RNLI helps with Holes Bay island blaze

Island fire marks lifeboat's 5000th shout

Island fire marks lifeboat's 5000th shout

First published in News by , Chief Reporter

POOLE lifeboat marked its 5000th shout last night by helping with a fire in Holes Bay.

The station’s record goes back to 1865 and at around 10.30pm on Sunday night there were reports of a fire on Pergin’s Island.

Dorset Fire and Rescue Service later confirmed that it was an area of gorse alight.

The alarm was raised as smoke was seen rising from the small island, which is at the top of Holes Bay.

The Inshore lifeboat took the station’s ‘X’ boat – an inflatable dinghy – and headed to the western black bridge, near to Cobbs Quay.

As high tide was at midnight the inshore lifeboat could not pass through the bridge, so the ‘X’ boat was deployed, two volunteer crew rowed through to the island before landing ashore.

They then began a sweep of the area, communicating with the inshore lifeboat as to what they had found.

Further volunteers launched the station’s boarding boat and brought a mobile pump. Other volunteers commandeered a ‘D’ class lifeboat from the Lifeboat College and dory.

Portland Coastguard had requested that the fire brigade respond and they worked with the lifeboat crew at the Lifeboat College slipway.

Three firemen and equipment were transferred on to a lifeboat with volunteer crew and a further two fire officers boarded the dory with a lifeboat man.

The lifeboat crew searching Pergin’s island reported back that there were no people, but there was a fire.

When the Fire brigade were happy that the fire had been put out, the lifeboat crews brought them and their equipment back safely ashore.

The volunteers returned back to station just before midnight.

Poole is the first all-weather lifeboat station to achieve the landmark 5000th.

Poole Lifeboat volunteer Anne-Marie Clark said: “Whatever the number of shouts, it’s always business as usual, 5000 is a huge number, what’s really humbling is when you think of the number of people, then their families, whom we have touched, reunited or helped in some small way.

“We think back to the courageous crews that have gone before us, who contributed to this historic achievement and shared our selfless commitment and we reflect on the present volunteers, especially on days like today, we also look forward.

“Next year is another milestone, when Poole Lifeboat station is 150 years old, please keep supporting us, as we are a charity and rely on the support and donations to keep afloat, we would prefer not to notch up another few thousand ‘shouts’ as we want people to stay safe.”

Comments (5)

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9:05am Mon 16 Jun 14

we-shall-see says...

How could a fire have started on a small island? Arson? Seems strange, especially at that time of night - possibly some stragglers along the pathway throwing something across the water? Catapault? How weird .....
How could a fire have started on a small island? Arson? Seems strange, especially at that time of night - possibly some stragglers along the pathway throwing something across the water? Catapault? How weird ..... we-shall-see
  • Score: 0

9:28am Mon 16 Jun 14

Tripod says...

I'm puzzled why they needed so many boats, in my younger days we used to walk over (from near Upton House), even at high-tide the water was only knee-deep.
I'm puzzled why they needed so many boats, in my younger days we used to walk over (from near Upton House), even at high-tide the water was only knee-deep. Tripod
  • Score: 0

10:51am Mon 16 Jun 14

Beachhutter says...

Did you not read the story? it was coming up to high tide and they had to take fire fighting equipment across, even at low tide in that gloopy mud, would you want to carry a pump? we used to camp there as kids, imagine if it was kids on it when its on fire.
Bless em all is what I say they do a fantastic job and I will always support the Poole lifeboat crew, I am grateful that they answer the call.
Did you not read the story? it was coming up to high tide and they had to take fire fighting equipment across, even at low tide in that gloopy mud, would you want to carry a pump? we used to camp there as kids, imagine if it was kids on it when its on fire. Bless em all is what I say they do a fantastic job and I will always support the Poole lifeboat crew, I am grateful that they answer the call. Beachhutter
  • Score: 6

5:24pm Mon 16 Jun 14

SeafaringMan says...

we-shall-see wrote:
How could a fire have started on a small island? Arson? Seems strange, especially at that time of night - possibly some stragglers along the pathway throwing something across the water? Catapault? How weird .....
Chinese Lantern?
[quote][p][bold]we-shall-see[/bold] wrote: How could a fire have started on a small island? Arson? Seems strange, especially at that time of night - possibly some stragglers along the pathway throwing something across the water? Catapault? How weird .....[/p][/quote]Chinese Lantern? SeafaringMan
  • Score: 1

6:17am Tue 17 Jun 14

Phixer says...

we-shall-see wrote:
How could a fire have started on a small island? Arson? Seems strange, especially at that time of night - possibly some stragglers along the pathway throwing something across the water? Catapault? How weird .....
Nature starts many fires and is natures way of clearing deadwood to encourage new growth.

This fire could have been smouldering for hours before expanding and becoming visible.
[quote][p][bold]we-shall-see[/bold] wrote: How could a fire have started on a small island? Arson? Seems strange, especially at that time of night - possibly some stragglers along the pathway throwing something across the water? Catapault? How weird .....[/p][/quote]Nature starts many fires and is natures way of clearing deadwood to encourage new growth. This fire could have been smouldering for hours before expanding and becoming visible. Phixer
  • Score: 1

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