Four year sentence of one-punch killer Lewis Gill will not change, court of Court of Appeal decides, following death of Andrew Young

UPDATE: One-punch killer Lewis Gill's sentence "not unduly lenient", Court of Appeal decides

COMPLAINTS: CCTV image of Lewis Gill punching Andrew Young

SENTENCE APPEAL: Lewis Gill

First published in News
Last updated
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COURT of Appeal judges have ruled that the four-year sentence given to Lewis Gill, 21, for the one-punch manslaughter of Asperger's sufferer Andrew Young in an unprovoked attack in Bournemouth, was not "unduly lenient".

But the Attorney General has told the Daily Echo that he will speak to the Secretary of State for Justice about sentencing guidelines for such crimes.

Gill, who was jailed for four years for the manslaughter of Andrew Young, could have received a longer jail term following national outcry over the incident.

The Attorney General  received around 300 complaints about the sentence, and Gill appeared before three Court of Appeal judges today. Their ruling was that the sentence was "not unduly lenient."

The Attorney General Dominic Grieve, who presented the case himself, told the Daily Echo today: “I would not have made the referral unless I thought there was an argument that could be made before the court, but I’m respectful of the court’s decision.

“They’re bound by sentencing guidelines and previous decisions and they felt that the sentence passed by the judge fell squarely within the interpretation of the previous decisions.”

Mr Grieve said that the guidelines could be looked at by the Sentencing Council, which is something he would discuss with the Secretary of State for Justice.

“I’m perfectly mindful of the fact that there is a lot of public disquiet over instances of death as a consequence of an action.

“It’s a matter that will ultimately have to be looked at and debated in Parliament.”

In a further statement released later, he added: “This was a case of gratuitous, unprovoked violence.

“It was broad daylight when Lewis Gill delivered a very deliberate, forceful and vicious punch.

“I asked the Court of Appeal too look again at this sentence as I believed it was unduly lenient.

"They have taken the view that the four-year sentence imposed on Lewis Gill should not be increased and I accept their decision entirely.”

Andrew Young’s mother slammed Britain’s ‘soft touch’ judicial system that allowed one-punch killer Lewis Gill to be given a four year prison sentence.

Pamela Young, 71, said: “I don’t feel sad for myself but sad for the police.

“In this country people can get away with anything, not through the police but through the courts.

“My sympathies are with the police who do a brilliant job. The police have done their duty but the judicial system hasn’t. The judicial system is a soft touch.”

She added: “I didn’t think it was justice for Andrew at the time but it’s now gone to the highest court in the land.

“If the highest court says that’s OK then I respect that.

“It’s best not to have any revenge. If you have revenge in your mind the only person you will hurt is yourself.”

When asked if she felt if justice had been served had Gill been given a longer sentence she said: “I suppose it would. It won’t bring Andrew back.”

Bournemouth East MP Tobias Ellwood contacted the Attorney General after hearing of the case and called for the sentencing guidelines to be reviewed so that such crimes were considered a category of murder, rather than manslaughter, in the future.

Warning: contains graphic scenes of violence

Mr Ellwood said: "There are two or three aspects to this case that particularly concern me - the sheer violence of the single strike itself and then the fact that the assailant walked away unperturbed by what he had done, leaving a victim lying in the road.

"He showed no remorse whatsoever. It behaviour that needs to be punished and I don't believe a four year sentence, possibly out in two, is a fair reflection of the crime that has been committed." 

"My view is that this category of a deliberate, single and violent punch, premediated and to the head, should constitute a new category of murder," he said.

"There's no weapon involved but the weapon is the sheer power these individuals are using." 

Mr Young, 40, died after being hit by Gill in a row over cycling on the pavement.

The victim, an Asperger’s sufferer, had made a racist remark to Gill’s acquaintance Victor Ibitoye while he rode a pedal cycle on the pathway in Charminster Road.

Overhearing, Gill swung a punch at Mr Young, who collapsed onto the road behind him.

He died the following day, November 7, at Southampton General Hospital following an operation.

The Daily Echo’s ‘Killer punch’ front page sparked widespread national and international media coverage, leading to calls for Gill’s sentence to be reviewed.

Mr Young is the fourth person to die in Bournemouth in just 13 years from a single blow.

 

Comments (60)

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7:17am Wed 7 May 14

Huey says...

Let's hope wiggsy stays away from court today. He'd probably reduce the sentence.
Let's hope wiggsy stays away from court today. He'd probably reduce the sentence. Huey
  • Score: 37

7:30am Wed 7 May 14

skydriver says...

This man should get at least double that sentence WITHOUT parole..
Thug!
This man should get at least double that sentence WITHOUT parole.. Thug! skydriver
  • Score: 75

7:38am Wed 7 May 14

BournemouthMum says...

Double his sentence at least. Even then it wouldn't be enough. He doesn't deserve to walk the streets again.
Double his sentence at least. Even then it wouldn't be enough. He doesn't deserve to walk the streets again. BournemouthMum
  • Score: 63

8:17am Wed 7 May 14

Controversial But True says...

Did the victim make a racist remark for sure, or was this just the offender's excuse for an appalling act? I could probably try and understand if there were independent witnesses stating this rather than just the offender's friend!
Did the victim make a racist remark for sure, or was this just the offender's excuse for an appalling act? I could probably try and understand if there were independent witnesses stating this rather than just the offender's friend! Controversial But True
  • Score: 66

8:34am Wed 7 May 14

RM says...

Yes, the alleged racist remark excuse seems a bit dodgy, considering where it came from.
Yes, the alleged racist remark excuse seems a bit dodgy, considering where it came from. RM
  • Score: 54

8:49am Wed 7 May 14

poolebabe says...

No racist remark excuses punching someone like that. I really hope the sentence is increased. I doubt the offender intended to kill the victim, but he did, and he should be made to accept the harshest of consequences for his actions.
No racist remark excuses punching someone like that. I really hope the sentence is increased. I doubt the offender intended to kill the victim, but he did, and he should be made to accept the harshest of consequences for his actions. poolebabe
  • Score: 62

9:51am Wed 7 May 14

Sir Beachy Head says...

Huey wrote:
Let's hope wiggsy stays away from court today. He'd probably reduce the sentence.
This will beh eard in the High court , London. Judge Wiggs will not be part of it.
[quote][p][bold]Huey[/bold] wrote: Let's hope wiggsy stays away from court today. He'd probably reduce the sentence.[/p][/quote]This will beh eard in the High court , London. Judge Wiggs will not be part of it. Sir Beachy Head
  • Score: 10

11:14am Wed 7 May 14

John T says...

Controversial But True wrote:
Did the victim make a racist remark for sure, or was this just the offender's excuse for an appalling act? I could probably try and understand if there were independent witnesses stating this rather than just the offender's friend!
What proof does the Echo reporter have that a racist remark was made? If they have no conclusive evidence, then it should be reported that an 'alleged' racist remark was made.
Either way, it does not justify the violent reaction from Gill, nor the lenient sentence he has received.
[quote][p][bold]Controversial But True[/bold] wrote: Did the victim make a racist remark for sure, or was this just the offender's excuse for an appalling act? I could probably try and understand if there were independent witnesses stating this rather than just the offender's friend![/p][/quote]What proof does the Echo reporter have that a racist remark was made? If they have no conclusive evidence, then it should be reported that an 'alleged' racist remark was made. Either way, it does not justify the violent reaction from Gill, nor the lenient sentence he has received. John T
  • Score: 33

11:14am Wed 7 May 14

speedy231278 says...

While I agree with the sentiment, this sets a dangerous precedent. A judge has passed sentence, and now public opinion has effectively or physically brought the accused back to court for potential changes to it. What then for other cases that the public might think resulted in too lenient or too heavy a sentence? Will the public now become judge, jury and executioner in every case in the media spotlight? What might happen to unpopular public figures who are convicted of crimes? Might we see a certain local 'businessman' convicted, given a light sentence, and then a public outcry see that extended (hopefully!), or should it be left in the court?
While I agree with the sentiment, this sets a dangerous precedent. A judge has passed sentence, and now public opinion has effectively or physically brought the accused back to court for potential changes to it. What then for other cases that the public might think resulted in too lenient or too heavy a sentence? Will the public now become judge, jury and executioner in every case in the media spotlight? What might happen to unpopular public figures who are convicted of crimes? Might we see a certain local 'businessman' convicted, given a light sentence, and then a public outcry see that extended (hopefully!), or should it be left in the court? speedy231278
  • Score: 3

11:24am Wed 7 May 14

pete woodley says...

speedy231278 wrote:
While I agree with the sentiment, this sets a dangerous precedent. A judge has passed sentence, and now public opinion has effectively or physically brought the accused back to court for potential changes to it. What then for other cases that the public might think resulted in too lenient or too heavy a sentence? Will the public now become judge, jury and executioner in every case in the media spotlight? What might happen to unpopular public figures who are convicted of crimes? Might we see a certain local 'businessman' convicted, given a light sentence, and then a public outcry see that extended (hopefully!), or should it be left in the court?
Well thought comment,i wonder how many agree with the sentence being reviewed.Most of us thought it was light,but should we not rely on the judges to give appropriate sentences.
[quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: While I agree with the sentiment, this sets a dangerous precedent. A judge has passed sentence, and now public opinion has effectively or physically brought the accused back to court for potential changes to it. What then for other cases that the public might think resulted in too lenient or too heavy a sentence? Will the public now become judge, jury and executioner in every case in the media spotlight? What might happen to unpopular public figures who are convicted of crimes? Might we see a certain local 'businessman' convicted, given a light sentence, and then a public outcry see that extended (hopefully!), or should it be left in the court?[/p][/quote]Well thought comment,i wonder how many agree with the sentence being reviewed.Most of us thought it was light,but should we not rely on the judges to give appropriate sentences. pete woodley
  • Score: 14

11:50am Wed 7 May 14

shannon2319 says...

I knew this man, he was the loveliest man you could meet. A racist remark would be extremely out of character..
I knew this man, he was the loveliest man you could meet. A racist remark would be extremely out of character.. shannon2319
  • Score: 32

11:54am Wed 7 May 14

Daz101978 says...

Controversial But True wrote:
Did the victim make a racist remark for sure, or was this just the offender's excuse for an appalling act? I could probably try and understand if there were independent witnesses stating this rather than just the offender's friend!
Racist? What evidence drew you to that question?
Ridiculous. Violence is a sign ones lost control and is NEVER justified.
Lewis Gill is a man of low intelligence and evil too.
[quote][p][bold]Controversial But True[/bold] wrote: Did the victim make a racist remark for sure, or was this just the offender's excuse for an appalling act? I could probably try and understand if there were independent witnesses stating this rather than just the offender's friend![/p][/quote]Racist? What evidence drew you to that question? Ridiculous. Violence is a sign ones lost control and is NEVER justified. Lewis Gill is a man of low intelligence and evil too. Daz101978
  • Score: 26

11:56am Wed 7 May 14

Daz101978 says...

skydriver wrote:
This man should get at least double that sentence WITHOUT parole..
Thug!
Agreed. Lewis Gill may God forgive you. Your a moron and evil.
[quote][p][bold]skydriver[/bold] wrote: This man should get at least double that sentence WITHOUT parole.. Thug![/p][/quote]Agreed. Lewis Gill may God forgive you. Your a moron and evil. Daz101978
  • Score: 15

12:03pm Wed 7 May 14

stevobath says...

Considering Gill was already a violent offender, I'm astounded he got this sentence?

He could be out in 2 years. Is that all a human life is worth?

I bet if it had been an off duty copper or establishment figure who'd been killed the sentence would've been tougher?

It's a joke sentence
Considering Gill was already a violent offender, I'm astounded he got this sentence? He could be out in 2 years. Is that all a human life is worth? I bet if it had been an off duty copper or establishment figure who'd been killed the sentence would've been tougher? It's a joke sentence stevobath
  • Score: 40

12:03pm Wed 7 May 14

alasdair1967 says...

Yet another spineless judge !
Yet another spineless judge ! alasdair1967
  • Score: 32

12:13pm Wed 7 May 14

afcbtintin says...

absolutely disgusting. This guy will probably be in an open prison within a year and if he hasn't already escaped be let free in two.

What happened to real JUSTICE ?
absolutely disgusting. This guy will probably be in an open prison within a year and if he hasn't already escaped be let free in two. What happened to real JUSTICE ? afcbtintin
  • Score: 32

12:17pm Wed 7 May 14

Roy S says...

The judge should have the option of a death sentence.
Once several of these mindless morons who kill have been hung then they will think twice (maybe) before taking life so cheaply.
The judge should have the option of a death sentence. Once several of these mindless morons who kill have been hung then they will think twice (maybe) before taking life so cheaply. Roy S
  • Score: 21

12:29pm Wed 7 May 14

Wesoblind says...

This country has had it, time to stop whimpering and get the system changed!
This country has had it, time to stop whimpering and get the system changed! Wesoblind
  • Score: 34

12:41pm Wed 7 May 14

mw2010 says...

4 YEARS OUT IN 2 IS THAT ALL A PERSONS LIFE IS WORTH NOW, PROBABLY GET MORE FOR TAX EVASION
4 YEARS OUT IN 2 IS THAT ALL A PERSONS LIFE IS WORTH NOW, PROBABLY GET MORE FOR TAX EVASION mw2010
  • Score: 37

12:47pm Wed 7 May 14

ProudofBoscombe says...

Daz101978 wrote:
Controversial But True wrote:
Did the victim make a racist remark for sure, or was this just the offender's excuse for an appalling act? I could probably try and understand if there were independent witnesses stating this rather than just the offender's friend!
Racist? What evidence drew you to that question?
Ridiculous. Violence is a sign ones lost control and is NEVER justified.
Lewis Gill is a man of low intelligence and evil too.
Reports of the incident mentioned that the victim had shouted out "go back to the jungle!".

We weren't there, we weren't at the trial to hear if any witnesses were called. National media reports made no mention of this.
[quote][p][bold]Daz101978[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Controversial But True[/bold] wrote: Did the victim make a racist remark for sure, or was this just the offender's excuse for an appalling act? I could probably try and understand if there were independent witnesses stating this rather than just the offender's friend![/p][/quote]Racist? What evidence drew you to that question? Ridiculous. Violence is a sign ones lost control and is NEVER justified. Lewis Gill is a man of low intelligence and evil too.[/p][/quote]Reports of the incident mentioned that the victim had shouted out "go back to the jungle!". We weren't there, we weren't at the trial to hear if any witnesses were called. National media reports made no mention of this. ProudofBoscombe
  • Score: 4

12:52pm Wed 7 May 14

Adrian XX says...

Daz101978 wrote:
Controversial But True wrote:
Did the victim make a racist remark for sure, or was this just the offender's excuse for an appalling act? I could probably try and understand if there were independent witnesses stating this rather than just the offender's friend!
Racist? What evidence drew you to that question?
Ridiculous. Violence is a sign ones lost control and is NEVER justified.
Lewis Gill is a man of low intelligence and evil too.
I agree that violence is never justified. However, the level of provocation is taken into account in determining the sentence. The CPS sentencing guidelines state "the intensity, extent and nature of the loss of control must be assessed in the context of the provocation that preceded it.". Google that phrase for more information.
[quote][p][bold]Daz101978[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Controversial But True[/bold] wrote: Did the victim make a racist remark for sure, or was this just the offender's excuse for an appalling act? I could probably try and understand if there were independent witnesses stating this rather than just the offender's friend![/p][/quote]Racist? What evidence drew you to that question? Ridiculous. Violence is a sign ones lost control and is NEVER justified. Lewis Gill is a man of low intelligence and evil too.[/p][/quote]I agree that violence is never justified. However, the level of provocation is taken into account in determining the sentence. The CPS sentencing guidelines state "the intensity, extent and nature of the loss of control must be assessed in the context of the provocation that preceded it.". Google that phrase for more information. Adrian XX
  • Score: 1

12:54pm Wed 7 May 14

Frank28 says...

This country becomes more lawless, as we are soft on crime, and even softer on punishment. People who commit murder on the streets should be removed from society for a much longer period. People should be able to walk down the street without the fear of becoming another victim of crime.
This country becomes more lawless, as we are soft on crime, and even softer on punishment. People who commit murder on the streets should be removed from society for a much longer period. People should be able to walk down the street without the fear of becoming another victim of crime. Frank28
  • Score: 26

1:06pm Wed 7 May 14

muscliffman says...

What a 'justice' system we have these days, how could they have decided the first sentence was adequate when the general public they are supposed to be serving so clearly thought not?

Meanwhile in breaking news..... the guy serving thirteen life sentences that this same UK 'justice' system put into an open prison - which he predictably walked away from, is now alleged to have today held up another Building Society only a few miles away from the open prison!

What IS going on?
What a 'justice' system we have these days, how could they have decided the first sentence was adequate when the general public they are supposed to be serving so clearly thought not? Meanwhile in breaking news..... the guy serving thirteen life sentences that this same UK 'justice' system put into an open prison - which he predictably walked away from, is now alleged to have today held up another Building Society only a few miles away from the open prison! What IS going on? muscliffman
  • Score: 24

1:08pm Wed 7 May 14

echor23 says...

Wow how much was the judge offered to not increase sentence then! What a wonderful judge to feel that four years is enough for a murderer!!! They wonder why our country is such a disgrace!!! I wonder if four years would be enough if it was his son?!!!
Wow how much was the judge offered to not increase sentence then! What a wonderful judge to feel that four years is enough for a murderer!!! They wonder why our country is such a disgrace!!! I wonder if four years would be enough if it was his son?!!! echor23
  • Score: 24

1:47pm Wed 7 May 14

master plan says...

Looking at sentences around the world for the same thing, 10 years minimum plus in some untried it's a death sentence but not here he'll be out in 18mths on licence
THIS COUNTRY IS A JOKE!
Looking at sentences around the world for the same thing, 10 years minimum plus in some untried it's a death sentence but not here he'll be out in 18mths on licence THIS COUNTRY IS A JOKE! master plan
  • Score: 24

1:49pm Wed 7 May 14

Buddles says...

Looking at the CCTV footage again: This was no "shove" that caused the victim to fall or stagger backwards, it was a haymaker-type punch. He almost looked like as if he was going to hit him again but realised that his victim had fallen immediately to the ground, striking his head.
The perp then walked off and looked behind....he knew that his victim was out for the count.
Agree with others, the sentence should be doubled...at LEAST.
Looking at the CCTV footage again: This was no "shove" that caused the victim to fall or stagger backwards, it was a haymaker-type punch. He almost looked like as if he was going to hit him again but realised that his victim had fallen immediately to the ground, striking his head. The perp then walked off and looked behind....he knew that his victim was out for the count. Agree with others, the sentence should be doubled...at LEAST. Buddles
  • Score: 26

2:12pm Wed 7 May 14

afcbtintin says...

speedy231278 wrote:
While I agree with the sentiment, this sets a dangerous precedent. A judge has passed sentence, and now public opinion has effectively or physically brought the accused back to court for potential changes to it. What then for other cases that the public might think resulted in too lenient or too heavy a sentence? Will the public now become judge, jury and executioner in every case in the media spotlight? What might happen to unpopular public figures who are convicted of crimes? Might we see a certain local 'businessman' convicted, given a light sentence, and then a public outcry see that extended (hopefully!), or should it be left in the court?
so do you think that public opinion shouldn't have brought Stuart Hall back to court when he had his sentence increased ?
[quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: While I agree with the sentiment, this sets a dangerous precedent. A judge has passed sentence, and now public opinion has effectively or physically brought the accused back to court for potential changes to it. What then for other cases that the public might think resulted in too lenient or too heavy a sentence? Will the public now become judge, jury and executioner in every case in the media spotlight? What might happen to unpopular public figures who are convicted of crimes? Might we see a certain local 'businessman' convicted, given a light sentence, and then a public outcry see that extended (hopefully!), or should it be left in the court?[/p][/quote]so do you think that public opinion shouldn't have brought Stuart Hall back to court when he had his sentence increased ? afcbtintin
  • Score: 12

2:12pm Wed 7 May 14

DorsetKnobber says...

I'd like to see him support the 'one punch can kill' campaign when he is released, and share his experience with schools and youth centres, more than I would like to see him recieve yet more years in jail financed by my taxes.
I'd like to see him support the 'one punch can kill' campaign when he is released, and share his experience with schools and youth centres, more than I would like to see him recieve yet more years in jail financed by my taxes. DorsetKnobber
  • Score: -9

2:19pm Wed 7 May 14

speedy231278 says...

afcbtintin wrote:
speedy231278 wrote:
While I agree with the sentiment, this sets a dangerous precedent. A judge has passed sentence, and now public opinion has effectively or physically brought the accused back to court for potential changes to it. What then for other cases that the public might think resulted in too lenient or too heavy a sentence? Will the public now become judge, jury and executioner in every case in the media spotlight? What might happen to unpopular public figures who are convicted of crimes? Might we see a certain local 'businessman' convicted, given a light sentence, and then a public outcry see that extended (hopefully!), or should it be left in the court?
so do you think that public opinion shouldn't have brought Stuart Hall back to court when he had his sentence increased ?
The public do not know all the facts, they are simply told what the media wants them to know. For example, the mainstream media on the case this article about does not mention the allegation of racial abuse that caused the convicted party to strike the victim. We do not know if this was true or not. So we cannot judge. If Stuart Hall's sentence was thought to be unduly lenient, a complaint should be brought about by the victims, not people who read the newspapers.
[quote][p][bold]afcbtintin[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: While I agree with the sentiment, this sets a dangerous precedent. A judge has passed sentence, and now public opinion has effectively or physically brought the accused back to court for potential changes to it. What then for other cases that the public might think resulted in too lenient or too heavy a sentence? Will the public now become judge, jury and executioner in every case in the media spotlight? What might happen to unpopular public figures who are convicted of crimes? Might we see a certain local 'businessman' convicted, given a light sentence, and then a public outcry see that extended (hopefully!), or should it be left in the court?[/p][/quote]so do you think that public opinion shouldn't have brought Stuart Hall back to court when he had his sentence increased ?[/p][/quote]The public do not know all the facts, they are simply told what the media wants them to know. For example, the mainstream media on the case this article about does not mention the allegation of racial abuse that caused the convicted party to strike the victim. We do not know if this was true or not. So we cannot judge. If Stuart Hall's sentence was thought to be unduly lenient, a complaint should be brought about by the victims, not people who read the newspapers. speedy231278
  • Score: -1

2:33pm Wed 7 May 14

apm1954 says...

oh well do what you want when you want , why bother with the law one big joke.
oh well do what you want when you want , why bother with the law one big joke. apm1954
  • Score: 17

3:01pm Wed 7 May 14

High Treason says...

apm1954 wrote:
oh well do what you want when you want , why bother with the law one big joke.
I believe many dish out their own justice after the courts have dished out their slapped wrist sentences. I would.
[quote][p][bold]apm1954[/bold] wrote: oh well do what you want when you want , why bother with the law one big joke.[/p][/quote]I believe many dish out their own justice after the courts have dished out their slapped wrist sentences. I would. High Treason
  • Score: 18

3:09pm Wed 7 May 14

politicaltrainspotter says...

One cannot understand the emotion and disapointment of the family and friends of Andrew.If they have not been through enough trauma then this decision would hurt deeply.If and that is a 'big' if there was a racist remark then nobody deserves to lose their life.

But it also brings into reservations as to whether being a witness in any future case that we stand in the witness box to see justice done.Clearly in this case, justice has not been done and faith has been lost in the criminal justice system.
One cannot understand the emotion and disapointment of the family and friends of Andrew.If they have not been through enough trauma then this decision would hurt deeply.If and that is a 'big' if there was a racist remark then nobody deserves to lose their life. But it also brings into reservations as to whether being a witness in any future case that we stand in the witness box to see justice done.Clearly in this case, justice has not been done and faith has been lost in the criminal justice system. politicaltrainspotter
  • Score: 19

3:44pm Wed 7 May 14

BmthNewshound says...

The British justice system used to be respected world-wide, not anymore. There appear to be an increasing number of cases where judges have gone soft on sentencing in favour of the criminals. It seems that the human rights of criminals are now given priority over the human rights of their victims, their families and friends.
The British justice system used to be respected world-wide, not anymore. There appear to be an increasing number of cases where judges have gone soft on sentencing in favour of the criminals. It seems that the human rights of criminals are now given priority over the human rights of their victims, their families and friends. BmthNewshound
  • Score: 17

4:12pm Wed 7 May 14

60plus says...

That judge needs to stand down he is not thinking of the victims,I hope that scum does not come back to Bournemouth when released because the same thing might happen to him.
That judge needs to stand down he is not thinking of the victims,I hope that scum does not come back to Bournemouth when released because the same thing might happen to him. 60plus
  • Score: 13

4:18pm Wed 7 May 14

stjxf12 says...

Would the judge think the sentence was Ok if that was his offspring dying in the street because he was punched by a thug. I think not. Justice I think NOT.
Would the judge think the sentence was Ok if that was his offspring dying in the street because he was punched by a thug. I think not. Justice I think NOT. stjxf12
  • Score: 16

4:59pm Wed 7 May 14

Sagacity says...

If it had been my son killed I would be waiting at the prison gates when the thug is released to deal with him in the way he deserves.
If it had been my son killed I would be waiting at the prison gates when the thug is released to deal with him in the way he deserves. Sagacity
  • Score: 15

5:05pm Wed 7 May 14

O'Reilly says...

Controversial But True wrote:
Did the victim make a racist remark for sure, or was this just the offender's excuse for an appalling act? I could probably try and understand if there were independent witnesses stating this rather than just the offender's friend!
............or maybe, just maybe , his brief 'coached' him.
[quote][p][bold]Controversial But True[/bold] wrote: Did the victim make a racist remark for sure, or was this just the offender's excuse for an appalling act? I could probably try and understand if there were independent witnesses stating this rather than just the offender's friend![/p][/quote]............or maybe, just maybe , his brief 'coached' him. O'Reilly
  • Score: 6

5:07pm Wed 7 May 14

O'Reilly says...

pete woodley wrote:
speedy231278 wrote:
While I agree with the sentiment, this sets a dangerous precedent. A judge has passed sentence, and now public opinion has effectively or physically brought the accused back to court for potential changes to it. What then for other cases that the public might think resulted in too lenient or too heavy a sentence? Will the public now become judge, jury and executioner in every case in the media spotlight? What might happen to unpopular public figures who are convicted of crimes? Might we see a certain local 'businessman' convicted, given a light sentence, and then a public outcry see that extended (hopefully!), or should it be left in the court?
Well thought comment,i wonder how many agree with the sentence being reviewed.Most of us thought it was light,but should we not rely on the judges to give appropriate sentences.
Are you mad....?
[quote][p][bold]pete woodley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: While I agree with the sentiment, this sets a dangerous precedent. A judge has passed sentence, and now public opinion has effectively or physically brought the accused back to court for potential changes to it. What then for other cases that the public might think resulted in too lenient or too heavy a sentence? Will the public now become judge, jury and executioner in every case in the media spotlight? What might happen to unpopular public figures who are convicted of crimes? Might we see a certain local 'businessman' convicted, given a light sentence, and then a public outcry see that extended (hopefully!), or should it be left in the court?[/p][/quote]Well thought comment,i wonder how many agree with the sentence being reviewed.Most of us thought it was light,but should we not rely on the judges to give appropriate sentences.[/p][/quote]Are you mad....? O'Reilly
  • Score: -2

5:11pm Wed 7 May 14

old duffa says...

scum
remember his name ,his face
someones going knock his block off
stay in london u thug
scum remember his name ,his face someones going knock his block off stay in london u thug old duffa
  • Score: 11

5:12pm Wed 7 May 14

old duffa says...

Sagacity says...

If it had been my son killed I would be waiting at the prison gates when the thug is released to deal with him in the way he deserves.

agree,be worth the sentence
Sagacity says... If it had been my son killed I would be waiting at the prison gates when the thug is released to deal with him in the way he deserves. agree,be worth the sentence old duffa
  • Score: 11

5:32pm Wed 7 May 14

SeafaringMan says...

For those criticising "the judge", please not that the Appal Court comprises a panel of three judgs. It's also worthy of note that the national press reports make no mention of the alleged "racist remark".
Also worthy of note t theho's coents misses out ranom letters I have not crrected theis sentence as can be sen!
For those criticising "the judge", please not that the Appal Court comprises a panel of three judgs. It's also worthy of note that the national press reports make no mention of the alleged "racist remark". Also worthy of note t theho's coents misses out ranom letters I have not crrected theis sentence as can be sen! SeafaringMan
  • Score: -6

6:01pm Wed 7 May 14

MMM444 says...

4 years for that, absolute disgrace, no wonder we live in a society like we do, why do the Police even bother, that has got to be one of the most disturbing videos ive seen, who ever sentenced him and upheld this, Hang your sorry head in shame, rant over
4 years for that, absolute disgrace, no wonder we live in a society like we do, why do the Police even bother, that has got to be one of the most disturbing videos ive seen, who ever sentenced him and upheld this, Hang your sorry head in shame, rant over MMM444
  • Score: 7

6:04pm Wed 7 May 14

Yankee1 says...

Well, there it is.

The value of a human life taken in a moment of violence = 4 years (less time served for good behaviour).
Well, there it is. The value of a human life taken in a moment of violence = 4 years (less time served for good behaviour). Yankee1
  • Score: 13

6:08pm Wed 7 May 14

Avengerboy says...

He was also sentenced to 3 months’ imprisonment, to be served consecutively, for an offence of handling stolen goods, and to a further consecutive sentence of 3 months for committing an offence during the operational period of a suspended sentence.
He was also sentenced to 3 months’ imprisonment, to be served consecutively, for an offence of handling stolen goods, and to a further consecutive sentence of 3 months for committing an offence during the operational period of a suspended sentence. Avengerboy
  • Score: 5

6:18pm Wed 7 May 14

pete woodley says...

O'Reilly wrote:
pete woodley wrote:
speedy231278 wrote:
While I agree with the sentiment, this sets a dangerous precedent. A judge has passed sentence, and now public opinion has effectively or physically brought the accused back to court for potential changes to it. What then for other cases that the public might think resulted in too lenient or too heavy a sentence? Will the public now become judge, jury and executioner in every case in the media spotlight? What might happen to unpopular public figures who are convicted of crimes? Might we see a certain local 'businessman' convicted, given a light sentence, and then a public outcry see that extended (hopefully!), or should it be left in the court?
Well thought comment,i wonder how many agree with the sentence being reviewed.Most of us thought it was light,but should we not rely on the judges to give appropriate sentences.
Are you mad....?
No but you obviously are.
[quote][p][bold]O'Reilly[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]pete woodley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: While I agree with the sentiment, this sets a dangerous precedent. A judge has passed sentence, and now public opinion has effectively or physically brought the accused back to court for potential changes to it. What then for other cases that the public might think resulted in too lenient or too heavy a sentence? Will the public now become judge, jury and executioner in every case in the media spotlight? What might happen to unpopular public figures who are convicted of crimes? Might we see a certain local 'businessman' convicted, given a light sentence, and then a public outcry see that extended (hopefully!), or should it be left in the court?[/p][/quote]Well thought comment,i wonder how many agree with the sentence being reviewed.Most of us thought it was light,but should we not rely on the judges to give appropriate sentences.[/p][/quote]Are you mad....?[/p][/quote]No but you obviously are. pete woodley
  • Score: -2

6:19pm Wed 7 May 14

pete woodley says...

O'Reilly wrote:
pete woodley wrote:
speedy231278 wrote:
While I agree with the sentiment, this sets a dangerous precedent. A judge has passed sentence, and now public opinion has effectively or physically brought the accused back to court for potential changes to it. What then for other cases that the public might think resulted in too lenient or too heavy a sentence? Will the public now become judge, jury and executioner in every case in the media spotlight? What might happen to unpopular public figures who are convicted of crimes? Might we see a certain local 'businessman' convicted, given a light sentence, and then a public outcry see that extended (hopefully!), or should it be left in the court?
Well thought comment,i wonder how many agree with the sentence being reviewed.Most of us thought it was light,but should we not rely on the judges to give appropriate sentences.
Are you mad....?
No but you obviously are.
[quote][p][bold]O'Reilly[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]pete woodley[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: While I agree with the sentiment, this sets a dangerous precedent. A judge has passed sentence, and now public opinion has effectively or physically brought the accused back to court for potential changes to it. What then for other cases that the public might think resulted in too lenient or too heavy a sentence? Will the public now become judge, jury and executioner in every case in the media spotlight? What might happen to unpopular public figures who are convicted of crimes? Might we see a certain local 'businessman' convicted, given a light sentence, and then a public outcry see that extended (hopefully!), or should it be left in the court?[/p][/quote]Well thought comment,i wonder how many agree with the sentence being reviewed.Most of us thought it was light,but should we not rely on the judges to give appropriate sentences.[/p][/quote]Are you mad....?[/p][/quote]No but you obviously are. pete woodley
  • Score: -3

6:35pm Wed 7 May 14

Sir Beachy Head says...

The justice system is as fookooked as the immigration system and the 'lets allow anyone to marry anyone system.

I'm pleased I'm not 18 and have to live through this for many many years
The justice system is as fookooked as the immigration system and the 'lets allow anyone to marry anyone system. I'm pleased I'm not 18 and have to live through this for many many years Sir Beachy Head
  • Score: -2

7:14pm Wed 7 May 14

kalebmoledirt says...

Sir Beachy Head wrote:
The justice system is as fookooked as the immigration system and the 'lets allow anyone to marry anyone system.

I'm pleased I'm not 18 and have to live through this for many many years
Enlightening as usual .you need to focus
[quote][p][bold]Sir Beachy Head[/bold] wrote: The justice system is as fookooked as the immigration system and the 'lets allow anyone to marry anyone system. I'm pleased I'm not 18 and have to live through this for many many years[/p][/quote]Enlightening as usual .you need to focus kalebmoledirt
  • Score: -5

7:41pm Wed 7 May 14

O'Reilly says...

Yankee1 wrote:
Well, there it is.

The value of a human life taken in a moment of violence = 4 years (less time served for good behaviour).
Well said............doub
t he would get such leniency in an Arkansas Court...
[quote][p][bold]Yankee1[/bold] wrote: Well, there it is. The value of a human life taken in a moment of violence = 4 years (less time served for good behaviour).[/p][/quote]Well said............doub t he would get such leniency in an Arkansas Court... O'Reilly
  • Score: 0

7:49pm Wed 7 May 14

curryandstella says...

If this awful crime was the other way round, I wonder what the sentence would be? It would be called a racial attack. Not long enough, hope someone gives him what for
If this awful crime was the other way round, I wonder what the sentence would be? It would be called a racial attack. Not long enough, hope someone gives him what for curryandstella
  • Score: 10

8:39pm Wed 7 May 14

News Fanatic says...

This decision is a disgrace. The victim, who was considerably older than his attacker, was not threatening in any way and was not even looking at this thug when he lashed out. Sure he regrets what he did but so do a lot of people who received much longer sentences.
This decision is a disgrace. The victim, who was considerably older than his attacker, was not threatening in any way and was not even looking at this thug when he lashed out. Sure he regrets what he did but so do a lot of people who received much longer sentences. News Fanatic
  • Score: 6

9:16pm Wed 7 May 14

scouserinbmth says...

DorsetKnobber wrote:
I'd like to see him support the 'one punch can kill' campaign when he is released, and share his experience with schools and youth centres, more than I would like to see him recieve yet more years in jail financed by my taxes.
no wonder u call yourself dorsetknobber as you are a knob with your comment, the scum should of got a minimum 15yrs
[quote][p][bold]DorsetKnobber[/bold] wrote: I'd like to see him support the 'one punch can kill' campaign when he is released, and share his experience with schools and youth centres, more than I would like to see him recieve yet more years in jail financed by my taxes.[/p][/quote]no wonder u call yourself dorsetknobber as you are a knob with your comment, the scum should of got a minimum 15yrs scouserinbmth
  • Score: 7

10:45pm Wed 7 May 14

MrEdge says...

Echo! Please stop calling this scumbag the "One-punch Killer". Dirt like this will wear that name like a badge of honour!
Echo! Please stop calling this scumbag the "One-punch Killer". Dirt like this will wear that name like a badge of honour! MrEdge
  • Score: 7

11:58pm Wed 7 May 14

Wageslave says...

shannon2319 wrote:
I knew this man, he was the loveliest man you could meet. A racist remark would be extremely out of character..
This was not my experience when I was ranted at by this man on the street some 3 years before. I live a few streets way and after that day I always crossed the road when I aw him coming.
[quote][p][bold]shannon2319[/bold] wrote: I knew this man, he was the loveliest man you could meet. A racist remark would be extremely out of character..[/p][/quote]This was not my experience when I was ranted at by this man on the street some 3 years before. I live a few streets way and after that day I always crossed the road when I aw him coming. Wageslave
  • Score: -3

8:03am Thu 8 May 14

BIGTONE says...

It's about time these Judges sentencing guideline books were ripped up and re written.
It's about time these Judges sentencing guideline books were ripped up and re written. BIGTONE
  • Score: 6

10:12am Thu 8 May 14

Lord Spring says...

speedy231278 wrote:
While I agree with the sentiment, this sets a dangerous precedent. A judge has passed sentence, and now public opinion has effectively or physically brought the accused back to court for potential changes to it. What then for other cases that the public might think resulted in too lenient or too heavy a sentence? Will the public now become judge, jury and executioner in every case in the media spotlight? What might happen to unpopular public figures who are convicted of crimes? Might we see a certain local 'businessman' convicted, given a light sentence, and then a public outcry see that extended (hopefully!), or should it be left in the court?
If the defence can appeal against a sentence why can not the prosecution, what is good for one is also good for the other
[quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: While I agree with the sentiment, this sets a dangerous precedent. A judge has passed sentence, and now public opinion has effectively or physically brought the accused back to court for potential changes to it. What then for other cases that the public might think resulted in too lenient or too heavy a sentence? Will the public now become judge, jury and executioner in every case in the media spotlight? What might happen to unpopular public figures who are convicted of crimes? Might we see a certain local 'businessman' convicted, given a light sentence, and then a public outcry see that extended (hopefully!), or should it be left in the court?[/p][/quote]If the defence can appeal against a sentence why can not the prosecution, what is good for one is also good for the other Lord Spring
  • Score: 5

1:23pm Thu 8 May 14

liveinhope says...

Should I be saddened that a Morrisons feel the need to advertise their scones before a video showing a man meeting his end in a Charminster gutter
Should I be saddened that a Morrisons feel the need to advertise their scones before a video showing a man meeting his end in a Charminster gutter liveinhope
  • Score: 2

11:47pm Thu 8 May 14

Superuser says...

Maybe if it were judges or their family members and not just normal law
abiding persons who were being murdered by these thugs we would see
some adequate punishments being handed out.
Things obviously work differently on planet justice!
Maybe if it were judges or their family members and not just normal law abiding persons who were being murdered by these thugs we would see some adequate punishments being handed out. Things obviously work differently on planet justice! Superuser
  • Score: 4

5:19pm Sun 11 May 14

RM says...

Yet another example of how out of touch with reality & the 'man in the street' these so-called 'elite' are. Time for changes to the criminal justice system through changes via the ballot box I think.Terrible disappointment for the victim's family.
Yet another example of how out of touch with reality & the 'man in the street' these so-called 'elite' are. Time for changes to the criminal justice system through changes via the ballot box I think.Terrible disappointment for the victim's family. RM
  • Score: 0

7:23am Mon 19 May 14

rudestickers says...

Yet another outrageous decision made by our judicial system. Shows us how insignificant a life is to our judges. Totally gutted for the family. I'm pretty sure if this was a case of tax evasion the sentence would of been a hell of a lot longer. Country is F%%%%d.....
Yet another outrageous decision made by our judicial system. Shows us how insignificant a life is to our judges. Totally gutted for the family. I'm pretty sure if this was a case of tax evasion the sentence would of been a hell of a lot longer. Country is F%%%%d..... rudestickers
  • Score: 0

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