Hundreds of workers stage demonstration in Bournemouth on day of public sector strike

VIDEO: "We want fair pay" - hundreds of workers take part in march on day of strike action

VIDEO: "We want fair pay" - hundreds of workers take part in march on day of strike action

VIDEO: "We want fair pay" - hundreds of workers take part in march on day of strike action

VIDEO: "We want fair pay" - hundreds of workers take part in march on day of strike action

First published in News
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AROUND 300 striking workers, many wearing Victorian fancy dress, staged a demonstration in Bournemouth calling for an end to “poverty wages”.

Local government workers and union officials marked a day of strike action by marching from Bournemouth Pier to the BIC, where the Local Government Association conference is being held.

They chanted “We didn’t cause the banking crisis” and “We want fair pay” and brandished a poster depicting Prime Minister David Cameron as a jester and saying that a one per cent proposed pay rise was a joke.

 

Bournemouth social worker Heather Cusack, who was there with her two-year-old daughter Robyn Payne, said: “Our pay has been cut and it’s getting harder and harder for us at home and in the workplace too.

“We’ve got to do more with less. One per cent is an insult.”

See how the strike unfolded in Dorset in our live coverage of the day's events

And another social worker, who gave her name as Dee, said: “We’re massively understaffed. I guess I’m on a higher pay rate than most of the workers, that’s what concerns me.

“People in admin and in unskilled jobs, what are they going to do with one per cent? It’s working poverty.”

Carol Freeman, who works in Ferndown library, said: “There are so many low paid women who work for the county council. People are struggling, people in work are going to foodbanks.”

And Chris Miles, who is a care assistant, said: “I reckon I get about 40 pence more per hour than if I worked on the checkout at Tesco.

“We’re expected to do a lot for that, we look after vulnerable people. A lot is expected of us and I would like to see people who do these jobs paid a decent wage.”

Bournemouth council leader John Beesley had criticised the unions for choosing to demonstrate outside the BIC, saying it would send out the “wrong message” for the town.

Many passing motorists tooted their horns in support but not everyone was so supportive, with one passer-by telling strikers: “You’re lucky to have a job.”

 

Comments (7)

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6:51pm Thu 10 Jul 14

Turtlebay says...

They have jobs and aren't happy.

Here's an idea. If you don't like what is on offer, leave! Doubt you'll get another job with anyone else though!
They have jobs and aren't happy. Here's an idea. If you don't like what is on offer, leave! Doubt you'll get another job with anyone else though! Turtlebay
  • Score: -6

7:44pm Thu 10 Jul 14

alasdair1967 says...

The thing is we are all in the same boat be it employed in the public sector or private sector , the cost of living has increased far more than pay increases the difference in the public sector you can get away with striking try doing that in the private sector !
The thing is we are all in the same boat be it employed in the public sector or private sector , the cost of living has increased far more than pay increases the difference in the public sector you can get away with striking try doing that in the private sector ! alasdair1967
  • Score: 6

10:05pm Thu 10 Jul 14

Ragwin says...

Found these numbers for their pay scales, but goes back to 2012.

Lowest pay scale salary is £12,145 with £2,283 contributed towards their pension. Totals £14,428 for the year.

The median average pay was £18,453 with £3,469 contributed towards their pension. Totals £21,922 for the year.

Public sector workers get paid a bit less because they receive healthy contributions towards their pensions paid for by the net tax payers.
Found these numbers for their pay scales, but goes back to 2012. Lowest pay scale salary is £12,145 with £2,283 contributed towards their pension. Totals £14,428 for the year. The median average pay was £18,453 with £3,469 contributed towards their pension. Totals £21,922 for the year. Public sector workers get paid a bit less because they receive healthy contributions towards their pensions paid for by the net tax payers. Ragwin
  • Score: -7

5:41am Fri 11 Jul 14

Lord Parkstone says...

Selfish militants. Never mind the rest of us that are in the same boat yet dont have the luxury of striking. Teachers have always been the same= troublemakers. Not a good example to set our young children. Its their career choice they knew the pay and conditions before they started.
The average man on the street has to put up with rising cost of living and no pay rise. If he doesnt like his job pay or conditions he changes jobs.
Put these militant idiots in Afghanistan on a soldiers pay a d conditions then see if what they get here is unfair. The soldier chooses his career exactly the same he knows the pay and conditions but does his job anyway without moaning.
Selfish militants. Never mind the rest of us that are in the same boat yet dont have the luxury of striking. Teachers have always been the same= troublemakers. Not a good example to set our young children. Its their career choice they knew the pay and conditions before they started. The average man on the street has to put up with rising cost of living and no pay rise. If he doesnt like his job pay or conditions he changes jobs. Put these militant idiots in Afghanistan on a soldiers pay a d conditions then see if what they get here is unfair. The soldier chooses his career exactly the same he knows the pay and conditions but does his job anyway without moaning. Lord Parkstone
  • Score: -5

7:23am Fri 11 Jul 14

chucky251 says...

Teachers are there to teach our kids??? is this really what we want them taught its a joke the government need to now step in and make changes to protect the areas these people keep striking in.

get a complete crew of cover teachers and firemen and so on so when they go on strike were completely covered so they don't get what they want.
Teachers are there to teach our kids??? is this really what we want them taught its a joke the government need to now step in and make changes to protect the areas these people keep striking in. get a complete crew of cover teachers and firemen and so on so when they go on strike were completely covered so they don't get what they want. chucky251
  • Score: -6

3:54pm Fri 11 Jul 14

rozmister says...

Ragwin wrote:
Found these numbers for their pay scales, but goes back to 2012.

Lowest pay scale salary is £12,145 with £2,283 contributed towards their pension. Totals £14,428 for the year.

The median average pay was £18,453 with £3,469 contributed towards their pension. Totals £21,922 for the year.

Public sector workers get paid a bit less because they receive healthy contributions towards their pensions paid for by the net tax payers.
They make contributions out of their salary as well though. An employee on £18.5k would contribute about £100 a month so £1200 per year. So their salary is actually £17.3k after pension contributions. If they don't join the pension scheme and put that money in the council won't put in the £3,469 that they contribute. So that worker would take home £18.5k and never see the extra £3,469.
[quote][p][bold]Ragwin[/bold] wrote: Found these numbers for their pay scales, but goes back to 2012. Lowest pay scale salary is £12,145 with £2,283 contributed towards their pension. Totals £14,428 for the year. The median average pay was £18,453 with £3,469 contributed towards their pension. Totals £21,922 for the year. Public sector workers get paid a bit less because they receive healthy contributions towards their pensions paid for by the net tax payers.[/p][/quote]They make contributions out of their salary as well though. An employee on £18.5k would contribute about £100 a month so £1200 per year. So their salary is actually £17.3k after pension contributions. If they don't join the pension scheme and put that money in the council won't put in the £3,469 that they contribute. So that worker would take home £18.5k and never see the extra £3,469. rozmister
  • Score: 1

4:35pm Sun 13 Jul 14

STEVEUK444 says...

People need to understand that rich people need poor people for them to survive, poor people have to borrow money, pay overdraft fees, interest rates, fines, renting rather than owning and anything else that can keep you in debt. Rich people earn interest from our debts and they don't need to borrow money.
Money is debt, for you to have £100 in your pocket someone else needs to be £100 in debt. Without debt money would cease to exist, which is why they pay us with paper IOU's and digital numbers that don't even physically exist.
How many times have we seen people protesting against poverty level wages?
How many times have they got what they asked for?
They even have the gall to pay bankers huge bonuses for putting the poor in more debt and MP pay rises right after the expenses scandal and all we do is moan and wave banners at them.
People need to understand that rich people need poor people for them to survive, poor people have to borrow money, pay overdraft fees, interest rates, fines, renting rather than owning and anything else that can keep you in debt. Rich people earn interest from our debts and they don't need to borrow money. Money is debt, for you to have £100 in your pocket someone else needs to be £100 in debt. Without debt money would cease to exist, which is why they pay us with paper IOU's and digital numbers that don't even physically exist. How many times have we seen people protesting against poverty level wages? How many times have they got what they asked for? They even have the gall to pay bankers huge bonuses for putting the poor in more debt and MP pay rises right after the expenses scandal and all we do is moan and wave banners at them. STEVEUK444
  • Score: 0

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