Jailed: the Dorset drug dealers who flooded area with cocaine

MAIN PLAYER: John Beckett

DEALER: Richard Lambe

First published in News by

TEN drug dealers have been jailed for more than 50 years between them for conspiracies that flooded the Bournemouth and Poole area with hundreds of thousands of pounds worth of cocaine.

Linked police investigations saw the local men brought to justice during a number of trials and other court hearings that lasted several months.

Most were sent to prison in November last year but a court order banning publication of the details of their crimes has only just been lifted.

The men, many of whom appeared as respectable businessmen and with young families, were given varying sentences ranging from 10 years to 12 months.

Judge John Harrow told them: “This case demonstrates the familiar picture of drug addiction and getting into drug debt.

“The consequences of imprisonment on your families are taken into account. You all went into this with your eyes open – you were all in it for personal gain.”

The court heard John Beckett and Richard Lambe played the biggest roles, obtaining cocaine in large quantities.

Sentencing Beckett to 10 years Judge Harrow said: “You were almost hyperactive in your dealings with obtaining and supplying cocaine in large quantities.

“Your turnover must have amounted to hundreds of thousands of pounds and you lived well on it. You were the hub of a network of buyers and suppliers.

“You arranged for drugs money to be dropped off and collected but you were very careful indeed to ensure that no drugs were ever in you possession – others had to take those risks.”

Judge Harrow described the conspiracy as “a large, intensive, big-money operation” and told Beckett: “You played one of the leading roles.”

The offences took place between June 2009 and July 2010 and the court was told how large quantities of drugs were brought into Dorset, mainly from the Liverpool area.

The cocaine, initially in packs of one or one-and-a-half kilos was mixed with other substances to maximise proft and re-packaged into smaller amounts to be sold on.

Covert police opeations witnessed drugs deals in many locations including the Seaview view point in Poole, Poole Road, Westbourne, Lloyds Bank car park in Commercial Road, Poole, Tower Park and the former Mountbatten Arms pub in Wallisdown.

Detective Sergeant Dave Webster of the Dorset Police Major Crime Investigation Team said: “Dorset Police is committed to tackling organised crime and this shows that we will use all the resources at our disposal to infiltrate, disrupt and bring to justice those involved in this type of serious criminal activity. These criminals are feeding from the misery and anguish of all those caught up and affected by their greed. They cause untold heartache for all those law abiding people in Dorset who have been subject to crime in order to fund those who have become addicted to drugs.”

The charges

• JOHN BECKETT, 28, of King Richard Drive, Bournemouth. Pleaded guilty to three conspirary offences. Jailed for 10 years. Worked for solar energy company Self Gen. Previous convictions for possession of class A drugs with intent to supply.

• RICHARD LAMBE, 47, of Hurn Way, Christchurch. Pleaded guilty to three conspiracy offences. Jailed for 10 years. Previous for burglary and dishonesty.

• GLYN JONES, 43, of Brampton Road, Poole. Pleaded not guilty to one charge of conspiracy but was found guilty by a jury and jailed for eight years. Pleaded guilty to possession of a stun gun and jailed for 12 months concurrent. Bought cocaine from Coulson, sub-divided it and sold it on for gain. Previous for possession of drugs, dishonesty, possession of a prohibited weapon and mortgage fraud.

• ANDREW GILCHRIST, 36, of Richmond Park Road, Bournemouth. Pleaded to guilty to two conspiracy charges. Jailed for five yers and four months. Bought drugs from Coulson. Drug-related activities described by judge as “part of your daily life”. Previous for violence and driving offences.

• BRIAN COULSON, 54, of Bournemouth Road, Poole. Pleaded guilty to two conspiracy charges. Jailed for six years and eight months. Had his own garage business, Wood Welding, for 25 years. Has a three-year-old son and his partner is pregnant. Bought large amounts of cocaine from Lambe, bulked it out and sold it on for profit. Previous for dishonesty, possession of a prohibited weapon and cannabis.

• TERENCE GRAVES, 70, of Dunmere Road, Torquay. Pleaded guilty to one charge of conspiracy. Jailed for 12 months. Received £500 as a courier of amphetamines. Previous for dishonesty.

• ROWAN TOWER, 31, of Bournemouth Road, Poole. Pleaded guilty to one conspiracy charge. Jailed for four years. Stored drugs in his father’s barn for Coulson and re-packaged them. Previous for obstructing a police officer.

• DAVID MARRON, 64, of Heathfield Road, West Moors, Ferndown. Pleaded not guilty to one conspiracy charge but found guilty by a jury and jailed for five years. Described as Beckett’s driver and “at his beck and call.” Previous for dishonesty and driving offences.

• DAVID EATON, 36, of Daisy Close, Poole. Pleaded guilty to one conspiracy charge. Jailed for three-and-a-half years. He supplied the press used to deal with the cocaine. Has a three-year-old son. Previous for possession and supply of cocaine, shoplifting, dishonesty and public order offences.

• MARK HENDER, 44, of Brook Road, Bournemouth. Pleaded guilty to one charge of conspiracy. Jailed for four-and-a-half years. Driver for Andrew Gilchrist. Lives with his 75-year-old mum. A cocaine user who formerly worked as a ground worker for Hooper Construction. Previous for commmon assault, possession of crack cocaine and dishonesty.

Comments (46)

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9:17am Sat 16 Jun 12

pete woodley says...

Very well done,by the Police.Carry on there is a lot more out there,and even bigger "bosses".
Very well done,by the Police.Carry on there is a lot more out there,and even bigger "bosses". pete woodley
  • Score: 0

9:48am Sat 16 Jun 12

uvox44 says...

the criminality connected with cocaine in this country is only one half of the story- don't forget that users and dealers are creating demand that is ruining lives and destroying the environment back in supply countries in South America.
the criminality connected with cocaine in this country is only one half of the story- don't forget that users and dealers are creating demand that is ruining lives and destroying the environment back in supply countries in South America. uvox44
  • Score: -1

9:50am Sat 16 Jun 12

Oldalbanian says...

These were relatively minor players and I suspect the supply chain was restored within a couple of days.

The bigger "bosses" referred to in the post above lead a "protected" existence and are never brought to trial.
These were relatively minor players and I suspect the supply chain was restored within a couple of days. The bigger "bosses" referred to in the post above lead a "protected" existence and are never brought to trial. Oldalbanian
  • Score: 0

9:58am Sat 16 Jun 12

pete woodley says...

Many years ago a certain "gentleman"used to hang around town in his Rolls Royce,collecting his share from the dealers,often around the Triangle.
Many years ago a certain "gentleman"used to hang around town in his Rolls Royce,collecting his share from the dealers,often around the Triangle. pete woodley
  • Score: 0

10:08am Sat 16 Jun 12

Baywolf says...

So maximum 10 years so we look at 4 max ...seriously? And they want to know why there is a drug problem. The law is an utter ****! Prison sentencing is lenient to the point of making a crime legal! Some poor lass was killed by an uninsured driver on drugs and was given just a pathetic 8 weeks.
So maximum 10 years so we look at 4 max ...seriously? And they want to know why there is a drug problem. The law is an utter ****! Prison sentencing is lenient to the point of making a crime legal! Some poor lass was killed by an uninsured driver on drugs and was given just a pathetic 8 weeks. Baywolf
  • Score: 0

10:17am Sat 16 Jun 12

lisa401 says...

As a pharmacist I had to study for four and a half years (as well as A level physics biology & chemistry), yet these people were cutting the cocaine with other (poisonous) chemicals ready for distribution, with the end user unaware of what substances were in it & what quantities they were taking. This is quite frightening and one of the reasons why most class A drugs should be legalised.
As a pharmacist I had to study for four and a half years (as well as A level physics biology & chemistry), yet these people were cutting the cocaine with other (poisonous) chemicals ready for distribution, with the end user unaware of what substances were in it & what quantities they were taking. This is quite frightening and one of the reasons why most class A drugs should be legalised. lisa401
  • Score: 0

10:20am Sat 16 Jun 12

High Treason says...

Why bother with prison. Drop them down a disused mine shaft head first.
Why bother with prison. Drop them down a disused mine shaft head first. High Treason
  • Score: 0

10:26am Sat 16 Jun 12

Vikki27 says...

Well done to the police for catching them all! Keep up the good work. And I might also agree with the dropping them down the mine shaft a little bit...prison isn't enough of a deterrant these days, clearly!
Well done to the police for catching them all! Keep up the good work. And I might also agree with the dropping them down the mine shaft a little bit...prison isn't enough of a deterrant these days, clearly! Vikki27
  • Score: 0

10:32am Sat 16 Jun 12

BmthNewshound says...

Oldalbanian wrote:
These were relatively minor players and I suspect the supply chain was restored within a couple of days.

The bigger "bosses" referred to in the post above lead a "protected" existence and are never brought to trial.
Sadly what you say is true.
[quote][p][bold]Oldalbanian[/bold] wrote: These were relatively minor players and I suspect the supply chain was restored within a couple of days. The bigger "bosses" referred to in the post above lead a "protected" existence and are never brought to trial.[/p][/quote]Sadly what you say is true. BmthNewshound
  • Score: 0

10:43am Sat 16 Jun 12

John T says...

People often like to justify lenient sentences given by judges by claiming that they are restricted in the sentences that they are allowed to give.
According to the Home Office website, the sentence for dealing in Class A drugs is up to a life sentence and an unlimited fine OR BOTH.
None of these scumbags have been given a sentence anything close to this. Indeed, the sentences for all 10 combined barely amounts to a true life sentence!
Could we be advised as to what is happening, or has happened to the proceeds of crime obtained by these villains? They all seem to have continued to have lived a comfortable lifestyle on their ill-gotten gains.
Well done to the Police for persevering in the face of such near pointless end results.
People often like to justify lenient sentences given by judges by claiming that they are restricted in the sentences that they are allowed to give. According to the Home Office website, the sentence for dealing in Class A drugs is up to a life sentence and an unlimited fine OR BOTH. None of these scumbags have been given a sentence anything close to this. Indeed, the sentences for all 10 combined barely amounts to a true life sentence! Could we be advised as to what is happening, or has happened to the proceeds of crime obtained by these villains? They all seem to have continued to have lived a comfortable lifestyle on their ill-gotten gains. Well done to the Police for persevering in the face of such near pointless end results. John T
  • Score: 0

11:04am Sat 16 Jun 12

Capricorn 1 says...

lisa401 wrote:
As a pharmacist I had to study for four and a half years (as well as A level physics biology & chemistry), yet these people were cutting the cocaine with other (poisonous) chemicals ready for distribution, with the end user unaware of what substances were in it & what quantities they were taking. This is quite frightening and one of the reasons why most class A drugs should be legalised.
I've argued about legalising drugs in order to pull the rug from under the feet of criminals.

The current system is a godsend to criminals.
[quote][p][bold]lisa401[/bold] wrote: As a pharmacist I had to study for four and a half years (as well as A level physics biology & chemistry), yet these people were cutting the cocaine with other (poisonous) chemicals ready for distribution, with the end user unaware of what substances were in it & what quantities they were taking. This is quite frightening and one of the reasons why most class A drugs should be legalised.[/p][/quote]I've argued about legalising drugs in order to pull the rug from under the feet of criminals. The current system is a godsend to criminals. Capricorn 1
  • Score: 0

11:14am Sat 16 Jun 12

Lewcee says...

John T - I would guess that one of the reasons the story was not published earlier was to enable the "recovery of proceeds of crime". Now the Local Echo Office may not have the contacts or the staff to properly follow up on the Court's proceedings...as they used to. 'Tiz rare for any Court case to have it's progress reported in any detail anywhere these days. The Echo just publishes what it thinks will "sell" it's rag... sorry, paper.
John T - I would guess that one of the reasons the story was not published earlier was to enable the "recovery of proceeds of crime". Now the Local Echo Office may not have the contacts or the staff to properly follow up on the Court's proceedings...as they used to. 'Tiz rare for any Court case to have it's progress reported in any detail anywhere these days. The Echo just publishes what it thinks will "sell" it's rag... sorry, paper. Lewcee
  • Score: 0

11:16am Sat 16 Jun 12

John T says...

Capricorn 1 wrote:
lisa401 wrote: As a pharmacist I had to study for four and a half years (as well as A level physics biology & chemistry), yet these people were cutting the cocaine with other (poisonous) chemicals ready for distribution, with the end user unaware of what substances were in it & what quantities they were taking. This is quite frightening and one of the reasons why most class A drugs should be legalised.
I've argued about legalising drugs in order to pull the rug from under the feet of criminals. The current system is a godsend to criminals.
And don't you realise that legalising drugs will lead to more driving and other offences being committed under the influence of drugs.
I guess you would also argue that an 8 week sentence is quite alright for a driver under the influence of cannabis who killed a young girl.
[quote][p][bold]Capricorn 1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]lisa401[/bold] wrote: As a pharmacist I had to study for four and a half years (as well as A level physics biology & chemistry), yet these people were cutting the cocaine with other (poisonous) chemicals ready for distribution, with the end user unaware of what substances were in it & what quantities they were taking. This is quite frightening and one of the reasons why most class A drugs should be legalised.[/p][/quote]I've argued about legalising drugs in order to pull the rug from under the feet of criminals. The current system is a godsend to criminals.[/p][/quote]And don't you realise that legalising drugs will lead to more driving and other offences being committed under the influence of drugs. I guess you would also argue that an 8 week sentence is quite alright for a driver under the influence of cannabis who killed a young girl. John T
  • Score: 0

11:43am Sat 16 Jun 12

contric says...

as regards to sentencing i think most people in the country feel sentences are to low for serious crime and the police do a great job on are behalf as this cxase shows there seems to be so many problems with criminals and the politicians and judges let the hard working tax paying public down but for me the sad thing is we can do nothing about it voting is just a ruse uised by bent politicians to dupe us into thinking we live in a wonderful democracy as someone once said if allowing people to vote changed anything they wouldnt allow it all of us just have to put up with what corrupt politicians foist upon us
as regards to sentencing i think most people in the country feel sentences are to low for serious crime and the police do a great job on are behalf as this cxase shows there seems to be so many problems with criminals and the politicians and judges let the hard working tax paying public down but for me the sad thing is we can do nothing about it voting is just a ruse uised by bent politicians to dupe us into thinking we live in a wonderful democracy as someone once said if allowing people to vote changed anything they wouldnt allow it all of us just have to put up with what corrupt politicians foist upon us contric
  • Score: 0

11:43am Sat 16 Jun 12

The Renegade Master says...

Alwaya nice to see a bunch of scumbags get what they deserve. I hope their time inside is a truly terrible experience for all of them.
Alwaya nice to see a bunch of scumbags get what they deserve. I hope their time inside is a truly terrible experience for all of them. The Renegade Master
  • Score: 0

11:50am Sat 16 Jun 12

dobrojoe says...

A more fitting punishment for these criminals would be if they had to generate electricity using their own muscle power for the period of their sentence. It would solve two problems at once and minimise re-offending rates!
A more fitting punishment for these criminals would be if they had to generate electricity using their own muscle power for the period of their sentence. It would solve two problems at once and minimise re-offending rates! dobrojoe
  • Score: 0

12:04pm Sat 16 Jun 12

lisa401 says...

John T wrote:
Capricorn 1 wrote:
lisa401 wrote: As a pharmacist I had to study for four and a half years (as well as A level physics biology & chemistry), yet these people were cutting the cocaine with other (poisonous) chemicals ready for distribution, with the end user unaware of what substances were in it & what quantities they were taking. This is quite frightening and one of the reasons why most class A drugs should be legalised.
I've argued about legalising drugs in order to pull the rug from under the feet of criminals. The current system is a godsend to criminals.
And don't you realise that legalising drugs will lead to more driving and other offences being committed under the influence of drugs.
I guess you would also argue that an 8 week sentence is quite alright for a driver under the influence of cannabis who killed a young girl.
Of course 8 weeks is not enough.

The problem with (class A&B) drugs being illegal is that there is very little education about them and the risks of taking them. Both legal and illegal drugs carry risks, however a doctor would not prescribe medication that was unsuitable for someone or has contraindications, and pharmaceutical companies do not put toxic substances into them to 'bulk them out' and make more money!

If they were legalised it would have to become a serious offence to drive whilst under the influence - just as drink driving is now. Legalisation is not ideal but I think it's the only answer.
[quote][p][bold]John T[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Capricorn 1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]lisa401[/bold] wrote: As a pharmacist I had to study for four and a half years (as well as A level physics biology & chemistry), yet these people were cutting the cocaine with other (poisonous) chemicals ready for distribution, with the end user unaware of what substances were in it & what quantities they were taking. This is quite frightening and one of the reasons why most class A drugs should be legalised.[/p][/quote]I've argued about legalising drugs in order to pull the rug from under the feet of criminals. The current system is a godsend to criminals.[/p][/quote]And don't you realise that legalising drugs will lead to more driving and other offences being committed under the influence of drugs. I guess you would also argue that an 8 week sentence is quite alright for a driver under the influence of cannabis who killed a young girl.[/p][/quote]Of course 8 weeks is not enough. The problem with (class A&B) drugs being illegal is that there is very little education about them and the risks of taking them. Both legal and illegal drugs carry risks, however a doctor would not prescribe medication that was unsuitable for someone or has contraindications, and pharmaceutical companies do not put toxic substances into them to 'bulk them out' and make more money! If they were legalised it would have to become a serious offence to drive whilst under the influence - just as drink driving is now. Legalisation is not ideal but I think it's the only answer. lisa401
  • Score: 0

12:17pm Sat 16 Jun 12

Justin666 says...

Wouldn't a fitting punishment be to give them all a dose of their own medicine over a protracted period of time then keep them locked up for life... minus supplies?
Wouldn't a fitting punishment be to give them all a dose of their own medicine over a protracted period of time then keep them locked up for life... minus supplies? Justin666
  • Score: 0

1:13pm Sat 16 Jun 12

Pierre France says...

lisa401 wrote:
As a pharmacist I had to study for four and a half years (as well as A level physics biology & chemistry), yet these people were cutting the cocaine with other (poisonous) chemicals ready for distribution, with the end user unaware of what substances were in it & what quantities they were taking. This is quite frightening and one of the reasons why most class A drugs should be legalised.
Well said. Good on ya...
[quote][p][bold]lisa401[/bold] wrote: As a pharmacist I had to study for four and a half years (as well as A level physics biology & chemistry), yet these people were cutting the cocaine with other (poisonous) chemicals ready for distribution, with the end user unaware of what substances were in it & what quantities they were taking. This is quite frightening and one of the reasons why most class A drugs should be legalised.[/p][/quote]Well said. Good on ya... Pierre France
  • Score: 0

1:51pm Sat 16 Jun 12

John T says...

Justin666 wrote:
Wouldn't a fitting punishment be to give them all a dose of their own medicine over a protracted period of time then keep them locked up for life... minus supplies?
As the devil in disguise, would it not be Just in your line to administer this?!
[quote][p][bold]Justin666[/bold] wrote: Wouldn't a fitting punishment be to give them all a dose of their own medicine over a protracted period of time then keep them locked up for life... minus supplies?[/p][/quote]As the devil in disguise, would it not be Just in your line to administer this?! John T
  • Score: 0

2:46pm Sat 16 Jun 12

devilstail says...

Well done Police, shame you are let down by a justice system that hands out far too lenient penalties. They should have all been jailed for a minimum of 25 years each.
Drugs, prostitution, counterfeit goods, people trafficking, terrorism are all connected through organised crime.
Some stats 80% of UK's Heroin and 90% of worlds Heroin originates from Helmand Province in Afghanistan, therefore anyone involved in drugs is indirectly helping to supply the Taliban and other insurgents with funds to kill British and Coalition Forces and innocent civilians. The insurgents will threaten local farmers including death threats against their families to ensure they get their cut. It is a shame that the media does not expose these links.
Well done Police, shame you are let down by a justice system that hands out far too lenient penalties. They should have all been jailed for a minimum of 25 years each. Drugs, prostitution, counterfeit goods, people trafficking, terrorism are all connected through organised crime. Some stats 80% of UK's Heroin and 90% of worlds Heroin originates from Helmand Province in Afghanistan, therefore anyone involved in drugs is indirectly helping to supply the Taliban and other insurgents with funds to kill British and Coalition Forces and innocent civilians. The insurgents will threaten local farmers including death threats against their families to ensure they get their cut. It is a shame that the media does not expose these links. devilstail
  • Score: 0

3:21pm Sat 16 Jun 12

Justin666 says...

John T wrote:
Justin666 wrote:
Wouldn't a fitting punishment be to give them all a dose of their own medicine over a protracted period of time then keep them locked up for life... minus supplies?
As the devil in disguise, would it not be Just in your line to administer this?!
Would love to administer this and would ensure using a blunt and much used needle picked up randomely in the park.
[quote][p][bold]John T[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Justin666[/bold] wrote: Wouldn't a fitting punishment be to give them all a dose of their own medicine over a protracted period of time then keep them locked up for life... minus supplies?[/p][/quote]As the devil in disguise, would it not be Just in your line to administer this?![/p][/quote]Would love to administer this and would ensure using a blunt and much used needle picked up randomely in the park. Justin666
  • Score: 0

3:36pm Sat 16 Jun 12

John T says...

And I would happily be devil's advocate to ensure fair play.
And I would happily be devil's advocate to ensure fair play. John T
  • Score: 0

3:42pm Sat 16 Jun 12

Capricorn 1 says...

John T wrote:
Capricorn 1 wrote:
lisa401 wrote: As a pharmacist I had to study for four and a half years (as well as A level physics biology & chemistry), yet these people were cutting the cocaine with other (poisonous) chemicals ready for distribution, with the end user unaware of what substances were in it & what quantities they were taking. This is quite frightening and one of the reasons why most class A drugs should be legalised.
I've argued about legalising drugs in order to pull the rug from under the feet of criminals. The current system is a godsend to criminals.
And don't you realise that legalising drugs will lead to more driving and other offences being committed under the influence of drugs.
I guess you would also argue that an 8 week sentence is quite alright for a driver under the influence of cannabis who killed a young girl.
To John T- let me make it perfectly clear that when I say that I would want to see these drugs legalised I am referring to a situation whereby drug addicts could get these drugs from legalised sources.

This would be a way of treatment and eventual weaning off of these drugs.

It would be aimed at preventing a situation that we have whereby drug users are going through criminals, and often committing crimes themselves in order to fund their habit.

This could be combined with introducing far greater penalties for anyone supplying or obtaining drugs via illegal means.

If someone killed a young girl while under the influence of anything I'd be quite happy for them to rot.

I'm interested in a means of removing the drug supply from criminals- destroying their market.

I abhor drug use but the current system of dealing with this problem is a failure.
[quote][p][bold]John T[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Capricorn 1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]lisa401[/bold] wrote: As a pharmacist I had to study for four and a half years (as well as A level physics biology & chemistry), yet these people were cutting the cocaine with other (poisonous) chemicals ready for distribution, with the end user unaware of what substances were in it & what quantities they were taking. This is quite frightening and one of the reasons why most class A drugs should be legalised.[/p][/quote]I've argued about legalising drugs in order to pull the rug from under the feet of criminals. The current system is a godsend to criminals.[/p][/quote]And don't you realise that legalising drugs will lead to more driving and other offences being committed under the influence of drugs. I guess you would also argue that an 8 week sentence is quite alright for a driver under the influence of cannabis who killed a young girl.[/p][/quote]To John T- let me make it perfectly clear that when I say that I would want to see these drugs legalised I am referring to a situation whereby drug addicts could get these drugs from legalised sources. This would be a way of treatment and eventual weaning off of these drugs. It would be aimed at preventing a situation that we have whereby drug users are going through criminals, and often committing crimes themselves in order to fund their habit. This could be combined with introducing far greater penalties for anyone supplying or obtaining drugs via illegal means. If someone killed a young girl while under the influence of anything I'd be quite happy for them to rot. I'm interested in a means of removing the drug supply from criminals- destroying their market. I abhor drug use but the current system of dealing with this problem is a failure. Capricorn 1
  • Score: 0

4:51pm Sat 16 Jun 12

EGHH says...

What strikes me is that the are all older white males which breaks the Tabloid stereotype of the pusher.
What strikes me is that the are all older white males which breaks the Tabloid stereotype of the pusher. EGHH
  • Score: 0

5:00pm Sat 16 Jun 12

AdamSFC says...

Justin666 wrote:
John T wrote:
Justin666 wrote:
Wouldn't a fitting punishment be to give them all a dose of their own medicine over a protracted period of time then keep them locked up for life... minus supplies?
As the devil in disguise, would it not be Just in your line to administer this?!
Would love to administer this and would ensure using a blunt and much used needle picked up randomely in the park.
You "would love to administer this"? Not really a righteous warrior of social justice are you? You are just a sadistic and depraved individual with fantasies about torturing people. Whatever your opinions on drugs and drug dealers are this is disgraceful when you actually stop your knee jerking for a minute and actually think about what you are proposing and how this would actually be achieved. I find people like you much more worrying than the people in this article. I hate to use the cliche but you are the exact sort of people that would be volunteering for the Einsatzgruppen (look it up) had you been born a few decades earlier and somewhere around Germany.
[quote][p][bold]Justin666[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]John T[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Justin666[/bold] wrote: Wouldn't a fitting punishment be to give them all a dose of their own medicine over a protracted period of time then keep them locked up for life... minus supplies?[/p][/quote]As the devil in disguise, would it not be Just in your line to administer this?![/p][/quote]Would love to administer this and would ensure using a blunt and much used needle picked up randomely in the park.[/p][/quote]You "would love to administer this"? Not really a righteous warrior of social justice are you? You are just a sadistic and depraved individual with fantasies about torturing people. Whatever your opinions on drugs and drug dealers are this is disgraceful when you actually stop your knee jerking for a minute and actually think about what you are proposing and how this would actually be achieved. I find people like you much more worrying than the people in this article. I hate to use the cliche but you are the exact sort of people that would be volunteering for the Einsatzgruppen (look it up) had you been born a few decades earlier and somewhere around Germany. AdamSFC
  • Score: 0

5:09pm Sat 16 Jun 12

Justin666 says...

AdamSFC wrote:
Justin666 wrote:
John T wrote:
Justin666 wrote:
Wouldn't a fitting punishment be to give them all a dose of their own medicine over a protracted period of time then keep them locked up for life... minus supplies?
As the devil in disguise, would it not be Just in your line to administer this?!
Would love to administer this and would ensure using a blunt and much used needle picked up randomely in the park.
You "would love to administer this"? Not really a righteous warrior of social justice are you? You are just a sadistic and depraved individual with fantasies about torturing people. Whatever your opinions on drugs and drug dealers are this is disgraceful when you actually stop your knee jerking for a minute and actually think about what you are proposing and how this would actually be achieved. I find people like you much more worrying than the people in this article. I hate to use the cliche but you are the exact sort of people that would be volunteering for the Einsatzgruppen (look it up) had you been born a few decades earlier and somewhere around Germany.
I take it that the the 'social justice' you refer to is working. With a 50% (conservative estimate) of re-offenders I think you had better come up with something a little better than your diatribe. I also think that you may need to adjust your thinking if you really believe that the Devil is to be taken seriously in his extreme views. Suggest a little growing up may do you some good. I look forward to seeing a more positive comment from you demonstrating your grasp of the problem and conceivably offering some solutions as others have done. Perhaps I ask too much. I do not have to look up Einsatzgruppen as I helped form it.
[quote][p][bold]AdamSFC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Justin666[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]John T[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Justin666[/bold] wrote: Wouldn't a fitting punishment be to give them all a dose of their own medicine over a protracted period of time then keep them locked up for life... minus supplies?[/p][/quote]As the devil in disguise, would it not be Just in your line to administer this?![/p][/quote]Would love to administer this and would ensure using a blunt and much used needle picked up randomely in the park.[/p][/quote]You "would love to administer this"? Not really a righteous warrior of social justice are you? You are just a sadistic and depraved individual with fantasies about torturing people. Whatever your opinions on drugs and drug dealers are this is disgraceful when you actually stop your knee jerking for a minute and actually think about what you are proposing and how this would actually be achieved. I find people like you much more worrying than the people in this article. I hate to use the cliche but you are the exact sort of people that would be volunteering for the Einsatzgruppen (look it up) had you been born a few decades earlier and somewhere around Germany.[/p][/quote]I take it that the the 'social justice' you refer to is working. With a 50% (conservative estimate) of re-offenders I think you had better come up with something a little better than your diatribe. I also think that you may need to adjust your thinking if you really believe that the Devil is to be taken seriously in his extreme views. Suggest a little growing up may do you some good. I look forward to seeing a more positive comment from you demonstrating your grasp of the problem and conceivably offering some solutions as others have done. Perhaps I ask too much. I do not have to look up Einsatzgruppen as I helped form it. Justin666
  • Score: 0

5:46pm Sat 16 Jun 12

pete woodley says...

Einsatzgruppen,is it a split off from the WI.
Einsatzgruppen,is it a split off from the WI. pete woodley
  • Score: 0

7:58pm Sat 16 Jun 12

scouserdavewells says...

pete woodley wrote:
Many years ago a certain "gentleman"used to hang around town in his Rolls Royce,collecting his share from the dealers,often around the Triangle.
Who would that be then? anyone we know? at least tell us his initials....
[quote][p][bold]pete woodley[/bold] wrote: Many years ago a certain "gentleman"used to hang around town in his Rolls Royce,collecting his share from the dealers,often around the Triangle.[/p][/quote]Who would that be then? anyone we know? at least tell us his initials.... scouserdavewells
  • Score: 0

8:29pm Sat 16 Jun 12

pete woodley says...

you would not know unless you worked for him,did you ?.
you would not know unless you worked for him,did you ?. pete woodley
  • Score: 0

9:52pm Sat 16 Jun 12

pete woodley says...

To be honest,i do not know but could be as was well in with the local gentry.
To be honest,i do not know but could be as was well in with the local gentry. pete woodley
  • Score: 0

3:18am Sun 17 Jun 12

ASM says...

pete woodley wrote:
Very well done,by the Police.Carry on there is a lot more out there,and even bigger "bosses".
I agree totally, with this comment, well done police and there are plenty more that should be locked up. Every time I read these echo reports, I keep my fingers crossed, that one thug, I had the unpleasent experience of working with is put behind bars (where he used to be and belongs forever). I heard he hides his stash in those green electrical boxes that are on the pavements, so please police use the sniffer dogs and clamp down on these dangerous animals who have no respect for anyone in society and think they can get away with it
[quote][p][bold]pete woodley[/bold] wrote: Very well done,by the Police.Carry on there is a lot more out there,and even bigger "bosses".[/p][/quote]I agree totally, with this comment, well done police and there are plenty more that should be locked up. Every time I read these echo reports, I keep my fingers crossed, that one thug, I had the unpleasent experience of working with is put behind bars (where he used to be and belongs forever). I heard he hides his stash in those green electrical boxes that are on the pavements, so please police use the sniffer dogs and clamp down on these dangerous animals who have no respect for anyone in society and think they can get away with it ASM
  • Score: 0

5:30am Sun 17 Jun 12

EGHH says...

In my youth in 70s a certain member of the aristocracy used to go to the hippie camp at Stonehenge in his chauffeur driven Rolls-Royce to supply "African smoking mixture" to the hippies there. His position kept him from being nicked by the local law. I was told this by several of the residents whom I'd meet at the free festivals at the Stones.
In my youth in 70s a certain member of the aristocracy used to go to the hippie camp at Stonehenge in his chauffeur driven Rolls-Royce to supply "African smoking mixture" to the hippies there. His position kept him from being nicked by the local law. I was told this by several of the residents whom I'd meet at the free festivals at the Stones. EGHH
  • Score: 0

7:02am Sun 17 Jun 12

Gastines2 says...

Lets just hope that the Police keep a strict operation going. A focus on Boscombe/Pokesdown would be a good start but as well as puting the local suppliers away ,I hope this is follwed up the chain to the main importers and finding out how easily they manage to get such huge supplies into the country. I just hope the massive amounts of money they have to hand doesn't bring them immunity!!!
Pity the billions spent in Afghanistan isn't used to eradicate the poppy fields, or at worse,buying the crop,keeping enough for medical purposes and destroying the rest. Never understood with satellite cameras why the fields aren't spotted and burnt. The billions spent could then be used to help the population in many useful areas,health,educati
on,sanitation and farming a crop that doesn't bring death and destruction to themselves and families throughout the world.
Lets just hope that the Police keep a strict operation going. A focus on Boscombe/Pokesdown would be a good start but as well as puting the local suppliers away ,I hope this is follwed up the chain to the main importers and finding out how easily they manage to get such huge supplies into the country. I just hope the massive amounts of money they have to hand doesn't bring them immunity!!! Pity the billions spent in Afghanistan isn't used to eradicate the poppy fields, or at worse,buying the crop,keeping enough for medical purposes and destroying the rest. Never understood with satellite cameras why the fields aren't spotted and burnt. The billions spent could then be used to help the population in many useful areas,health,educati on,sanitation and farming a crop that doesn't bring death and destruction to themselves and families throughout the world. Gastines2
  • Score: 0

8:02am Sun 17 Jun 12

rudestickers says...

Putting drug dealers in prison doesn't stop them dealing, they'll be free to deal to the people in prison! Prisons are far from drug free environments, Countries gone mad. But I'd rather they were poisoning low lifes like themselves.
Putting drug dealers in prison doesn't stop them dealing, they'll be free to deal to the people in prison! Prisons are far from drug free environments, Countries gone mad. But I'd rather they were poisoning low lifes like themselves. rudestickers
  • Score: 0

9:36am Sun 17 Jun 12

Capricorn 1 says...

Gastines2 wrote:
Lets just hope that the Police keep a strict operation going. A focus on Boscombe/Pokesdown would be a good start but as well as puting the local suppliers away ,I hope this is follwed up the chain to the main importers and finding out how easily they manage to get such huge supplies into the country. I just hope the massive amounts of money they have to hand doesn't bring them immunity!!!
Pity the billions spent in Afghanistan isn't used to eradicate the poppy fields, or at worse,buying the crop,keeping enough for medical purposes and destroying the rest. Never understood with satellite cameras why the fields aren't spotted and burnt. The billions spent could then be used to help the population in many useful areas,health,educati

on,sanitation and farming a crop that doesn't bring death and destruction to themselves and families throughout the world.
The Taliban pretty much put a stop to the production of heroin in Afghanistan.

Poppy cultivation increased after the US led invasion.
[quote][p][bold]Gastines2[/bold] wrote: Lets just hope that the Police keep a strict operation going. A focus on Boscombe/Pokesdown would be a good start but as well as puting the local suppliers away ,I hope this is follwed up the chain to the main importers and finding out how easily they manage to get such huge supplies into the country. I just hope the massive amounts of money they have to hand doesn't bring them immunity!!! Pity the billions spent in Afghanistan isn't used to eradicate the poppy fields, or at worse,buying the crop,keeping enough for medical purposes and destroying the rest. Never understood with satellite cameras why the fields aren't spotted and burnt. The billions spent could then be used to help the population in many useful areas,health,educati on,sanitation and farming a crop that doesn't bring death and destruction to themselves and families throughout the world.[/p][/quote]The Taliban pretty much put a stop to the production of heroin in Afghanistan. Poppy cultivation increased after the US led invasion. Capricorn 1
  • Score: 0

10:32am Sun 17 Jun 12

pete woodley says...

Gastines2,Are you forgetting that Pokesdown is a enterprising rejuvenated area,real vintage,so they say.Its the in place.
Gastines2,Are you forgetting that Pokesdown is a enterprising rejuvenated area,real vintage,so they say.Its the in place. pete woodley
  • Score: 0

7:51am Mon 18 Jun 12

nevernever says...

There is an associate of these people that lives in Boscombe and he is well at it, dealing class A.I have told the Police but he seems to get away with it, it did a few years at Her Majesty pleasure now he brags he will never get caught !!!!
There is an associate of these people that lives in Boscombe and he is well at it, dealing class A.I have told the Police but he seems to get away with it, it did a few years at Her Majesty pleasure now he brags he will never get caught !!!! nevernever
  • Score: 0

11:18am Mon 18 Jun 12

HRH of Boscombe says...

lisa401 is Glucose powder really such a dangerous chemical?
.
As a pharmacist with so much study behind you aren't you aware of the most common cutting agent?
lisa401 is Glucose powder really such a dangerous chemical? . As a pharmacist with so much study behind you aren't you aware of the most common cutting agent? HRH of Boscombe
  • Score: 0

1:43pm Mon 18 Jun 12

Capricorn 1 says...

That's assuming that that is what they are using as a cutting agent.

It doesn't come with an ingredients list!

It doesn't come with a health warning either!
That's assuming that that is what they are using as a cutting agent. It doesn't come with an ingredients list! It doesn't come with a health warning either! Capricorn 1
  • Score: 0

3:11pm Mon 18 Jun 12

chrspeters says...

This has been a very interesting thread to read.

First, a pat on the back for our Police for bringing these low-life to court. I have always respected the majority of our British Police, just like I do our Armed Forces. However, as has been said earlier, our British Judges have not only let them down them many times, but also us good citizens.

This is not only the case for drug offenders but for many other serious offences right across the spectrum where the perpetrator is often given what has now been long coined as, 'A Slap on the Wrist!'

Maybe its time for the rules to be changed. Instead of old stuffy boring Judges, who don't live in the real world, giving out sentences – it should be left to the Jury (who often do), to decide what is proper, fitting and more as a real punishment. If twelve honest people can decide on guilt or not, I feel sure that they can also determine what is a 'fair' punishment for the person before them, taking in all things including their known previous record.

Today, it just seems to me that all a 'scallywag' has to do before appearing before the Beak, is wear a smart suit. Every regular criminal keeps one in their wardrobe for their own 'special' occasions and the Judges always soak it up!
This has been a very interesting thread to read. First, a pat on the back for our Police for bringing these low-life to court. I have always respected the majority of our British Police, just like I do our Armed Forces. However, as has been said earlier, our British Judges have not only let them down them many times, but also us good citizens. This is not only the case for drug offenders but for many other serious offences right across the spectrum where the perpetrator is often given what has now been long coined as, 'A Slap on the Wrist!' Maybe its time for the rules to be changed. Instead of old stuffy boring Judges, who don't live in the real world, giving out sentences – it should be left to the Jury (who often do), to decide what is proper, fitting and more as a real punishment. If twelve honest people can decide on guilt or not, I feel sure that they can also determine what is a 'fair' punishment for the person before them, taking in all things including their known previous record. Today, it just seems to me that all a 'scallywag' has to do before appearing before the Beak, is wear a smart suit. Every regular criminal keeps one in their wardrobe for their own 'special' occasions and the Judges always soak it up! chrspeters
  • Score: 0

10:50am Tue 19 Jun 12

Norwegian Justice says...

Give them all an ASBO!!! LOL!
Give them all an ASBO!!! LOL! Norwegian Justice
  • Score: 0

5:28pm Thu 21 Jun 12

FNS-man says...

John T wrote:
Capricorn 1 wrote:
lisa401 wrote: As a pharmacist I had to study for four and a half years (as well as A level physics biology & chemistry), yet these people were cutting the cocaine with other (poisonous) chemicals ready for distribution, with the end user unaware of what substances were in it & what quantities they were taking. This is quite frightening and one of the reasons why most class A drugs should be legalised.
I've argued about legalising drugs in order to pull the rug from under the feet of criminals. The current system is a godsend to criminals.
And don't you realise that legalising drugs will lead to more driving and other offences being committed under the influence of drugs. I guess you would also argue that an 8 week sentence is quite alright for a driver under the influence of cannabis who killed a young girl.
Why?

When cannabis was reduced to a class C drug temporarily, its use went down. Legalisation doesn't necessarily mean that usage will go up.

If drugs are legal then people don't become criminals simply by wanting to take them. Is there something so wrong in wanting to snort a few lines of cocaine occasionally? I'm not sure why it's considered so different to alchohol. Both have pernicious effects, but one is illegal and the other not. And MDMA has very few downsides in health or social terms, especially when compared to tobacco or alchohol, and yet it's a class A drug. We are involving a large swathe of the population in crime by making their drug of choice illegal. If they were legal, then you could buy them from licensed premises, and it would all be a lot more civilised.

If that scenario is so wrong then we should probably be stringing up pub landlords.
[quote][p][bold]John T[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Capricorn 1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]lisa401[/bold] wrote: As a pharmacist I had to study for four and a half years (as well as A level physics biology & chemistry), yet these people were cutting the cocaine with other (poisonous) chemicals ready for distribution, with the end user unaware of what substances were in it & what quantities they were taking. This is quite frightening and one of the reasons why most class A drugs should be legalised.[/p][/quote]I've argued about legalising drugs in order to pull the rug from under the feet of criminals. The current system is a godsend to criminals.[/p][/quote]And don't you realise that legalising drugs will lead to more driving and other offences being committed under the influence of drugs. I guess you would also argue that an 8 week sentence is quite alright for a driver under the influence of cannabis who killed a young girl.[/p][/quote]Why? When cannabis was reduced to a class C drug temporarily, its use went down. Legalisation doesn't necessarily mean that usage will go up. If drugs are legal then people don't become criminals simply by wanting to take them. Is there something so wrong in wanting to snort a few lines of cocaine occasionally? I'm not sure why it's considered so different to alchohol. Both have pernicious effects, but one is illegal and the other not. And MDMA has very few downsides in health or social terms, especially when compared to tobacco or alchohol, and yet it's a class A drug. We are involving a large swathe of the population in crime by making their drug of choice illegal. If they were legal, then you could buy them from licensed premises, and it would all be a lot more civilised. If that scenario is so wrong then we should probably be stringing up pub landlords. FNS-man
  • Score: 0

2:47pm Fri 22 Jun 12

Frogsporn says...

Justin666 wrote:
AdamSFC wrote:
Justin666 wrote:
John T wrote:
Justin666 wrote:
Wouldn't a fitting punishment be to give them all a dose of their own medicine over a protracted period of time then keep them locked up for life... minus supplies?
As the devil in disguise, would it not be Just in your line to administer this?!
Would love to administer this and would ensure using a blunt and much used needle picked up randomely in the park.
You "would love to administer this"? Not really a righteous warrior of social justice are you? You are just a sadistic and depraved individual with fantasies about torturing people. Whatever your opinions on drugs and drug dealers are this is disgraceful when you actually stop your knee jerking for a minute and actually think about what you are proposing and how this would actually be achieved. I find people like you much more worrying than the people in this article. I hate to use the cliche but you are the exact sort of people that would be volunteering for the Einsatzgruppen (look it up) had you been born a few decades earlier and somewhere around Germany.
I take it that the the 'social justice' you refer to is working. With a 50% (conservative estimate) of re-offenders I think you had better come up with something a little better than your diatribe. I also think that you may need to adjust your thinking if you really believe that the Devil is to be taken seriously in his extreme views. Suggest a little growing up may do you some good. I look forward to seeing a more positive comment from you demonstrating your grasp of the problem and conceivably offering some solutions as others have done. Perhaps I ask too much. I do not have to look up Einsatzgruppen as I helped form it.
You helped form the SS paramilitary death squads?

Really?
[quote][p][bold]Justin666[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]AdamSFC[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Justin666[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]John T[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Justin666[/bold] wrote: Wouldn't a fitting punishment be to give them all a dose of their own medicine over a protracted period of time then keep them locked up for life... minus supplies?[/p][/quote]As the devil in disguise, would it not be Just in your line to administer this?![/p][/quote]Would love to administer this and would ensure using a blunt and much used needle picked up randomely in the park.[/p][/quote]You "would love to administer this"? Not really a righteous warrior of social justice are you? You are just a sadistic and depraved individual with fantasies about torturing people. Whatever your opinions on drugs and drug dealers are this is disgraceful when you actually stop your knee jerking for a minute and actually think about what you are proposing and how this would actually be achieved. I find people like you much more worrying than the people in this article. I hate to use the cliche but you are the exact sort of people that would be volunteering for the Einsatzgruppen (look it up) had you been born a few decades earlier and somewhere around Germany.[/p][/quote]I take it that the the 'social justice' you refer to is working. With a 50% (conservative estimate) of re-offenders I think you had better come up with something a little better than your diatribe. I also think that you may need to adjust your thinking if you really believe that the Devil is to be taken seriously in his extreme views. Suggest a little growing up may do you some good. I look forward to seeing a more positive comment from you demonstrating your grasp of the problem and conceivably offering some solutions as others have done. Perhaps I ask too much. I do not have to look up Einsatzgruppen as I helped form it.[/p][/quote]You helped form the SS paramilitary death squads? Really? Frogsporn
  • Score: 0

2:54am Mon 2 Jul 12

Just a friend says...

I hate what they did, but I feel sorry to the families that are stuck with the horror. Some didn't know what happened, until their husband/family member was taken to prison. The children of the men, must have been horrified to see their fathers names or faces spread across the newspaper. I know these men have done terrible acts of crime, but I feel that the mens family's shouldn't have to know if people want those people to be dead. Those men are in prison and probably can't see what people are saying on the internet, but their familys do. A little bit of disgression would be nice, personally I think these men should get punished but I wouldn't go right out and say ' Why bother with prison. Just drop them down a disused mine shaft head first
I hate what they did, but I feel sorry to the families that are stuck with the horror. Some didn't know what happened, until their husband/family member was taken to prison. The children of the men, must have been horrified to see their fathers names or faces spread across the newspaper. I know these men have done terrible acts of crime, but I feel that the mens family's shouldn't have to know if people want those people to be dead. Those men are in prison and probably can't see what people are saying on the internet, but their familys do. A little bit of disgression would be nice, personally I think these men should get punished but I wouldn't go right out and say ' Why bother with prison. Just drop them down a disused mine shaft head first Just a friend
  • Score: 0

2:55am Mon 2 Jul 12

Just a friend says...

I hate what they did, but I feel sorry to the families that are stuck with the horror. Some didn't know what happened, until their husband/family member was taken to prison. The children of the men, must have been horrified to see their fathers names or faces spread across the newspaper. I know these men have done terrible acts of crime, but I feel that the mens family's shouldn't have to know if people want those people to be dead. Those men are in prison and probably can't see what people are saying on the internet, but their familys do. A little bit of disgression would be nice, personally I think these men should get punished but I wouldn't go right out and say ' Why bother with prison. Just drop them down a disused mine shaft head first
I hate what they did, but I feel sorry to the families that are stuck with the horror. Some didn't know what happened, until their husband/family member was taken to prison. The children of the men, must have been horrified to see their fathers names or faces spread across the newspaper. I know these men have done terrible acts of crime, but I feel that the mens family's shouldn't have to know if people want those people to be dead. Those men are in prison and probably can't see what people are saying on the internet, but their familys do. A little bit of disgression would be nice, personally I think these men should get punished but I wouldn't go right out and say ' Why bother with prison. Just drop them down a disused mine shaft head first Just a friend
  • Score: 0

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