord Haw Haw you would do better to spend a bity motre time doing research and checking your facts. Using something a little more in depth than 1950's copies of Victor and the Hotspur.
And it sounds to me Bob that you use the Marxist Guide to Anti-British ideology with your dismissive attitude.

The fact remains that first over Northern France, and then in the skies over Britain, the Germans suffered their first major defeat of any arms, a large part of their front-line, experienced Luftwaffe crews were killed or captured - aircraft lost - and a pessimism and disillusionment with the High Command started to gradually creep in.
We gave the Hun a bloody nose, no two ways about it and forced the Germans to fight on two fronts, something that even Hitler knew to be potential suicide for his ambitions.
Your desperate wish to belittle and denigrate what this country went through all those years ago is tiresome .
[quote][p][bold]Bob49[/bold] wrote: More nonsense fron christchurchman. Nonsense that has been proven by all leading historians by the analysis carried out by Sandhurst and more recently proven by released German documents. . The supposed Stuka threat was non existent. With sitting targets at Dunkirk, they and other German bomber, failed miserably. . Rather than make childish backhand comments about Lord Haw Haw you would do better to spend a bity motre time doing research and checking your facts. Using something a little more in depth than 1950's copies of Victor and the Hotspur.[/p][/quote]And it sounds to me Bob that you use the Marxist Guide to Anti-British ideology with your dismissive attitude. The fact remains that first over Northern France, and then in the skies over Britain, the Germans suffered their first major defeat of any arms, a large part of their front-line, experienced Luftwaffe crews were killed or captured - aircraft lost - and a pessimism and disillusionment with the High Command started to gradually creep in. We gave the Hun a bloody nose, no two ways about it and forced the Germans to fight on two fronts, something that even Hitler knew to be potential suicide for his ambitions. Your desperate wish to belittle and denigrate what this country went through all those years ago is tiresome . Nickolai

1:14pm Sat 18 Sep 10

Nickolai says...

free wessex wrote:
Google Shinglestreet a bit more than what if to be found
Free Wessex - have you read the book "Where the Eagle Landed - the mystery of the German Invasion of Britain 1940 " , by Peter Haining ?

I thoroughly recommend it - it covers everything from the secret preparations for the defence of our Realm, the Radar and installations at Bawdsey manor ansd Orford Ness, the "Fire on the Water " myths and truth, the Battle of Shingle Street and much more.
[quote][p][bold]free wessex[/bold] wrote: Google Shinglestreet a bit more than what if to be found[/p][/quote]Free Wessex - have you read the book "Where the Eagle Landed - the mystery of the German Invasion of Britain 1940 " , by Peter Haining ? I thoroughly recommend it - it covers everything from the secret preparations for the defence of our Realm, the Radar and installations at Bawdsey manor ansd Orford Ness, the "Fire on the Water " myths and truth, the Battle of Shingle Street and much more. Nickolai

7:19pm Sat 18 Sep 10

Xchurch-man says...

Well said Nikolai. And for your information bob49, I have studied the history of this period in depth, not just by reading, but by talking to people who were actually there, including I am proud to say, my own father and my uncle.
A fact of history regarding Stukas.
without air superiority they were sitting ducks for even a rookie spitfire or hurricane pilot, this is why they failed miserably against the RAF we maintained air superiority.
In a situation where the Germans held air superiority they were in fact deadly ground attack aircraft capable of inflicting precision strikes on both land based and naval targets. In every engagement in WW2 where dive bombers were used under air superiority they were deadly.
Viz, Japan at Pearl Harbour, the US at Midway and the Luftwaffe during numerous engagements in Europe.
But again only where those using dive bombers held air superiority.
Thanks to the skills and courage of the RAF and our radar that never happened here. I say once more had it done, things would have have been very different. I for one will never forget, I will always remember them.
Don't try and trivialise the deeds of our heroes.

password fact-card!!!
Well said Nikolai. And for your information bob49, I have studied the history of this period in depth, not just by reading, but by talking to people who were actually there, including I am proud to say, my own father and my uncle. A fact of history regarding Stukas. without air superiority they were sitting ducks for even a rookie spitfire or hurricane pilot, this is why they failed miserably against the RAF we maintained air superiority. In a situation where the Germans held air superiority they were in fact deadly ground attack aircraft capable of inflicting precision strikes on both land based and naval targets. In every engagement in WW2 where dive bombers were used under air superiority they were deadly. Viz, Japan at Pearl Harbour, the US at Midway and the Luftwaffe during numerous engagements in Europe. But again only where those using dive bombers held air superiority. Thanks to the skills and courage of the RAF and our radar that never happened here. I say once more had it done, things would have have been very different. I for one will never forget, I will always remember them. Don't try and trivialise the deeds of our heroes. password fact-card!!! Xchurch-man

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