Revealed: the 73 care homes in Bournemouth, Poole and Dorset told to improve by the Care Quality Commission

Kingland House

Ashley Court Care Home

Gainsborough Care Home, part of the James Day Care Centre

Beechey House

Mitchell House

Delapre Care on Magna Road

First published in News
Last updated
by

DOZENS of care homes across Dorset have failed to meet national standards, according to official reports.

In the wake of national concern about standards of care for the elderly, the Echo can reveal 73 care homes in Dorset have been told to improve for a variety of reasons.

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) has listed the names of all the homes, with concerns ranging from administrative failures to residents left in urine soaked beds and being ignored when asking to go to the toilet.

Fears about the care system were heightened after a recent Panorama programme in which an elderly woman partially paralysed and with dementia was allegedly slapped by a worker at an Essex care home.

The programme alleged the same resident was also mocked, taunted and bullied by other care workers while some residents were roughly handled, ignored and left in their own excrement for hours when undercover filming took place at the home.

Among the Dorset homes, five in the area have faced enforcement action: Kingland House Nursing and Residential Home; Beechey House; Ashley Court Care Home; Gainsborough Care Home (part of the James Day Care Centre) and Magna Road.

Kingland House Nursing Home in Poole, for 43 residents who require nursing or personal care, was visited by officials on February 12 and inspectors said residents were “at risk of receiving unsafe or inappropriate care.”

Their report described how two members of staff did not acknowledge a person calling out to use the toilet and said one resident had claimed staff were “horrid”.

The inspectors’ report said staff walked passed one person’s room without acknowledging their call bell was ringing.

“We fetched staff to attend to this individual and they arrived after ten minutes,” said the report.

Owner Buckland Care Ltd could not be reached for comment

Beechey House in Charminster, Bournemouth, which specialises in dementia care, a 60-bed nursing home for people with dementia, was inspected in November last year and judged to be failing in four out of the five areas it was assessed in.

One example given by the CQC described how staff only changed sheets on Tuesdays and Thursdays for an incontinent resident who became distressed when staff tried to swap the bedding.

“This meant the person had been sleeping in wet urine soaked sheets for up to five days,” said the report.

A risk of legionella, exposed wiring, cigarettes left in a commode and a failure to “promote dignity” were other issues highlighted.

Joanna Smart has been hired as the new manager of Beechey House since the inspection.

She said: “We have received a draft of the latest report and it shows we are now meeting three of the five required standards.

“We are working closely with Bournemouth Borough Council and CQC to ensure we make the further required improvements.”

A report after an inspection carried out on February 18 at Ashley Court Care Home in Poole said residents’ health and safety was “not fully protected.”

The report stated residents’ with a high risk of choking were not being protected and equipment required by two people to stay in bed had not been in place during the inspection.

“This meant these individuals would have been at a high risk of an injury if they had fallen out of bed,” said the report.

Inspectors also identified “issues with fingernail care” and found gaps in records.

Clinical operations director Felicity Somerville of owner Life Style Care plc said: “There was no clinical evidence they were giving good care. The documentation wasn’t up to standard.”

The home was now fully compliant and they had used the experience to improve practice across the whole group, she said.

Action was also taken against Gainsborough Care Home, a residential and nursing home for 45 residents in Swanage, following an inspection on March 18, for its management of medicines, which the report said had a “major impact” on residents.

In a statement the home said nursing provision started on the same day as the unannounced CQC inspection. The statement said: “Gainsborough Care Home Ltd took immediate action and within 24 hours the issues raised by CQC were dealt with to ensure that Gainsborough Care and Nursing Home was once again compliant.”

The statement added that CQC had not re-inspected according to its procedures, and despite telephone calls, emails and letters a return visit to check on compliance had not taken place.

An inspection on November 7 at Magna Road Care Home, Bearwood, a home for up to seven people with learning difficulties, criticised its lack of sufficiently qualified staff and said: “Care and treatment was not assessed, planned and delivered in a way that was intended to ensure people’s safety.”

A statement from owners Community Integrated Care said: “On receipt of the notice, we immediately began to address the issues raised. We worked in close partnership with CQC, the local authority, people supported, their families and staff to develop a robust plan of action to quickly remedy all concerns.” By January 28 2014 the home was deemed to be fully compliant.

CQC Response

A spokesperson for the CQC said the reports need to be viewed “in perspective” as the majority of homes are meeting the required standards.

He added: “We cannot let care homes to continually fail to meet standards. Where we find that a care home is not compliant we will ask them to draw up an action plan by a date specified by us. We will then return for an unannounced inspection. If the improvements are not made, we will consider further action.

“CQC has a range of enforcement powers which include restricting the services that a provider can offer, or, in the most serious cases, suspending or cancelling a service. CQC can also issue financial penalty notices and cautions, or prosecute the provider for failing to meet national standards.”

Mitchell House response

Mitchell House, a residential home for 50 people with dementia, which is due to be closed this summer, was subject to a fine after failing to have a registered manager in place.

Care UK, which runs Borough of Poole’s dementia services, was fined £4,000 after being served a fixed penalty notice by the CQC on February 19.

In a statement it said: “Mitchell House has always had an experienced manage in place to provide leadership and support to the care team. However, we did have an administrative issue which led to a delay in us registering the new manger with the CQC.”

Phil Hornsby, head of commission and improvement, Borough of Poole said: “The CQC will always inform us of any issues that arise and if we feel the quality of care is affected we will intervene and take action. In the case of Mitchell House it was not necessary for us to get involved as it was a registration issue that has now been resolved.”

The 73 care homes in Dorset which the CQC has said require improvement:

Abbey View, Sherborne – latest report published on March 2014

Treating people with respect and involving them with their care: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Adamscourt Residential Care Home, Bournemouth – latest report published on March 21

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required Staffing: Improvements required

Ashley Court Care Home, Poole – latest report published on April 1 Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Enforcement action

Autism Wessex – Highcroft and Valley View, Beaminster – latest report published on March 20

Treating people with respect and involving them in their care: Improvements required Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Avenue House, Dorchester – latest report published on January 30

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: enforcement action Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Avonwood Manor, Poole – latest report published on November 28

Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required

Beechey House, Bournemouth – latest report published on February 18

Treating people with respect and involving them in their care: Enforcement action Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Enforcement action Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Enforcement action Management: Enforcement action

Belle Rose Nursing Home, Dorchester – latest report published on September 11, 2013

Treating people with respect and involving them in their care: Improvements required Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Broadwaters, Bournemouth – latest report published on September 28, 2013

Treating people with respect and involving them in their care: Improvements required

Buxton House, Weymouth – latest report published on June 11, 2013

Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Castle Dene, Bournemouth – latest inspection report published on November 13, 2013

Management: Improvements required

Castleman House, Blandford Forum – latest inspection report published on November 28, 2013

Management: Improvements required

Chaseborough House, Wimborne – latest inspection report published on March 21

Management: Improvements required

Cheverels Care Home, Maiden Newton – latest inspection report published on January 29

Staffing: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Chine Breeze, Bournemouth – last inspection report December 10, 2013

Treating people with respect and involving them in their care: Improvements required Staffing: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Clarondene Residential Care Home, Lyme Regis – latest inspection report published on June 14, 2013

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required Staffing: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Coneygar Lodge, Bridport – latest inspection report published on May 29, 2013

Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required

Crecy Residential Home, Weymouth – latest inspection report published on September 28

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required Staffing: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Denewood House Care Home, Ferndown – latest inspection report published on October 25, 2013

Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Dorset House, Poole – latest inspection report published on October 30, 2013

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required

Dorset Learning Disability Service - 11 Friars Close, Dorchester – latest inspection report published on March 1

Treating people with respect and involving them in their care: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Dorset Learning Disability Service- 20 Edward Road, Dorchester – latest inspection report published on October 9, 2013

Treating people with respect and involving them in their care: Improvements required Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs

Dorset Learning Disability Service - 4 Romulus Close, Dorchester – latest inspection report published on January 17

Management: Improvements required Dorset Residential Homes- Kirtleton Avenue, Weymouth – latest inspection report published on October 1, 2013 Management: Improvements required

Drayton House Residential Care Home, Bridport – latest inspection report published on March 19

Treating people with respect and involving them in their care: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Drumconner Care Home, Bournemouth – latest inspection report published on November 27, 2013

Staffing: Improvements required

Fairfield House, Chickerell – latest inspection report published on January 10

Management: Improvements required

Forest Hill House Nursing Home, Wimborne – latest inspection report published on October 29

Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required

Gainsborough Care Home, Swanage – latest inspection report published on March 27

Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Enforcement action

Gillingham Grange, Gillingham – latest inspection report published on September 6, 2013

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required Caring for people, safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Glencairn House Retirement Home, Dorchester – latest inspection report published on February 21

Treating people with respect and involving them in their care: Improvements required

Goldcrest House, Weymouth – latest inspection report on November 23, 2013

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required Staffing: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Greenbushes Nursing Home, Dorchester – latest inspection report published on January 30

Treating people with respect and involving them in their care: Improvements required Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required Staffing: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Hannah Levy House Trust, Bournemouth – latest inspection report published on November 13, 2013

Management: Improvements required

Highview Residential Home, Bournemouth – latest inspection report published on November 1, 2013.

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required.

UPDATE: The Echo was contacted by the above home on Thursday, May 15, to be told that a re-inspection had been carried out on April 17 and the home was now compliant in all areas. The CQC website confirms that an inspection to check whether required improvements had been put in place was being carried out. The updated report has not yet been published by the CQC.

Ivers, Marnhull – latest inspection report published on January 28 Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required

Kendal Bank Care, Gillingham – latest inspection report published on October 15, 2013

Staffing: Improvements required

Kingland House Nursing and Residential Home, Poole – latest inspection report published on March 28

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Enforcement action Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required

Kingsley Court Care Home, Weymouth – latest inspection report published on December 17, 2013

Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required

Ladignac Care Home, Shaftesbury – latest inspection report published on November 19, 2013

Management: Improvements required Linkfield Court (Bournemouth) Limited – latest inspection report published on November 22, 2013 Staffing: Improvements required

Lyndale, Bournemouth – latest inspection report published on December 24, 2013

Management: Improvements required

Lytchetts, Dorchester – latest inspection report published on July 26

Staffing: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Magna Road, Poole – latest inspection report published on February 19

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Enforcement action Staffing: Improvements required

Marley House, Dorchester – latest inspection report published on October 26, 2013

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required Staffing: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Millbrook House (Dorset) Limited, Blandford Forum – latest inspection report published on January 21

Management: Improvements required

Mulberry Court and Scope Inclusion Dorset, Gillingham – latest inspection report published on Mach 19

Management: Improvements required

New Horizon Centre Limited- Eilat, Bournemouth – latest inspection report published on January 15

Staffing: Improvements required

Oakdene Nursing Home, Wimborne – latest inspection report published on January 7

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Park Lodge Residential Care Home, Poole – latest inspection report published on October 24, 2013

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Pinhay House Residential Care Home, Lyme Regis – latest inspection report published on December 20 Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required Staffing: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Purbeck Care, Wareham – latest inspection report published on October 23, 2013

Staffing: Improvements required

Raglan House, Weymouth – latest inspection report published on January 25

Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required

Retired Nurses National Home, Bournemouth – latest inspection report published on October 2, 2013

Treating people with respect and involving them in their care: Improvements required Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Sandbourne House, Poole – latest inspection report published on January 11

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required

Somerleigh Court, Dorchester – latest inspection report published on September 3, 2013

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required Staffing: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

St Albans House, Bournemouth – latest inspection report published on October 26, 2013

Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

St Bridgets Care Centre, Bournemouth – latest inspection report published on August 13, 2013

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required

St Denis Lodge Residential Home, Bournemouth – latest inspection report published on August 13

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required

Sunningdales Care Home, Bournemouth – latest inspection report published on November 21

Treating people with respect and involving them in their care: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Talbot Woods Lodge, Bournemouth – latest inspection report published on January 30

Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required

The Aldbury, Poole – latest inspection report published on February 18

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

The Elms, Bournemouth – latest inspection report published on January 7

Staffing: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

The Fearnes, Bournemouth – latest inspection report published on November 16

Management: Improvements required

The Gables, Ferndown – latest inspection report published on February 13

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required

The Links, Broadstone – latest inspection report published on April 17

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required

The Old Rectory, Sturminster Newton – latest inspection report published on October 2, 2013

Management: Improvements required

Thistlegate House, Charmouth – latest inspection report published on February 13

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

White Lodge and St Helens, Bournemouth – latest inspection report published on November 20, 2013

Management: Improvements required

Whitway House, Dorchester – latest inspection report published on January 3

Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required

Windsor Court Nursing Home, Bournemouth – latest inspection report published on April 5

Providing care, treatment and support that meets people’s needs: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Winterbourne Steepleton- Steepleton Manor Care Home, Dorchester – latest inspection report published on February 22

Management: Improvements required

Wordsworth House Care Home, Swanage – latest inspection report published on November 19, 2013

Caring for people safely and protecting them from harm: Improvements required Management: Improvements required

Comments (28)

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5:43am Thu 15 May 14

Lord Parkstone says...

The entire care home system for the elderly needs a total shake up and investigation full stop. How we treat the elderly in this country is disgusting so little care or regard for them but more than happy to charge a fortune for giving them little more than bed and board.
The entire care home system for the elderly needs a total shake up and investigation full stop. How we treat the elderly in this country is disgusting so little care or regard for them but more than happy to charge a fortune for giving them little more than bed and board. Lord Parkstone
  • Score: 54

6:54am Thu 15 May 14

High Treason says...

This is all part of the no one takes responsibility UK. We have hospitals like the RBH and Tony Spotswood who hangs on after a damning CQC report.
In the news today it states "The care given to people dying in hospital is "deeply concerning"
Now it is nursing homes, who charge a fortune and fail our elderly. What a compassionately bankrupt country we are.
This is all part of the no one takes responsibility UK. We have hospitals like the RBH and Tony Spotswood who hangs on after a damning CQC report. In the news today it states "The care given to people dying in hospital is "deeply concerning" Now it is nursing homes, who charge a fortune and fail our elderly. What a compassionately bankrupt country we are. High Treason
  • Score: 43

7:50am Thu 15 May 14

tinkerten says...

There are more bad care homes than those mentioned. Inspections cannot see all what goes on, only relatives really have a clue as to what goes on and they are often afraid to complain for fear of what might happen to their loved ones who remain in the home. Social services are quick to take the money, but slow to care or support, only in a way to protect themselves and do what they want. More should be done to protect the elderly in our society. We will all need care one day, so we should fight for the best care now.
There are more bad care homes than those mentioned. Inspections cannot see all what goes on, only relatives really have a clue as to what goes on and they are often afraid to complain for fear of what might happen to their loved ones who remain in the home. Social services are quick to take the money, but slow to care or support, only in a way to protect themselves and do what they want. More should be done to protect the elderly in our society. We will all need care one day, so we should fight for the best care now. tinkerten
  • Score: 28

8:47am Thu 15 May 14

RM says...

Thanks to the Echo for running this story - it's only by shining a very bright light on how drastically our elderly are being let down in their last days that change will be brought about.

Don't suppose any of the care homes on the CQC list will be reducing their fees until their service is up to the expected level?
Thanks to the Echo for running this story - it's only by shining a very bright light on how drastically our elderly are being let down in their last days that change will be brought about. Don't suppose any of the care homes on the CQC list will be reducing their fees until their service is up to the expected level? RM
  • Score: 23

9:17am Thu 15 May 14

master plan says...

As my wife works in the care sector I could say a lot about the problems she faces everyday. The one thing that is a problem is langue I feel if your working in a care home you should be able to communicate with residents and staff if you struggle with stringing one sentence together how can you know the needs and wants of the elderly or infirm?
As my wife works in the care sector I could say a lot about the problems she faces everyday. The one thing that is a problem is langue I feel if your working in a care home you should be able to communicate with residents and staff if you struggle with stringing one sentence together how can you know the needs and wants of the elderly or infirm? master plan
  • Score: 37

9:50am Thu 15 May 14

Eamon Toman says...

I note that the article above names the Retired Nurses National Home (RNNH) of which I am interim Chief Executive as one of the 73 Homes in the area in need of improvement.
Whilst the article in relation to the RNNH is factually correct, in that the Home was inspected by the CQC in August 2013 and a number of recommendation for improvements made, as the CQC themselves state, their reports need to be seen in perspective. I am concerned that set as it is within the context of abuse and poor care as highlighted in the recent Panarama programe, the article might serve to give an unfair and inaccurate impression of the RNNH. Can I in the first instance state clearly that this care home has an excellent reputation in relation to the care of its residents spanning more that 75 years and is justifiably proud of its homely and caring atmosphere. Residents here have always been and will continue to be treated with the utmost care and respect. The issues raised by the CQC in August of 2013, related to managerial and administrative matters, not standards of care per se and have since been addressed, In fact the Home has since received an unannounced follow up visit from the CQC in April of this year as a pilot to their new inspection regime and whilst their final report has not yet been published, the verbal feedback we received from the inspectors was that they are happy that all issues raised by them in August 2013 have been addressed and the Home is fully compliant with all their standards.
I note that the article above names the Retired Nurses National Home (RNNH) of which I am interim Chief Executive as one of the 73 Homes in the area in need of improvement. Whilst the article in relation to the RNNH is factually correct, in that the Home was inspected by the CQC in August 2013 and a number of recommendation for improvements made, as the CQC themselves state, their reports need to be seen in perspective. I am concerned that set as it is within the context of abuse and poor care as highlighted in the recent Panarama programe, the article might serve to give an unfair and inaccurate impression of the RNNH. Can I in the first instance state clearly that this care home has an excellent reputation in relation to the care of its residents spanning more that 75 years and is justifiably proud of its homely and caring atmosphere. Residents here have always been and will continue to be treated with the utmost care and respect. The issues raised by the CQC in August of 2013, related to managerial and administrative matters, not standards of care per se and have since been addressed, In fact the Home has since received an unannounced follow up visit from the CQC in April of this year as a pilot to their new inspection regime and whilst their final report has not yet been published, the verbal feedback we received from the inspectors was that they are happy that all issues raised by them in August 2013 have been addressed and the Home is fully compliant with all their standards. Eamon Toman
  • Score: 12

9:58am Thu 15 May 14

BmthNewshound says...

Despite constant inspections and by the CQC it doesn't appear that the quality of care is improving. Which begs the question - is the CQC fit for purpose and have adequate powers to enforce better standards of care ?
.
Since local authorities closed down council run care homes they have paid out £millions to privately run care home operators. I think its time councils started to hit poor performing care home providers where it hurts, in the pocket, by withhold payments to care homes which fail to provide a good standard of care
Despite constant inspections and by the CQC it doesn't appear that the quality of care is improving. Which begs the question - is the CQC fit for purpose and have adequate powers to enforce better standards of care ? . Since local authorities closed down council run care homes they have paid out £millions to privately run care home operators. I think its time councils started to hit poor performing care home providers where it hurts, in the pocket, by withhold payments to care homes which fail to provide a good standard of care BmthNewshound
  • Score: 3

10:05am Thu 15 May 14

bella99 says...

And they are closing mitchell house. Damb shame. The carers there are fantastic. It seems to be one of the few care homes that is good. Other than not having a registered manager , though they have now. Buck up your idea's poole council and keep this care facility open.
And they are closing mitchell house. Damb shame. The carers there are fantastic. It seems to be one of the few care homes that is good. Other than not having a registered manager , though they have now. Buck up your idea's poole council and keep this care facility open. bella99
  • Score: 2

10:19am Thu 15 May 14

Branksome Boy says...

The CQC needs to spot check these homes - IE turn up at Midnight on a Saturday evening or on a Sunday afternoon! But they don't! All of these homes know when the visit is due and know that they will be visited between 9 am and 4pm. They should turn up when the residents are getting up in the morning or when they are being made ready for bed! They should send questionnaires to relatives - instead of getting the homes to give out questionnaires which the relative then has to hand back to the home (most relatives are terrified as to the consequences for their relatives if they are totally honest about the care received! ).
The CQC needs to spot check these homes - IE turn up at Midnight on a Saturday evening or on a Sunday afternoon! But they don't! All of these homes know when the visit is due and know that they will be visited between 9 am and 4pm. They should turn up when the residents are getting up in the morning or when they are being made ready for bed! They should send questionnaires to relatives - instead of getting the homes to give out questionnaires which the relative then has to hand back to the home (most relatives are terrified as to the consequences for their relatives if they are totally honest about the care received! ). Branksome Boy
  • Score: 13

10:46am Thu 15 May 14

Azphreal says...

tinkerten wrote:
There are more bad care homes than those mentioned. Inspections cannot see all what goes on, only relatives really have a clue as to what goes on and they are often afraid to complain for fear of what might happen to their loved ones who remain in the home. Social services are quick to take the money, but slow to care or support, only in a way to protect themselves and do what they want. More should be done to protect the elderly in our society. We will all need care one day, so we should fight for the best care now.
How many of these are RUN by social services and how many are private? People i know who have worked in private care homes are sickened by the penny pinching and cost cutting that goes on. Saying a resident is only allowed a certain number of incontinance pads per day (2) no matter how many they need is just sick,never having gloves for staff,gaps in reports,forcing residents out of bed and into day rooms when they were not feeling well and as with many of these places understaffing. Gone are the days when care giving was a calling now its a job.
[quote][p][bold]tinkerten[/bold] wrote: There are more bad care homes than those mentioned. Inspections cannot see all what goes on, only relatives really have a clue as to what goes on and they are often afraid to complain for fear of what might happen to their loved ones who remain in the home. Social services are quick to take the money, but slow to care or support, only in a way to protect themselves and do what they want. More should be done to protect the elderly in our society. We will all need care one day, so we should fight for the best care now.[/p][/quote]How many of these are RUN by social services and how many are private? People i know who have worked in private care homes are sickened by the penny pinching and cost cutting that goes on. Saying a resident is only allowed a certain number of incontinance pads per day (2) no matter how many they need is just sick,never having gloves for staff,gaps in reports,forcing residents out of bed and into day rooms when they were not feeling well and as with many of these places understaffing. Gone are the days when care giving was a calling now its a job. Azphreal
  • Score: 9

10:54am Thu 15 May 14

bella99 says...

Quick people sign the petition to keep mitchell house open. We need 5000 more signatures. Its an amazing place and not like the penny pinching private care homes. Google 'mitchell house petition'
Quick people sign the petition to keep mitchell house open. We need 5000 more signatures. Its an amazing place and not like the penny pinching private care homes. Google 'mitchell house petition' bella99
  • Score: 0

11:30am Thu 15 May 14

rozmister says...

Branksome Boy wrote:
The CQC needs to spot check these homes - IE turn up at Midnight on a Saturday evening or on a Sunday afternoon! But they don't! All of these homes know when the visit is due and know that they will be visited between 9 am and 4pm. They should turn up when the residents are getting up in the morning or when they are being made ready for bed! They should send questionnaires to relatives - instead of getting the homes to give out questionnaires which the relative then has to hand back to the home (most relatives are terrified as to the consequences for their relatives if they are totally honest about the care received! ).
That's funny because I worked for an organisation that was CQC inspected (and passed). We got into work one day to find CQC waiting in reception ready to inspect us and so we cancelled everything that was planned that day to pull out every bit of necessary paperwork and take them round! The CQC can and do spot check, it even talks in the article about unannounced CQC inspections and how one of these visits were just that.
[quote][p][bold]Branksome Boy[/bold] wrote: The CQC needs to spot check these homes - IE turn up at Midnight on a Saturday evening or on a Sunday afternoon! But they don't! All of these homes know when the visit is due and know that they will be visited between 9 am and 4pm. They should turn up when the residents are getting up in the morning or when they are being made ready for bed! They should send questionnaires to relatives - instead of getting the homes to give out questionnaires which the relative then has to hand back to the home (most relatives are terrified as to the consequences for their relatives if they are totally honest about the care received! ).[/p][/quote]That's funny because I worked for an organisation that was CQC inspected (and passed). We got into work one day to find CQC waiting in reception ready to inspect us and so we cancelled everything that was planned that day to pull out every bit of necessary paperwork and take them round! The CQC can and do spot check, it even talks in the article about unannounced CQC inspections and how one of these visits were just that. rozmister
  • Score: 9

11:51am Thu 15 May 14

Rednax says...

Which Councillors should be resigning over this?! Disgraceful.
Which Councillors should be resigning over this?! Disgraceful. Rednax
  • Score: 3

12:24pm Thu 15 May 14

Branksome Boy says...

rozmister wrote:
Branksome Boy wrote:
The CQC needs to spot check these homes - IE turn up at Midnight on a Saturday evening or on a Sunday afternoon! But they don't! All of these homes know when the visit is due and know that they will be visited between 9 am and 4pm. They should turn up when the residents are getting up in the morning or when they are being made ready for bed! They should send questionnaires to relatives - instead of getting the homes to give out questionnaires which the relative then has to hand back to the home (most relatives are terrified as to the consequences for their relatives if they are totally honest about the care received! ).
That's funny because I worked for an organisation that was CQC inspected (and passed). We got into work one day to find CQC waiting in reception ready to inspect us and so we cancelled everything that was planned that day to pull out every bit of necessary paperwork and take them round! The CQC can and do spot check, it even talks in the article about unannounced CQC inspections and how one of these visits were just that.
This may be the case on odd occasions but I know that they don't visit unannounced at night or at the weekends when the homes are run on a very low staff ratio and the staff on duty are not trained to the same level as normal weekday staff. The managers in the home that my relative lives in did a spot check one evening around 1.00am and were horrified to discover staff asleep in chairs and the team leader actually in a locked bedroom asleep in a bed! That is when CQC never visit but it's when they should!
[quote][p][bold]rozmister[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Branksome Boy[/bold] wrote: The CQC needs to spot check these homes - IE turn up at Midnight on a Saturday evening or on a Sunday afternoon! But they don't! All of these homes know when the visit is due and know that they will be visited between 9 am and 4pm. They should turn up when the residents are getting up in the morning or when they are being made ready for bed! They should send questionnaires to relatives - instead of getting the homes to give out questionnaires which the relative then has to hand back to the home (most relatives are terrified as to the consequences for their relatives if they are totally honest about the care received! ).[/p][/quote]That's funny because I worked for an organisation that was CQC inspected (and passed). We got into work one day to find CQC waiting in reception ready to inspect us and so we cancelled everything that was planned that day to pull out every bit of necessary paperwork and take them round! The CQC can and do spot check, it even talks in the article about unannounced CQC inspections and how one of these visits were just that.[/p][/quote]This may be the case on odd occasions but I know that they don't visit unannounced at night or at the weekends when the homes are run on a very low staff ratio and the staff on duty are not trained to the same level as normal weekday staff. The managers in the home that my relative lives in did a spot check one evening around 1.00am and were horrified to discover staff asleep in chairs and the team leader actually in a locked bedroom asleep in a bed! That is when CQC never visit but it's when they should! Branksome Boy
  • Score: 7

3:19pm Thu 15 May 14

bbird says...

My late mum had a stroke, then developed vascular dementia, swallowing/communica
tion problems etc.

We tried our best to look after her, but on occasion booked her in for respite care as we were frequently at breaking point.

She stayed at the '2nd best home' (not in the article). On the first day she had an omelette for dinner (re swallowing problems). On the second day she was given the same. I explained this was the second day in a row and was told their liquidiser had broken down. On the third day, egg again! Now if I hadn't been there to check I wouldn't have known as mum couldn't have told me.

I can write a book on the horrific experiences I encountered at NHS & private facilitlies. I wrote to the hospitals and nursing homes concerned, MPs, Age Concern, the Media etc etc and either had no response or was fobbed off.

Mum was apparently manhandled at the nursing home (not local) where she died soon after. Management we unable to 'get to the root of the problem, although they admitted something was going on'. I subsequently found out none of the senior management checked on the night team. And when I was allowed to stay the night when she was slipping away, Inwas horrified to find the nurse in attendance was unable to stand unsupported (she walked round leaning in a trolley), and couldn't even put on the blood pressure machine as she needed one hand supported on the trolley, unbelievable but true. She was one of the regular staff incidentally.

I can tell you I am no way going into a home until these issues are sorted. And vulnerable confused people need to be cared for by (a good) NHS, and not left in the hands of the private sector.
My late mum had a stroke, then developed vascular dementia, swallowing/communica tion problems etc. We tried our best to look after her, but on occasion booked her in for respite care as we were frequently at breaking point. She stayed at the '2nd best home' (not in the article). On the first day she had an omelette for dinner (re swallowing problems). On the second day she was given the same. I explained this was the second day in a row and was told their liquidiser had broken down. On the third day, egg again! Now if I hadn't been there to check I wouldn't have known as mum couldn't have told me. I can write a book on the horrific experiences I encountered at NHS & private facilitlies. I wrote to the hospitals and nursing homes concerned, MPs, Age Concern, the Media etc etc and either had no response or was fobbed off. Mum was apparently manhandled at the nursing home (not local) where she died soon after. Management we unable to 'get to the root of the problem, although they admitted something was going on'. I subsequently found out none of the senior management checked on the night team. And when I was allowed to stay the night when she was slipping away, Inwas horrified to find the nurse in attendance was unable to stand unsupported (she walked round leaning in a trolley), and couldn't even put on the blood pressure machine as she needed one hand supported on the trolley, unbelievable but true. She was one of the regular staff incidentally. I can tell you I am no way going into a home until these issues are sorted. And vulnerable confused people need to be cared for by (a good) NHS, and not left in the hands of the private sector. bbird
  • Score: 6

3:47pm Thu 15 May 14

Frank28 says...

A very shameful summary for the County. Considering the eye-watering amount of money these places charge, the care and value placed upon a resident should be much better than it is. Having a Care Home Licence is a privilege, and not a right. Homes that fail to comply with the law, and fail to meet the required standard should be shut down immediately. There must also be adequate funding to ensure that enough inspectors carry out their duties, often enough.
A very shameful summary for the County. Considering the eye-watering amount of money these places charge, the care and value placed upon a resident should be much better than it is. Having a Care Home Licence is a privilege, and not a right. Homes that fail to comply with the law, and fail to meet the required standard should be shut down immediately. There must also be adequate funding to ensure that enough inspectors carry out their duties, often enough. Frank28
  • Score: 2

3:50pm Thu 15 May 14

pete woodley says...

Lord Parkstone wrote:
The entire care home system for the elderly needs a total shake up and investigation full stop. How we treat the elderly in this country is disgusting so little care or regard for them but more than happy to charge a fortune for giving them little more than bed and board.
Having witnessed for many years,some of what goes on in care homes,i completely agree.Keep up the inspections.
[quote][p][bold]Lord Parkstone[/bold] wrote: The entire care home system for the elderly needs a total shake up and investigation full stop. How we treat the elderly in this country is disgusting so little care or regard for them but more than happy to charge a fortune for giving them little more than bed and board.[/p][/quote]Having witnessed for many years,some of what goes on in care homes,i completely agree.Keep up the inspections. pete woodley
  • Score: 4

5:45pm Thu 15 May 14

Benji61 says...

would like to know why The Echo felt the need to include a larger paragraph about Mitchell House than any other home when it is NOT actually included on their list of homes that need to improve? I suppose it makes the Borough of Poole look better for closing it. the problem at Mitchell House wasn't care, it was an issue with Care UK not registering a Manager!
would like to know why The Echo felt the need to include a larger paragraph about Mitchell House than any other home when it is NOT actually included on their list of homes that need to improve? I suppose it makes the Borough of Poole look better for closing it. the problem at Mitchell House wasn't care, it was an issue with Care UK not registering a Manager! Benji61
  • Score: 3

7:07pm Thu 15 May 14

Gingertree says...

A lot of problems in the care sector arise because of a lack of staff I know of a home that runs with 5 care staff to almost 50 residents most of whom have dementia Its terrible pay for a job that is both physically and mentally draining
A lot of problems in the care sector arise because of a lack of staff I know of a home that runs with 5 care staff to almost 50 residents most of whom have dementia Its terrible pay for a job that is both physically and mentally draining Gingertree
  • Score: 5

8:14pm Thu 15 May 14

ashleycross says...

Gingertree wrote:
A lot of problems in the care sector arise because of a lack of staff I know of a home that runs with 5 care staff to almost 50 residents most of whom have dementia Its terrible pay for a job that is both physically and mentally draining
aren't these places like nurseries with a minimum ration of staff on duty at any one time to people being looked after? Anyone know anything about this?
Older people are often in second childhood so these ratios should exist. Looking forward to seeing some informed posting on this.
[quote][p][bold]Gingertree[/bold] wrote: A lot of problems in the care sector arise because of a lack of staff I know of a home that runs with 5 care staff to almost 50 residents most of whom have dementia Its terrible pay for a job that is both physically and mentally draining[/p][/quote]aren't these places like nurseries with a minimum ration of staff on duty at any one time to people being looked after? Anyone know anything about this? Older people are often in second childhood so these ratios should exist. Looking forward to seeing some informed posting on this. ashleycross
  • Score: -1

8:45pm Thu 15 May 14

sam3737 says...

I work in one of the mentioned Care Home's and at the Home I work in we treat the residents with extra care, kindness and consideration and if they ring their bell they are only kept waiting a minute or two at the very most. Most of the time there needs are met at once. The residents in the home are very happy and well cared for and they just have to ask for something and we will do our best to provide it. We try not to rush whilst caring for someone who is bedridden, but we do have a 'full house' at present and its very busy on every shift. I am happy in my job as its a second career for me and it was a real challenge to start with, very different from working in a bank!!. I feel have taken to it very well and love my job. It helps that I have a super, caring Manager who will go out of her way to make sure the Home runs smoothly.
I work in one of the mentioned Care Home's and at the Home I work in we treat the residents with extra care, kindness and consideration and if they ring their bell they are only kept waiting a minute or two at the very most. Most of the time there needs are met at once. The residents in the home are very happy and well cared for and they just have to ask for something and we will do our best to provide it. We try not to rush whilst caring for someone who is bedridden, but we do have a 'full house' at present and its very busy on every shift. I am happy in my job as its a second career for me and it was a real challenge to start with, very different from working in a bank!!. I feel have taken to it very well and love my job. It helps that I have a super, caring Manager who will go out of her way to make sure the Home runs smoothly. sam3737
  • Score: 10

10:30pm Thu 15 May 14

Superpink83 says...

As a carer for 10+years it always upsets me to read stories like this. And something clearly needs to be done for all the bad homes
But... Please do not tar every home with the same brush.
I work in a group of homes which is not mentioned. And I know the staff I work with treat all of our residents with they dignity and respect they deserve. All of the carers go above and beyond the call of duty
Maybe we should have some "secret cameras" and undercover investigations to say well done to the women & men that work so hard on near min wage !
As a carer for 10+years it always upsets me to read stories like this. And something clearly needs to be done for all the bad homes But... Please do not tar every home with the same brush. I work in a group of homes which is not mentioned. And I know the staff I work with treat all of our residents with they dignity and respect they deserve. All of the carers go above and beyond the call of duty Maybe we should have some "secret cameras" and undercover investigations to say well done to the women & men that work so hard on near min wage ! Superpink83
  • Score: 9

10:56pm Thu 15 May 14

bbird says...

It is very important to differentiate between vulnerable confused people who are unable to communicate, and those that are maybe frail but in command of their senses.

In my late mother's case, whatever happened to her in hospitals and care homes, remained hidden from me, as she could not tell me. But I saw so many distressing things happening to her and other residents. I even had to usually 'train' staff how to feed someone with swallowing issues. And once I found anyone who was competent there was a good chance they would get moved or return to their homeland. The carers who came to our home were also always changing, so in the end my husband I looked after mum 24/7, as I couldn't leave her alone with carers who didn't know her needs.

To feed my mother took ages, one teaspoon at a time, check it had all gone down before giving the next spoon. I wonder is she has enough to drink as she was unable to ask. And drinks had to be thickened, but often weren't as if she was wheeled down to a 'party/event', staff there wouldn't know her. I even found her putting bingo counters in her mouth presumably thinking they were sweets.

It is very difficult to look after people in these circumstances, but surely it is our duty. The government (both parties) are dragging their heels.

Again I would like to mention mum was only once in a local home for a brief (distressing) period. But I have a feeling the situation is not that much different across the country.

Of course there are some good carers, but there are too many that aren't. It takes proper training, compassion and skill & devotion to be a good carer. So thanks to those that are committed to their work. It really is up to the government to sort out this horrid situation which I have been aware of ans following since my mother had her stroke more than 15 years ago!
It is very important to differentiate between vulnerable confused people who are unable to communicate, and those that are maybe frail but in command of their senses. In my late mother's case, whatever happened to her in hospitals and care homes, remained hidden from me, as she could not tell me. But I saw so many distressing things happening to her and other residents. I even had to usually 'train' staff how to feed someone with swallowing issues. And once I found anyone who was competent there was a good chance they would get moved or return to their homeland. The carers who came to our home were also always changing, so in the end my husband I looked after mum 24/7, as I couldn't leave her alone with carers who didn't know her needs. To feed my mother took ages, one teaspoon at a time, check it had all gone down before giving the next spoon. I wonder is she has enough to drink as she was unable to ask. And drinks had to be thickened, but often weren't as if she was wheeled down to a 'party/event', staff there wouldn't know her. I even found her putting bingo counters in her mouth presumably thinking they were sweets. It is very difficult to look after people in these circumstances, but surely it is our duty. The government (both parties) are dragging their heels. Again I would like to mention mum was only once in a local home for a brief (distressing) period. But I have a feeling the situation is not that much different across the country. Of course there are some good carers, but there are too many that aren't. It takes proper training, compassion and skill & devotion to be a good carer. So thanks to those that are committed to their work. It really is up to the government to sort out this horrid situation which I have been aware of ans following since my mother had her stroke more than 15 years ago! bbird
  • Score: 4

11:39pm Thu 15 May 14

step up says...

Following the TV expose last week the Care Minister was called to parliament
for an Urgent Question. Not one of our local MP's attended it and a letter I wrote to the Echo bemoaning this locally relevant fact was not published. Mustn't talk politics during election season...personally cant think of a better time to expose just how useless they are.
Following the TV expose last week the Care Minister was called to parliament for an Urgent Question. Not one of our local MP's attended it and a letter I wrote to the Echo bemoaning this locally relevant fact was not published. Mustn't talk politics during election season...personally cant think of a better time to expose just how useless they are. step up
  • Score: 5

1:10am Fri 16 May 14

SwanageSun1 says...

I work for one of these care homes. The majority of staff are brilliant. However on an inspection I raised my concerns to CQC on various points but the home was still awarded a pass. I would not have deemed this acceptable. But I am only a care worker
I work for one of these care homes. The majority of staff are brilliant. However on an inspection I raised my concerns to CQC on various points [before said inspection] but the home was still awarded a pass. I would not have deemed this acceptable. But I am only a care worker SwanageSun1
  • Score: 0

6:40pm Fri 16 May 14

Yankee1 says...

All I can say is this: there is an authority taking action.

In the US (and probably many other advanced countries) these homes are largely unmonitored.

Don't fuss...find the problems...and sort them. And be grateful someone checks. Life is only as ideal as you - and I - make it.
All I can say is this: there is an authority taking action. In the US (and probably many other advanced countries) these homes are largely unmonitored. Don't fuss...find the problems...and sort them. And be grateful someone checks. Life is only as ideal as you - and I - make it. Yankee1
  • Score: 0

8:27pm Fri 16 May 14

bbird says...

Yankee1 wrote:
All I can say is this: there is an authority taking action.

In the US (and probably many other advanced countries) these homes are largely unmonitored.

Don't fuss...find the problems...and sort them. And be grateful someone checks. Life is only as ideal as you - and I - make it.
You are joking, this has been going on for years. Nothing changes.
[quote][p][bold]Yankee1[/bold] wrote: All I can say is this: there is an authority taking action. In the US (and probably many other advanced countries) these homes are largely unmonitored. Don't fuss...find the problems...and sort them. And be grateful someone checks. Life is only as ideal as you - and I - make it.[/p][/quote]You are joking, this has been going on for years. Nothing changes. bbird
  • Score: 0

5:29pm Mon 19 May 14

looneyluna says...

I am a Senior Carer in one of the care homes on your list and I am appalled that you would lump all the homes together in one long list with out actually doing some research into finding out what improvements were suggested by the CQC,.
A care home can fail its inspection on paper work alone, and the CQC will give instructions as to what improvements need to be made, It is not always the case that a the care home fails because of the low standard of personal care that is being provided.
Your article is very misleading and the public could easily misinterpret the way it is presented . It reflects shoddy journalism on your part , in fact your information is out of date because the care home I work in, and is on you list has recently been inspected and has PASSED.
So i suggest that you check out all the facts before you print an article of this nature that could cause irreparable damage to the reputation of this lovely residential care home.
I am a Senior Carer in one of the care homes on your list and I am appalled that you would lump all the homes together in one long list with out actually doing some research into finding out what improvements were suggested by the CQC,. A care home can fail its inspection on paper work alone, and the CQC will give instructions as to what improvements need to be made, It is not always the case that a the care home fails because of the low standard of personal care that is being provided. Your article is very misleading and the public could easily misinterpret the way it is presented . It reflects shoddy journalism on your part , in fact your information is out of date because the care home I work in, and is on you list has recently been inspected and has PASSED. So i suggest that you check out all the facts before you print an article of this nature that could cause irreparable damage to the reputation of this lovely residential care home. looneyluna
  • Score: 1

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