UPDATE: Teachers' strike: see which schools are closed in Dorset

Bournemouth Echo: Public sector strike: see which schools will be closed on Thursday in Dorset Public sector strike: see which schools will be closed on Thursday in Dorset

Staying open

Bournemouth

Christchurch

Poole

East Dorset

Closing

Bournemouth

Christchurch

  • Christchurch Junior School
  • Mudeford Junior School.

Poole

  • Ad Astra Infant School
  • Montacute Special School
  • Oakdale Junior School
  • Winchelsea School.

Partially open

Bournemouth

Linwood School.

Christchurch

Christchurch Infant School, Burton Primary School.

Poole

  • Bearwood Primary and Nursery
  • Longfleet CE VC Primary School
  • Longspee Special School
  • Hamworthy Park Junior School
  • St Joseph’s RC VA Primary
  • Branksome Heath Junior.
  • Turlin Moor Community School

East Dorset

  • Corfe Hills School, opens at 11am
  • Wimborne First School, only reception and year one classes closed
  • Queen Elizabeth School, year 9 and 10 not open but teaching for year 12 is going ahead

Purbeck

The Purbeck School, closed to Year 9 students but open to all other students

Comments (102)

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6:13am Wed 9 Jul 14

roamer200 says...

Shame on you all. Another pressure on honest working families having to now find child care or lose work. If you don't want the job I am sure someone else does.
Shame on you all. Another pressure on honest working families having to now find child care or lose work. If you don't want the job I am sure someone else does. roamer200
  • Score: -7

6:19am Wed 9 Jul 14

fedupwithjobsworths says...

Teachers on strike yet again,, what a surprise! Many hard working peoples lives being disrupted again, and many poorer people losing wages as a result ... shame on all you selfish teachers.
Teachers on strike yet again,, what a surprise! Many hard working peoples lives being disrupted again, and many poorer people losing wages as a result ... shame on all you selfish teachers. fedupwithjobsworths
  • Score: -21

7:04am Wed 9 Jul 14

wannabewriter says...

It's not just teachers but unison, unite and GMB so hopefully you will be inconvenienced in other ways too other than having to find an alternative babysitter because we live in a country where democratic rights can be exercised. Have you any idea WHY there is industrial action - IT IS NOT THE PAY.
It's not just teachers but unison, unite and GMB so hopefully you will be inconvenienced in other ways too other than having to find an alternative babysitter because we live in a country where democratic rights can be exercised. Have you any idea WHY there is industrial action - IT IS NOT THE PAY. wannabewriter
  • Score: 45

7:12am Wed 9 Jul 14

Vortigern says...

wannabewriter wrote:
It's not just teachers but unison, unite and GMB so hopefully you will be inconvenienced in other ways too other than having to find an alternative babysitter because we live in a country where democratic rights can be exercised. Have you any idea WHY there is industrial action - IT IS NOT THE PAY.
It is to the people who are losing it to make sure their children are taken care of.
[quote][p][bold]wannabewriter[/bold] wrote: It's not just teachers but unison, unite and GMB so hopefully you will be inconvenienced in other ways too other than having to find an alternative babysitter because we live in a country where democratic rights can be exercised. Have you any idea WHY there is industrial action - IT IS NOT THE PAY.[/p][/quote]It is to the people who are losing it to make sure their children are taken care of. Vortigern
  • Score: 9

7:16am Wed 9 Jul 14

fedupwithjobsworths says...

wannabewriter wrote:
It's not just teachers but unison, unite and GMB so hopefully you will be inconvenienced in other ways too other than having to find an alternative babysitter because we live in a country where democratic rights can be exercised. Have you any idea WHY there is industrial action - IT IS NOT THE PAY.
Yeah right, its nothing to do with pay ,,, pull the other one. Your comment that you hope we are unconvinced in other ways just goes to show how selfish you are! We live in a democratic society so please deal free to get a different job if you are unhappy, and stop ruining the education of children and causing many low paid parents to lose pay by your inconsiderate selfish actions
[quote][p][bold]wannabewriter[/bold] wrote: It's not just teachers but unison, unite and GMB so hopefully you will be inconvenienced in other ways too other than having to find an alternative babysitter because we live in a country where democratic rights can be exercised. Have you any idea WHY there is industrial action - IT IS NOT THE PAY.[/p][/quote]Yeah right, its nothing to do with pay ,,, pull the other one. Your comment that you hope we are unconvinced in other ways just goes to show how selfish you are! We live in a democratic society so please deal free to get a different job if you are unhappy, and stop ruining the education of children and causing many low paid parents to lose pay by your inconsiderate selfish actions fedupwithjobsworths
  • Score: -23

7:43am Wed 9 Jul 14

bosco1 says...

Dont go on strike in the school holidays do they.!! No they manage to fit it in term time.!
Dont go on strike in the school holidays do they.!! No they manage to fit it in term time.! bosco1
  • Score: 2

7:48am Wed 9 Jul 14

maru says...

wannabewriter wrote:
It's not just teachers but unison, unite and GMB so hopefully you will be inconvenienced in other ways too other than having to find an alternative babysitter because we live in a country where democratic rights can be exercised. Have you any idea WHY there is industrial action - IT IS NOT THE PAY.
no
[quote][p][bold]wannabewriter[/bold] wrote: It's not just teachers but unison, unite and GMB so hopefully you will be inconvenienced in other ways too other than having to find an alternative babysitter because we live in a country where democratic rights can be exercised. Have you any idea WHY there is industrial action - IT IS NOT THE PAY.[/p][/quote]no maru
  • Score: 11

7:48am Wed 9 Jul 14

Bpl333 says...

Strikes should be in august....
Strikes should be in august.... Bpl333
  • Score: -19

8:00am Wed 9 Jul 14

Marty Caine UKIP says...

wannabewriter wrote:
It's not just teachers but unison, unite and GMB so hopefully you will be inconvenienced in other ways too other than having to find an alternative babysitter because we live in a country where democratic rights can be exercised. Have you any idea WHY there is industrial action - IT IS NOT THE PAY.
Hopefully people will be inconvenienced in others ways? Please tell me you are not a teacher!

Do feel free to enlighten me though, if the strike is not about pay and pensions then what is it really about, because it certainly seem to be a pay related strike to me.
[quote][p][bold]wannabewriter[/bold] wrote: It's not just teachers but unison, unite and GMB so hopefully you will be inconvenienced in other ways too other than having to find an alternative babysitter because we live in a country where democratic rights can be exercised. Have you any idea WHY there is industrial action - IT IS NOT THE PAY.[/p][/quote]Hopefully people will be inconvenienced in others ways? Please tell me you are not a teacher! Do feel free to enlighten me though, if the strike is not about pay and pensions then what is it really about, because it certainly seem to be a pay related strike to me. Marty Caine UKIP
  • Score: 5

8:11am Wed 9 Jul 14

boardsandphotos says...

roamer200 wrote:
Shame on you all. Another pressure on honest working families having to now find child care or lose work. If you don't want the job I am sure someone else does.
So no Teachers are part of honest hard working families then? Teachers aren't parents too with the same bills and outgoings as the rest of us?
[quote][p][bold]roamer200[/bold] wrote: Shame on you all. Another pressure on honest working families having to now find child care or lose work. If you don't want the job I am sure someone else does.[/p][/quote]So no Teachers are part of honest hard working families then? Teachers aren't parents too with the same bills and outgoings as the rest of us? boardsandphotos
  • Score: 22

8:30am Wed 9 Jul 14

Carolyn43 says...

As a teacher who retired 17 years ago, I can honestly say I wouldn't do the job today. Conditions are now worse than I experienced. Even then is was an average of 60 hours a week (preparation, marking, reports, meetings outside school time, plus out-of-school activities); trying to teach 30 children who are allowed to do as they like by parents and who then blame teachers for their lack of discipline; no choice on what you do when in your working day - it's timetabled; no support from parents; pressure in trying to get not-very-bright children through exams; more and more paperwork from central government; frequent changes in what and how is taught, and a not very good pension at the end of it all. In spite of that I wouldn't have wanted to do any other job because of the satisfaction in seeing youngsters succeed through their own efforts and the efforts teachers put in for them.

I bet not one of those complaining about having to look after their own children is a teacher. I suggest if you think it's such an easy life, that you actually try it - if you're capable of doing 4 years full time at college without pay to get the necessary degree and are then prepared for a lifetime of abuse from parents who have it easy by palming their children off on others. Or if you don't actually want to give up your cushy job, shadow a teacher for a week, 24 hours a day. But of course you wouldn't believe that he/she actually did that amount of work every week because it would show your prejudices for what they are - delusion.

And it's not only teachers, but all public sector employees who are getting worse and worse conditions, while the conditions of those in the private sector are improving.
As a teacher who retired 17 years ago, I can honestly say I wouldn't do the job today. Conditions are now worse than I experienced. Even then is was an average of 60 hours a week (preparation, marking, reports, meetings outside school time, plus out-of-school activities); trying to teach 30 children who are allowed to do as they like by parents and who then blame teachers for their lack of discipline; no choice on what you do when in your working day - it's timetabled; no support from parents; pressure in trying to get not-very-bright children through exams; more and more paperwork from central government; frequent changes in what and how is taught, and a not very good pension at the end of it all. In spite of that I wouldn't have wanted to do any other job because of the satisfaction in seeing youngsters succeed through their own efforts and the efforts teachers put in for them. I bet not one of those complaining about having to look after their own children is a teacher. I suggest if you think it's such an easy life, that you actually try it - if you're capable of doing 4 years full time at college without pay to get the necessary degree and are then prepared for a lifetime of abuse from parents who have it easy by palming their children off on others. Or if you don't actually want to give up your cushy job, shadow a teacher for a week, 24 hours a day. But of course you wouldn't believe that he/she actually did that amount of work every week because it would show your prejudices for what they are - delusion. And it's not only teachers, but all public sector employees who are getting worse and worse conditions, while the conditions of those in the private sector are improving. Carolyn43
  • Score: 116

8:32am Wed 9 Jul 14

Harpenter says...

Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....!
Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....! Harpenter
  • Score: 26

8:33am Wed 9 Jul 14

Carolyn43 says...

Oh, and it's not all teachers going on strike - only those teachers in the NUT. Those in other unions and associations are still working. So stop lumping all teachers together - find out the facts.
Oh, and it's not all teachers going on strike - only those teachers in the NUT. Those in other unions and associations are still working. So stop lumping all teachers together - find out the facts. Carolyn43
  • Score: 36

8:57am Wed 9 Jul 14

Carolyn43 says...

Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.
Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do. Carolyn43
  • Score: 29

8:57am Wed 9 Jul 14

Marty Caine UKIP says...

Carolyn43 wrote:
As a teacher who retired 17 years ago, I can honestly say I wouldn't do the job today. Conditions are now worse than I experienced. Even then is was an average of 60 hours a week (preparation, marking, reports, meetings outside school time, plus out-of-school activities); trying to teach 30 children who are allowed to do as they like by parents and who then blame teachers for their lack of discipline; no choice on what you do when in your working day - it's timetabled; no support from parents; pressure in trying to get not-very-bright children through exams; more and more paperwork from central government; frequent changes in what and how is taught, and a not very good pension at the end of it all. In spite of that I wouldn't have wanted to do any other job because of the satisfaction in seeing youngsters succeed through their own efforts and the efforts teachers put in for them.

I bet not one of those complaining about having to look after their own children is a teacher. I suggest if you think it's such an easy life, that you actually try it - if you're capable of doing 4 years full time at college without pay to get the necessary degree and are then prepared for a lifetime of abuse from parents who have it easy by palming their children off on others. Or if you don't actually want to give up your cushy job, shadow a teacher for a week, 24 hours a day. But of course you wouldn't believe that he/she actually did that amount of work every week because it would show your prejudices for what they are - delusion.

And it's not only teachers, but all public sector employees who are getting worse and worse conditions, while the conditions of those in the private sector are improving.
And just how exactly are the conditions in the private sector improving whilst the public sector workers are being victimised in your delusional world. I agree that the pay freezes and 1% rises are wrong but I was always taught that two wrongs do not make a right. This strike action is only going to disadvantage the public not the government who actually care less about the situation than anyone. How have the previous strike actions panned out for the public sector workers? If you for one moment think about it logically this strike action is only attacking those who contribute to the public sector earnings and have no real say in what happens in respect of their pay rises, in other words you are simply attacking the wrong people and this is why so many despise these strikes.
[quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: As a teacher who retired 17 years ago, I can honestly say I wouldn't do the job today. Conditions are now worse than I experienced. Even then is was an average of 60 hours a week (preparation, marking, reports, meetings outside school time, plus out-of-school activities); trying to teach 30 children who are allowed to do as they like by parents and who then blame teachers for their lack of discipline; no choice on what you do when in your working day - it's timetabled; no support from parents; pressure in trying to get not-very-bright children through exams; more and more paperwork from central government; frequent changes in what and how is taught, and a not very good pension at the end of it all. In spite of that I wouldn't have wanted to do any other job because of the satisfaction in seeing youngsters succeed through their own efforts and the efforts teachers put in for them. I bet not one of those complaining about having to look after their own children is a teacher. I suggest if you think it's such an easy life, that you actually try it - if you're capable of doing 4 years full time at college without pay to get the necessary degree and are then prepared for a lifetime of abuse from parents who have it easy by palming their children off on others. Or if you don't actually want to give up your cushy job, shadow a teacher for a week, 24 hours a day. But of course you wouldn't believe that he/she actually did that amount of work every week because it would show your prejudices for what they are - delusion. And it's not only teachers, but all public sector employees who are getting worse and worse conditions, while the conditions of those in the private sector are improving.[/p][/quote]And just how exactly are the conditions in the private sector improving whilst the public sector workers are being victimised in your delusional world. I agree that the pay freezes and 1% rises are wrong but I was always taught that two wrongs do not make a right. This strike action is only going to disadvantage the public not the government who actually care less about the situation than anyone. How have the previous strike actions panned out for the public sector workers? If you for one moment think about it logically this strike action is only attacking those who contribute to the public sector earnings and have no real say in what happens in respect of their pay rises, in other words you are simply attacking the wrong people and this is why so many despise these strikes. Marty Caine UKIP
  • Score: -14

8:59am Wed 9 Jul 14

AdelaidePete says...

Often comments like some of the above show that many parents see school just as a free babysitting service, concerned about who will look after the children, not about education!
Often comments like some of the above show that many parents see school just as a free babysitting service, concerned about who will look after the children, not about education! AdelaidePete
  • Score: 49

9:04am Wed 9 Jul 14

Hessenford says...

roamer200 wrote:
Shame on you all. Another pressure on honest working families having to now find child care or lose work. If you don't want the job I am sure someone else does.
Perhaps you could apply.
[quote][p][bold]roamer200[/bold] wrote: Shame on you all. Another pressure on honest working families having to now find child care or lose work. If you don't want the job I am sure someone else does.[/p][/quote]Perhaps you could apply. Hessenford
  • Score: 13

9:10am Wed 9 Jul 14

loftusrod says...

AdelaidePete wrote:
Often comments like some of the above show that many parents see school just as a free babysitting service, concerned about who will look after the children, not about education!
Cost of education paid through taxes aside, that's exactly what it is!
Parents can plan their lives around the fact that they know children will be at school, apart from school holidays, teacher training days, strikes and every time it snows.
Seems to me it's the teachers losing sight that schooling is about education, otherwise why not strike during school holidays or a teacher training day?
[quote][p][bold]AdelaidePete[/bold] wrote: Often comments like some of the above show that many parents see school just as a free babysitting service, concerned about who will look after the children, not about education![/p][/quote]Cost of education paid through taxes aside, that's exactly what it is! Parents can plan their lives around the fact that they know children will be at school, apart from school holidays, teacher training days, strikes and every time it snows. Seems to me it's the teachers losing sight that schooling is about education, otherwise why not strike during school holidays or a teacher training day? loftusrod
  • Score: -10

9:12am Wed 9 Jul 14

Hessenford says...

I have been a Union member for most of my life but I have never agreed with strike action, there are other ways to protest without losing any pay or inconveniencing others while at the same time hitting the government where it hurts, teachers striking will get no public support what so ever.
I have been a Union member for most of my life but I have never agreed with strike action, there are other ways to protest without losing any pay or inconveniencing others while at the same time hitting the government where it hurts, teachers striking will get no public support what so ever. Hessenford
  • Score: 29

9:16am Wed 9 Jul 14

Marty Caine UKIP says...

Carolyn43 wrote:
Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.
Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first?

Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.
[quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.[/p][/quote]Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first? Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense. Marty Caine UKIP
  • Score: 13

9:32am Wed 9 Jul 14

boardsandphotos says...

Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.
Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first?

Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.
Carolyn didn't 'imply' any such thing that's your interpretation in order to fit your strawman arguement.

Don't just assume that because some think teachers have a right to strike and deserve better pay they don't also think the same about soldiers.
[quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.[/p][/quote]Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first? Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.[/p][/quote]Carolyn didn't 'imply' any such thing that's your interpretation in order to fit your strawman arguement. Don't just assume that because some think teachers have a right to strike and deserve better pay they don't also think the same about soldiers. boardsandphotos
  • Score: 24

9:35am Wed 9 Jul 14

bosco1 says...

Seems like word has got around amongst the teaching staff to read the Daily Echo and thumbs down anyone that remarks against the strike.!! Thats of course there not teaching in a classroom.!!
Seems like word has got around amongst the teaching staff to read the Daily Echo and thumbs down anyone that remarks against the strike.!! Thats of course there not teaching in a classroom.!! bosco1
  • Score: -31

9:37am Wed 9 Jul 14

ben111 says...

Its a joke, and we are fools for falling for it. At any point has anyone ever thought the system in place , as in media government etc , has a basic point of pitting people against each other to be selfish. As people surely we are better than this. but im sure this will go over the heads of some, so for the engry few please vent this way. instead of all getting together and finding a solution, shame on us all . I wait for the abuse.
Its a joke, and we are fools for falling for it. At any point has anyone ever thought the system in place , as in media government etc , has a basic point of pitting people against each other to be selfish. As people surely we are better than this. but im sure this will go over the heads of some, so for the engry few please vent this way. instead of all getting together and finding a solution, shame on us all . I wait for the abuse. ben111
  • Score: 17

9:39am Wed 9 Jul 14

Carolyn43 says...

Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.
Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first?

Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.
Err, I mentioned that I retired 17 years ago. so I don't want to swap jobs with anyone. And I didn't say it was the toughest job in the world, just that it's tougher than people seem to think.

I wasn't a teacher all my life - I went into teaching at the age of 30 when there was a shortage of science teachers. Prior to that I'd been a shop assistant, civil servant, accounting machine operator, laboratory technician, nursing assistant, none of which gave me any satisfaction and left me with periods of the day when I was just twiddling my thumbs because there was nothing to do. I jumped at the chance to do something worthwhile and kept me working all day with extra work outside the school day - although I hadn't expected just how many extra hours would be involved. It was highly satisfying, but I still wouldn't do it nowadays. I worked in a period which wasn't as material as it is now, when parents didn't pander to the wants of their children and parents actually respected what teachers did for their children rather than just regard them as overpaid, short-houred baby sitters.
[quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.[/p][/quote]Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first? Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.[/p][/quote]Err, I mentioned that I retired 17 years ago. so I don't want to swap jobs with anyone. And I didn't say it was the toughest job in the world, just that it's tougher than people seem to think. I wasn't a teacher all my life - I went into teaching at the age of 30 when there was a shortage of science teachers. Prior to that I'd been a shop assistant, civil servant, accounting machine operator, laboratory technician, nursing assistant, none of which gave me any satisfaction and left me with periods of the day when I was just twiddling my thumbs because there was nothing to do. I jumped at the chance to do something worthwhile and kept me working all day with extra work outside the school day - although I hadn't expected just how many extra hours would be involved. It was highly satisfying, but I still wouldn't do it nowadays. I worked in a period which wasn't as material as it is now, when parents didn't pander to the wants of their children and parents actually respected what teachers did for their children rather than just regard them as overpaid, short-houred baby sitters. Carolyn43
  • Score: 37

9:39am Wed 9 Jul 14

Stereotyped says...

Harpenter wrote:
Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....!
If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...?

Walk out and get a job elsewhere.

I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable.
[quote][p][bold]Harpenter[/bold] wrote: Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....![/p][/quote]If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...? Walk out and get a job elsewhere. I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable. Stereotyped
  • Score: -17

9:46am Wed 9 Jul 14

Hessenford says...

Stereotyped wrote:
Harpenter wrote:
Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....!
If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...?

Walk out and get a job elsewhere.

I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable.
If he chooses to work beyond his contracted hours that's his own fault.
[quote][p][bold]Stereotyped[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Harpenter[/bold] wrote: Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....![/p][/quote]If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...? Walk out and get a job elsewhere. I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable.[/p][/quote]If he chooses to work beyond his contracted hours that's his own fault. Hessenford
  • Score: -6

9:46am Wed 9 Jul 14

Carolyn43 says...

Stereotyped wrote:
Harpenter wrote:
Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....!
If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...?

Walk out and get a job elsewhere.

I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable.
In that case he isn't doing his job properly, but of course you know what he does every minute of his waking life.
[quote][p][bold]Stereotyped[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Harpenter[/bold] wrote: Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....![/p][/quote]If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...? Walk out and get a job elsewhere. I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable.[/p][/quote]In that case he isn't doing his job properly, but of course you know what he does every minute of his waking life. Carolyn43
  • Score: 5

9:53am Wed 9 Jul 14

driangsmith says...

We should make special arrangements for the children.
They should go back to work................
..................
We should make special arrangements for the children. They should go back to work................ .................. driangsmith
  • Score: 7

9:55am Wed 9 Jul 14

samjdavis says...

Yet again, a number of predictable short term-ist views from parents moaning about a days pay when their child is in a system where the teachers are teaching less and their children are getting less of an education as they should be, despite the best efforts of the teachers.

Depends who you care more about I suppose doesn't it....
Yet again, a number of predictable short term-ist views from parents moaning about a days pay when their child is in a system where the teachers are teaching less and their children are getting less of an education as they should be, despite the best efforts of the teachers. Depends who you care more about I suppose doesn't it.... samjdavis
  • Score: 0

9:57am Wed 9 Jul 14

samjdavis says...

bosco1 wrote:
Seems like word has got around amongst the teaching staff to read the Daily Echo and thumbs down anyone that remarks against the strike.!! Thats of course there not teaching in a classroom.!!
There?

Please tell me that was ironic or are you actually unintelligent?
[quote][p][bold]bosco1[/bold] wrote: Seems like word has got around amongst the teaching staff to read the Daily Echo and thumbs down anyone that remarks against the strike.!! Thats of course there not teaching in a classroom.!![/p][/quote]There? Please tell me that was ironic or are you actually unintelligent? samjdavis
  • Score: 7

10:06am Wed 9 Jul 14

Carolyn43 says...

Hessenford wrote:
Stereotyped wrote:
Harpenter wrote:
Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....!
If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...?

Walk out and get a job elsewhere.

I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable.
If he chooses to work beyond his contracted hours that's his own fault.
I don't know what contracts for teaching are now, but mine laid down the minimum number of hours I had to attend the school site during the school day (which included 30 minutes before attendance of children was taken, 30 minutes after the end of the school day (which meant 8.30 am to 4.30 pm - 40 hours a week) with a break of 45 minutes for lunch during which time I could be asked to attend meetings with individuals or groups as required), plus meetings with parents from 6pm to 9 pm twice a year for each class I taught (I taught 9 different groups throughout the week - that's another 27 hours a year) plus any hours necessary for meetings, record keeping, preparation, marking and to carry out any other duties assigned to me by the local authority or the head teacher. Doesn't take long to get to 60 contracted hours.
[quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Stereotyped[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Harpenter[/bold] wrote: Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....![/p][/quote]If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...? Walk out and get a job elsewhere. I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable.[/p][/quote]If he chooses to work beyond his contracted hours that's his own fault.[/p][/quote]I don't know what contracts for teaching are now, but mine laid down the minimum number of hours I had to attend the school site during the school day (which included 30 minutes before attendance of children was taken, 30 minutes after the end of the school day (which meant 8.30 am to 4.30 pm - 40 hours a week) with a break of 45 minutes for lunch during which time I could be asked to attend meetings with individuals or groups as required), plus meetings with parents from 6pm to 9 pm twice a year for each class I taught (I taught 9 different groups throughout the week - that's another 27 hours a year) plus any hours necessary for meetings, record keeping, preparation, marking and to carry out any other duties assigned to me by the local authority or the head teacher. Doesn't take long to get to 60 contracted hours. Carolyn43
  • Score: 15

10:08am Wed 9 Jul 14

TheDistrict says...

Whilst I support action against pensions, pay and conditions of work in the Public Sector, will those striking be listened to. The simple answer is NO. Already, in another story, Cllr Beesley has said the strike will not be supported, and the Council will not take any action on it. He also stated that if they wanted more pay, pensions, and conditions, then the loss of jobs to compensate would be inevitable. Public Sector workers are fighting a power that cares none for the average working person. They do not care how much you earn, how you survive, or how you live. Their concern is to ensure that their own pockets are lined with cash, when most of them are such a waste of space and resources.

It is appreciated some sort of action is needed, but is striking the answer, when at the same time you will be placing other Public Sector workers in a position of having to compensate for your actions, ie, finding child care, taking time off work, etc etc. Is this fair to both other Public Sector workers, and indeed the Private Sector workers.

As said, other actions can be taken, other than striking.

Incidentally, I do not support the Council in their feeble responses and threats. They are the criminals in all of this.
Whilst I support action against pensions, pay and conditions of work in the Public Sector, will those striking be listened to. The simple answer is NO. Already, in another story, Cllr Beesley has said the strike will not be supported, and the Council will not take any action on it. He also stated that if they wanted more pay, pensions, and conditions, then the loss of jobs to compensate would be inevitable. Public Sector workers are fighting a power that cares none for the average working person. They do not care how much you earn, how you survive, or how you live. Their concern is to ensure that their own pockets are lined with cash, when most of them are such a waste of space and resources. It is appreciated some sort of action is needed, but is striking the answer, when at the same time you will be placing other Public Sector workers in a position of having to compensate for your actions, ie, finding child care, taking time off work, etc etc. Is this fair to both other Public Sector workers, and indeed the Private Sector workers. As said, other actions can be taken, other than striking. Incidentally, I do not support the Council in their feeble responses and threats. They are the criminals in all of this. TheDistrict
  • Score: 7

10:12am Wed 9 Jul 14

new2it says...

Carolyn43 wrote:
As a teacher who retired 17 years ago, I can honestly say I wouldn't do the job today. Conditions are now worse than I experienced. Even then is was an average of 60 hours a week (preparation, marking, reports, meetings outside school time, plus out-of-school activities); trying to teach 30 children who are allowed to do as they like by parents and who then blame teachers for their lack of discipline; no choice on what you do when in your working day - it's timetabled; no support from parents; pressure in trying to get not-very-bright children through exams; more and more paperwork from central government; frequent changes in what and how is taught, and a not very good pension at the end of it all. In spite of that I wouldn't have wanted to do any other job because of the satisfaction in seeing youngsters succeed through their own efforts and the efforts teachers put in for them.

I bet not one of those complaining about having to look after their own children is a teacher. I suggest if you think it's such an easy life, that you actually try it - if you're capable of doing 4 years full time at college without pay to get the necessary degree and are then prepared for a lifetime of abuse from parents who have it easy by palming their children off on others. Or if you don't actually want to give up your cushy job, shadow a teacher for a week, 24 hours a day. But of course you wouldn't believe that he/she actually did that amount of work every week because it would show your prejudices for what they are - delusion.

And it's not only teachers, but all public sector employees who are getting worse and worse conditions, while the conditions of those in the private sector are improving.
Absolutely agree with you. Those complaining have no idea of the work teachers do. Having been involved with teachers in my own family I am only too aware of how stressful it is. Many of them stay with the job, because that is why they spent 4 years at college, to train for the job they wanted to do. It is not the pay, it is all the additional work they have put on them. My daughter feels there is so much paper work now she is no longer able to have so much hands on teaching that she was actually trained for, and enjoys. If those who think they could do their jobs, feel free to shadow a teacher for a while, they would soon realise they do not have as cushy a number as many appear to think. Sadly good teachers are becoming disillusioned now.
[quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: As a teacher who retired 17 years ago, I can honestly say I wouldn't do the job today. Conditions are now worse than I experienced. Even then is was an average of 60 hours a week (preparation, marking, reports, meetings outside school time, plus out-of-school activities); trying to teach 30 children who are allowed to do as they like by parents and who then blame teachers for their lack of discipline; no choice on what you do when in your working day - it's timetabled; no support from parents; pressure in trying to get not-very-bright children through exams; more and more paperwork from central government; frequent changes in what and how is taught, and a not very good pension at the end of it all. In spite of that I wouldn't have wanted to do any other job because of the satisfaction in seeing youngsters succeed through their own efforts and the efforts teachers put in for them. I bet not one of those complaining about having to look after their own children is a teacher. I suggest if you think it's such an easy life, that you actually try it - if you're capable of doing 4 years full time at college without pay to get the necessary degree and are then prepared for a lifetime of abuse from parents who have it easy by palming their children off on others. Or if you don't actually want to give up your cushy job, shadow a teacher for a week, 24 hours a day. But of course you wouldn't believe that he/she actually did that amount of work every week because it would show your prejudices for what they are - delusion. And it's not only teachers, but all public sector employees who are getting worse and worse conditions, while the conditions of those in the private sector are improving.[/p][/quote]Absolutely agree with you. Those complaining have no idea of the work teachers do. Having been involved with teachers in my own family I am only too aware of how stressful it is. Many of them stay with the job, because that is why they spent 4 years at college, to train for the job they wanted to do. It is not the pay, it is all the additional work they have put on them. My daughter feels there is so much paper work now she is no longer able to have so much hands on teaching that she was actually trained for, and enjoys. If those who think they could do their jobs, feel free to shadow a teacher for a while, they would soon realise they do not have as cushy a number as many appear to think. Sadly good teachers are becoming disillusioned now. new2it
  • Score: 16

10:15am Wed 9 Jul 14

Marty Caine UKIP says...

boardsandphotos wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.
Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first?

Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.
Carolyn didn't 'imply' any such thing that's your interpretation in order to fit your strawman arguement.

Don't just assume that because some think teachers have a right to strike and deserve better pay they don't also think the same about soldiers.
Well actually it is exactly what she implied as her statement was a generalisation to everyone, it is actually you trying to twist what I said, for some strange reason.

Can any sensible public sector worker who intends to go on strike tomorrow, please tell what they think it will achieve other than disrupting the lives of those who can do nothing about their plight. I personally believe it will achieve nothing else but I am always willing to be convinced otherwise.

On the teachers side of things the real hypocrisy here is that parents who take their kids on holiday can be fined, so surely in retrospect if the teachers decide to go on strike then shouldn't those parents should be, compensated. Preferably at the expense of those teachers future pay rises. Would they then be so keen to take non productive strike action?
[quote][p][bold]boardsandphotos[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.[/p][/quote]Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first? Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.[/p][/quote]Carolyn didn't 'imply' any such thing that's your interpretation in order to fit your strawman arguement. Don't just assume that because some think teachers have a right to strike and deserve better pay they don't also think the same about soldiers.[/p][/quote]Well actually it is exactly what she implied as her statement was a generalisation to everyone, it is actually you trying to twist what I said, for some strange reason. Can any sensible public sector worker who intends to go on strike tomorrow, please tell what they think it will achieve other than disrupting the lives of those who can do nothing about their plight. I personally believe it will achieve nothing else but I am always willing to be convinced otherwise. On the teachers side of things the real hypocrisy here is that parents who take their kids on holiday can be fined, so surely in retrospect if the teachers decide to go on strike then shouldn't those parents should be, compensated. Preferably at the expense of those teachers future pay rises. Would they then be so keen to take non productive strike action? Marty Caine UKIP
  • Score: -14

10:23am Wed 9 Jul 14

Stuart_Lane says...

Can I introduce the teaching union / community to http://www.38degrees
.org.uk/campaigns
This is surely a better way to gather support for an issue that affects such a large number of people.
Causing considerable inconvenience to the public when you want their support just seems completely irrational.
Can I introduce the teaching union / community to http://www.38degrees .org.uk/campaigns This is surely a better way to gather support for an issue that affects such a large number of people. Causing considerable inconvenience to the public when you want their support just seems completely irrational. Stuart_Lane
  • Score: 9

10:27am Wed 9 Jul 14

Carolyn43 says...

Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
boardsandphotos wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.
Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first?

Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.
Carolyn didn't 'imply' any such thing that's your interpretation in order to fit your strawman arguement.

Don't just assume that because some think teachers have a right to strike and deserve better pay they don't also think the same about soldiers.
Well actually it is exactly what she implied as her statement was a generalisation to everyone, it is actually you trying to twist what I said, for some strange reason.

Can any sensible public sector worker who intends to go on strike tomorrow, please tell what they think it will achieve other than disrupting the lives of those who can do nothing about their plight. I personally believe it will achieve nothing else but I am always willing to be convinced otherwise.

On the teachers side of things the real hypocrisy here is that parents who take their kids on holiday can be fined, so surely in retrospect if the teachers decide to go on strike then shouldn't those parents should be, compensated. Preferably at the expense of those teachers future pay rises. Would they then be so keen to take non productive strike action?
No I didn't imply that and it WILL make a difference to teachers - parents criticising teachers and saying what an easy job they have will make teachers' jobs even harder than it is now. The general perception of parents is that teachers do little for a huge salary and pension while they are struggling to make ends meet doing long hours encouraging this in the minds of the children, resulting in even less than the little respect they have now and making classroom management even more difficult.

As I, and others have said, either swap jobs or shadow a teacher and see just what really goes on rather than assuming. When you see a classroom on TV, the whole thing has been set up so that everyone is on their best behaviour, and it isn't always like that in real life. Belligerent parents usually have belligerent children, which makes teaching and learning difficult for others.

Notice there's never any criticism of other public sector workers - it's always teachers.
[quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]boardsandphotos[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.[/p][/quote]Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first? Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.[/p][/quote]Carolyn didn't 'imply' any such thing that's your interpretation in order to fit your strawman arguement. Don't just assume that because some think teachers have a right to strike and deserve better pay they don't also think the same about soldiers.[/p][/quote]Well actually it is exactly what she implied as her statement was a generalisation to everyone, it is actually you trying to twist what I said, for some strange reason. Can any sensible public sector worker who intends to go on strike tomorrow, please tell what they think it will achieve other than disrupting the lives of those who can do nothing about their plight. I personally believe it will achieve nothing else but I am always willing to be convinced otherwise. On the teachers side of things the real hypocrisy here is that parents who take their kids on holiday can be fined, so surely in retrospect if the teachers decide to go on strike then shouldn't those parents should be, compensated. Preferably at the expense of those teachers future pay rises. Would they then be so keen to take non productive strike action?[/p][/quote]No I didn't imply that and it WILL make a difference to teachers - parents criticising teachers and saying what an easy job they have will make teachers' jobs even harder than it is now. The general perception of parents is that teachers do little for a huge salary and pension while they are struggling to make ends meet doing long hours encouraging this in the minds of the children, resulting in even less than the little respect they have now and making classroom management even more difficult. As I, and others have said, either swap jobs or shadow a teacher and see just what really goes on rather than assuming. When you see a classroom on TV, the whole thing has been set up so that everyone is on their best behaviour, and it isn't always like that in real life. Belligerent parents usually have belligerent children, which makes teaching and learning difficult for others. Notice there's never any criticism of other public sector workers - it's always teachers. Carolyn43
  • Score: 11

10:39am Wed 9 Jul 14

The Liberal says...

Marty Caine UKIP wrote: On the teachers side of things the real hypocrisy here is that parents who take their kids on holiday can be fined, so surely in retrospect if the teachers decide to go on strike then shouldn't those parents should be, compensated.
Not that old chestnut again. Who do you think instigated the new rules banning parents from taking their kids out of school during term time? Teachers? No, it was Michael Gove – whose other school reforms are part of the reason that teachers are striking in the first place.
[Quote]Marty Caine UKIP wrote: On the teachers side of things the real hypocrisy here is that parents who take their kids on holiday can be fined, so surely in retrospect if the teachers decide to go on strike then shouldn't those parents should be, compensated.[/quote] Not that old chestnut again. Who do you think instigated the new rules banning parents from taking their kids out of school during term time? Teachers? No, it was Michael Gove – whose other school reforms are part of the reason that teachers are striking in the first place. The Liberal
  • Score: 14

10:50am Wed 9 Jul 14

Marty Caine UKIP says...

Carolyn43 wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
boardsandphotos wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.
Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first?

Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.
Carolyn didn't 'imply' any such thing that's your interpretation in order to fit your strawman arguement.

Don't just assume that because some think teachers have a right to strike and deserve better pay they don't also think the same about soldiers.
Well actually it is exactly what she implied as her statement was a generalisation to everyone, it is actually you trying to twist what I said, for some strange reason.

Can any sensible public sector worker who intends to go on strike tomorrow, please tell what they think it will achieve other than disrupting the lives of those who can do nothing about their plight. I personally believe it will achieve nothing else but I am always willing to be convinced otherwise.

On the teachers side of things the real hypocrisy here is that parents who take their kids on holiday can be fined, so surely in retrospect if the teachers decide to go on strike then shouldn't those parents should be, compensated. Preferably at the expense of those teachers future pay rises. Would they then be so keen to take non productive strike action?
No I didn't imply that and it WILL make a difference to teachers - parents criticising teachers and saying what an easy job they have will make teachers' jobs even harder than it is now. The general perception of parents is that teachers do little for a huge salary and pension while they are struggling to make ends meet doing long hours encouraging this in the minds of the children, resulting in even less than the little respect they have now and making classroom management even more difficult.

As I, and others have said, either swap jobs or shadow a teacher and see just what really goes on rather than assuming. When you see a classroom on TV, the whole thing has been set up so that everyone is on their best behaviour, and it isn't always like that in real life. Belligerent parents usually have belligerent children, which makes teaching and learning difficult for others.

Notice there's never any criticism of other public sector workers - it's always teachers.
So here we have a retired teacher accusing me of assuming because she assumes I have no prior experience of teaching, how remarkably funny that must be to those who know me personally. The reason there is no criticism of other public sector workers on this particular article is more than likely due to the simple fact it is about teachers and schools.

So let me just reiterate, the fact that public sector workers have had to endure pay freezes and 1% pay rises is wrong. No one should have to take a drop in salary to keep their job under any circumstances as far as I am concerned and that is exactly what has happened by giving people pay rises below the rate of inflation. So I am in total agreement with the grievance, what I do struggle with is the mentality behind taking strike action which will undoubtedly achieve nothing other than disrupting the lives of those that you really do want on your side. That to me is illogical behaviour. Someone stated that we will end up losing good teachers and I think it has already gone past that stage a very long time ago and now we are left with militant unionists who are only to happy to go out on strike regardless who it may directly affect.
[quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]boardsandphotos[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.[/p][/quote]Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first? Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.[/p][/quote]Carolyn didn't 'imply' any such thing that's your interpretation in order to fit your strawman arguement. Don't just assume that because some think teachers have a right to strike and deserve better pay they don't also think the same about soldiers.[/p][/quote]Well actually it is exactly what she implied as her statement was a generalisation to everyone, it is actually you trying to twist what I said, for some strange reason. Can any sensible public sector worker who intends to go on strike tomorrow, please tell what they think it will achieve other than disrupting the lives of those who can do nothing about their plight. I personally believe it will achieve nothing else but I am always willing to be convinced otherwise. On the teachers side of things the real hypocrisy here is that parents who take their kids on holiday can be fined, so surely in retrospect if the teachers decide to go on strike then shouldn't those parents should be, compensated. Preferably at the expense of those teachers future pay rises. Would they then be so keen to take non productive strike action?[/p][/quote]No I didn't imply that and it WILL make a difference to teachers - parents criticising teachers and saying what an easy job they have will make teachers' jobs even harder than it is now. The general perception of parents is that teachers do little for a huge salary and pension while they are struggling to make ends meet doing long hours encouraging this in the minds of the children, resulting in even less than the little respect they have now and making classroom management even more difficult. As I, and others have said, either swap jobs or shadow a teacher and see just what really goes on rather than assuming. When you see a classroom on TV, the whole thing has been set up so that everyone is on their best behaviour, and it isn't always like that in real life. Belligerent parents usually have belligerent children, which makes teaching and learning difficult for others. Notice there's never any criticism of other public sector workers - it's always teachers.[/p][/quote]So here we have a retired teacher accusing me of assuming because she assumes I have no prior experience of teaching, how remarkably funny that must be to those who know me personally. The reason there is no criticism of other public sector workers on this particular article is more than likely due to the simple fact it is about teachers and schools. So let me just reiterate, the fact that public sector workers have had to endure pay freezes and 1% pay rises is wrong. No one should have to take a drop in salary to keep their job under any circumstances as far as I am concerned and that is exactly what has happened by giving people pay rises below the rate of inflation. So I am in total agreement with the grievance, what I do struggle with is the mentality behind taking strike action which will undoubtedly achieve nothing other than disrupting the lives of those that you really do want on your side. That to me is illogical behaviour. Someone stated that we will end up losing good teachers and I think it has already gone past that stage a very long time ago and now we are left with militant unionists who are only to happy to go out on strike regardless who it may directly affect. Marty Caine UKIP
  • Score: -3

10:51am Wed 9 Jul 14

Harpenter says...

Stereotyped wrote:
Harpenter wrote:
Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....!
If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...?

Walk out and get a job elsewhere.

I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable.
I see ... Your solution would be teachers "walk out and leave" Sorry I'm missing the 'solution' here as I believe the consequences of that action would surely grind the country to a halt. Remind me again Why teachers don't deserve to currently fight to protect their terms and conditions, not demand more money as some people may think.
[quote][p][bold]Stereotyped[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Harpenter[/bold] wrote: Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....![/p][/quote]If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...? Walk out and get a job elsewhere. I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable.[/p][/quote]I see ... Your solution would be teachers "walk out and leave" Sorry I'm missing the 'solution' here as I believe the consequences of that action would surely grind the country to a halt. Remind me again Why teachers don't deserve to currently fight to protect their terms and conditions, not demand more money as some people may think. Harpenter
  • Score: 1

10:58am Wed 9 Jul 14

Marty Caine UKIP says...

The Liberal wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote: On the teachers side of things the real hypocrisy here is that parents who take their kids on holiday can be fined, so surely in retrospect if the teachers decide to go on strike then shouldn't those parents should be, compensated.
Not that old chestnut again. Who do you think instigated the new rules banning parents from taking their kids out of school during term time? Teachers? No, it was Michael Gove – whose other school reforms are part of the reason that teachers are striking in the first place.Does it really matter who instigated the rules? My point was if parents can be fined for not sending their children to school then they should be compensated when teachers go on strike, isn't that a fair opinion then ?
[quote][p][bold]The Liberal[/bold] wrote: [Quote]Marty Caine UKIP wrote: On the teachers side of things the real hypocrisy here is that parents who take their kids on holiday can be fined, so surely in retrospect if the teachers decide to go on strike then shouldn't those parents should be, compensated.[/quote] Not that old chestnut again. Who do you think instigated the new rules banning parents from taking their kids out of school during term time? Teachers? No, it was Michael Gove – whose other school reforms are part of the reason that teachers are striking in the first place.[/p][/quote]Does it really matter who instigated the rules? My point was if parents can be fined for not sending their children to school then they should be compensated when teachers go on strike, isn't that a fair opinion then ? Marty Caine UKIP
  • Score: -11

11:01am Wed 9 Jul 14

LeGrove says...

Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.
Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first?

Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.
And UKIP members wonder why the party has such a bad image. You are a pathetic human being Mr Caine. So decided to support soldiers now did you? http://goo.gl/frXjV6
[quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.[/p][/quote]Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first? Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.[/p][/quote]And UKIP members wonder why the party has such a bad image. You are a pathetic human being Mr Caine. So decided to support soldiers now did you? http://goo.gl/frXjV6 LeGrove
  • Score: 0

11:03am Wed 9 Jul 14

LeGrove says...

Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
The Liberal wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote: On the teachers side of things the real hypocrisy here is that parents who take their kids on holiday can be fined, so surely in retrospect if the teachers decide to go on strike then shouldn't those parents should be, compensated.
Not that old chestnut again. Who do you think instigated the new rules banning parents from taking their kids out of school during term time? Teachers? No, it was Michael Gove – whose other school reforms are part of the reason that teachers are striking in the first place.Does it really matter who instigated the rules? My point was if parents can be fined for not sending their children to school then they should be compensated when teachers go on strike, isn't that a fair opinion then ?The blokes a moron. Clearly has no idea what he's talking about!
[quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Liberal[/bold] wrote: [Quote]Marty Caine UKIP wrote: On the teachers side of things the real hypocrisy here is that parents who take their kids on holiday can be fined, so surely in retrospect if the teachers decide to go on strike then shouldn't those parents should be, compensated.[/quote] Not that old chestnut again. Who do you think instigated the new rules banning parents from taking their kids out of school during term time? Teachers? No, it was Michael Gove – whose other school reforms are part of the reason that teachers are striking in the first place.[/p][/quote]Does it really matter who instigated the rules? My point was if parents can be fined for not sending their children to school then they should be compensated when teachers go on strike, isn't that a fair opinion then ?[/p][/quote]The blokes a moron. Clearly has no idea what he's talking about! LeGrove
  • Score: -3

11:12am Wed 9 Jul 14

Marty Caine UKIP says...

LeGrove wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.
Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first?

Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.
And UKIP members wonder why the party has such a bad image. You are a pathetic human being Mr Caine. So decided to support soldiers now did you? http://goo.gl/frXjV6
Maybe you should find out the truth about that nonsense before advertising your stupidity.

http://www.hopenotha
te.org.uk/ukip/ukip-
activist-marty-caine
-provokes-fury-by-br
anding-drummer-lee-r
igby-s-family-idiots
-2744
[quote][p][bold]LeGrove[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.[/p][/quote]Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first? Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.[/p][/quote]And UKIP members wonder why the party has such a bad image. You are a pathetic human being Mr Caine. So decided to support soldiers now did you? http://goo.gl/frXjV6[/p][/quote]Maybe you should find out the truth about that nonsense before advertising your stupidity. http://www.hopenotha te.org.uk/ukip/ukip- activist-marty-caine -provokes-fury-by-br anding-drummer-lee-r igby-s-family-idiots -2744 Marty Caine UKIP
  • Score: -2

11:31am Wed 9 Jul 14

Hessenford says...

According to the NASUWT teachers contracted hours are 1265 over 195 days which is around 32.5 hours per week.
If teachers want to protest about their conditions there is absolutely no need to strike and inconvenience parents, there is no need for any teacher to lose money by striking, all you have to do is tell the government you are working to rule, I.E your contracted hours, that way the only loser would be the very government you have the grievance with.
And dont say this isn't possible, no one can force you to work more than your contracted hours.
According to the NASUWT teachers contracted hours are 1265 over 195 days which is around 32.5 hours per week. If teachers want to protest about their conditions there is absolutely no need to strike and inconvenience parents, there is no need for any teacher to lose money by striking, all you have to do is tell the government you are working to rule, I.E your contracted hours, that way the only loser would be the very government you have the grievance with. And dont say this isn't possible, no one can force you to work more than your contracted hours. Hessenford
  • Score: 5

11:35am Wed 9 Jul 14

Stereotyped says...

Carolyn43 wrote:
Hessenford wrote:
Stereotyped wrote:
Harpenter wrote:
Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....!
If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...?

Walk out and get a job elsewhere.

I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable.
If he chooses to work beyond his contracted hours that's his own fault.
I don't know what contracts for teaching are now, but mine laid down the minimum number of hours I had to attend the school site during the school day (which included 30 minutes before attendance of children was taken, 30 minutes after the end of the school day (which meant 8.30 am to 4.30 pm - 40 hours a week) with a break of 45 minutes for lunch during which time I could be asked to attend meetings with individuals or groups as required), plus meetings with parents from 6pm to 9 pm twice a year for each class I taught (I taught 9 different groups throughout the week - that's another 27 hours a year) plus any hours necessary for meetings, record keeping, preparation, marking and to carry out any other duties assigned to me by the local authority or the head teacher. Doesn't take long to get to 60 contracted hours.
Oh dear, welcome to the real world!

I get in to work at about 07:30...and I don't even consider that early, 08:30 would be a lay in!

45 minute break... 5 more minutes than I get.

All the while I probably earn less than a teacher does but you don't see me walking out because that is life.
[quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Stereotyped[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Harpenter[/bold] wrote: Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....![/p][/quote]If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...? Walk out and get a job elsewhere. I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable.[/p][/quote]If he chooses to work beyond his contracted hours that's his own fault.[/p][/quote]I don't know what contracts for teaching are now, but mine laid down the minimum number of hours I had to attend the school site during the school day (which included 30 minutes before attendance of children was taken, 30 minutes after the end of the school day (which meant 8.30 am to 4.30 pm - 40 hours a week) with a break of 45 minutes for lunch during which time I could be asked to attend meetings with individuals or groups as required), plus meetings with parents from 6pm to 9 pm twice a year for each class I taught (I taught 9 different groups throughout the week - that's another 27 hours a year) plus any hours necessary for meetings, record keeping, preparation, marking and to carry out any other duties assigned to me by the local authority or the head teacher. Doesn't take long to get to 60 contracted hours.[/p][/quote]Oh dear, welcome to the real world! I get in to work at about 07:30...and I don't even consider that early, 08:30 would be a lay in! 45 minute break... 5 more minutes than I get. All the while I probably earn less than a teacher does but you don't see me walking out because that is life. Stereotyped
  • Score: 1

11:36am Wed 9 Jul 14

LeGrove says...

Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
LeGrove wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.
Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first?

Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.
And UKIP members wonder why the party has such a bad image. You are a pathetic human being Mr Caine. So decided to support soldiers now did you? http://goo.gl/frXjV6
Maybe you should find out the truth about that nonsense before advertising your stupidity.

http://www.hopenotha

te.org.uk/ukip/ukip-

activist-marty-caine

-provokes-fury-by-br

anding-drummer-lee-r

igby-s-family-idiots

-2744
Oh yeah, easy to retract a statement isn't it. MUST have been mis-quoted eh? Sure thing.
You've already displayed your lack of understanding on the subject of parental fines when removing children from school in term time, so maybe you should just lay off commenting. Good lad.
[quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LeGrove[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.[/p][/quote]Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first? Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.[/p][/quote]And UKIP members wonder why the party has such a bad image. You are a pathetic human being Mr Caine. So decided to support soldiers now did you? http://goo.gl/frXjV6[/p][/quote]Maybe you should find out the truth about that nonsense before advertising your stupidity. http://www.hopenotha te.org.uk/ukip/ukip- activist-marty-caine -provokes-fury-by-br anding-drummer-lee-r igby-s-family-idiots -2744[/p][/quote]Oh yeah, easy to retract a statement isn't it. MUST have been mis-quoted eh? Sure thing. You've already displayed your lack of understanding on the subject of parental fines when removing children from school in term time, so maybe you should just lay off commenting. Good lad. LeGrove
  • Score: -4

11:43am Wed 9 Jul 14

LeGrove says...

Stereotyped wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
Hessenford wrote:
Stereotyped wrote:
Harpenter wrote:
Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....!
If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...?

Walk out and get a job elsewhere.

I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable.
If he chooses to work beyond his contracted hours that's his own fault.
I don't know what contracts for teaching are now, but mine laid down the minimum number of hours I had to attend the school site during the school day (which included 30 minutes before attendance of children was taken, 30 minutes after the end of the school day (which meant 8.30 am to 4.30 pm - 40 hours a week) with a break of 45 minutes for lunch during which time I could be asked to attend meetings with individuals or groups as required), plus meetings with parents from 6pm to 9 pm twice a year for each class I taught (I taught 9 different groups throughout the week - that's another 27 hours a year) plus any hours necessary for meetings, record keeping, preparation, marking and to carry out any other duties assigned to me by the local authority or the head teacher. Doesn't take long to get to 60 contracted hours.
Oh dear, welcome to the real world!

I get in to work at about 07:30...and I don't even consider that early, 08:30 would be a lay in!

45 minute break... 5 more minutes than I get.

All the while I probably earn less than a teacher does but you don't see me walking out because that is life.
Congrats, welcome to your right to complain about your job in this democratic country. Feel free to speak to your manager regarding your issues or join a union.
Yeah, see where i'm going with this?
[quote][p][bold]Stereotyped[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Stereotyped[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Harpenter[/bold] wrote: Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....![/p][/quote]If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...? Walk out and get a job elsewhere. I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable.[/p][/quote]If he chooses to work beyond his contracted hours that's his own fault.[/p][/quote]I don't know what contracts for teaching are now, but mine laid down the minimum number of hours I had to attend the school site during the school day (which included 30 minutes before attendance of children was taken, 30 minutes after the end of the school day (which meant 8.30 am to 4.30 pm - 40 hours a week) with a break of 45 minutes for lunch during which time I could be asked to attend meetings with individuals or groups as required), plus meetings with parents from 6pm to 9 pm twice a year for each class I taught (I taught 9 different groups throughout the week - that's another 27 hours a year) plus any hours necessary for meetings, record keeping, preparation, marking and to carry out any other duties assigned to me by the local authority or the head teacher. Doesn't take long to get to 60 contracted hours.[/p][/quote]Oh dear, welcome to the real world! I get in to work at about 07:30...and I don't even consider that early, 08:30 would be a lay in! 45 minute break... 5 more minutes than I get. All the while I probably earn less than a teacher does but you don't see me walking out because that is life.[/p][/quote]Congrats, welcome to your right to complain about your job in this democratic country. Feel free to speak to your manager regarding your issues or join a union. Yeah, see where i'm going with this? LeGrove
  • Score: -4

11:55am Wed 9 Jul 14

Marty Caine UKIP says...

LeGrove wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
LeGrove wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.
Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first?

Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.
And UKIP members wonder why the party has such a bad image. You are a pathetic human being Mr Caine. So decided to support soldiers now did you? http://goo.gl/frXjV6
Maybe you should find out the truth about that nonsense before advertising your stupidity.

http://www.hopenotha


te.org.uk/ukip/ukip-


activist-marty-caine


-provokes-fury-by-br


anding-drummer-lee-r


igby-s-family-idiots


-2744
Oh yeah, easy to retract a statement isn't it. MUST have been mis-quoted eh? Sure thing.
You've already displayed your lack of understanding on the subject of parental fines when removing children from school in term time, so maybe you should just lay off commenting. Good lad.
Do you actually know how many people take their children out of school for holidays and simply pay the fine because it is far cheaper than paying the over inflated airfares during school holidays?

Now if you want to get into a political battle simply because you don't like me or UKIP then do feel free to register on www.political-inquis
ition.co.uk but don't expect me to get into one on here with a you. You would have to register with your own name though as anonymous trolls are banned.
[quote][p][bold]LeGrove[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LeGrove[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.[/p][/quote]Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first? Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.[/p][/quote]And UKIP members wonder why the party has such a bad image. You are a pathetic human being Mr Caine. So decided to support soldiers now did you? http://goo.gl/frXjV6[/p][/quote]Maybe you should find out the truth about that nonsense before advertising your stupidity. http://www.hopenotha te.org.uk/ukip/ukip- activist-marty-caine -provokes-fury-by-br anding-drummer-lee-r igby-s-family-idiots -2744[/p][/quote]Oh yeah, easy to retract a statement isn't it. MUST have been mis-quoted eh? Sure thing. You've already displayed your lack of understanding on the subject of parental fines when removing children from school in term time, so maybe you should just lay off commenting. Good lad.[/p][/quote]Do you actually know how many people take their children out of school for holidays and simply pay the fine because it is far cheaper than paying the over inflated airfares during school holidays? Now if you want to get into a political battle simply because you don't like me or UKIP then do feel free to register on www.political-inquis ition.co.uk but don't expect me to get into one on here with a you. You would have to register with your own name though as anonymous trolls are banned. Marty Caine UKIP
  • Score: 1

12:01pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Mejulie1967 says...

Actually after reading the list, the schools on strike are in the minority. I do know that the strikes are governed by the unions and the decision of the Head, not the individual teachers.
Actually after reading the list, the schools on strike are in the minority. I do know that the strikes are governed by the unions and the decision of the Head, not the individual teachers. Mejulie1967
  • Score: 9

12:05pm Wed 9 Jul 14

LeGrove says...

Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
LeGrove wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
LeGrove wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.
Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first?

Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.
And UKIP members wonder why the party has such a bad image. You are a pathetic human being Mr Caine. So decided to support soldiers now did you? http://goo.gl/frXjV6
Maybe you should find out the truth about that nonsense before advertising your stupidity.

http://www.hopenotha



te.org.uk/ukip/ukip-



activist-marty-caine



-provokes-fury-by-br



anding-drummer-lee-r



igby-s-family-idiots



-2744
Oh yeah, easy to retract a statement isn't it. MUST have been mis-quoted eh? Sure thing.
You've already displayed your lack of understanding on the subject of parental fines when removing children from school in term time, so maybe you should just lay off commenting. Good lad.
Do you actually know how many people take their children out of school for holidays and simply pay the fine because it is far cheaper than paying the over inflated airfares during school holidays?

Now if you want to get into a political battle simply because you don't like me or UKIP then do feel free to register on www.political-inquis

ition.co.uk but don't expect me to get into one on here with a you. You would have to register with your own name though as anonymous trolls are banned.
Sorry, are you asking me to pull stats?

Thanks for the offer, but i'd prefer to debate with people who are familiar with the subject and know what they're talking about, which you've proven not to.
[quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LeGrove[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LeGrove[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.[/p][/quote]Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first? Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.[/p][/quote]And UKIP members wonder why the party has such a bad image. You are a pathetic human being Mr Caine. So decided to support soldiers now did you? http://goo.gl/frXjV6[/p][/quote]Maybe you should find out the truth about that nonsense before advertising your stupidity. http://www.hopenotha te.org.uk/ukip/ukip- activist-marty-caine -provokes-fury-by-br anding-drummer-lee-r igby-s-family-idiots -2744[/p][/quote]Oh yeah, easy to retract a statement isn't it. MUST have been mis-quoted eh? Sure thing. You've already displayed your lack of understanding on the subject of parental fines when removing children from school in term time, so maybe you should just lay off commenting. Good lad.[/p][/quote]Do you actually know how many people take their children out of school for holidays and simply pay the fine because it is far cheaper than paying the over inflated airfares during school holidays? Now if you want to get into a political battle simply because you don't like me or UKIP then do feel free to register on www.political-inquis ition.co.uk but don't expect me to get into one on here with a you. You would have to register with your own name though as anonymous trolls are banned.[/p][/quote]Sorry, are you asking me to pull stats? Thanks for the offer, but i'd prefer to debate with people who are familiar with the subject and know what they're talking about, which you've proven not to. LeGrove
  • Score: -4

12:14pm Wed 9 Jul 14

The Liberal says...

Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
The Liberal wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote: On the teachers side of things the real hypocrisy here is that parents who take their kids on holiday can be fined, so surely in retrospect if the teachers decide to go on strike then shouldn't those parents should be, compensated.
Not that old chestnut again. Who do you think instigated the new rules banning parents from taking their kids out of school during term time? Teachers? No, it was Michael Gove – whose other school reforms are part of the reason that teachers are striking in the first place.Does it really matter who instigated the rules? My point was if parents can be fined for not sending their children to school then they should be compensated when teachers go on strike, isn't that a fair opinion then ?Not when you suggest the compensation should be paid out of teachers' pay, no it most certainly isn't!
[quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Liberal[/bold] wrote: [Quote]Marty Caine UKIP wrote: On the teachers side of things the real hypocrisy here is that parents who take their kids on holiday can be fined, so surely in retrospect if the teachers decide to go on strike then shouldn't those parents should be, compensated.[/quote] Not that old chestnut again. Who do you think instigated the new rules banning parents from taking their kids out of school during term time? Teachers? No, it was Michael Gove – whose other school reforms are part of the reason that teachers are striking in the first place.[/p][/quote]Does it really matter who instigated the rules? My point was if parents can be fined for not sending their children to school then they should be compensated when teachers go on strike, isn't that a fair opinion then ?[/p][/quote]Not when you suggest the compensation should be paid out of teachers' pay, no it most certainly isn't! The Liberal
  • Score: -2

12:23pm Wed 9 Jul 14

tinkerbell101 says...

Anyone know if Oak Academy is open tomorrow?
Anyone know if Oak Academy is open tomorrow? tinkerbell101
  • Score: 1

12:44pm Wed 9 Jul 14

chrisii1991 says...

Here we go again and why so soon to the summer holidays?
Here we go again and why so soon to the summer holidays? chrisii1991
  • Score: -2

12:56pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Stereotyped says...

LeGrove wrote:
Stereotyped wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
Hessenford wrote:
Stereotyped wrote:
Harpenter wrote:
Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....!
If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...?

Walk out and get a job elsewhere.

I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable.
If he chooses to work beyond his contracted hours that's his own fault.
I don't know what contracts for teaching are now, but mine laid down the minimum number of hours I had to attend the school site during the school day (which included 30 minutes before attendance of children was taken, 30 minutes after the end of the school day (which meant 8.30 am to 4.30 pm - 40 hours a week) with a break of 45 minutes for lunch during which time I could be asked to attend meetings with individuals or groups as required), plus meetings with parents from 6pm to 9 pm twice a year for each class I taught (I taught 9 different groups throughout the week - that's another 27 hours a year) plus any hours necessary for meetings, record keeping, preparation, marking and to carry out any other duties assigned to me by the local authority or the head teacher. Doesn't take long to get to 60 contracted hours.
Oh dear, welcome to the real world!

I get in to work at about 07:30...and I don't even consider that early, 08:30 would be a lay in!

45 minute break... 5 more minutes than I get.

All the while I probably earn less than a teacher does but you don't see me walking out because that is life.
Congrats, welcome to your right to complain about your job in this democratic country. Feel free to speak to your manager regarding your issues or join a union.
Yeah, see where i'm going with this?
I don't have a problem with it... it is called "work". Deal with it and crack on, teachers are worse than the pupils!
[quote][p][bold]LeGrove[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Stereotyped[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Stereotyped[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Harpenter[/bold] wrote: Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....![/p][/quote]If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...? Walk out and get a job elsewhere. I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable.[/p][/quote]If he chooses to work beyond his contracted hours that's his own fault.[/p][/quote]I don't know what contracts for teaching are now, but mine laid down the minimum number of hours I had to attend the school site during the school day (which included 30 minutes before attendance of children was taken, 30 minutes after the end of the school day (which meant 8.30 am to 4.30 pm - 40 hours a week) with a break of 45 minutes for lunch during which time I could be asked to attend meetings with individuals or groups as required), plus meetings with parents from 6pm to 9 pm twice a year for each class I taught (I taught 9 different groups throughout the week - that's another 27 hours a year) plus any hours necessary for meetings, record keeping, preparation, marking and to carry out any other duties assigned to me by the local authority or the head teacher. Doesn't take long to get to 60 contracted hours.[/p][/quote]Oh dear, welcome to the real world! I get in to work at about 07:30...and I don't even consider that early, 08:30 would be a lay in! 45 minute break... 5 more minutes than I get. All the while I probably earn less than a teacher does but you don't see me walking out because that is life.[/p][/quote]Congrats, welcome to your right to complain about your job in this democratic country. Feel free to speak to your manager regarding your issues or join a union. Yeah, see where i'm going with this?[/p][/quote]I don't have a problem with it... it is called "work". Deal with it and crack on, teachers are worse than the pupils! Stereotyped
  • Score: -2

1:46pm Wed 9 Jul 14

joneshome says...

Carolyn43 wrote:
Hessenford wrote:
Stereotyped wrote:
Harpenter wrote:
Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....!
If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...?

Walk out and get a job elsewhere.

I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable.
If he chooses to work beyond his contracted hours that's his own fault.
I don't know what contracts for teaching are now, but mine laid down the minimum number of hours I had to attend the school site during the school day (which included 30 minutes before attendance of children was taken, 30 minutes after the end of the school day (which meant 8.30 am to 4.30 pm - 40 hours a week) with a break of 45 minutes for lunch during which time I could be asked to attend meetings with individuals or groups as required), plus meetings with parents from 6pm to 9 pm twice a year for each class I taught (I taught 9 different groups throughout the week - that's another 27 hours a year) plus any hours necessary for meetings, record keeping, preparation, marking and to carry out any other duties assigned to me by the local authority or the head teacher. Doesn't take long to get to 60 contracted hours.
Not if you take out the holidays it doesn't!

40 hours per week less 45 minutes break per day x 39 weeks = 1,472.25 hrs
After school meetings = 27 hrs
Lunchtime meetings (twice a week?) - 1.5 hrs x 39 weeks = 58.5 hrs

Total - 1,557.75 / 52 weeks = 29.96 average hours per week. It takes a lot of marking and lesson prep to get this to 60!!

And before all the teachers give me the thumbs down, if you don't like your job, move on, find another job. Constant year after year moaning does no one any good. We choose our job and take the good and bad points.
[quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Stereotyped[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Harpenter[/bold] wrote: Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....![/p][/quote]If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...? Walk out and get a job elsewhere. I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable.[/p][/quote]If he chooses to work beyond his contracted hours that's his own fault.[/p][/quote]I don't know what contracts for teaching are now, but mine laid down the minimum number of hours I had to attend the school site during the school day (which included 30 minutes before attendance of children was taken, 30 minutes after the end of the school day (which meant 8.30 am to 4.30 pm - 40 hours a week) with a break of 45 minutes for lunch during which time I could be asked to attend meetings with individuals or groups as required), plus meetings with parents from 6pm to 9 pm twice a year for each class I taught (I taught 9 different groups throughout the week - that's another 27 hours a year) plus any hours necessary for meetings, record keeping, preparation, marking and to carry out any other duties assigned to me by the local authority or the head teacher. Doesn't take long to get to 60 contracted hours.[/p][/quote]Not if you take out the holidays it doesn't! 40 hours per week less 45 minutes break per day x 39 weeks = 1,472.25 hrs After school meetings = 27 hrs Lunchtime meetings (twice a week?) - 1.5 hrs x 39 weeks = 58.5 hrs Total - 1,557.75 / 52 weeks = 29.96 average hours per week. It takes a lot of marking and lesson prep to get this to 60!! And before all the teachers give me the thumbs down, if you don't like your job, move on, find another job. Constant year after year moaning does no one any good. We choose our job and take the good and bad points. joneshome
  • Score: -4

2:52pm Wed 9 Jul 14

loftusrod says...

Can a teacher answer my earlier question please: why don't they go on strike during the school holidays or teacher training days, thereby causing minimum disruption to pupils and parents?
Can a teacher answer my earlier question please: why don't they go on strike during the school holidays or teacher training days, thereby causing minimum disruption to pupils and parents? loftusrod
  • Score: -7

3:28pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Marty Caine UKIP says...

loftusrod wrote:
Can a teacher answer my earlier question please: why don't they go on strike during the school holidays or teacher training days, thereby causing minimum disruption to pupils and parents?
Because the teachers themselves do not pick the strike date their union does that and all unions want to cause the maximum disruption possible, that is what they do regardless of the common sense arguments against doing it.
[quote][p][bold]loftusrod[/bold] wrote: Can a teacher answer my earlier question please: why don't they go on strike during the school holidays or teacher training days, thereby causing minimum disruption to pupils and parents?[/p][/quote]Because the teachers themselves do not pick the strike date their union does that and all unions want to cause the maximum disruption possible, that is what they do regardless of the common sense arguments against doing it. Marty Caine UKIP
  • Score: 6

4:37pm Wed 9 Jul 14

LeGrove says...

loftusrod wrote:
Can a teacher answer my earlier question please: why don't they go on strike during the school holidays or teacher training days, thereby causing minimum disruption to pupils and parents?
What would be the point in doing it during the holidays? ALL strikes are undertaken to cause disruption, so they get noticed and by those who make the decisions. If they had strikes when the kids weren't there they'd be totally ignored.
[quote][p][bold]loftusrod[/bold] wrote: Can a teacher answer my earlier question please: why don't they go on strike during the school holidays or teacher training days, thereby causing minimum disruption to pupils and parents?[/p][/quote]What would be the point in doing it during the holidays? ALL strikes are undertaken to cause disruption, so they get noticed and by those who make the decisions. If they had strikes when the kids weren't there they'd be totally ignored. LeGrove
  • Score: 10

5:03pm Wed 9 Jul 14

loftusrod says...

LeGrove wrote:
loftusrod wrote:
Can a teacher answer my earlier question please: why don't they go on strike during the school holidays or teacher training days, thereby causing minimum disruption to pupils and parents?
What would be the point in doing it during the holidays? ALL strikes are undertaken to cause disruption, so they get noticed and by those who make the decisions. If they had strikes when the kids weren't there they'd be totally ignored.
....and never mind the children's education and disruption to parents.
[quote][p][bold]LeGrove[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]loftusrod[/bold] wrote: Can a teacher answer my earlier question please: why don't they go on strike during the school holidays or teacher training days, thereby causing minimum disruption to pupils and parents?[/p][/quote]What would be the point in doing it during the holidays? ALL strikes are undertaken to cause disruption, so they get noticed and by those who make the decisions. If they had strikes when the kids weren't there they'd be totally ignored.[/p][/quote]....and never mind the children's education and disruption to parents. loftusrod
  • Score: 1

5:37pm Wed 9 Jul 14

ashleycross says...

We are an entire nation dependent on benefits because pay and job security are so bad. I don't know exactly why they are striking but when so many people have no idea of their hours. have to fill in begging forms for the government just to eat and keep a roof over their heads you have to expect a bit of discontent.
People of all ages want to be independent and work for a living. Instead, unless you are a doctor or a banker you're going to spend your whole life either working flat out and having to claim benefits or not going to work and claiming benefits.
Minimum wage needs to be a living wage, properly enforced and get rid of all these benefits.
Bring back the dignity in working instead of just patronising nonsense about hard working families from the millionaire aristocrats ruling the country.
Since the expenses scandal you now have to own two houses before you can even think about standing for parliament. anyone who doesn't can't afford to be an MP any more.
We are an entire nation dependent on benefits because pay and job security are so bad. I don't know exactly why they are striking but when so many people have no idea of their hours. have to fill in begging forms for the government just to eat and keep a roof over their heads you have to expect a bit of discontent. People of all ages want to be independent and work for a living. Instead, unless you are a doctor or a banker you're going to spend your whole life either working flat out and having to claim benefits or not going to work and claiming benefits. Minimum wage needs to be a living wage, properly enforced and get rid of all these benefits. Bring back the dignity in working instead of just patronising nonsense about hard working families from the millionaire aristocrats ruling the country. Since the expenses scandal you now have to own two houses before you can even think about standing for parliament. anyone who doesn't can't afford to be an MP any more. ashleycross
  • Score: 0

5:47pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Loonyspoon says...

loftusrod wrote:
Can a teacher answer my earlier question please: why don't they go on strike during the school holidays or teacher training days, thereby causing minimum disruption to pupils and parents?
Bless you, you really don't understand the point of strikes, do you? Award for the most innocent quote of the day. : )
[quote][p][bold]loftusrod[/bold] wrote: Can a teacher answer my earlier question please: why don't they go on strike during the school holidays or teacher training days, thereby causing minimum disruption to pupils and parents?[/p][/quote]Bless you, you really don't understand the point of strikes, do you? Award for the most innocent quote of the day. : ) Loonyspoon
  • Score: 9

6:31pm Wed 9 Jul 14

loftusrod says...

Loonyspoon wrote:
loftusrod wrote:
Can a teacher answer my earlier question please: why don't they go on strike during the school holidays or teacher training days, thereby causing minimum disruption to pupils and parents?
Bless you, you really don't understand the point of strikes, do you? Award for the most innocent quote of the day. : )
Oh l understand all right, just trying to smoke out the militant left......
[quote][p][bold]Loonyspoon[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]loftusrod[/bold] wrote: Can a teacher answer my earlier question please: why don't they go on strike during the school holidays or teacher training days, thereby causing minimum disruption to pupils and parents?[/p][/quote]Bless you, you really don't understand the point of strikes, do you? Award for the most innocent quote of the day. : )[/p][/quote]Oh l understand all right, just trying to smoke out the militant left...... loftusrod
  • Score: -8

6:40pm Wed 9 Jul 14

StVallier says...

Seventeen weeks holiday plus training days, that's not many actual days teaching in a working lifetime.
Seventeen weeks holiday plus training days, that's not many actual days teaching in a working lifetime. StVallier
  • Score: -8

6:40pm Wed 9 Jul 14

breamoreboy says...

As none of the politicians in Parliament give one hoot about the general public I think that the best course of action would be to have a general strike. This would not involve stopping work, that hits yourself in the pocket. Just don't drink alcohol, smoke cigarettes or drive your car for a week and see what the reaction is. Certainly the Chancellor of the Exchequer and his shadow would be having kittens, roughly 2% of a years revenue from those sources must amount to billions. Fantasy maybe, but surely it's about time that we all got together in an attempt to make them sit and up take notice.
As none of the politicians in Parliament give one hoot about the general public I think that the best course of action would be to have a general strike. This would not involve stopping work, that hits yourself in the pocket. Just don't drink alcohol, smoke cigarettes or drive your car for a week and see what the reaction is. Certainly the Chancellor of the Exchequer and his shadow would be having kittens, roughly 2% of a years revenue from those sources must amount to billions. Fantasy maybe, but surely it's about time that we all got together in an attempt to make them sit and up take notice. breamoreboy
  • Score: 1

6:46pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Carolyn43 says...

loftusrod wrote:
LeGrove wrote:
loftusrod wrote:
Can a teacher answer my earlier question please: why don't they go on strike during the school holidays or teacher training days, thereby causing minimum disruption to pupils and parents?
What would be the point in doing it during the holidays? ALL strikes are undertaken to cause disruption, so they get noticed and by those who make the decisions. If they had strikes when the kids weren't there they'd be totally ignored.
....and never mind the children's education and disruption to parents.
Unless parents want to take their children out of school on holiday.

There are very few schools closing because the majority of teachers are not in unions which are going on strike and they don't want to strike anyway. I never went on strike.
[quote][p][bold]loftusrod[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LeGrove[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]loftusrod[/bold] wrote: Can a teacher answer my earlier question please: why don't they go on strike during the school holidays or teacher training days, thereby causing minimum disruption to pupils and parents?[/p][/quote]What would be the point in doing it during the holidays? ALL strikes are undertaken to cause disruption, so they get noticed and by those who make the decisions. If they had strikes when the kids weren't there they'd be totally ignored.[/p][/quote]....and never mind the children's education and disruption to parents.[/p][/quote]Unless parents want to take their children out of school on holiday. There are very few schools closing because the majority of teachers are not in unions which are going on strike and they don't want to strike anyway. I never went on strike. Carolyn43
  • Score: 4

7:22pm Wed 9 Jul 14

sea poole says...

Marty Caine -Your strange assertion that only left wing striking teachers remain is surely undermined by the fact that many more schools in this area are open tomorrow, compared with the proportion that are closing.. or will you put another 'spin' on it?
Marty Caine -Your strange assertion that only left wing striking teachers remain is surely undermined by the fact that many more schools in this area are open tomorrow, compared with the proportion that are closing.. or will you put another 'spin' on it? sea poole
  • Score: 3

7:23pm Wed 9 Jul 14

boardsandphotos says...

Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
boardsandphotos wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.
Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first?

Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.
Carolyn didn't 'imply' any such thing that's your interpretation in order to fit your strawman arguement.

Don't just assume that because some think teachers have a right to strike and deserve better pay they don't also think the same about soldiers.
Well actually it is exactly what she implied as her statement was a generalisation to everyone, it is actually you trying to twist what I said, for some strange reason.

Can any sensible public sector worker who intends to go on strike tomorrow, please tell what they think it will achieve other than disrupting the lives of those who can do nothing about their plight. I personally believe it will achieve nothing else but I am always willing to be convinced otherwise.

On the teachers side of things the real hypocrisy here is that parents who take their kids on holiday can be fined, so surely in retrospect if the teachers decide to go on strike then shouldn't those parents should be, compensated. Preferably at the expense of those teachers future pay rises. Would they then be so keen to take non productive strike action?
No Carolyn invited those who are critisising teachers to spend a day doing the job to gain a better understanding in what's involved Her focus was on Teachers and the lack of understanding of what Teachers do day to day.

Rather than reply to that you turned attention to jobs that we would all agree were tougher than a teachers; soldiers and nurses - but none of us would disagree with that and none of us would begrudge soldiers or nurses a payrise because we DO know how tough their jobs are, whereas with Teachers there is clearly a lack of understanding and/or disagreement about what is involved.

You turning the attention to nurses and soldiers is a non-arguement.

Your other comparisson about strikes (a democratic right) and parents taking their kids on holiday during term time (a policy NOT drawn up by teachers) also doesn't really make any sense they bear no relation to one another.

I generally don't agree with strike action but I wouldn't ever deny a workers right to do it.
[quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]boardsandphotos[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.[/p][/quote]Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first? Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.[/p][/quote]Carolyn didn't 'imply' any such thing that's your interpretation in order to fit your strawman arguement. Don't just assume that because some think teachers have a right to strike and deserve better pay they don't also think the same about soldiers.[/p][/quote]Well actually it is exactly what she implied as her statement was a generalisation to everyone, it is actually you trying to twist what I said, for some strange reason. Can any sensible public sector worker who intends to go on strike tomorrow, please tell what they think it will achieve other than disrupting the lives of those who can do nothing about their plight. I personally believe it will achieve nothing else but I am always willing to be convinced otherwise. On the teachers side of things the real hypocrisy here is that parents who take their kids on holiday can be fined, so surely in retrospect if the teachers decide to go on strike then shouldn't those parents should be, compensated. Preferably at the expense of those teachers future pay rises. Would they then be so keen to take non productive strike action?[/p][/quote]No Carolyn invited those who are critisising teachers to spend a day doing the job to gain a better understanding in what's involved Her focus was on Teachers and the lack of understanding of what Teachers do day to day. Rather than reply to that you turned attention to jobs that we would all agree were tougher than a teachers; soldiers and nurses - but none of us would disagree with that and none of us would begrudge soldiers or nurses a payrise because we DO know how tough their jobs are, whereas with Teachers there is clearly a lack of understanding and/or disagreement about what is involved. You turning the attention to nurses and soldiers is a non-arguement. Your other comparisson about strikes (a democratic right) and parents taking their kids on holiday during term time (a policy NOT drawn up by teachers) also doesn't really make any sense they bear no relation to one another. I generally don't agree with strike action but I wouldn't ever deny a workers right to do it. boardsandphotos
  • Score: 8

8:24pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Marty Caine UKIP says...

sea poole wrote:
Marty Caine -Your strange assertion that only left wing striking teachers remain is surely undermined by the fact that many more schools in this area are open tomorrow, compared with the proportion that are closing.. or will you put another 'spin' on it?
I wouldn't say I am putting a spin on anything, I am simply pointing out my own belief that there is nothing to be gained by this strike action, as was the same the last time the unions decided to strike. I have also clearly stated that I agree with their grievance of getting below inflation pay rises or freezes.
[quote][p][bold]sea poole[/bold] wrote: Marty Caine -Your strange assertion that only left wing striking teachers remain is surely undermined by the fact that many more schools in this area are open tomorrow, compared with the proportion that are closing.. or will you put another 'spin' on it?[/p][/quote]I wouldn't say I am putting a spin on anything, I am simply pointing out my own belief that there is nothing to be gained by this strike action, as was the same the last time the unions decided to strike. I have also clearly stated that I agree with their grievance of getting below inflation pay rises or freezes. Marty Caine UKIP
  • Score: -2

8:58pm Wed 9 Jul 14

sea poole says...

Marty Caine, But you haven't answered the statement- YOU wrote that only left wing teachers remain- how does that sit with most schools being open...?
Marty Caine, But you haven't answered the statement- YOU wrote that only left wing teachers remain- how does that sit with most schools being open...? sea poole
  • Score: 4

9:30pm Wed 9 Jul 14

cjj27551 says...

Wish i had 6 mths holiday a year full pay then have a training day after the holiday what an easy life a teacher has i swop jobs they want to think themselfs lucky they got a job come get ur act together
Wish i had 6 mths holiday a year full pay then have a training day after the holiday what an easy life a teacher has i swop jobs they want to think themselfs lucky they got a job come get ur act together cjj27551
  • Score: -12

9:57pm Wed 9 Jul 14

sea poole says...

cjj -ha, ha -you swap jobs? You can hardly write in English!
cjj -ha, ha -you swap jobs? You can hardly write in English! sea poole
  • Score: 15

10:13pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Baysider says...

Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
sea poole wrote:
Marty Caine -Your strange assertion that only left wing striking teachers remain is surely undermined by the fact that many more schools in this area are open tomorrow, compared with the proportion that are closing.. or will you put another 'spin' on it?
I wouldn't say I am putting a spin on anything, I am simply pointing out my own belief that there is nothing to be gained by this strike action, as was the same the last time the unions decided to strike. I have also clearly stated that I agree with their grievance of getting below inflation pay rises or freezes.
Not true again. As a result of the last industrial action taken the employers got back around the negotiating table with an improved offer re:pensions reform.
[quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sea poole[/bold] wrote: Marty Caine -Your strange assertion that only left wing striking teachers remain is surely undermined by the fact that many more schools in this area are open tomorrow, compared with the proportion that are closing.. or will you put another 'spin' on it?[/p][/quote]I wouldn't say I am putting a spin on anything, I am simply pointing out my own belief that there is nothing to be gained by this strike action, as was the same the last time the unions decided to strike. I have also clearly stated that I agree with their grievance of getting below inflation pay rises or freezes.[/p][/quote]Not true again. As a result of the last industrial action taken the employers got back around the negotiating table with an improved offer re:pensions reform. Baysider
  • Score: 2

10:16pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Marty Caine UKIP says...

sea poole wrote:
Marty Caine, But you haven't answered the statement- YOU wrote that only left wing teachers remain- how does that sit with most schools being open...?
Hopefully that is down to the fact that a lot of schools realise there is nothing to be gained by this strike action anyway.

I do know from my own experience of attending local schools such as Seldown and Kemp Welch when teachers were paid a lot less with far fewer benefits and comparing my education to that of my five children, who have now thankfully left school and are all working. The standard of education in this country has lowered dramatically over the years. I believe there are various reasons for this but one of the reasons is definitely union involvement. That is my opinion and one that you are more than entitled to disagree with but it will certainly not change that opinion.
[quote][p][bold]sea poole[/bold] wrote: Marty Caine, But you haven't answered the statement- YOU wrote that only left wing teachers remain- how does that sit with most schools being open...?[/p][/quote]Hopefully that is down to the fact that a lot of schools realise there is nothing to be gained by this strike action anyway. I do know from my own experience of attending local schools such as Seldown and Kemp Welch when teachers were paid a lot less with far fewer benefits and comparing my education to that of my five children, who have now thankfully left school and are all working. The standard of education in this country has lowered dramatically over the years. I believe there are various reasons for this but one of the reasons is definitely union involvement. That is my opinion and one that you are more than entitled to disagree with but it will certainly not change that opinion. Marty Caine UKIP
  • Score: -5

10:20pm Wed 9 Jul 14

boardsandphotos says...

Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
sea poole wrote:
Marty Caine, But you haven't answered the statement- YOU wrote that only left wing teachers remain- how does that sit with most schools being open...?
Hopefully that is down to the fact that a lot of schools realise there is nothing to be gained by this strike action anyway.

I do know from my own experience of attending local schools such as Seldown and Kemp Welch when teachers were paid a lot less with far fewer benefits and comparing my education to that of my five children, who have now thankfully left school and are all working. The standard of education in this country has lowered dramatically over the years. I believe there are various reasons for this but one of the reasons is definitely union involvement. That is my opinion and one that you are more than entitled to disagree with but it will certainly not change that opinion.
I too went to Kemp Welch, early to mid-90's.
[quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sea poole[/bold] wrote: Marty Caine, But you haven't answered the statement- YOU wrote that only left wing teachers remain- how does that sit with most schools being open...?[/p][/quote]Hopefully that is down to the fact that a lot of schools realise there is nothing to be gained by this strike action anyway. I do know from my own experience of attending local schools such as Seldown and Kemp Welch when teachers were paid a lot less with far fewer benefits and comparing my education to that of my five children, who have now thankfully left school and are all working. The standard of education in this country has lowered dramatically over the years. I believe there are various reasons for this but one of the reasons is definitely union involvement. That is my opinion and one that you are more than entitled to disagree with but it will certainly not change that opinion.[/p][/quote]I too went to Kemp Welch, early to mid-90's. boardsandphotos
  • Score: 0

10:39pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Marty Caine UKIP says...

boardsandphotos wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
sea poole wrote:
Marty Caine, But you haven't answered the statement- YOU wrote that only left wing teachers remain- how does that sit with most schools being open...?
Hopefully that is down to the fact that a lot of schools realise there is nothing to be gained by this strike action anyway.

I do know from my own experience of attending local schools such as Seldown and Kemp Welch when teachers were paid a lot less with far fewer benefits and comparing my education to that of my five children, who have now thankfully left school and are all working. The standard of education in this country has lowered dramatically over the years. I believe there are various reasons for this but one of the reasons is definitely union involvement. That is my opinion and one that you are more than entitled to disagree with but it will certainly not change that opinion.
I too went to Kemp Welch, early to mid-90's.
I'm a tad older I left in 76
[quote][p][bold]boardsandphotos[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sea poole[/bold] wrote: Marty Caine, But you haven't answered the statement- YOU wrote that only left wing teachers remain- how does that sit with most schools being open...?[/p][/quote]Hopefully that is down to the fact that a lot of schools realise there is nothing to be gained by this strike action anyway. I do know from my own experience of attending local schools such as Seldown and Kemp Welch when teachers were paid a lot less with far fewer benefits and comparing my education to that of my five children, who have now thankfully left school and are all working. The standard of education in this country has lowered dramatically over the years. I believe there are various reasons for this but one of the reasons is definitely union involvement. That is my opinion and one that you are more than entitled to disagree with but it will certainly not change that opinion.[/p][/quote]I too went to Kemp Welch, early to mid-90's.[/p][/quote]I'm a tad older I left in 76 Marty Caine UKIP
  • Score: -3

11:07pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Marty Caine UKIP says...

Baysider wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
sea poole wrote:
Marty Caine -Your strange assertion that only left wing striking teachers remain is surely undermined by the fact that many more schools in this area are open tomorrow, compared with the proportion that are closing.. or will you put another 'spin' on it?
I wouldn't say I am putting a spin on anything, I am simply pointing out my own belief that there is nothing to be gained by this strike action, as was the same the last time the unions decided to strike. I have also clearly stated that I agree with their grievance of getting below inflation pay rises or freezes.
Not true again. As a result of the last industrial action taken the employers got back around the negotiating table with an improved offer re:pensions reform.
If it was so successful then why are they striking again ?
[quote][p][bold]Baysider[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sea poole[/bold] wrote: Marty Caine -Your strange assertion that only left wing striking teachers remain is surely undermined by the fact that many more schools in this area are open tomorrow, compared with the proportion that are closing.. or will you put another 'spin' on it?[/p][/quote]I wouldn't say I am putting a spin on anything, I am simply pointing out my own belief that there is nothing to be gained by this strike action, as was the same the last time the unions decided to strike. I have also clearly stated that I agree with their grievance of getting below inflation pay rises or freezes.[/p][/quote]Not true again. As a result of the last industrial action taken the employers got back around the negotiating table with an improved offer re:pensions reform.[/p][/quote]If it was so successful then why are they striking again ? Marty Caine UKIP
  • Score: 1

11:21pm Wed 9 Jul 14

boardsandphotos says...

Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
Baysider wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
sea poole wrote:
Marty Caine -Your strange assertion that only left wing striking teachers remain is surely undermined by the fact that many more schools in this area are open tomorrow, compared with the proportion that are closing.. or will you put another 'spin' on it?
I wouldn't say I am putting a spin on anything, I am simply pointing out my own belief that there is nothing to be gained by this strike action, as was the same the last time the unions decided to strike. I have also clearly stated that I agree with their grievance of getting below inflation pay rises or freezes.
Not true again. As a result of the last industrial action taken the employers got back around the negotiating table with an improved offer re:pensions reform.
If it was so successful then why are they striking again ?
You know why, you've just stated that you agree with their grievance?
Below inflation or frozen pay.
[quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Baysider[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sea poole[/bold] wrote: Marty Caine -Your strange assertion that only left wing striking teachers remain is surely undermined by the fact that many more schools in this area are open tomorrow, compared with the proportion that are closing.. or will you put another 'spin' on it?[/p][/quote]I wouldn't say I am putting a spin on anything, I am simply pointing out my own belief that there is nothing to be gained by this strike action, as was the same the last time the unions decided to strike. I have also clearly stated that I agree with their grievance of getting below inflation pay rises or freezes.[/p][/quote]Not true again. As a result of the last industrial action taken the employers got back around the negotiating table with an improved offer re:pensions reform.[/p][/quote]If it was so successful then why are they striking again ?[/p][/quote]You know why, you've just stated that you agree with their grievance? Below inflation or frozen pay. boardsandphotos
  • Score: 2

11:34pm Wed 9 Jul 14

Marty Caine UKIP says...

boardsandphotos wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
Baysider wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
sea poole wrote:
Marty Caine -Your strange assertion that only left wing striking teachers remain is surely undermined by the fact that many more schools in this area are open tomorrow, compared with the proportion that are closing.. or will you put another 'spin' on it?
I wouldn't say I am putting a spin on anything, I am simply pointing out my own belief that there is nothing to be gained by this strike action, as was the same the last time the unions decided to strike. I have also clearly stated that I agree with their grievance of getting below inflation pay rises or freezes.
Not true again. As a result of the last industrial action taken the employers got back around the negotiating table with an improved offer re:pensions reform.
If it was so successful then why are they striking again ?
You know why, you've just stated that you agree with their grievance?
Below inflation or frozen pay.
But as I keep asking how will strike action tomorrow actually achieve anything?

Another question is, if they are striking for an extra £1 an hour and there are about 8,000 public sector staff in Bournemouth and Poole, where is that kind of wage increase actually going to come from?
[quote][p][bold]boardsandphotos[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Baysider[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sea poole[/bold] wrote: Marty Caine -Your strange assertion that only left wing striking teachers remain is surely undermined by the fact that many more schools in this area are open tomorrow, compared with the proportion that are closing.. or will you put another 'spin' on it?[/p][/quote]I wouldn't say I am putting a spin on anything, I am simply pointing out my own belief that there is nothing to be gained by this strike action, as was the same the last time the unions decided to strike. I have also clearly stated that I agree with their grievance of getting below inflation pay rises or freezes.[/p][/quote]Not true again. As a result of the last industrial action taken the employers got back around the negotiating table with an improved offer re:pensions reform.[/p][/quote]If it was so successful then why are they striking again ?[/p][/quote]You know why, you've just stated that you agree with their grievance? Below inflation or frozen pay.[/p][/quote]But as I keep asking how will strike action tomorrow actually achieve anything? Another question is, if they are striking for an extra £1 an hour and there are about 8,000 public sector staff in Bournemouth and Poole, where is that kind of wage increase actually going to come from? Marty Caine UKIP
  • Score: -1

11:45pm Wed 9 Jul 14

boardsandphotos says...

Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
boardsandphotos wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
Baysider wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
sea poole wrote:
Marty Caine -Your strange assertion that only left wing striking teachers remain is surely undermined by the fact that many more schools in this area are open tomorrow, compared with the proportion that are closing.. or will you put another 'spin' on it?
I wouldn't say I am putting a spin on anything, I am simply pointing out my own belief that there is nothing to be gained by this strike action, as was the same the last time the unions decided to strike. I have also clearly stated that I agree with their grievance of getting below inflation pay rises or freezes.
Not true again. As a result of the last industrial action taken the employers got back around the negotiating table with an improved offer re:pensions reform.
If it was so successful then why are they striking again ?
You know why, you've just stated that you agree with their grievance?
Below inflation or frozen pay.
But as I keep asking how will strike action tomorrow actually achieve anything?

Another question is, if they are striking for an extra £1 an hour and there are about 8,000 public sector staff in Bournemouth and Poole, where is that kind of wage increase actually going to come from?
So they went on strike last time about Pensions and as Baysider stated that resulted in the employers renegotiating the pension offer.

As for tomorrow, well only time will tell but it's in the media, we're talking about it so that's a start, awareness has been raised and if nothing elae their voices will be heard.
[quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]boardsandphotos[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Baysider[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sea poole[/bold] wrote: Marty Caine -Your strange assertion that only left wing striking teachers remain is surely undermined by the fact that many more schools in this area are open tomorrow, compared with the proportion that are closing.. or will you put another 'spin' on it?[/p][/quote]I wouldn't say I am putting a spin on anything, I am simply pointing out my own belief that there is nothing to be gained by this strike action, as was the same the last time the unions decided to strike. I have also clearly stated that I agree with their grievance of getting below inflation pay rises or freezes.[/p][/quote]Not true again. As a result of the last industrial action taken the employers got back around the negotiating table with an improved offer re:pensions reform.[/p][/quote]If it was so successful then why are they striking again ?[/p][/quote]You know why, you've just stated that you agree with their grievance? Below inflation or frozen pay.[/p][/quote]But as I keep asking how will strike action tomorrow actually achieve anything? Another question is, if they are striking for an extra £1 an hour and there are about 8,000 public sector staff in Bournemouth and Poole, where is that kind of wage increase actually going to come from?[/p][/quote]So they went on strike last time about Pensions and as Baysider stated that resulted in the employers renegotiating the pension offer. As for tomorrow, well only time will tell but it's in the media, we're talking about it so that's a start, awareness has been raised and if nothing elae their voices will be heard. boardsandphotos
  • Score: 0

11:48pm Wed 9 Jul 14

breamoreboy says...

Stuart_Lane wrote:
Can I introduce the teaching union / community to http://www.38degrees

.org.uk/campaigns
This is surely a better way to gather support for an issue that affects such a large number of people.
Causing considerable inconvenience to the public when you want their support just seems completely irrational.
Or change.org or sumofus.org (at least from memory that's what they're called). I've signed petitions on all three at one time or another and shared them on facebook and twitter.
[quote][p][bold]Stuart_Lane[/bold] wrote: Can I introduce the teaching union / community to http://www.38degrees .org.uk/campaigns This is surely a better way to gather support for an issue that affects such a large number of people. Causing considerable inconvenience to the public when you want their support just seems completely irrational.[/p][/quote]Or change.org or sumofus.org (at least from memory that's what they're called). I've signed petitions on all three at one time or another and shared them on facebook and twitter. breamoreboy
  • Score: 0

6:54am Thu 10 Jul 14

roamer200 says...

boardsandphotos wrote:
roamer200 wrote:
Shame on you all. Another pressure on honest working families having to now find child care or lose work. If you don't want the job I am sure someone else does.
So no Teachers are part of honest hard working families then? Teachers aren't parents too with the same bills and outgoings as the rest of us?
Yes but we aren't going strike because if we did our companies would lose more money and we our jobs.... It's little different in the real world!!! Oh and those that don't strike be proud of yourselves you have put the kids first
[quote][p][bold]boardsandphotos[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]roamer200[/bold] wrote: Shame on you all. Another pressure on honest working families having to now find child care or lose work. If you don't want the job I am sure someone else does.[/p][/quote]So no Teachers are part of honest hard working families then? Teachers aren't parents too with the same bills and outgoings as the rest of us?[/p][/quote]Yes but we aren't going strike because if we did our companies would lose more money and we our jobs.... It's little different in the real world!!! Oh and those that don't strike be proud of yourselves you have put the kids first roamer200
  • Score: 1

7:14am Thu 10 Jul 14

boardsandphotos says...

roamer200 wrote:
boardsandphotos wrote:
roamer200 wrote:
Shame on you all. Another pressure on honest working families having to now find child care or lose work. If you don't want the job I am sure someone else does.
So no Teachers are part of honest hard working families then? Teachers aren't parents too with the same bills and outgoings as the rest of us?
Yes but we aren't going strike because if we did our companies would lose more money and we our jobs.... It's little different in the real world!!! Oh and those that don't strike be proud of yourselves you have put the kids first
Then don't ever complain about pay freezes and extra hours for no reward, if you want to convince yourself you can't do anything about it because you live in "the real world" then fine what ever makes you feel better to get through your long day, but your "real world" is one where you've removed your democratic right to protest, because you are more concerned with the profits of the company you work for, genius.
[quote][p][bold]roamer200[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]boardsandphotos[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]roamer200[/bold] wrote: Shame on you all. Another pressure on honest working families having to now find child care or lose work. If you don't want the job I am sure someone else does.[/p][/quote]So no Teachers are part of honest hard working families then? Teachers aren't parents too with the same bills and outgoings as the rest of us?[/p][/quote]Yes but we aren't going strike because if we did our companies would lose more money and we our jobs.... It's little different in the real world!!! Oh and those that don't strike be proud of yourselves you have put the kids first[/p][/quote]Then don't ever complain about pay freezes and extra hours for no reward, if you want to convince yourself you can't do anything about it because you live in "the real world" then fine what ever makes you feel better to get through your long day, but your "real world" is one where you've removed your democratic right to protest, because you are more concerned with the profits of the company you work for, genius. boardsandphotos
  • Score: 3

7:16am Thu 10 Jul 14

cherries189 says...

I understand the low pay increase and wages need to be addressed but i dont like hearing teachers keep complaining about how hard their job is. Did you not know what you were getting in to? I have served 8 years on the frontline fighting in various war zones but never complained as it was part of the job i wanted. Is it the example we want children to have, that if you dont get what you want then just refuse to work and complain, like well infants.
I understand the low pay increase and wages need to be addressed but i dont like hearing teachers keep complaining about how hard their job is. Did you not know what you were getting in to? I have served 8 years on the frontline fighting in various war zones but never complained as it was part of the job i wanted. Is it the example we want children to have, that if you dont get what you want then just refuse to work and complain, like well infants. cherries189
  • Score: 6

10:09am Thu 10 Jul 14

old buffer says...

cherries189 wrote:
I understand the low pay increase and wages need to be addressed but i dont like hearing teachers keep complaining about how hard their job is. Did you not know what you were getting in to? I have served 8 years on the frontline fighting in various war zones but never complained as it was part of the job i wanted. Is it the example we want children to have, that if you dont get what you want then just refuse to work and complain, like well infants.
I should have thought that unwell infants would be more likely to complain!
[quote][p][bold]cherries189[/bold] wrote: I understand the low pay increase and wages need to be addressed but i dont like hearing teachers keep complaining about how hard their job is. Did you not know what you were getting in to? I have served 8 years on the frontline fighting in various war zones but never complained as it was part of the job i wanted. Is it the example we want children to have, that if you dont get what you want then just refuse to work and complain, like well infants.[/p][/quote]I should have thought that unwell infants would be more likely to complain! old buffer
  • Score: -1

11:13am Thu 10 Jul 14

Bournesouthmouth Downpokes says...

ben111 wrote:
Its a joke, and we are fools for falling for it. At any point has anyone ever thought the system in place , as in media government etc , has a basic point of pitting people against each other to be selfish. As people surely we are better than this. but im sure this will go over the heads of some, so for the engry few please vent this way. instead of all getting together and finding a solution, shame on us all . I wait for the abuse.
You are a wise man Ben and have seen the light. Thumbs up brother!
[quote][p][bold]ben111[/bold] wrote: Its a joke, and we are fools for falling for it. At any point has anyone ever thought the system in place , as in media government etc , has a basic point of pitting people against each other to be selfish. As people surely we are better than this. but im sure this will go over the heads of some, so for the engry few please vent this way. instead of all getting together and finding a solution, shame on us all . I wait for the abuse.[/p][/quote]You are a wise man Ben and have seen the light. Thumbs up brother! Bournesouthmouth Downpokes
  • Score: 1

11:16am Thu 10 Jul 14

bmthmark says...

Echo you say that all the schools are open but in reality many classes have been asked not to go in to school. Muscliff is an example as you say its open but my daughters teacher is on strike so she is at home.

I have no objection to striking but I will have an objection if I get charged if I ever need to take my children out of school in term time.
Echo you say that all the schools are open but in reality many classes have been asked not to go in to school. Muscliff is an example as you say its open but my daughters teacher is on strike so she is at home. I have no objection to striking but I will have an objection if I get charged if I ever need to take my children out of school in term time. bmthmark
  • Score: 2

1:45pm Thu 10 Jul 14

Chris60 says...

From the miners onwards I have always thought "If I wouldn't do the job for the money then I can't blame those who do for wanting better conditions". That certainly would be the case with teaching. Having known a couple of teachers in the past, I know how many hours they really worked (including in those long Summer "holidays") and I certainly wouldn't swap places with one. Why in this country do we always want the lowest common denominator to apply (e.g. "I haven't got a great pension so why should somebody else", "I can't/won't strike so why should somebody else"). Look to improve your own lot instead of applying this bitter idea we now seem to have of "If I can't have something neither should anybody else" and if the grass looks that much greener on the other side try going over there. Anybody who isn't a teacher themselves has either chosen not to be or didn't have the intellect and either way, they shouldn't then moan at those who took on the job.
From the miners onwards I have always thought "If I wouldn't do the job for the money then I can't blame those who do for wanting better conditions". That certainly would be the case with teaching. Having known a couple of teachers in the past, I know how many hours they really worked (including in those long Summer "holidays") and I certainly wouldn't swap places with one. Why in this country do we always want the lowest common denominator to apply (e.g. "I haven't got a great pension so why should somebody else", "I can't/won't strike so why should somebody else"). Look to improve your own lot instead of applying this bitter idea we now seem to have of "If I can't have something neither should anybody else" and if the grass looks that much greener on the other side try going over there. Anybody who isn't a teacher themselves has either chosen not to be or didn't have the intellect and either way, they shouldn't then moan at those who took on the job. Chris60
  • Score: 8

2:51pm Thu 10 Jul 14

Baysider says...

Chris60 wrote:
From the miners onwards I have always thought "If I wouldn't do the job for the money then I can't blame those who do for wanting better conditions". That certainly would be the case with teaching. Having known a couple of teachers in the past, I know how many hours they really worked (including in those long Summer "holidays") and I certainly wouldn't swap places with one. Why in this country do we always want the lowest common denominator to apply (e.g. "I haven't got a great pension so why should somebody else", "I can't/won't strike so why should somebody else"). Look to improve your own lot instead of applying this bitter idea we now seem to have of "If I can't have something neither should anybody else" and if the grass looks that much greener on the other side try going over there. Anybody who isn't a teacher themselves has either chosen not to be or didn't have the intellect and either way, they shouldn't then moan at those who took on the job.
Spot on sir, I doff my cap.
[quote][p][bold]Chris60[/bold] wrote: From the miners onwards I have always thought "If I wouldn't do the job for the money then I can't blame those who do for wanting better conditions". That certainly would be the case with teaching. Having known a couple of teachers in the past, I know how many hours they really worked (including in those long Summer "holidays") and I certainly wouldn't swap places with one. Why in this country do we always want the lowest common denominator to apply (e.g. "I haven't got a great pension so why should somebody else", "I can't/won't strike so why should somebody else"). Look to improve your own lot instead of applying this bitter idea we now seem to have of "If I can't have something neither should anybody else" and if the grass looks that much greener on the other side try going over there. Anybody who isn't a teacher themselves has either chosen not to be or didn't have the intellect and either way, they shouldn't then moan at those who took on the job.[/p][/quote]Spot on sir, I doff my cap. Baysider
  • Score: 3

3:23pm Thu 10 Jul 14

boardsandphotos says...

Baysider wrote:
Chris60 wrote:
From the miners onwards I have always thought "If I wouldn't do the job for the money then I can't blame those who do for wanting better conditions". That certainly would be the case with teaching. Having known a couple of teachers in the past, I know how many hours they really worked (including in those long Summer "holidays") and I certainly wouldn't swap places with one. Why in this country do we always want the lowest common denominator to apply (e.g. "I haven't got a great pension so why should somebody else", "I can't/won't strike so why should somebody else"). Look to improve your own lot instead of applying this bitter idea we now seem to have of "If I can't have something neither should anybody else" and if the grass looks that much greener on the other side try going over there. Anybody who isn't a teacher themselves has either chosen not to be or didn't have the intellect and either way, they shouldn't then moan at those who took on the job.
Spot on sir, I doff my cap.
Cap doffing going on here too, well said.
[quote][p][bold]Baysider[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Chris60[/bold] wrote: From the miners onwards I have always thought "If I wouldn't do the job for the money then I can't blame those who do for wanting better conditions". That certainly would be the case with teaching. Having known a couple of teachers in the past, I know how many hours they really worked (including in those long Summer "holidays") and I certainly wouldn't swap places with one. Why in this country do we always want the lowest common denominator to apply (e.g. "I haven't got a great pension so why should somebody else", "I can't/won't strike so why should somebody else"). Look to improve your own lot instead of applying this bitter idea we now seem to have of "If I can't have something neither should anybody else" and if the grass looks that much greener on the other side try going over there. Anybody who isn't a teacher themselves has either chosen not to be or didn't have the intellect and either way, they shouldn't then moan at those who took on the job.[/p][/quote]Spot on sir, I doff my cap.[/p][/quote]Cap doffing going on here too, well said. boardsandphotos
  • Score: 1

3:43pm Thu 10 Jul 14

fireflier says...

Instead of asking everyone to 'race for the bottom' in their pay and conditions why don't all these moaners, about just how inconvenienced they are, begin to realise that teachers will always have pupils in front of them so whatever they do someone is going to shout 'Shame!'

Teachers stiil have bills to pay, obligations to meet and, hopefully, a retirement to look forward to where they won't have to live on the breadline.

...or, as these folks seem to be telling them, should they just accept any pittance that's offered ...not worry about their poverty ...just apply for benefits to cover the cost of bread and dripping in old age?

All those who saw pensions, etc being smashed to bits by fat-cat bosses during the last two or three decades should have stood up for their own interests and encouraged others to stand alongside them in support. Please don't expect everyone to join you in your misery!
Instead of asking everyone to 'race for the bottom' in their pay and conditions why don't all these moaners, about just how inconvenienced they are, begin to realise that teachers will always have pupils in front of them so whatever they do someone is going to shout 'Shame!' Teachers stiil have bills to pay, obligations to meet and, hopefully, a retirement to look forward to where they won't have to live on the breadline. ...or, as these folks seem to be telling them, should they just accept any pittance that's offered ...not worry about their poverty ...just apply for benefits to cover the cost of bread and dripping in old age? All those who saw pensions, etc being smashed to bits by fat-cat bosses during the last two or three decades should have stood up for their own interests and encouraged others to stand alongside them in support. Please don't expect everyone to join you in your misery! fireflier
  • Score: 0

3:46pm Thu 10 Jul 14

fireflier says...

boardsandphotos wrote:
Baysider wrote:
Chris60 wrote:
From the miners onwards I have always thought "If I wouldn't do the job for the money then I can't blame those who do for wanting better conditions". That certainly would be the case with teaching. Having known a couple of teachers in the past, I know how many hours they really worked (including in those long Summer "holidays") and I certainly wouldn't swap places with one. Why in this country do we always want the lowest common denominator to apply (e.g. "I haven't got a great pension so why should somebody else", "I can't/won't strike so why should somebody else"). Look to improve your own lot instead of applying this bitter idea we now seem to have of "If I can't have something neither should anybody else" and if the grass looks that much greener on the other side try going over there. Anybody who isn't a teacher themselves has either chosen not to be or didn't have the intellect and either way, they shouldn't then moan at those who took on the job.
Spot on sir, I doff my cap.
Cap doffing going on here too, well said.
Doffing...most certainly!
[quote][p][bold]boardsandphotos[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Baysider[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Chris60[/bold] wrote: From the miners onwards I have always thought "If I wouldn't do the job for the money then I can't blame those who do for wanting better conditions". That certainly would be the case with teaching. Having known a couple of teachers in the past, I know how many hours they really worked (including in those long Summer "holidays") and I certainly wouldn't swap places with one. Why in this country do we always want the lowest common denominator to apply (e.g. "I haven't got a great pension so why should somebody else", "I can't/won't strike so why should somebody else"). Look to improve your own lot instead of applying this bitter idea we now seem to have of "If I can't have something neither should anybody else" and if the grass looks that much greener on the other side try going over there. Anybody who isn't a teacher themselves has either chosen not to be or didn't have the intellect and either way, they shouldn't then moan at those who took on the job.[/p][/quote]Spot on sir, I doff my cap.[/p][/quote]Cap doffing going on here too, well said.[/p][/quote]Doffing...most certainly! fireflier
  • Score: 2

6:53pm Thu 10 Jul 14

alasdair1967 says...

loftusrod wrote:
Can a teacher answer my earlier question please: why don't they go on strike during the school holidays or teacher training days, thereby causing minimum disruption to pupils and parents?
I'm not a teacher , however the whole point of being on strike is to cause disruption to highlight your grievience , so what is the point in striking during school holidays and teacher training days as there would be zero disruption
[quote][p][bold]loftusrod[/bold] wrote: Can a teacher answer my earlier question please: why don't they go on strike during the school holidays or teacher training days, thereby causing minimum disruption to pupils and parents?[/p][/quote]I'm not a teacher , however the whole point of being on strike is to cause disruption to highlight your grievience , so what is the point in striking during school holidays and teacher training days as there would be zero disruption alasdair1967
  • Score: 4

8:09pm Thu 10 Jul 14

sezzler says...

Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
As a teacher who retired 17 years ago, I can honestly say I wouldn't do the job today. Conditions are now worse than I experienced. Even then is was an average of 60 hours a week (preparation, marking, reports, meetings outside school time, plus out-of-school activities); trying to teach 30 children who are allowed to do as they like by parents and who then blame teachers for their lack of discipline; no choice on what you do when in your working day - it's timetabled; no support from parents; pressure in trying to get not-very-bright children through exams; more and more paperwork from central government; frequent changes in what and how is taught, and a not very good pension at the end of it all. In spite of that I wouldn't have wanted to do any other job because of the satisfaction in seeing youngsters succeed through their own efforts and the efforts teachers put in for them.

I bet not one of those complaining about having to look after their own children is a teacher. I suggest if you think it's such an easy life, that you actually try it - if you're capable of doing 4 years full time at college without pay to get the necessary degree and are then prepared for a lifetime of abuse from parents who have it easy by palming their children off on others. Or if you don't actually want to give up your cushy job, shadow a teacher for a week, 24 hours a day. But of course you wouldn't believe that he/she actually did that amount of work every week because it would show your prejudices for what they are - delusion.

And it's not only teachers, but all public sector employees who are getting worse and worse conditions, while the conditions of those in the private sector are improving.
And just how exactly are the conditions in the private sector improving whilst the public sector workers are being victimised in your delusional world. I agree that the pay freezes and 1% rises are wrong but I was always taught that two wrongs do not make a right. This strike action is only going to disadvantage the public not the government who actually care less about the situation than anyone. How have the previous strike actions panned out for the public sector workers? If you for one moment think about it logically this strike action is only attacking those who contribute to the public sector earnings and have no real say in what happens in respect of their pay rises, in other words you are simply attacking the wrong people and this is why so many despise these strikes.
Then support teachers and other public sector workers by lobbying government.
[quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: As a teacher who retired 17 years ago, I can honestly say I wouldn't do the job today. Conditions are now worse than I experienced. Even then is was an average of 60 hours a week (preparation, marking, reports, meetings outside school time, plus out-of-school activities); trying to teach 30 children who are allowed to do as they like by parents and who then blame teachers for their lack of discipline; no choice on what you do when in your working day - it's timetabled; no support from parents; pressure in trying to get not-very-bright children through exams; more and more paperwork from central government; frequent changes in what and how is taught, and a not very good pension at the end of it all. In spite of that I wouldn't have wanted to do any other job because of the satisfaction in seeing youngsters succeed through their own efforts and the efforts teachers put in for them. I bet not one of those complaining about having to look after their own children is a teacher. I suggest if you think it's such an easy life, that you actually try it - if you're capable of doing 4 years full time at college without pay to get the necessary degree and are then prepared for a lifetime of abuse from parents who have it easy by palming their children off on others. Or if you don't actually want to give up your cushy job, shadow a teacher for a week, 24 hours a day. But of course you wouldn't believe that he/she actually did that amount of work every week because it would show your prejudices for what they are - delusion. And it's not only teachers, but all public sector employees who are getting worse and worse conditions, while the conditions of those in the private sector are improving.[/p][/quote]And just how exactly are the conditions in the private sector improving whilst the public sector workers are being victimised in your delusional world. I agree that the pay freezes and 1% rises are wrong but I was always taught that two wrongs do not make a right. This strike action is only going to disadvantage the public not the government who actually care less about the situation than anyone. How have the previous strike actions panned out for the public sector workers? If you for one moment think about it logically this strike action is only attacking those who contribute to the public sector earnings and have no real say in what happens in respect of their pay rises, in other words you are simply attacking the wrong people and this is why so many despise these strikes.[/p][/quote]Then support teachers and other public sector workers by lobbying government. sezzler
  • Score: 2

8:11pm Thu 10 Jul 14

sezzler says...

loftusrod wrote:
AdelaidePete wrote:
Often comments like some of the above show that many parents see school just as a free babysitting service, concerned about who will look after the children, not about education!
Cost of education paid through taxes aside, that's exactly what it is!
Parents can plan their lives around the fact that they know children will be at school, apart from school holidays, teacher training days, strikes and every time it snows.
Seems to me it's the teachers losing sight that schooling is about education, otherwise why not strike during school holidays or a teacher training day?
Teachers are paid for 1285 hours a year. This doesn't include holidays. How can you strike on a day you are not paid to work?
[quote][p][bold]loftusrod[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]AdelaidePete[/bold] wrote: Often comments like some of the above show that many parents see school just as a free babysitting service, concerned about who will look after the children, not about education![/p][/quote]Cost of education paid through taxes aside, that's exactly what it is! Parents can plan their lives around the fact that they know children will be at school, apart from school holidays, teacher training days, strikes and every time it snows. Seems to me it's the teachers losing sight that schooling is about education, otherwise why not strike during school holidays or a teacher training day?[/p][/quote]Teachers are paid for 1285 hours a year. This doesn't include holidays. How can you strike on a day you are not paid to work? sezzler
  • Score: 1

8:14pm Thu 10 Jul 14

sezzler says...

Stereotyped wrote:
Harpenter wrote:
Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....!
If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...?

Walk out and get a job elsewhere.

I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable.
Then he probably isn't very good at his job. To do it well you have to work way above and beyond contracted hours.
[quote][p][bold]Stereotyped[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Harpenter[/bold] wrote: Such hypocritical comments from those not supporting strike action - why ? Loss of pay !! If your employer insisted you work harder and longer for less in an already incredibly challenging job I believe you would take action ! Pay is just part of the reason to take industrial action and as mentioned in previous comments not happy with YOUR pay do something about it ....![/p][/quote]If my employer told me to do more hours and get paid less, do you know what I'd do...? Walk out and get a job elsewhere. I know a teacher (I know a few to be fair) and he does far from the 60 hours a week you all claim to do. Laughable.[/p][/quote]Then he probably isn't very good at his job. To do it well you have to work way above and beyond contracted hours. sezzler
  • Score: 1

8:19pm Thu 10 Jul 14

sezzler says...

Carolyn43 wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
boardsandphotos wrote:
Marty Caine UKIP wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.
Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first?

Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.
Carolyn didn't 'imply' any such thing that's your interpretation in order to fit your strawman arguement.

Don't just assume that because some think teachers have a right to strike and deserve better pay they don't also think the same about soldiers.
Well actually it is exactly what she implied as her statement was a generalisation to everyone, it is actually you trying to twist what I said, for some strange reason.

Can any sensible public sector worker who intends to go on strike tomorrow, please tell what they think it will achieve other than disrupting the lives of those who can do nothing about their plight. I personally believe it will achieve nothing else but I am always willing to be convinced otherwise.

On the teachers side of things the real hypocrisy here is that parents who take their kids on holiday can be fined, so surely in retrospect if the teachers decide to go on strike then shouldn't those parents should be, compensated. Preferably at the expense of those teachers future pay rises. Would they then be so keen to take non productive strike action?
No I didn't imply that and it WILL make a difference to teachers - parents criticising teachers and saying what an easy job they have will make teachers' jobs even harder than it is now. The general perception of parents is that teachers do little for a huge salary and pension while they are struggling to make ends meet doing long hours encouraging this in the minds of the children, resulting in even less than the little respect they have now and making classroom management even more difficult.

As I, and others have said, either swap jobs or shadow a teacher and see just what really goes on rather than assuming. When you see a classroom on TV, the whole thing has been set up so that everyone is on their best behaviour, and it isn't always like that in real life. Belligerent parents usually have belligerent children, which makes teaching and learning difficult for others.

Notice there's never any criticism of other public sector workers - it's always teachers.
Quite right Carolyn. Everyone thinks they are an expert on teaching because they went to school. They feel it makes them qualified to judge.
[quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]boardsandphotos[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Marty Caine UKIP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: Here's an idea. All those objecting to teachers wanting better pensions and conditions swap places with a teacher for a week. Bet you'll be very happy to back at your normal job. Then you'll be more qualified to comment on what they do.[/p][/quote]Any teacher here want to trade places with a soldier who happens to be getting a far rougher deal than they are, just to see if Carolyn43 is correct in her statement or maybe job swop with a nurse and see who quits first? Teaching is far from being the toughest job in the world and to imply that it is, is simply pure nonsense.[/p][/quote]Carolyn didn't 'imply' any such thing that's your interpretation in order to fit your strawman arguement. Don't just assume that because some think teachers have a right to strike and deserve better pay they don't also think the same about soldiers.[/p][/quote]Well actually it is exactly what she implied as her statement was a generalisation to everyone, it is actually you trying to twist what I said, for some strange reason. Can any sensible public sector worker who intends to go on strike tomorrow, please tell what they think it will achieve other than disrupting the lives of those who can do nothing about their plight. I personally believe it will achieve nothing else but I am always willing to be convinced otherwise. On the teachers side of things the real hypocrisy here is that parents who take their kids on holiday can be fined, so surely in retrospect if the teachers decide to go on strike then shouldn't those parents should be, compensated. Preferably at the expense of those teachers future pay rises. Would they then be so keen to take non productive strike action?[/p][/quote]No I didn't imply that and it WILL make a difference to teachers - parents criticising teachers and saying what an easy job they have will make teachers' jobs even harder than it is now. The general perception of parents is that teachers do little for a huge salary and pension while they are struggling to make ends meet doing long hours encouraging this in the minds of the children, resulting in even less than the little respect they have now and making classroom management even more difficult. As I, and others have said, either swap jobs or shadow a teacher and see just what really goes on rather than assuming. When you see a classroom on TV, the whole thing has been set up so that everyone is on their best behaviour, and it isn't always like that in real life. Belligerent parents usually have belligerent children, which makes teaching and learning difficult for others. Notice there's never any criticism of other public sector workers - it's always teachers.[/p][/quote]Quite right Carolyn. Everyone thinks they are an expert on teaching because they went to school. They feel it makes them qualified to judge. sezzler
  • Score: 1

8:31pm Thu 10 Jul 14

sezzler says...

cjj27551 wrote:
Wish i had 6 mths holiday a year full pay then have a training day after the holiday what an easy life a teacher has i swop jobs they want to think themselfs lucky they got a job come get ur act together
Oh dear. Never mind. Engage your brain before you comment in future. Must try harder.
[quote][p][bold]cjj27551[/bold] wrote: Wish i had 6 mths holiday a year full pay then have a training day after the holiday what an easy life a teacher has i swop jobs they want to think themselfs lucky they got a job come get ur act together[/p][/quote]Oh dear. Never mind. Engage your brain before you comment in future. Must try harder. sezzler
  • Score: 0

8:38pm Thu 10 Jul 14

sezzler says...

StVallier wrote:
Seventeen weeks holiday plus training days, that's not many actual days teaching in a working lifetime.
What do you think we are doing on training days? Lying in bed? Where do the 17 weeks come from? It's 13 and they are UNPAID. Comment on things you understand please.
[quote][p][bold]StVallier[/bold] wrote: Seventeen weeks holiday plus training days, that's not many actual days teaching in a working lifetime.[/p][/quote]What do you think we are doing on training days? Lying in bed? Where do the 17 weeks come from? It's 13 and they are UNPAID. Comment on things you understand please. sezzler
  • Score: 2

8:43pm Thu 10 Jul 14

sezzler says...

Hessenford wrote:
According to the NASUWT teachers contracted hours are 1265 over 195 days which is around 32.5 hours per week.
If teachers want to protest about their conditions there is absolutely no need to strike and inconvenience parents, there is no need for any teacher to lose money by striking, all you have to do is tell the government you are working to rule, I.E your contracted hours, that way the only loser would be the very government you have the grievance with.
And dont say this isn't possible, no one can force you to work more than your contracted hours.
This is a good idea in principle. However, the impact on children would be far greater in the long term than losing the odd day. In any case, there are plenty of after school clubs run by teachers (unpaid) that provide free childcare - people would still be inconvenienced.
[quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: According to the NASUWT teachers contracted hours are 1265 over 195 days which is around 32.5 hours per week. If teachers want to protest about their conditions there is absolutely no need to strike and inconvenience parents, there is no need for any teacher to lose money by striking, all you have to do is tell the government you are working to rule, I.E your contracted hours, that way the only loser would be the very government you have the grievance with. And dont say this isn't possible, no one can force you to work more than your contracted hours.[/p][/quote]This is a good idea in principle. However, the impact on children would be far greater in the long term than losing the odd day. In any case, there are plenty of after school clubs run by teachers (unpaid) that provide free childcare - people would still be inconvenienced. sezzler
  • Score: 1

6:01pm Fri 11 Jul 14

cromwell9 says...

Carolyn43 wrote:
As a teacher who retired 17 years ago, I can honestly say I wouldn't do the job today. Conditions are now worse than I experienced. Even then is was an average of 60 hours a week (preparation, marking, reports, meetings outside school time, plus out-of-school activities); trying to teach 30 children who are allowed to do as they like by parents and who then blame teachers for their lack of discipline; no choice on what you do when in your working day - it's timetabled; no support from parents; pressure in trying to get not-very-bright children through exams; more and more paperwork from central government; frequent changes in what and how is taught, and a not very good pension at the end of it all. In spite of that I wouldn't have wanted to do any other job because of the satisfaction in seeing youngsters succeed through their own efforts and the efforts teachers put in for them.

I bet not one of those complaining about having to look after their own children is a teacher. I suggest if you think it's such an easy life, that you actually try it - if you're capable of doing 4 years full time at college without pay to get the necessary degree and are then prepared for a lifetime of abuse from parents who have it easy by palming their children off on others. Or if you don't actually want to give up your cushy job, shadow a teacher for a week, 24 hours a day. But of course you wouldn't believe that he/she actually did that amount of work every week because it would show your prejudices for what they are - delusion.

And it's not only teachers, but all public sector employees who are getting worse and worse conditions, while the conditions of those in the private sector are improving.
Well Carolyn,Let me spell out the facts.
Teachers ave salary over £30,000.
3 months paid leave.
Fantastic sick pay scheme,1YEAR full pay, 2nd year half pay.
Gold plate pention.You pay £1 in ,you take £4 out .
25% of our council tax goes into your pention pot.
Ave pention for a retired teacher 30 yrs service over £ 1,200 pm index linked.
To have a pention like that ,We in the Private secter would have to invest £950,000 in a private pention scheme,IMPOSSIBLE.
That degree you have for teaching , cost you nothing .Unlike today,Where the ave UNI debt is around £30,000.
The cost to the tax payer for a teaching degree is around £120,000.
Yes teachers have a tough job,Yes you earn every penny .
But in the private secter there are also very tough hard jobs .Without all your benefits.
So I Say to you Teachers ,get on with your jobs,.
I know you all vote LIB DEM LABOUR,beacause you think they have your interest at heart,.Well they havent .
Those two partys support uncontrolled immigration in the EU,
That means that any person with a teaching degree in the EU can apply for a teaching post,in the UK .and they would have a good chance of getting it over YOU.
They would be very happy with your working conditions,and SNAP there hands off,.
Having said all that I would hate to teach the spoilt little darlings today.
Some time in the future ROBOTS may have to teach them.
[quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: As a teacher who retired 17 years ago, I can honestly say I wouldn't do the job today. Conditions are now worse than I experienced. Even then is was an average of 60 hours a week (preparation, marking, reports, meetings outside school time, plus out-of-school activities); trying to teach 30 children who are allowed to do as they like by parents and who then blame teachers for their lack of discipline; no choice on what you do when in your working day - it's timetabled; no support from parents; pressure in trying to get not-very-bright children through exams; more and more paperwork from central government; frequent changes in what and how is taught, and a not very good pension at the end of it all. In spite of that I wouldn't have wanted to do any other job because of the satisfaction in seeing youngsters succeed through their own efforts and the efforts teachers put in for them. I bet not one of those complaining about having to look after their own children is a teacher. I suggest if you think it's such an easy life, that you actually try it - if you're capable of doing 4 years full time at college without pay to get the necessary degree and are then prepared for a lifetime of abuse from parents who have it easy by palming their children off on others. Or if you don't actually want to give up your cushy job, shadow a teacher for a week, 24 hours a day. But of course you wouldn't believe that he/she actually did that amount of work every week because it would show your prejudices for what they are - delusion. And it's not only teachers, but all public sector employees who are getting worse and worse conditions, while the conditions of those in the private sector are improving.[/p][/quote]Well Carolyn,Let me spell out the facts. Teachers ave salary over £30,000. 3 months paid leave. Fantastic sick pay scheme,1YEAR full pay, 2nd year half pay. Gold plate pention.You pay £1 in ,you take £4 out . 25% of our council tax goes into your pention pot. Ave pention for a retired teacher 30 yrs service over £ 1,200 pm index linked. To have a pention like that ,We in the Private secter would have to invest £950,000 in a private pention scheme,IMPOSSIBLE. That degree you have for teaching , cost you nothing .Unlike today,Where the ave UNI debt is around £30,000. The cost to the tax payer for a teaching degree is around £120,000. Yes teachers have a tough job,Yes you earn every penny . But in the private secter there are also very tough hard jobs .Without all your benefits. So I Say to you Teachers ,get on with your jobs,. I know you all vote LIB DEM LABOUR,beacause you think they have your interest at heart,.Well they havent . Those two partys support uncontrolled immigration in the EU, That means that any person with a teaching degree in the EU can apply for a teaching post,in the UK .and they would have a good chance of getting it over YOU. They would be very happy with your working conditions,and SNAP there hands off,. Having said all that I would hate to teach the spoilt little darlings today. Some time in the future ROBOTS may have to teach them. cromwell9
  • Score: 0

6:11pm Fri 11 Jul 14

cromwell9 says...

LeGrove wrote:
loftusrod wrote:
Can a teacher answer my earlier question please: why don't they go on strike during the school holidays or teacher training days, thereby causing minimum disruption to pupils and parents?
What would be the point in doing it during the holidays? ALL strikes are undertaken to cause disruption, so they get noticed and by those who make the decisions. If they had strikes when the kids weren't there they'd be totally ignored.
So they should.
[quote][p][bold]LeGrove[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]loftusrod[/bold] wrote: Can a teacher answer my earlier question please: why don't they go on strike during the school holidays or teacher training days, thereby causing minimum disruption to pupils and parents?[/p][/quote]What would be the point in doing it during the holidays? ALL strikes are undertaken to cause disruption, so they get noticed and by those who make the decisions. If they had strikes when the kids weren't there they'd be totally ignored.[/p][/quote]So they should. cromwell9
  • Score: 1

9:02am Mon 14 Jul 14

Stirling151 says...

No surprise to see firemen getting in on the act. If they're not striking every five minutes they start feeling faint.
No surprise to see firemen getting in on the act. If they're not striking every five minutes they start feeling faint. Stirling151
  • Score: -2

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