Cancer mum forced to continue fight with school bureaucrats

Stuart and Michelle Amey

Lesley Dedman

First published in News
Last updated
by

A COUPLE appealing for their two young sons to go to the same school so they can support each other through their mother’s terminal illness remain “frustrated” as they continue their battle with Dorset County Council.

As reported previously in the Daily Echo, cancer sufferer Michelle Amey and her husband Stuart were told their six-year-old son George will not be able to join Charlie, nine, at Mudeford Junior School due to a lack of places.

Yesterday evening Mr Amey and Christchurch councillor Lesley Dedman met with Sara Tough, the director for Children’s Services at Dorset County Council.

Following the meeting, Mr Amey said he was told the council is looking into the matter but remains unable to offer George, who is currently a pupil at Mudeford Infants, a place at Mudeford Junior School with Charlie.

“It’s frustrating,” he said. “They haven’t changed their mind. They are still saying there’s no room.

“I retain that we should be seen as exceptional circumstances,” he added.

The couple are hopeful Michael Gove MP, Secretary of State for Education, will write to the authority backing their appeal. But for now the family’s battle continues.

Mr Amey said: “George will leave school in a couple of weeks and it’s all still up in the air. All of his friends are going to see their new classrooms but he can’t go. It’s not fair on him.

“And it’s not fair on the rest of the family,” he added.

“Michelle has been really poorly and the stress of this is not helping.”

Describing the meeting as “very positive”, Cllr Dedman said she was hopeful a resolution will be found.

She said: “She [Mrs Tough] was very sympathetic and is really trying to get George into the school he needs to go to.

“There were a lot of ideas put on the table,” she added.

Mrs Amey was originally diagnosed with skin cancer seven years ago, but the deadly disease has now spread to her brain, kidneys, lungs, liver and lymph nodes.

Two years ago she was given the devastating news that she had just nine months to live but has since been taking a trial drug to give her more time to spend with her family.

Comments (29)

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7:06am Tue 8 Jul 14

Morrigan says...

How thoughtful of DCC to let this poor lady spend what could be her last few months alive, worrying about her children's education.

Get a grip DCC and give her son a place at Mudeford Junior school!
How thoughtful of DCC to let this poor lady spend what could be her last few months alive, worrying about her children's education. Get a grip DCC and give her son a place at Mudeford Junior school! Morrigan
  • Score: 35

7:16am Tue 8 Jul 14

afcb-mark says...

So the rest of George's class are off to visit their new teacher for the next school year and this little lad is being left out, how callous is that. For crying out loud give this poor woman some peace.
So the rest of George's class are off to visit their new teacher for the next school year and this little lad is being left out, how callous is that. For crying out loud give this poor woman some peace. afcb-mark
  • Score: 37

7:27am Tue 8 Jul 14

new2it says...

What an intolerable situation for this poor family to be in. Feel so sorry for them and all they are going through. I do so hope they are offered a place at the school of their choice so that the brothers can be together at this time. I know it is difficult if the school is full, but I wonder why a place wasn't given to them in the first instance, given the circumstances and the fact that his brother is already at the school. What a pity another family is not prepared to let them have the place that they have been allocated, although it's understandable that everybody wants to hold on to their place at their choice of school. Just hope things can be resolved for them. They should not have to be worrying about this on top of everything else.
What an intolerable situation for this poor family to be in. Feel so sorry for them and all they are going through. I do so hope they are offered a place at the school of their choice so that the brothers can be together at this time. I know it is difficult if the school is full, but I wonder why a place wasn't given to them in the first instance, given the circumstances and the fact that his brother is already at the school. What a pity another family is not prepared to let them have the place that they have been allocated, although it's understandable that everybody wants to hold on to their place at their choice of school. Just hope things can be resolved for them. They should not have to be worrying about this on top of everything else. new2it
  • Score: 18

7:54am Tue 8 Jul 14

Mr MSP says...

There is another school not to far away that could accommodate both children. It's called Somerford, why not simply remove the strain and send both lads to the same school there.
There is another school not to far away that could accommodate both children. It's called Somerford, why not simply remove the strain and send both lads to the same school there. Mr MSP
  • Score: 29

7:58am Tue 8 Jul 14

kalebmoledirt says...

What must the children of the school think of the people that have denied the lad a place,amongst them .perhaps a high profile demonstration by the kids will send the message especially of is covered by TV and Newspaper
What must the children of the school think of the people that have denied the lad a place,amongst them .perhaps a high profile demonstration by the kids will send the message especially of is covered by TV and Newspaper kalebmoledirt
  • Score: 9

8:07am Tue 8 Jul 14

AdelaidePete says...

When I read things like this I am tempted to return "home" so that I can stand for election and sort out idiots like the ones running similar councils, don't suppose I'd get elected though because it is always the same group which is elected. (Why?) :-/
When I read things like this I am tempted to return "home" so that I can stand for election and sort out idiots like the ones running similar councils, don't suppose I'd get elected though because it is always the same group which is elected. (Why?) :-/ AdelaidePete
  • Score: 12

8:59am Tue 8 Jul 14

joetheman says...

Mr MSP wrote:
There is another school not to far away that could accommodate both children. It's called Somerford, why not simply remove the strain and send both lads to the same school there.
somerford infants and the grange are good schools with good dedicated staff but because it is on an estate had a bad name,there is no reason why both the children could not attend the schools, it would be interesting to hear the parents reasons for boys not attending the somerford and grange schools, it is a terrible situation to be in but there is an alternative option,
[quote][p][bold]Mr MSP[/bold] wrote: There is another school not to far away that could accommodate both children. It's called Somerford, why not simply remove the strain and send both lads to the same school there.[/p][/quote]somerford infants and the grange are good schools with good dedicated staff but because it is on an estate had a bad name,there is no reason why both the children could not attend the schools, it would be interesting to hear the parents reasons for boys not attending the somerford and grange schools, it is a terrible situation to be in but there is an alternative option, joetheman
  • Score: 16

9:07am Tue 8 Jul 14

Townee says...

The people who made this decision should think what if this was my child and my wife/ husband had cancer. How who they feel?
Jobs worth just sticking to the rules, they need to get a life and consider people not rules and the money it costs.
The people who made this decision should think what if this was my child and my wife/ husband had cancer. How who they feel? Jobs worth just sticking to the rules, they need to get a life and consider people not rules and the money it costs. Townee
  • Score: 10

11:53am Tue 8 Jul 14

bubba5710 says...

Morrigan wrote:
How thoughtful of DCC to let this poor lady spend what could be her last few months alive, worrying about her children's education.

Get a grip DCC and give her son a place at Mudeford Junior school!
The situation this poor lady is in is absolutely terrible. But should every terminal cancer sufferer be allowed to break the rules?????
If the school is full and her child is allowed into the school then that means another child will be excluded or all will suffer due to over crowding this is not as simple as everyone has made out.
[quote][p][bold]Morrigan[/bold] wrote: How thoughtful of DCC to let this poor lady spend what could be her last few months alive, worrying about her children's education. Get a grip DCC and give her son a place at Mudeford Junior school![/p][/quote]The situation this poor lady is in is absolutely terrible. But should every terminal cancer sufferer be allowed to break the rules????? If the school is full and her child is allowed into the school then that means another child will be excluded or all will suffer due to over crowding this is not as simple as everyone has made out. bubba5710
  • Score: 3

11:55am Tue 8 Jul 14

bubba5710 says...

If ever terminal cancer sufferer was allowed to break the rules there would be no point in rules. This is a terrible situation for the lady and her family but I don't understand why she should be allowed where others would not be.
If ever terminal cancer sufferer was allowed to break the rules there would be no point in rules. This is a terrible situation for the lady and her family but I don't understand why she should be allowed where others would not be. bubba5710
  • Score: -11

12:20pm Tue 8 Jul 14

Arjay says...

If George is allowed to join Charlie at Mudeford, I wonder how the child who will need to be removed from the school to make room will be selected.? And I'm guessing his (or her) parents won't be pleased to learn about that decision at this late stage..
A very difficult situation, but I can't see that it has been created maliciously by the education professionals involved....
If George is allowed to join Charlie at Mudeford, I wonder how the child who will need to be removed from the school to make room will be selected.? And I'm guessing his (or her) parents won't be pleased to learn about that decision at this late stage.. A very difficult situation, but I can't see that it has been created maliciously by the education professionals involved.... Arjay
  • Score: 10

12:32pm Tue 8 Jul 14

rayc says...

The fact that is happening tells you all you need to know about the UK in 2014. Is it really that difficult to help this lady? All the Councillors and professionals who cannot sort this mess out should hang their heads in shame.
It took a massive effort for MP's to get our local Councils to even let those residing in each others council areas use their rubbish tips and even now only on a permit system so perhaps it should come as no surprise.
The fact that is happening tells you all you need to know about the UK in 2014. Is it really that difficult to help this lady? All the Councillors and professionals who cannot sort this mess out should hang their heads in shame. It took a massive effort for MP's to get our local Councils to even let those residing in each others council areas use their rubbish tips and even now only on a permit system so perhaps it should come as no surprise. rayc
  • Score: 0

1:01pm Tue 8 Jul 14

jpm2067 says...

bubba5710 wrote:
Morrigan wrote:
How thoughtful of DCC to let this poor lady spend what could be her last few months alive, worrying about her children's education.

Get a grip DCC and give her son a place at Mudeford Junior school!
The situation this poor lady is in is absolutely terrible. But should every terminal cancer sufferer be allowed to break the rules?????
If the school is full and her child is allowed into the school then that means another child will be excluded or all will suffer due to over crowding this is not as simple as everyone has made out.
"Rules" are broken all the time in everyday life to accommodate what is the right thing to do under rare circumstances...any decent person recognises that, no matter what the situation/subject is....Common sense is all that's needed.
[quote][p][bold]bubba5710[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Morrigan[/bold] wrote: How thoughtful of DCC to let this poor lady spend what could be her last few months alive, worrying about her children's education. Get a grip DCC and give her son a place at Mudeford Junior school![/p][/quote]The situation this poor lady is in is absolutely terrible. But should every terminal cancer sufferer be allowed to break the rules????? If the school is full and her child is allowed into the school then that means another child will be excluded or all will suffer due to over crowding this is not as simple as everyone has made out.[/p][/quote]"Rules" are broken all the time in everyday life to accommodate what is the right thing to do under rare circumstances...any decent person recognises that, no matter what the situation/subject is....Common sense is all that's needed. jpm2067
  • Score: 7

1:07pm Tue 8 Jul 14

fedupwithjobsworths says...

Arjay wrote:
If George is allowed to join Charlie at Mudeford, I wonder how the child who will need to be removed from the school to make room will be selected.? And I'm guessing his (or her) parents won't be pleased to learn about that decision at this late stage..
A very difficult situation, but I can't see that it has been created maliciously by the education professionals involved....
You just squeeze an extra desk in, rules should be bent when there are special circumstances.
[quote][p][bold]Arjay[/bold] wrote: If George is allowed to join Charlie at Mudeford, I wonder how the child who will need to be removed from the school to make room will be selected.? And I'm guessing his (or her) parents won't be pleased to learn about that decision at this late stage.. A very difficult situation, but I can't see that it has been created maliciously by the education professionals involved....[/p][/quote]You just squeeze an extra desk in, rules should be bent when there are special circumstances. fedupwithjobsworths
  • Score: 6

1:24pm Tue 8 Jul 14

The Wise Old Elf says...

joetheman wrote:
Mr MSP wrote:
There is another school not to far away that could accommodate both children. It's called Somerford, why not simply remove the strain and send both lads to the same school there.
somerford infants and the grange are good schools with good dedicated staff but because it is on an estate had a bad name,there is no reason why both the children could not attend the schools, it would be interesting to hear the parents reasons for boys not attending the somerford and grange schools, it is a terrible situation to be in but there is an alternative option,
At last two people who speak sense.
I do feel for the family that she is suffering this horrific illness but unfortunately I don't think that they should use the illness as a guilt trip for the boards.
As has been said Somerfors schools are good schools but snobbery is stopping them sending there sons there, plus as it was an issue last time why did they not move from friars cliff to nearer mudeford school? Snobbery again me thinks
[quote][p][bold]joetheman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mr MSP[/bold] wrote: There is another school not to far away that could accommodate both children. It's called Somerford, why not simply remove the strain and send both lads to the same school there.[/p][/quote]somerford infants and the grange are good schools with good dedicated staff but because it is on an estate had a bad name,there is no reason why both the children could not attend the schools, it would be interesting to hear the parents reasons for boys not attending the somerford and grange schools, it is a terrible situation to be in but there is an alternative option,[/p][/quote]At last two people who speak sense. I do feel for the family that she is suffering this horrific illness but unfortunately I don't think that they should use the illness as a guilt trip for the boards. As has been said Somerfors schools are good schools but snobbery is stopping them sending there sons there, plus as it was an issue last time why did they not move from friars cliff to nearer mudeford school? Snobbery again me thinks The Wise Old Elf
  • Score: 7

1:28pm Tue 8 Jul 14

Arjay says...

fedupwithjobsworths wrote:
Arjay wrote:
If George is allowed to join Charlie at Mudeford, I wonder how the child who will need to be removed from the school to make room will be selected.? And I'm guessing his (or her) parents won't be pleased to learn about that decision at this late stage..
A very difficult situation, but I can't see that it has been created maliciously by the education professionals involved....
You just squeeze an extra desk in, rules should be bent when there are special circumstances.
The problem there is that there then may then be other parents - also claiming 'special circumstances' - who might then insist that a second extra desk could be squeezed in .... and perhaps a third?.....

As I say, a difficult situation, and is it very sad for those affected. I just don't think the decision has been made arbitrarily, or with any malice.....
[quote][p][bold]fedupwithjobsworths[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Arjay[/bold] wrote: If George is allowed to join Charlie at Mudeford, I wonder how the child who will need to be removed from the school to make room will be selected.? And I'm guessing his (or her) parents won't be pleased to learn about that decision at this late stage.. A very difficult situation, but I can't see that it has been created maliciously by the education professionals involved....[/p][/quote]You just squeeze an extra desk in, rules should be bent when there are special circumstances.[/p][/quote]The problem there is that there then may then be other parents - also claiming 'special circumstances' - who might then insist that a second extra desk could be squeezed in .... and perhaps a third?..... As I say, a difficult situation, and is it very sad for those affected. I just don't think the decision has been made arbitrarily, or with any malice..... Arjay
  • Score: 6

1:36pm Tue 8 Jul 14

afcb-mark says...

The Wise Old Elf wrote:
joetheman wrote:
Mr MSP wrote:
There is another school not to far away that could accommodate both children. It's called Somerford, why not simply remove the strain and send both lads to the same school there.
somerford infants and the grange are good schools with good dedicated staff but because it is on an estate had a bad name,there is no reason why both the children could not attend the schools, it would be interesting to hear the parents reasons for boys not attending the somerford and grange schools, it is a terrible situation to be in but there is an alternative option,
At last two people who speak sense.
I do feel for the family that she is suffering this horrific illness but unfortunately I don't think that they should use the illness as a guilt trip for the boards.
As has been said Somerfors schools are good schools but snobbery is stopping them sending there sons there, plus as it was an issue last time why did they not move from friars cliff to nearer mudeford school? Snobbery again me thinks
With all these two kids have to cope with why should they be torn away from their friends as well. The elder child would have been with the same group of children for four or five years and the younger one has from the way I've read it been attending Mudeford 1st school for a while now. They are both already in the school and now they want to kick one of them out. Whatever the reason for this...It is wrong and heartless.
[quote][p][bold]The Wise Old Elf[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]joetheman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mr MSP[/bold] wrote: There is another school not to far away that could accommodate both children. It's called Somerford, why not simply remove the strain and send both lads to the same school there.[/p][/quote]somerford infants and the grange are good schools with good dedicated staff but because it is on an estate had a bad name,there is no reason why both the children could not attend the schools, it would be interesting to hear the parents reasons for boys not attending the somerford and grange schools, it is a terrible situation to be in but there is an alternative option,[/p][/quote]At last two people who speak sense. I do feel for the family that she is suffering this horrific illness but unfortunately I don't think that they should use the illness as a guilt trip for the boards. As has been said Somerfors schools are good schools but snobbery is stopping them sending there sons there, plus as it was an issue last time why did they not move from friars cliff to nearer mudeford school? Snobbery again me thinks[/p][/quote]With all these two kids have to cope with why should they be torn away from their friends as well. The elder child would have been with the same group of children for four or five years and the younger one has from the way I've read it been attending Mudeford 1st school for a while now. They are both already in the school and now they want to kick one of them out. Whatever the reason for this...It is wrong and heartless. afcb-mark
  • Score: 12

1:37pm Tue 8 Jul 14

MudefordMum says...

Whilst I see the frustration of the boys not being able to attend the same school the facts remain:
The family do not live in catchment for the school.
http://mapping.dorse
tforyou.com/map?vers
ion=mylocal&lyrs=261
,2445
They encountered this problem a few years ago when the son in question did not get a place at the infant school. They stated the same reason that 'they needed to be together'. The younger son started the infant school and the older brother moved up to junior school. So they have not been schooled together as the parents wished. The local schools who have a reception to Yr6 joint campus are Somerford and Highcliffe St Marks - their LOCAL school.
So their fight was on slightly misleading grounds - apart from the travel convenience side of the argument.
They were offered options last time to rectify this, but chose not to accept them, knowing the same was bound to happen when applying for junior school.
Now they are in the same plight because they managed to bend the rules last time.
Surely the common sense thing to do is firstly - fight the battle with your local school - in your catchment area - or accept the place where they can be together.
It's not the authorities fault - the applications are made and allocated on a criteria which is fed into a computer - all the places are filled in a certain order having a sibling at the school, but being out of catchment is a low priority.
I hope they get a place at the school, but because another family has moved, not because someone else who does live in catchment is forced out of their place.
Whilst I see the frustration of the boys not being able to attend the same school the facts remain: The family do not live in catchment for the school. http://mapping.dorse tforyou.com/map?vers ion=mylocal&lyrs=261 ,2445 They encountered this problem a few years ago when the son in question did not get a place at the infant school. They stated the same reason that 'they needed to be together'. The younger son started the infant school and the older brother moved up to junior school. So they have not been schooled together as the parents wished. The local schools who have a reception to Yr6 joint campus are Somerford and Highcliffe St Marks - their LOCAL school. So their fight was on slightly misleading grounds - apart from the travel convenience side of the argument. They were offered options last time to rectify this, but chose not to accept them, knowing the same was bound to happen when applying for junior school. Now they are in the same plight because they managed to bend the rules last time. Surely the common sense thing to do is firstly - fight the battle with your local school - in your catchment area - or accept the place where they can be together. It's not the authorities fault - the applications are made and allocated on a criteria which is fed into a computer - all the places are filled in a certain order having a sibling at the school, but being out of catchment is a low priority. I hope they get a place at the school, but because another family has moved, not because someone else who does live in catchment is forced out of their place. MudefordMum
  • Score: 15

1:47pm Tue 8 Jul 14

rayc says...

I wonder how they managed in the war when all those children from the cities were evacuated? Not many computers around then to say no presumably. How has the influx of migrant workers children into English schools been managed? The Government got the numbers wrong but presumable they all got into school?
I wonder how they managed in the war when all those children from the cities were evacuated? Not many computers around then to say no presumably. How has the influx of migrant workers children into English schools been managed? The Government got the numbers wrong but presumable they all got into school? rayc
  • Score: 1

1:47pm Tue 8 Jul 14

speedy231278 says...

I don't understand what difference both kids being in the same school will make. Sounds to me like the parents want both kids at the same school for their own convenience and are using the mother's unfortunate illness as a bargaining tool. Tragic though the situation is, it seems a little distasteful to me to use it in this way.
I don't understand what difference both kids being in the same school will make. Sounds to me like the parents want both kids at the same school for their own convenience and are using the mother's unfortunate illness as a bargaining tool. Tragic though the situation is, it seems a little distasteful to me to use it in this way. speedy231278
  • Score: 3

2:03pm Tue 8 Jul 14

yasinac says...

speedy231278 wrote:
I don't understand what difference both kids being in the same school will make. Sounds to me like the parents want both kids at the same school for their own convenience and are using the mother's unfortunate illness as a bargaining tool. Tragic though the situation is, it seems a little distasteful to me to use it in this way.
Really? If the school is in walking distance then on 'good days' Mrs Amey could walk to collect her children. The original story highlighted that they did not live out of catchment on the original application but that because of higher school age population the catchment area had in fact 'shrunk'.
It would make sense for the boys to continue in an environment that is aware of what they are dealing with. With friends and those friends families that know them and can support them when the inevitable happens and their whole world is turned upside down.
[quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: I don't understand what difference both kids being in the same school will make. Sounds to me like the parents want both kids at the same school for their own convenience and are using the mother's unfortunate illness as a bargaining tool. Tragic though the situation is, it seems a little distasteful to me to use it in this way.[/p][/quote]Really? If the school is in walking distance then on 'good days' Mrs Amey could walk to collect her children. The original story highlighted that they did not live out of catchment on the original application but that because of higher school age population the catchment area had in fact 'shrunk'. It would make sense for the boys to continue in an environment that is aware of what they are dealing with. With friends and those friends families that know them and can support them when the inevitable happens and their whole world is turned upside down. yasinac
  • Score: 4

2:12pm Tue 8 Jul 14

speedy231278 says...

yasinac wrote:
speedy231278 wrote:
I don't understand what difference both kids being in the same school will make. Sounds to me like the parents want both kids at the same school for their own convenience and are using the mother's unfortunate illness as a bargaining tool. Tragic though the situation is, it seems a little distasteful to me to use it in this way.
Really? If the school is in walking distance then on 'good days' Mrs Amey could walk to collect her children. The original story highlighted that they did not live out of catchment on the original application but that because of higher school age population the catchment area had in fact 'shrunk'.
It would make sense for the boys to continue in an environment that is aware of what they are dealing with. With friends and those friends families that know them and can support them when the inevitable happens and their whole world is turned upside down.
Well, then the zone has shrunk for everyone.
[quote][p][bold]yasinac[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: I don't understand what difference both kids being in the same school will make. Sounds to me like the parents want both kids at the same school for their own convenience and are using the mother's unfortunate illness as a bargaining tool. Tragic though the situation is, it seems a little distasteful to me to use it in this way.[/p][/quote]Really? If the school is in walking distance then on 'good days' Mrs Amey could walk to collect her children. The original story highlighted that they did not live out of catchment on the original application but that because of higher school age population the catchment area had in fact 'shrunk'. It would make sense for the boys to continue in an environment that is aware of what they are dealing with. With friends and those friends families that know them and can support them when the inevitable happens and their whole world is turned upside down.[/p][/quote]Well, then the zone has shrunk for everyone. speedy231278
  • Score: 0

2:18pm Tue 8 Jul 14

yasinac says...

speedy231278 wrote:
yasinac wrote:
speedy231278 wrote:
I don't understand what difference both kids being in the same school will make. Sounds to me like the parents want both kids at the same school for their own convenience and are using the mother's unfortunate illness as a bargaining tool. Tragic though the situation is, it seems a little distasteful to me to use it in this way.
Really? If the school is in walking distance then on 'good days' Mrs Amey could walk to collect her children. The original story highlighted that they did not live out of catchment on the original application but that because of higher school age population the catchment area had in fact 'shrunk'.
It would make sense for the boys to continue in an environment that is aware of what they are dealing with. With friends and those friends families that know them and can support them when the inevitable happens and their whole world is turned upside down.
Well, then the zone has shrunk for everyone.
So much compassion and empathy.
[quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]yasinac[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: I don't understand what difference both kids being in the same school will make. Sounds to me like the parents want both kids at the same school for their own convenience and are using the mother's unfortunate illness as a bargaining tool. Tragic though the situation is, it seems a little distasteful to me to use it in this way.[/p][/quote]Really? If the school is in walking distance then on 'good days' Mrs Amey could walk to collect her children. The original story highlighted that they did not live out of catchment on the original application but that because of higher school age population the catchment area had in fact 'shrunk'. It would make sense for the boys to continue in an environment that is aware of what they are dealing with. With friends and those friends families that know them and can support them when the inevitable happens and their whole world is turned upside down.[/p][/quote]Well, then the zone has shrunk for everyone.[/p][/quote]So much compassion and empathy. yasinac
  • Score: 6

2:51pm Tue 8 Jul 14

Lucy28 says...

yasinac wrote:
speedy231278 wrote:
yasinac wrote:
speedy231278 wrote:
I don't understand what difference both kids being in the same school will make. Sounds to me like the parents want both kids at the same school for their own convenience and are using the mother's unfortunate illness as a bargaining tool. Tragic though the situation is, it seems a little distasteful to me to use it in this way.
Really? If the school is in walking distance then on 'good days' Mrs Amey could walk to collect her children. The original story highlighted that they did not live out of catchment on the original application but that because of higher school age population the catchment area had in fact 'shrunk'.
It would make sense for the boys to continue in an environment that is aware of what they are dealing with. With friends and those friends families that know them and can support them when the inevitable happens and their whole world is turned upside down.
Well, then the zone has shrunk for everyone.
So much compassion and empathy.
The schools full, you can't take into account every circumstance and base school allocations on compassion and empathy loads of families are going through similar situations they can't pick which school they go to either.
[quote][p][bold]yasinac[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]yasinac[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: I don't understand what difference both kids being in the same school will make. Sounds to me like the parents want both kids at the same school for their own convenience and are using the mother's unfortunate illness as a bargaining tool. Tragic though the situation is, it seems a little distasteful to me to use it in this way.[/p][/quote]Really? If the school is in walking distance then on 'good days' Mrs Amey could walk to collect her children. The original story highlighted that they did not live out of catchment on the original application but that because of higher school age population the catchment area had in fact 'shrunk'. It would make sense for the boys to continue in an environment that is aware of what they are dealing with. With friends and those friends families that know them and can support them when the inevitable happens and their whole world is turned upside down.[/p][/quote]Well, then the zone has shrunk for everyone.[/p][/quote]So much compassion and empathy.[/p][/quote]The schools full, you can't take into account every circumstance and base school allocations on compassion and empathy loads of families are going through similar situations they can't pick which school they go to either. Lucy28
  • Score: 14

3:02pm Tue 8 Jul 14

rarnold says...

How much time would the children actually be able to spend together during the school day anyway? If they really do need to be together at school then surely move the older child to the school with available places. It's not fair to add extra children to an already full class- it's detrimental to both the other students and teachers. It's not just a case of squeezing in an extra desk, it's a teachers time and attention, classroom resources, pupil to teacher ratios and even things like fire regulations!
How much time would the children actually be able to spend together during the school day anyway? If they really do need to be together at school then surely move the older child to the school with available places. It's not fair to add extra children to an already full class- it's detrimental to both the other students and teachers. It's not just a case of squeezing in an extra desk, it's a teachers time and attention, classroom resources, pupil to teacher ratios and even things like fire regulations! rarnold
  • Score: 12

4:37pm Tue 8 Jul 14

HappyTalkyTalkyHappyTalk says...

This families time is so precious and should be being used making memories not wasted on dcc to make decisions, how heartless are these people. I hope you get good news soon from dcc and can start enjoying the time you all have left together xxx time is very precious xxx
This families time is so precious and should be being used making memories not wasted on dcc to make decisions, how heartless are these people. I hope you get good news soon from dcc and can start enjoying the time you all have left together xxx time is very precious xxx HappyTalkyTalkyHappyTalk
  • Score: 1

5:12pm Tue 8 Jul 14

shaundk22 says...

From what i remember on the last report on this situation the family used this illness to get there first son into this school years back fully knowing that they were not in the catchment area and are know annoyed its all happening again. This is truly a couple who are using the illness as a smoke screen for a snob factor to get them in a nicer school. If they truly only wanted the boys in same school they would have placed the first child in the correct cathcment area all those years ago
From what i remember on the last report on this situation the family used this illness to get there first son into this school years back fully knowing that they were not in the catchment area and are know annoyed its all happening again. This is truly a couple who are using the illness as a smoke screen for a snob factor to get them in a nicer school. If they truly only wanted the boys in same school they would have placed the first child in the correct cathcment area all those years ago shaundk22
  • Score: 14

5:58pm Tue 8 Jul 14

The Wise Old Elf says...

afcb-mark wrote:
The Wise Old Elf wrote:
joetheman wrote:
Mr MSP wrote:
There is another school not to far away that could accommodate both children. It's called Somerford, why not simply remove the strain and send both lads to the same school there.
somerford infants and the grange are good schools with good dedicated staff but because it is on an estate had a bad name,there is no reason why both the children could not attend the schools, it would be interesting to hear the parents reasons for boys not attending the somerford and grange schools, it is a terrible situation to be in but there is an alternative option,
At last two people who speak sense.
I do feel for the family that she is suffering this horrific illness but unfortunately I don't think that they should use the illness as a guilt trip for the boards.
As has been said Somerfors schools are good schools but snobbery is stopping them sending there sons there, plus as it was an issue last time why did they not move from friars cliff to nearer mudeford school? Snobbery again me thinks
With all these two kids have to cope with why should they be torn away from their friends as well. The elder child would have been with the same group of children for four or five years and the younger one has from the way I've read it been attending Mudeford 1st school for a while now. They are both already in the school and now they want to kick one of them out. Whatever the reason for this...It is wrong and heartless.
They are not kicking one out, they are saying there is no room.
It was a problem last time so was obviously going to be the same this time.
They are NOT in the catchment area for this school so those children that are get priority (rightly so) end of story.
Unfortunately they are not the only family who are suffering from some sort of horrific life changing illness.
Unfortunately there has to be a cut off otherwise where is the line drawn with what are special circumstances regarding different life altering illnesses or disabilitys.
Do the boys actually care? Probably not, when I went from infant to juniors , I couldn't of cared less what school it was! Although this was quite some time ago
[quote][p][bold]afcb-mark[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Wise Old Elf[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]joetheman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mr MSP[/bold] wrote: There is another school not to far away that could accommodate both children. It's called Somerford, why not simply remove the strain and send both lads to the same school there.[/p][/quote]somerford infants and the grange are good schools with good dedicated staff but because it is on an estate had a bad name,there is no reason why both the children could not attend the schools, it would be interesting to hear the parents reasons for boys not attending the somerford and grange schools, it is a terrible situation to be in but there is an alternative option,[/p][/quote]At last two people who speak sense. I do feel for the family that she is suffering this horrific illness but unfortunately I don't think that they should use the illness as a guilt trip for the boards. As has been said Somerfors schools are good schools but snobbery is stopping them sending there sons there, plus as it was an issue last time why did they not move from friars cliff to nearer mudeford school? Snobbery again me thinks[/p][/quote]With all these two kids have to cope with why should they be torn away from their friends as well. The elder child would have been with the same group of children for four or five years and the younger one has from the way I've read it been attending Mudeford 1st school for a while now. They are both already in the school and now they want to kick one of them out. Whatever the reason for this...It is wrong and heartless.[/p][/quote]They are not kicking one out, they are saying there is no room. It was a problem last time so was obviously going to be the same this time. They are NOT in the catchment area for this school so those children that are get priority (rightly so) end of story. Unfortunately they are not the only family who are suffering from some sort of horrific life changing illness. Unfortunately there has to be a cut off otherwise where is the line drawn with what are special circumstances regarding different life altering illnesses or disabilitys. Do the boys actually care? Probably not, when I went from infant to juniors , I couldn't of cared less what school it was! Although this was quite some time ago The Wise Old Elf
  • Score: 5

7:07am Wed 9 Jul 14

fedupwithjobsworths says...

MudefordMum wrote:
Whilst I see the frustration of the boys not being able to attend the same school the facts remain:
The family do not live in catchment for the school.
http://mapping.dorse

tforyou.com/map?vers

ion=mylocal&lyrs
=261
,2445
They encountered this problem a few years ago when the son in question did not get a place at the infant school. They stated the same reason that 'they needed to be together'. The younger son started the infant school and the older brother moved up to junior school. So they have not been schooled together as the parents wished. The local schools who have a reception to Yr6 joint campus are Somerford and Highcliffe St Marks - their LOCAL school.
So their fight was on slightly misleading grounds - apart from the travel convenience side of the argument.
They were offered options last time to rectify this, but chose not to accept them, knowing the same was bound to happen when applying for junior school.
Now they are in the same plight because they managed to bend the rules last time.
Surely the common sense thing to do is firstly - fight the battle with your local school - in your catchment area - or accept the place where they can be together.
It's not the authorities fault - the applications are made and allocated on a criteria which is fed into a computer - all the places are filled in a certain order having a sibling at the school, but being out of catchment is a low priority.
I hope they get a place at the school, but because another family has moved, not because someone else who does live in catchment is forced out of their place.
Computer says no
[quote][p][bold]MudefordMum[/bold] wrote: Whilst I see the frustration of the boys not being able to attend the same school the facts remain: The family do not live in catchment for the school. http://mapping.dorse tforyou.com/map?vers ion=mylocal&lyrs =261 ,2445 They encountered this problem a few years ago when the son in question did not get a place at the infant school. They stated the same reason that 'they needed to be together'. The younger son started the infant school and the older brother moved up to junior school. So they have not been schooled together as the parents wished. The local schools who have a reception to Yr6 joint campus are Somerford and Highcliffe St Marks - their LOCAL school. So their fight was on slightly misleading grounds - apart from the travel convenience side of the argument. They were offered options last time to rectify this, but chose not to accept them, knowing the same was bound to happen when applying for junior school. Now they are in the same plight because they managed to bend the rules last time. Surely the common sense thing to do is firstly - fight the battle with your local school - in your catchment area - or accept the place where they can be together. It's not the authorities fault - the applications are made and allocated on a criteria which is fed into a computer - all the places are filled in a certain order having a sibling at the school, but being out of catchment is a low priority. I hope they get a place at the school, but because another family has moved, not because someone else who does live in catchment is forced out of their place.[/p][/quote]Computer says no fedupwithjobsworths
  • Score: 3

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