Revealed: How many rehab centres ARE there in Boscombe?

First published in News by

A POLICE chief has revealed research showing there are 60 rehab or accommodation centres in Boscombe for drug abusers.

Residents have often said the concentration of rehab centres has created many of the area’s problems – and the new research will be used to lobby the Government.

Chief Inspector Chris Weeks, who was speaking at October’s meet of Boscombe Business Forum, said until the research was done it was not known how many centres there were.

He said: “We have ranked them on which cause concern. About 30 cause us concern at the moment.

“We are looking into how they operate and what their business models are and how we can try and change the way they operate and get an understanding there’s a saturation in quite a tight area.”

Boscombe community campaigner Lisa Northover told the Echo after the meeting: “For years we were told that there were fewer than 10 drug rehab places operating in Boscombe.

“Residents always thought there were more. Finally it has been looked into.”

Bournemouth council said in its September newsletter that it is “working to tackle unregulated accommodation offering treatment for substance users”.

Council leader John Beesley wrote: “We are working with the police and our other partners, together with the MP for Bournemouth East, to raise this issue as a matter of urgency with the government.”

Helene Bowman-Brown, chair of the Friends of Roumelia Lane, said: “I am not saying all treatment centres are bad.

“I am in favour of rehabilitation, but to have so many in a concentrated area cannot be a good thing.”

Boscombe West councillor Chris Wakefield said: “Boscombe is not the place for this saturation. All it is doing is creating other issues.”

Bournemouth East MP Tobias Ellwood said: “There are some very well-run rehab centres in Boscombe that we can proud of.

“But there’s no regulation.

“You can set one up in your garage. Councils need powers to close centres that aren’t working.

“The number doesn’t surprise me but at least we know now.

Landlord Dave Wells, who owns numerous properties in Boscombe, also said there were too many centres.

The council, police, MP and other parties will meet this afternoon to discuss the findings of the research.

Comments (23)

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9:08am Fri 12 Oct 12

O'Reilly says...

Wow!!! the figure was 25 last report I read.
Wow!!! the figure was 25 last report I read. O'Reilly
  • Score: 0

9:12am Fri 12 Oct 12

rudolph_hucker says...

Bournemouth council said in its September newsletter that it is “working to tackle unregulated accommodation offering treatment for substance users”.
HOW, EXACTLY?
Or is this just a load more hot guff from the mouths of fools?
Bournemouth council said in its September newsletter that it is “working to tackle unregulated accommodation offering treatment for substance users”. HOW, EXACTLY? Or is this just a load more hot guff from the mouths of fools? rudolph_hucker
  • Score: 0

9:23am Fri 12 Oct 12

Upkeep says...

Thats just Boscombe !
Thats just Boscombe ! Upkeep
  • Score: 0

9:36am Fri 12 Oct 12

apop3d says...

There are so many treatment centres because there are so many drug addicts and alcoholics because there are so many treatment centres because ....

Seriously, if you close the treatment centres the drug and alcohol abuse won't go away. If, however, you stem the drug and alcohol abuse then eventually the treatment centres will close.

Sorry, but the treatment centres aren't the problem. They might be an unwitting contributing factor, though, as their sheer numbers make Boscombe a beacon nationwide for those who wish to shed their addictions. The problem is that once discharged from the programs, addicts and alcoholics are back on the street again and find themselves in an area where substance abuse is rampant and largely ignored by law enforcement officers (in fairness to the police, they aren't staffed to handle the scope of the problem).
There are so many treatment centres because there are so many drug addicts and alcoholics because there are so many treatment centres because .... Seriously, if you close the treatment centres the drug and alcohol abuse won't go away. If, however, you stem the drug and alcohol abuse then eventually the treatment centres will close. Sorry, but the treatment centres aren't the problem. They might be an unwitting contributing factor, though, as their sheer numbers make Boscombe a beacon nationwide for those who wish to shed their addictions. The problem is that once discharged from the programs, addicts and alcoholics are back on the street again and find themselves in an area where substance abuse is rampant and largely ignored by law enforcement officers (in fairness to the police, they aren't staffed to handle the scope of the problem). apop3d
  • Score: 0

9:57am Fri 12 Oct 12

rudolph_hucker says...

Build a rehab centre on the bloody moon and send em all there
Build a rehab centre on the bloody moon and send em all there rudolph_hucker
  • Score: 0

10:16am Fri 12 Oct 12

nonnisrevenge says...

apop3d wrote:
There are so many treatment centres because there are so many drug addicts and alcoholics because there are so many treatment centres because .... Seriously, if you close the treatment centres the drug and alcohol abuse won't go away. If, however, you stem the drug and alcohol abuse then eventually the treatment centres will close. Sorry, but the treatment centres aren't the problem. They might be an unwitting contributing factor, though, as their sheer numbers make Boscombe a beacon nationwide for those who wish to shed their addictions. The problem is that once discharged from the programs, addicts and alcoholics are back on the street again and find themselves in an area where substance abuse is rampant and largely ignored by law enforcement officers (in fairness to the police, they aren't staffed to handle the scope of the problem).
The system is overwhelmed; the main issue though is do these rehab centres work? What is the success rate and if it's low then surely we have every right to look into these 'centres'?

The police & other agencies are underfunded and over-stretched; however their job is not made any easier by addicts/patients coming in from outside the area for treatment. When you look at the figure suggested 60 seems disproportionately high for an area the size of Boscombe; it would be interesting to see how other conurbations of a similar size stack up numerically against Boscombe for rehab centres. The unfortunate reality is that as a region you do have to look at the issue in financial terms; do we have enough funding to deal with the potential social problems that arise from having so many centres in the confines of such a small area?

As a general note, I've lived in Boscombe for around 20 or so years and have witnessed the decline of the area socially and financially; there is so much potential for the town, however it has been allowed to fester away with authorities seemingly powerless or unwilling to address the social problems. Unfortunately nothing short of a massive regeneration project and or huge public pressure will turn around its fortunes for the foreseeable future.
[quote][p][bold]apop3d[/bold] wrote: There are so many treatment centres because there are so many drug addicts and alcoholics because there are so many treatment centres because .... Seriously, if you close the treatment centres the drug and alcohol abuse won't go away. If, however, you stem the drug and alcohol abuse then eventually the treatment centres will close. Sorry, but the treatment centres aren't the problem. They might be an unwitting contributing factor, though, as their sheer numbers make Boscombe a beacon nationwide for those who wish to shed their addictions. The problem is that once discharged from the programs, addicts and alcoholics are back on the street again and find themselves in an area where substance abuse is rampant and largely ignored by law enforcement officers (in fairness to the police, they aren't staffed to handle the scope of the problem).[/p][/quote]The system is overwhelmed; the main issue though is do these rehab centres work? What is the success rate and if it's low then surely we have every right to look into these 'centres'? The police & other agencies are underfunded and over-stretched; however their job is not made any easier by addicts/patients coming in from outside the area for treatment. When you look at the figure suggested 60 seems disproportionately high for an area the size of Boscombe; it would be interesting to see how other conurbations of a similar size stack up numerically against Boscombe for rehab centres. The unfortunate reality is that as a region you do have to look at the issue in financial terms; do we have enough funding to deal with the potential social problems that arise from having so many centres in the confines of such a small area? As a general note, I've lived in Boscombe for around 20 or so years and have witnessed the decline of the area socially and financially; there is so much potential for the town, however it has been allowed to fester away with authorities seemingly powerless or unwilling to address the social problems. Unfortunately nothing short of a massive regeneration project and or huge public pressure will turn around its fortunes for the foreseeable future. nonnisrevenge
  • Score: 0

10:20am Fri 12 Oct 12

penhale says...

rudolph_hucker wrote:
Build a rehab centre on the bloody moon and send em all there
I think you'll find that most of them are already on another planet every day.
[quote][p][bold]rudolph_hucker[/bold] wrote: Build a rehab centre on the bloody moon and send em all there[/p][/quote]I think you'll find that most of them are already on another planet every day. penhale
  • Score: 0

10:28am Fri 12 Oct 12

praelis says...

The problem is that these agencies from up and down the country send their clients down to Boscombe to get "better" only for them then to be in the middle of a "drugs for sale" area.Maybe its time our coucil actually fulfilled some of its promises to the residents expecially as i had to teach my son at 2 and a half not to touch needles he saw lying in the street:(
The problem is that these agencies from up and down the country send their clients down to Boscombe to get "better" only for them then to be in the middle of a "drugs for sale" area.Maybe its time our coucil actually fulfilled some of its promises to the residents expecially as i had to teach my son at 2 and a half not to touch needles he saw lying in the street:( praelis
  • Score: 0

10:35am Fri 12 Oct 12

Dibbles2 says...

nonnisrevenge wrote:
apop3d wrote:
There are so many treatment centres because there are so many drug addicts and alcoholics because there are so many treatment centres because .... Seriously, if you close the treatment centres the drug and alcohol abuse won't go away. If, however, you stem the drug and alcohol abuse then eventually the treatment centres will close. Sorry, but the treatment centres aren't the problem. They might be an unwitting contributing factor, though, as their sheer numbers make Boscombe a beacon nationwide for those who wish to shed their addictions. The problem is that once discharged from the programs, addicts and alcoholics are back on the street again and find themselves in an area where substance abuse is rampant and largely ignored by law enforcement officers (in fairness to the police, they aren't staffed to handle the scope of the problem).
The system is overwhelmed; the main issue though is do these rehab centres work? What is the success rate and if it's low then surely we have every right to look into these 'centres'?

The police & other agencies are underfunded and over-stretched; however their job is not made any easier by addicts/patients coming in from outside the area for treatment. When you look at the figure suggested 60 seems disproportionately high for an area the size of Boscombe; it would be interesting to see how other conurbations of a similar size stack up numerically against Boscombe for rehab centres. The unfortunate reality is that as a region you do have to look at the issue in financial terms; do we have enough funding to deal with the potential social problems that arise from having so many centres in the confines of such a small area?

As a general note, I've lived in Boscombe for around 20 or so years and have witnessed the decline of the area socially and financially; there is so much potential for the town, however it has been allowed to fester away with authorities seemingly powerless or unwilling to address the social problems. Unfortunately nothing short of a massive regeneration project and or huge public pressure will turn around its fortunes for the foreseeable future.
The "success" rates are fiddled by the people who run the treatment centres and hostels. They look like they are successful but the truth is that all outcomes are just made to look successful. There is a lot of money to made in drug treatment! Perhaps the echo should publish the rents for these "establishments" so that the general public can see what a load of c@@p they are and if you dont have a local connection sod off back to where you came from! Simple.
[quote][p][bold]nonnisrevenge[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]apop3d[/bold] wrote: There are so many treatment centres because there are so many drug addicts and alcoholics because there are so many treatment centres because .... Seriously, if you close the treatment centres the drug and alcohol abuse won't go away. If, however, you stem the drug and alcohol abuse then eventually the treatment centres will close. Sorry, but the treatment centres aren't the problem. They might be an unwitting contributing factor, though, as their sheer numbers make Boscombe a beacon nationwide for those who wish to shed their addictions. The problem is that once discharged from the programs, addicts and alcoholics are back on the street again and find themselves in an area where substance abuse is rampant and largely ignored by law enforcement officers (in fairness to the police, they aren't staffed to handle the scope of the problem).[/p][/quote]The system is overwhelmed; the main issue though is do these rehab centres work? What is the success rate and if it's low then surely we have every right to look into these 'centres'? The police & other agencies are underfunded and over-stretched; however their job is not made any easier by addicts/patients coming in from outside the area for treatment. When you look at the figure suggested 60 seems disproportionately high for an area the size of Boscombe; it would be interesting to see how other conurbations of a similar size stack up numerically against Boscombe for rehab centres. The unfortunate reality is that as a region you do have to look at the issue in financial terms; do we have enough funding to deal with the potential social problems that arise from having so many centres in the confines of such a small area? As a general note, I've lived in Boscombe for around 20 or so years and have witnessed the decline of the area socially and financially; there is so much potential for the town, however it has been allowed to fester away with authorities seemingly powerless or unwilling to address the social problems. Unfortunately nothing short of a massive regeneration project and or huge public pressure will turn around its fortunes for the foreseeable future.[/p][/quote]The "success" rates are fiddled by the people who run the treatment centres and hostels. They look like they are successful but the truth is that all outcomes are just made to look successful. There is a lot of money to made in drug treatment! Perhaps the echo should publish the rents for these "establishments" so that the general public can see what a load of c@@p they are and if you dont have a local connection sod off back to where you came from! Simple. Dibbles2
  • Score: 0

11:03am Fri 12 Oct 12

onetimeapathetic says...

Whatever the numbers, the only way to deal with the problems in Boscombe is with a zero tolerance policing policy, not a softly softly approach. Until the beer drinking, pit bull walking, drug abusing people are cleared from the streets, they will come back time and time again.
Whatever the numbers, the only way to deal with the problems in Boscombe is with a zero tolerance policing policy, not a softly softly approach. Until the beer drinking, pit bull walking, drug abusing people are cleared from the streets, they will come back time and time again. onetimeapathetic
  • Score: 0

11:08am Fri 12 Oct 12

mysticalshoelace says...

Add the bail hostel, the dodgy landlords and the pedo 'rehab' center to the mix and it's easy to see why Boscombe has so many problems.
Add the bail hostel, the dodgy landlords and the pedo 'rehab' center to the mix and it's easy to see why Boscombe has so many problems. mysticalshoelace
  • Score: 0

11:20am Fri 12 Oct 12

Bob49 says...

"There is a lot of money to made in drug treatment!"


And an awful lot more in housing those with drug (and drink) problems.

Minimum provision, minimum maintenance and maximum housing benefit straight into the landlords ppocket.

When the council stop paying obscene high rents for squalid accomodation then many of these 'rehabs' will disappear, as will their clents.

Deal with the cause.
"There is a lot of money to made in drug treatment!" And an awful lot more in housing those with drug (and drink) problems. Minimum provision, minimum maintenance and maximum housing benefit straight into the landlords ppocket. When the council stop paying obscene high rents for squalid accomodation then many of these 'rehabs' will disappear, as will their clents. Deal with the cause. Bob49
  • Score: 0

11:44am Fri 12 Oct 12

sollie says...

The figure at last highlight the official establishments but what about the unofficial places?

Fine having these places concentrated in one place but what happens when the clients are let out? Do they go back home? No they stay around and before long they are back on drugs because of easy access to substances in the area.

What we need is zero tolerance to break the cycle of rehabilitation and relapse.
The figure at last highlight the official establishments but what about the unofficial places? Fine having these places concentrated in one place but what happens when the clients are let out? Do they go back home? No they stay around and before long they are back on drugs because of easy access to substances in the area. What we need is zero tolerance to break the cycle of rehabilitation and relapse. sollie
  • Score: 0

12:02pm Fri 12 Oct 12

HRH of Boscombe says...

There aren't any as far as I can see. How many rehabilitated people do you see in Boscombe?
There aren't any as far as I can see. How many rehabilitated people do you see in Boscombe? HRH of Boscombe
  • Score: 0

1:09pm Fri 12 Oct 12

lonelysurf says...

A very lucrative sector,nobody can deny.
A very lucrative sector,nobody can deny. lonelysurf
  • Score: 0

1:10pm Fri 12 Oct 12

lonelysurf says...

When a situation doesn't quite add up, simply follow the money.
When a situation doesn't quite add up, simply follow the money. lonelysurf
  • Score: 0

1:21pm Fri 12 Oct 12

muscliffman says...

rudolph_hucker wrote:
Build a rehab centre on the bloody moon and send em all there
The Moon? You cannot do that. How would the people doing very nicely out of Boscombe, doubtless including not a few connected someway or another to our illustrious 'establishment', feel about this.
Just leave things as they are, talk loads of Boscombe regeneration and rehabilitation blah, blah to keep the plebs happy..... and let the money carry on rolling in, thank you.
[quote][p][bold]rudolph_hucker[/bold] wrote: Build a rehab centre on the bloody moon and send em all there[/p][/quote]The Moon? You cannot do that. How would the people doing very nicely out of Boscombe, doubtless including not a few connected someway or another to our illustrious 'establishment', feel about this. Just leave things as they are, talk loads of Boscombe regeneration and rehabilitation blah, blah to keep the plebs happy..... and let the money carry on rolling in, thank you. muscliffman
  • Score: 0

3:44pm Fri 12 Oct 12

jinglebell says...

If rehab centres, and addicts are of concern, is it because they don't go "cold-turkey" and are still offered drugs to wean them off whatever they are on? I ask this because, if they are not given substitute drugs I can't see what can do done to stop rehabs from operating; these places could just call themselves bedsits or HMO's, private hotels or something to do with accommodation rather than health.
If addicts are given substitute drugs, then that has to legally come from medics; so which doctors or hospitals in the area are giving this stuff out, especially to unregulated premises?
I had been given to understand that, some years ago, the G.P.'s in this area do not prescribe any substitutes but advocate addicts have no drugs but that they go through counselling etc as research shows substitutes are very ineffective in keeping addicts off drugs long term.
I suppose, however, it could be that addicts might be registered with doctors in another town or city and have a prescription from their doctor there. Presumably, all they have to do then is take it to the local pharmacist here in Boscombe.
If that is the case, then it means that some sort of law would need to be passed to prevent those sort of substances being given by pharmacists in a different town to where the doctor is, who prescribed it.
If there are times when an addict might not have enough substitute drug for whatever reason and they are in a different town to where their own doctor is, surely that could also be covered by an agreement that in such circumstances, the addict has to agree to the pharmacist contacting their doctor to see what has been previously prescribed; when and where that prescription was issued by a pharmacist.
If the prescription was issued previously outside the area their G.P. is registered in, then the undertaking would have to be that the addict does not get his or her prescription.
Obviously, the best thing would be to make it illegal to have a rehab unless it was registered with and overseen by the local health authorities, with no availability of substitute drubs. And if it is true that doctors in this area don't give out substitute drugs, the combination of tighter regulations or new law should go a long way toward improving things.
If rehab centres, and addicts are of concern, is it because they don't go "cold-turkey" and are still offered drugs to wean them off whatever they are on? I ask this because, if they are not given substitute drugs I can't see what can do done to stop rehabs from operating; these places could just call themselves bedsits or HMO's, private hotels or something to do with accommodation rather than health. If addicts are given substitute drugs, then that has to legally come from medics; so which doctors or hospitals in the area are giving this stuff out, especially to unregulated premises? I had been given to understand that, some years ago, the G.P.'s in this area do not prescribe any substitutes but advocate addicts have no drugs but that they go through counselling etc as research shows substitutes are very ineffective in keeping addicts off drugs long term. I suppose, however, it could be that addicts might be registered with doctors in another town or city and have a prescription from their doctor there. Presumably, all they have to do then is take it to the local pharmacist here in Boscombe. If that is the case, then it means that some sort of law would need to be passed to prevent those sort of substances being given by pharmacists in a different town to where the doctor is, who prescribed it. If there are times when an addict might not have enough substitute drug for whatever reason and they are in a different town to where their own doctor is, surely that could also be covered by an agreement that in such circumstances, the addict has to agree to the pharmacist contacting their doctor to see what has been previously prescribed; when and where that prescription was issued by a pharmacist. If the prescription was issued previously outside the area their G.P. is registered in, then the undertaking would have to be that the addict does not get his or her prescription. Obviously, the best thing would be to make it illegal to have a rehab unless it was registered with and overseen by the local health authorities, with no availability of substitute drubs. And if it is true that doctors in this area don't give out substitute drugs, the combination of tighter regulations or new law should go a long way toward improving things. jinglebell
  • Score: 0

4:55pm Fri 12 Oct 12

rozmister says...

jinglebell wrote:
If rehab centres, and addicts are of concern, is it because they don't go "cold-turkey" and are still offered drugs to wean them off whatever they are on? I ask this because, if they are not given substitute drugs I can't see what can do done to stop rehabs from operating; these places could just call themselves bedsits or HMO's, private hotels or something to do with accommodation rather than health.
If addicts are given substitute drugs, then that has to legally come from medics; so which doctors or hospitals in the area are giving this stuff out, especially to unregulated premises?
I had been given to understand that, some years ago, the G.P.'s in this area do not prescribe any substitutes but advocate addicts have no drugs but that they go through counselling etc as research shows substitutes are very ineffective in keeping addicts off drugs long term.
I suppose, however, it could be that addicts might be registered with doctors in another town or city and have a prescription from their doctor there. Presumably, all they have to do then is take it to the local pharmacist here in Boscombe.
If that is the case, then it means that some sort of law would need to be passed to prevent those sort of substances being given by pharmacists in a different town to where the doctor is, who prescribed it.
If there are times when an addict might not have enough substitute drug for whatever reason and they are in a different town to where their own doctor is, surely that could also be covered by an agreement that in such circumstances, the addict has to agree to the pharmacist contacting their doctor to see what has been previously prescribed; when and where that prescription was issued by a pharmacist.
If the prescription was issued previously outside the area their G.P. is registered in, then the undertaking would have to be that the addict does not get his or her prescription.
Obviously, the best thing would be to make it illegal to have a rehab unless it was registered with and overseen by the local health authorities, with no availability of substitute drubs. And if it is true that doctors in this area don't give out substitute drugs, the combination of tighter regulations or new law should go a long way toward improving things.
I live and work in Boscombe and I can tell you now there are plenty of people round that way on methadone (I couldn't give you figures I'm just basing that on people I've spoken to who take it) and when you go to the pharmacy you sometimes see them taking it so it's definitely being dispensed in Boscombe and I would imagine it's probably also prescribed around there.
In my personal experience of using GPs in Boscombe they are very willing to give out strong drugs (I've been given high dosage tranquilisers when I've requested a repeat prescription of the low dosage sleeping pills despite my protesting!) so I imagine they're probably prescribed it within Boscombe now. I also know people who go to the GP around there on methadone and so I don't think they're going out of town to get it.
Putting drug addicts on methadone is cheaper than a talking therapy (which is very expensive) or a rehab place and I would imagine the budget for Bournemouth & Poole PCT is stretched to the limits for funding for addicts due to the high number in Boscombe. I imagine those numbers have got much higher recently which would explain a change in policy.
[quote][p][bold]jinglebell[/bold] wrote: If rehab centres, and addicts are of concern, is it because they don't go "cold-turkey" and are still offered drugs to wean them off whatever they are on? I ask this because, if they are not given substitute drugs I can't see what can do done to stop rehabs from operating; these places could just call themselves bedsits or HMO's, private hotels or something to do with accommodation rather than health. If addicts are given substitute drugs, then that has to legally come from medics; so which doctors or hospitals in the area are giving this stuff out, especially to unregulated premises? I had been given to understand that, some years ago, the G.P.'s in this area do not prescribe any substitutes but advocate addicts have no drugs but that they go through counselling etc as research shows substitutes are very ineffective in keeping addicts off drugs long term. I suppose, however, it could be that addicts might be registered with doctors in another town or city and have a prescription from their doctor there. Presumably, all they have to do then is take it to the local pharmacist here in Boscombe. If that is the case, then it means that some sort of law would need to be passed to prevent those sort of substances being given by pharmacists in a different town to where the doctor is, who prescribed it. If there are times when an addict might not have enough substitute drug for whatever reason and they are in a different town to where their own doctor is, surely that could also be covered by an agreement that in such circumstances, the addict has to agree to the pharmacist contacting their doctor to see what has been previously prescribed; when and where that prescription was issued by a pharmacist. If the prescription was issued previously outside the area their G.P. is registered in, then the undertaking would have to be that the addict does not get his or her prescription. Obviously, the best thing would be to make it illegal to have a rehab unless it was registered with and overseen by the local health authorities, with no availability of substitute drubs. And if it is true that doctors in this area don't give out substitute drugs, the combination of tighter regulations or new law should go a long way toward improving things.[/p][/quote]I live and work in Boscombe and I can tell you now there are plenty of people round that way on methadone (I couldn't give you figures I'm just basing that on people I've spoken to who take it) and when you go to the pharmacy you sometimes see them taking it so it's definitely being dispensed in Boscombe and I would imagine it's probably also prescribed around there. In my personal experience of using GPs in Boscombe they are very willing to give out strong drugs (I've been given high dosage tranquilisers when I've requested a repeat prescription of the low dosage sleeping pills despite my protesting!) so I imagine they're probably prescribed it within Boscombe now. I also know people who go to the GP around there on methadone and so I don't think they're going out of town to get it. Putting drug addicts on methadone is cheaper than a talking therapy (which is very expensive) or a rehab place and I would imagine the budget for Bournemouth & Poole PCT is stretched to the limits for funding for addicts due to the high number in Boscombe. I imagine those numbers have got much higher recently which would explain a change in policy. rozmister
  • Score: 0

9:13pm Fri 12 Oct 12

pragueboy says...

rozmister wrote:
jinglebell wrote:
If rehab centres, and addicts are of concern, is it because they don't go "cold-turkey" and are still offered drugs to wean them off whatever they are on? I ask this because, if they are not given substitute drugs I can't see what can do done to stop rehabs from operating; these places could just call themselves bedsits or HMO's, private hotels or something to do with accommodation rather than health.
If addicts are given substitute drugs, then that has to legally come from medics; so which doctors or hospitals in the area are giving this stuff out, especially to unregulated premises?
I had been given to understand that, some years ago, the G.P.'s in this area do not prescribe any substitutes but advocate addicts have no drugs but that they go through counselling etc as research shows substitutes are very ineffective in keeping addicts off drugs long term.
I suppose, however, it could be that addicts might be registered with doctors in another town or city and have a prescription from their doctor there. Presumably, all they have to do then is take it to the local pharmacist here in Boscombe.
If that is the case, then it means that some sort of law would need to be passed to prevent those sort of substances being given by pharmacists in a different town to where the doctor is, who prescribed it.
If there are times when an addict might not have enough substitute drug for whatever reason and they are in a different town to where their own doctor is, surely that could also be covered by an agreement that in such circumstances, the addict has to agree to the pharmacist contacting their doctor to see what has been previously prescribed; when and where that prescription was issued by a pharmacist.
If the prescription was issued previously outside the area their G.P. is registered in, then the undertaking would have to be that the addict does not get his or her prescription.
Obviously, the best thing would be to make it illegal to have a rehab unless it was registered with and overseen by the local health authorities, with no availability of substitute drubs. And if it is true that doctors in this area don't give out substitute drugs, the combination of tighter regulations or new law should go a long way toward improving things.
I live and work in Boscombe and I can tell you now there are plenty of people round that way on methadone (I couldn't give you figures I'm just basing that on people I've spoken to who take it) and when you go to the pharmacy you sometimes see them taking it so it's definitely being dispensed in Boscombe and I would imagine it's probably also prescribed around there.
In my personal experience of using GPs in Boscombe they are very willing to give out strong drugs (I've been given high dosage tranquilisers when I've requested a repeat prescription of the low dosage sleeping pills despite my protesting!) so I imagine they're probably prescribed it within Boscombe now. I also know people who go to the GP around there on methadone and so I don't think they're going out of town to get it.
Putting drug addicts on methadone is cheaper than a talking therapy (which is very expensive) or a rehab place and I would imagine the budget for Bournemouth & Poole PCT is stretched to the limits for funding for addicts due to the high number in Boscombe. I imagine those numbers have got much higher recently which would explain a change in policy.
Most rehab centers in residential areas deal with people who have completed detox already in another rehab "Primary" or first-stage, detox center or prison.
[quote][p][bold]rozmister[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jinglebell[/bold] wrote: If rehab centres, and addicts are of concern, is it because they don't go "cold-turkey" and are still offered drugs to wean them off whatever they are on? I ask this because, if they are not given substitute drugs I can't see what can do done to stop rehabs from operating; these places could just call themselves bedsits or HMO's, private hotels or something to do with accommodation rather than health. If addicts are given substitute drugs, then that has to legally come from medics; so which doctors or hospitals in the area are giving this stuff out, especially to unregulated premises? I had been given to understand that, some years ago, the G.P.'s in this area do not prescribe any substitutes but advocate addicts have no drugs but that they go through counselling etc as research shows substitutes are very ineffective in keeping addicts off drugs long term. I suppose, however, it could be that addicts might be registered with doctors in another town or city and have a prescription from their doctor there. Presumably, all they have to do then is take it to the local pharmacist here in Boscombe. If that is the case, then it means that some sort of law would need to be passed to prevent those sort of substances being given by pharmacists in a different town to where the doctor is, who prescribed it. If there are times when an addict might not have enough substitute drug for whatever reason and they are in a different town to where their own doctor is, surely that could also be covered by an agreement that in such circumstances, the addict has to agree to the pharmacist contacting their doctor to see what has been previously prescribed; when and where that prescription was issued by a pharmacist. If the prescription was issued previously outside the area their G.P. is registered in, then the undertaking would have to be that the addict does not get his or her prescription. Obviously, the best thing would be to make it illegal to have a rehab unless it was registered with and overseen by the local health authorities, with no availability of substitute drubs. And if it is true that doctors in this area don't give out substitute drugs, the combination of tighter regulations or new law should go a long way toward improving things.[/p][/quote]I live and work in Boscombe and I can tell you now there are plenty of people round that way on methadone (I couldn't give you figures I'm just basing that on people I've spoken to who take it) and when you go to the pharmacy you sometimes see them taking it so it's definitely being dispensed in Boscombe and I would imagine it's probably also prescribed around there. In my personal experience of using GPs in Boscombe they are very willing to give out strong drugs (I've been given high dosage tranquilisers when I've requested a repeat prescription of the low dosage sleeping pills despite my protesting!) so I imagine they're probably prescribed it within Boscombe now. I also know people who go to the GP around there on methadone and so I don't think they're going out of town to get it. Putting drug addicts on methadone is cheaper than a talking therapy (which is very expensive) or a rehab place and I would imagine the budget for Bournemouth & Poole PCT is stretched to the limits for funding for addicts due to the high number in Boscombe. I imagine those numbers have got much higher recently which would explain a change in policy.[/p][/quote]Most rehab centers in residential areas deal with people who have completed detox already in another rehab "Primary" or first-stage, detox center or prison. pragueboy
  • Score: 0

9:25pm Fri 12 Oct 12

pragueboy says...

sollie wrote:
The figure at last highlight the official establishments but what about the unofficial places?

Fine having these places concentrated in one place but what happens when the clients are let out? Do they go back home? No they stay around and before long they are back on drugs because of easy access to substances in the area.

What we need is zero tolerance to break the cycle of rehabilitation and relapse.
The other side of the coin is if they do fall down they are in close proximity to recovering friends and support groups. This is of little consolation to the average Boscombe resident though i understand!
As for zero tolerance, it would never work. The dealers get replaced within 24 hours - the law of supply and demand. The customer is an addict and therefore isnt capable of reason and logic - if addiction was logical it wouldnt exist.At best you can make them all feel more afraid when going about their day but it wont stop them.
[quote][p][bold]sollie[/bold] wrote: The figure at last highlight the official establishments but what about the unofficial places? Fine having these places concentrated in one place but what happens when the clients are let out? Do they go back home? No they stay around and before long they are back on drugs because of easy access to substances in the area. What we need is zero tolerance to break the cycle of rehabilitation and relapse.[/p][/quote]The other side of the coin is if they do fall down they are in close proximity to recovering friends and support groups. This is of little consolation to the average Boscombe resident though i understand! As for zero tolerance, it would never work. The dealers get replaced within 24 hours - the law of supply and demand. The customer is an addict and therefore isnt capable of reason and logic - if addiction was logical it wouldnt exist.At best you can make them all feel more afraid when going about their day but it wont stop them. pragueboy
  • Score: 0

3:24am Sat 13 Oct 12

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  • Score: 0

8:23pm Sat 20 Oct 12

MunkeyMafia says...

it is absolutely fine having a few rehabs in the area, it is when the rehabilitated leave that new rules should apply. 1 idea could be a list of names given to the services so if someone relapses and is arrested for example then they are sent back to the area they came from. if they are not in full/part time employment within a year then they are sent back home. these are just ideas. it is obvious to me that the council and the police allow the chaos to continue in boscombe. the crack houses are as busy as ever and every now and again the police do a raid(accompanied by the news crew) for the public. rant rant rave. dont know why any of us bother because nothing is ever done.
it is absolutely fine having a few rehabs in the area, it is when the rehabilitated leave that new rules should apply. 1 idea could be a list of names given to the services so if someone relapses and is arrested for example then they are sent back to the area they came from. if they are not in full/part time employment within a year then they are sent back home. these are just ideas. it is obvious to me that the council and the police allow the chaos to continue in boscombe. the crack houses are as busy as ever and every now and again the police do a raid(accompanied by the news crew) for the public. rant rant rave. dont know why any of us bother because nothing is ever done. MunkeyMafia
  • Score: 0

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