Turn the lights off and light a candle to commemorate WWI

LIGHTS OUT: Bournemouth Youth Marching Band

LIGHTS OUT: Bournemouth Youth Marching Band

First published in News by

CHRISTCHURCH will mark the centenary of the start of World War One with a special Lights Out event in Saxon Square.

The event on Monday, August 4 will complement a candlelit vigil of prayer being held at Westminster Abbey.

The organisers of the vigil, 14-18 NOW, are asking people throughout the country to turn the lights out for an hour from 10pm leaving just one candle burning in their window.

The event starts at 8pm with a display of WW1 artefacts, literature, paintings and photographs from Christchurch Library and curated pieces from Christchurch Junior School and organisations.

Music, songs and poems will take place from 9pm to 10pm in the Square with the Christchurch & District Band.

The programme will end with the Last Post played by the director of the Royal British Legion Band and a minute’s silence.

The lights in Saxon Square will go out at 10pm leaving a single candle in the window of the Mayor’s Parlour overlooking the Square.

The town has already started its World War One commemorations with a special Tribute to the Fallen event taking place at Christchurch Quay last weekend.

The Mayor of Christchurch, Cllr Denise Jones, said: “I hope that people will come along to join us to mark the centenary of the conflict in which so many of our ancestors and relatives lost their lives.

“I also hope that people will join in the Lights Out event by extinguishing all lights but one candle in their homes for an hour that evening.”

Comments (6)

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11:36pm Sun 27 Jul 14

Yankee1 says...

I am sorry, but it seems rather pointless to commemorate an event that happened and has no living survivors.

By all means recall the date, but focus more on modern conflicts, which are legion, and move ahead. Personally, I would prefer children to learn the significant of Remembrance Day, than an assassination of a minor prince in a world far removed from today.
I am sorry, but it seems rather pointless to commemorate an event that happened and has no living survivors. By all means recall the date, but focus more on modern conflicts, which are legion, and move ahead. Personally, I would prefer children to learn the significant of Remembrance Day, than an assassination of a minor prince in a world far removed from today. Yankee1
  • Score: -6

2:00am Mon 28 Jul 14

Bob49 says...

err, I think you'll find thats what this is - a rememberance of the day when this horror began

perhaps you are confusing the assassination of the Archduke Ferdinand (28th June) with the day Britain declared war on Germany (4th August)

if so, perhaps you are not the best person to judge what should be taught to children ?
err, I think you'll find thats what this is - a rememberance of the day when this horror began perhaps you are confusing the assassination of the Archduke Ferdinand (28th June) with the day Britain declared war on Germany (4th August) if so, perhaps you are not the best person to judge what should be taught to children ? Bob49
  • Score: 8

4:27am Mon 28 Jul 14

twynhamob says...

Bob49, I think you missed the solid point offered by Yankee1. I remember something about a king being disposed of by some guy from Normandy, around 948 years ago, should I light a candle for him, what about those naughty Scots(picts) England fought against, not to mention the many problems with the frogs (sorry, French) then the Zulu's, and on and on. If we remember each event then remembrance day would be about once a month. I agree with Yankee1 in as much as I thought that the one day in November, known as Remembrance Day, was GB's way of honouring ALL.
Bob49, I think you missed the solid point offered by Yankee1. I remember something about a king being disposed of by some guy from Normandy, around 948 years ago, should I light a candle for him, what about those naughty Scots(picts) England fought against, not to mention the many problems with the frogs (sorry, French) then the Zulu's, and on and on. If we remember each event then remembrance day would be about once a month. I agree with Yankee1 in as much as I thought that the one day in November, known as Remembrance Day, was GB's way of honouring ALL. twynhamob
  • Score: 0

11:20am Mon 28 Jul 14

The Witch says...

Yankee1 wrote:
I am sorry, but it seems rather pointless to commemorate an event that happened and has no living survivors.

By all means recall the date, but focus more on modern conflicts, which are legion, and move ahead. Personally, I would prefer children to learn the significant of Remembrance Day, than an assassination of a minor prince in a world far removed from today.
Bit of an ironic comment from a Yankee whose country still celebrates 4th July, let me see don't think there is anyone alive who would remember this advent!
[quote][p][bold]Yankee1[/bold] wrote: I am sorry, but it seems rather pointless to commemorate an event that happened and has no living survivors. By all means recall the date, but focus more on modern conflicts, which are legion, and move ahead. Personally, I would prefer children to learn the significant of Remembrance Day, than an assassination of a minor prince in a world far removed from today.[/p][/quote]Bit of an ironic comment from a Yankee whose country still celebrates 4th July, let me see don't think there is anyone alive who would remember this advent! The Witch
  • Score: 2

1:48pm Mon 28 Jul 14

H2o-hara says...

I understand all the above comments as it is true that this nation spends too much time and money mourning and remembering past wars and victories instead of getting on with current affairs of today and tomorrow .
By all means take note of the dates . But to go on and on carrying out mock battles and imitating what it was like and so on is taking it all too far .
Can't we like all other nations just keep it to Remembrance Day ?
Life is for living and not the opposite .
I understand all the above comments as it is true that this nation spends too much time and money mourning and remembering past wars and victories instead of getting on with current affairs of today and tomorrow . By all means take note of the dates . But to go on and on carrying out mock battles and imitating what it was like and so on is taking it all too far . Can't we like all other nations just keep it to Remembrance Day ? Life is for living and not the opposite . H2o-hara
  • Score: -1

11:45pm Mon 28 Jul 14

Yankee1 says...

The Witch wrote:
Yankee1 wrote:
I am sorry, but it seems rather pointless to commemorate an event that happened and has no living survivors.

By all means recall the date, but focus more on modern conflicts, which are legion, and move ahead. Personally, I would prefer children to learn the significant of Remembrance Day, than an assassination of a minor prince in a world far removed from today.
Bit of an ironic comment from a Yankee whose country still celebrates 4th July, let me see don't think there is anyone alive who would remember this advent!
Well, we have rather lost the point of the 4th of July, I will admit. But it signifies the birth of a nation with a Constitution and a Bill of Rights, two items the UK has still to adopt, some 238 years after the US did.

I am a dual national, so your comment rolls off my back like water off a duck. But understand this: most people today would prefer to be a citizen, than a subject. We have moved beyond the subservience of the past, however quaint it may seem.
[quote][p][bold]The Witch[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Yankee1[/bold] wrote: I am sorry, but it seems rather pointless to commemorate an event that happened and has no living survivors. By all means recall the date, but focus more on modern conflicts, which are legion, and move ahead. Personally, I would prefer children to learn the significant of Remembrance Day, than an assassination of a minor prince in a world far removed from today.[/p][/quote]Bit of an ironic comment from a Yankee whose country still celebrates 4th July, let me see don't think there is anyone alive who would remember this advent![/p][/quote]Well, we have rather lost the point of the 4th of July, I will admit. But it signifies the birth of a nation with a Constitution and a Bill of Rights, two items the UK has still to adopt, some 238 years after the US did. I am a dual national, so your comment rolls off my back like water off a duck. But understand this: most people today would prefer to be a citizen, than a subject. We have moved beyond the subservience of the past, however quaint it may seem. Yankee1
  • Score: -1

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