Residents in Poole to be given larger recycling bins in bid to boost recycling rates

The great Poole bin swap – bid to boost recycling figures with new scheme

COLLECTION: Blue bins in Lower Parkstone.

CONSIDERING CASES INDIVIDUALLY: Cllr Xena Dion

First published in News
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THE great Poole bin swap is due to get underway in June as the council starts a massive replacement programme which will take months to complete.

Around 67,500 households in the borough will receive letters this weekend informing them that by the end of the year their 140-litre blue recycling bin will be swapped for a 240-litre bin.

And their 20-year-old large black refuse bin will be replaced by a smaller 180-litre bin. Accompanying this will be The Blue Book, a definitive guide on what can and cannot be recycled.

A government grant of more than £1million aimed at helping councils with a weekly refuse collection means this will be retained along with the two-weekly kerbside recycling collection.

“Recycling costs the council tax payer more than £100 less per tonne,” said Shaun Robson, pictured, head of environmental and consumer protection, Borough of Poole. “That’s between putting things in the black bin and into the blue bin.”

He added; “Part of this message is an environment sustainability message, there’s also a financial message of getting good value for council tax payers. We all know how much pressure our range of services are under.”

With recycling rates remaining steady at around 40 per cent of the town’s waste, they are hoping to increase that figure.

Cllr Xena Dion, cabinet portfolio holder for a prosperous and sustainable Poole said: “There are always exceptions such as people with large families or who have got medical needs and produce additional healthcare waste.”

She said: “We will look at each case individually. Where there are people with additional needs we will consider them.”

Residents will not have to take any action, bins will be swapped on normal collection days, however if a household wishes to retain their small blue bin they should call 01202 261700 by May 23.

Comments (53)

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7:07am Fri 25 Apr 14

master plan says...

So I have a large family and I have the large black bin and blue bin.
The black bin is over flowing every week and I recycle everything!
My blue bin is emptied every 2 weeks which is always over flowing and I take more than half my recycling to recycle points.

Poole council need to buck there ideas up.
So I have a large family and I have the large black bin and blue bin. The black bin is over flowing every week and I recycle everything! My blue bin is emptied every 2 weeks which is always over flowing and I take more than half my recycling to recycle points. Poole council need to buck there ideas up. master plan
  • Score: 15

7:35am Fri 25 Apr 14

Bournemouth Ohec says...

The best set up is the one that New Forest District Council run.

We put rubbish out in black bags, recyclable materials in a clear bag.

No unsightly and unwieldy bins in sight.
The best set up is the one that New Forest District Council run. We put rubbish out in black bags, recyclable materials in a clear bag. No unsightly and unwieldy bins in sight. Bournemouth Ohec
  • Score: -13

7:47am Fri 25 Apr 14

mrpickles69 says...

not sure we can get that many s***y nappys in a blue bin!! have a think about people with family's! sigh
not sure we can get that many s***y nappys in a blue bin!! have a think about people with family's! sigh mrpickles69
  • Score: 1

7:54am Fri 25 Apr 14

AmsterdamMan says...

Complete and utter waste of time! Climate change is a global problem and unless all countries participate any efforts we make will have no effect whatsoever. Unfortunately our government feel they must lead the field in wasting millions and millions and getting nowhere in the so-called global fight.
Complete and utter waste of time! Climate change is a global problem and unless all countries participate any efforts we make will have no effect whatsoever. Unfortunately our government feel they must lead the field in wasting millions and millions and getting nowhere in the so-called global fight. AmsterdamMan
  • Score: 6

8:05am Fri 25 Apr 14

bosco1 says...

The trouble is there are so many different rules for every council around the uk regarding recycling, a simple system that eveyone followed would make sense.
The trouble is there are so many different rules for every council around the uk regarding recycling, a simple system that eveyone followed would make sense. bosco1
  • Score: 10

8:29am Fri 25 Apr 14

Morrigan says...

mrpickles69 wrote:
not sure we can get that many s***y nappys in a blue bin!! have a think about people with family's! sigh
So use towelling ones and stop filling your bin with stuff that does not break down in landfill. Besides, surely dirty nappies don't go into the recycling bins anyway!!
[quote][p][bold]mrpickles69[/bold] wrote: not sure we can get that many s***y nappys in a blue bin!! have a think about people with family's! sigh[/p][/quote]So use towelling ones and stop filling your bin with stuff that does not break down in landfill. Besides, surely dirty nappies don't go into the recycling bins anyway!! Morrigan
  • Score: 23

8:42am Fri 25 Apr 14

The Timelord says...

Welcome to the world of recycling obsessed Borough Councils.
If only the rhetoric and prophecy was that simple....
Welcome to the world of recycling obsessed Borough Councils. If only the rhetoric and prophecy was that simple.... The Timelord
  • Score: 11

9:14am Fri 25 Apr 14

Old Colonial says...

master plan wrote:
So I have a large family and I have the large black bin and blue bin.
The black bin is over flowing every week and I recycle everything!
My blue bin is emptied every 2 weeks which is always over flowing and I take more than half my recycling to recycle points.

Poole council need to buck there ideas up.
People have had large families for generations but didn't produce mountains of trash every week. Start thinking for yourself, what is all this rubbish? Why expect someone else to clear up your mess?
[quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: So I have a large family and I have the large black bin and blue bin. The black bin is over flowing every week and I recycle everything! My blue bin is emptied every 2 weeks which is always over flowing and I take more than half my recycling to recycle points. Poole council need to buck there ideas up.[/p][/quote]People have had large families for generations but didn't produce mountains of trash every week. Start thinking for yourself, what is all this rubbish? Why expect someone else to clear up your mess? Old Colonial
  • Score: 21

9:29am Fri 25 Apr 14

BoscVegas says...

What are they doing with the old bins? surely the environmentally friendly / cost effective way of doing this would have been to change the colours and keep the existing bins. A big sticker on each would suffice.
What are they doing with the old bins? surely the environmentally friendly / cost effective way of doing this would have been to change the colours and keep the existing bins. A big sticker on each would suffice. BoscVegas
  • Score: 23

9:44am Fri 25 Apr 14

BarrHumbug says...

So at the moment Poole residents have a 240lt black bin and a 140lt blue bin and the council propose to take away your two bins and replace them with a 240lt Blue bin and a 140lt black one?

Surely Poole residents have enough intelligence to just be told to swap around the contents of their waste to the other bin?
So at the moment Poole residents have a 240lt black bin and a 140lt blue bin and the council propose to take away your two bins and replace them with a 240lt Blue bin and a 140lt black one? Surely Poole residents have enough intelligence to just be told to swap around the contents of their waste to the other bin? BarrHumbug
  • Score: 19

9:55am Fri 25 Apr 14

rozmister says...

master plan wrote:
So I have a large family and I have the large black bin and blue bin.
The black bin is over flowing every week and I recycle everything!
My blue bin is emptied every 2 weeks which is always over flowing and I take more than half my recycling to recycle points.

Poole council need to buck there ideas up.
It does state in the article that they can make exceptions for large families so why don't you contact them directly? If they supplied large family capacity for everyone you'd have people who lived alone putting everything in the rubbish because they'd have the capacity to do so!
[quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: So I have a large family and I have the large black bin and blue bin. The black bin is over flowing every week and I recycle everything! My blue bin is emptied every 2 weeks which is always over flowing and I take more than half my recycling to recycle points. Poole council need to buck there ideas up.[/p][/quote]It does state in the article that they can make exceptions for large families so why don't you contact them directly? If they supplied large family capacity for everyone you'd have people who lived alone putting everything in the rubbish because they'd have the capacity to do so! rozmister
  • Score: 6

9:57am Fri 25 Apr 14

BoscVegas says...

BarrHumbug wrote:
So at the moment Poole residents have a 240lt black bin and a 140lt blue bin and the council propose to take away your two bins and replace them with a 240lt Blue bin and a 140lt black one?

Surely Poole residents have enough intelligence to just be told to swap around the contents of their waste to the other bin?
Now I know why it's called the echo ;)
[quote][p][bold]BarrHumbug[/bold] wrote: So at the moment Poole residents have a 240lt black bin and a 140lt blue bin and the council propose to take away your two bins and replace them with a 240lt Blue bin and a 140lt black one? Surely Poole residents have enough intelligence to just be told to swap around the contents of their waste to the other bin?[/p][/quote]Now I know why it's called the echo ;) BoscVegas
  • Score: 1

10:48am Fri 25 Apr 14

Maverick1979 says...

BarrHumbug wrote:
So at the moment Poole residents have a 240lt black bin and a 140lt blue bin and the council propose to take away your two bins and replace them with a 240lt Blue bin and a 140lt black one?

Surely Poole residents have enough intelligence to just be told to swap around the contents of their waste to the other bin?
No, no they don't!
[quote][p][bold]BarrHumbug[/bold] wrote: So at the moment Poole residents have a 240lt black bin and a 140lt blue bin and the council propose to take away your two bins and replace them with a 240lt Blue bin and a 140lt black one? Surely Poole residents have enough intelligence to just be told to swap around the contents of their waste to the other bin?[/p][/quote]No, no they don't! Maverick1979
  • Score: 8

10:54am Fri 25 Apr 14

Maverick1979 says...

The Timelord wrote:
Welcome to the world of recycling obsessed Borough Councils.
If only the rhetoric and prophecy was that simple....
I think you'll find that local authorities are dictated to by Central Government, and are told they have to hit certain recycling targets and reduce landfill. Therefore, something has to change. Also there is an element of reducing the deficit in the councils budget, when you consider it costs £100 per tonne to take waste to landfill, it makes sense. And there will be an element of education, as i'm sure all those that swear they recycling everything they can, probably don't.
[quote][p][bold]The Timelord[/bold] wrote: Welcome to the world of recycling obsessed Borough Councils. If only the rhetoric and prophecy was that simple....[/p][/quote]I think you'll find that local authorities are dictated to by Central Government, and are told they have to hit certain recycling targets and reduce landfill. Therefore, something has to change. Also there is an element of reducing the deficit in the councils budget, when you consider it costs £100 per tonne to take waste to landfill, it makes sense. And there will be an element of education, as i'm sure all those that swear they recycling everything they can, probably don't. Maverick1979
  • Score: 5

10:59am Fri 25 Apr 14

Bournemouth Ohec says...

Could those that gave a thumbs down to my comment about using bags instead of bins explain why?

I'd be interested in the reasons.
Could those that gave a thumbs down to my comment about using bags instead of bins explain why? I'd be interested in the reasons. Bournemouth Ohec
  • Score: -7

11:07am Fri 25 Apr 14

Maverick1979 says...

Bournemouth Ohec wrote:
Could those that gave a thumbs down to my comment about using bags instead of bins explain why?

I'd be interested in the reasons.
Where do you store the bin bags prior to collection day?
[quote][p][bold]Bournemouth Ohec[/bold] wrote: Could those that gave a thumbs down to my comment about using bags instead of bins explain why? I'd be interested in the reasons.[/p][/quote]Where do you store the bin bags prior to collection day? Maverick1979
  • Score: 12

11:11am Fri 25 Apr 14

rozmister says...

Bournemouth Ohec wrote:
Could those that gave a thumbs down to my comment about using bags instead of bins explain why?

I'd be interested in the reasons.
I didn't score you down (I don't mind how you prefer your rubbish/recycling) but my biggest concern would be animals. My parents have a similar collection system where they live but they have to store the bags in an outbuilding and then place them under a very thick heavy blanket for collection because otherwise animals like foxes and seagulls rip them wide open and spread waste all over the kerb, grass and road.
[quote][p][bold]Bournemouth Ohec[/bold] wrote: Could those that gave a thumbs down to my comment about using bags instead of bins explain why? I'd be interested in the reasons.[/p][/quote]I didn't score you down (I don't mind how you prefer your rubbish/recycling) but my biggest concern would be animals. My parents have a similar collection system where they live but they have to store the bags in an outbuilding and then place them under a very thick heavy blanket for collection because otherwise animals like foxes and seagulls rip them wide open and spread waste all over the kerb, grass and road. rozmister
  • Score: 15

11:12am Fri 25 Apr 14

Bournemouth Ohec says...

Maverick1979 wrote:
Bournemouth Ohec wrote:
Could those that gave a thumbs down to my comment about using bags instead of bins explain why?

I'd be interested in the reasons.
Where do you store the bin bags prior to collection day?
Fair point.

What I don't have, which my mother does, is a whole load of different coloured bins filling up her small back garden.
[quote][p][bold]Maverick1979[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bournemouth Ohec[/bold] wrote: Could those that gave a thumbs down to my comment about using bags instead of bins explain why? I'd be interested in the reasons.[/p][/quote]Where do you store the bin bags prior to collection day?[/p][/quote]Fair point. What I don't have, which my mother does, is a whole load of different coloured bins filling up her small back garden. Bournemouth Ohec
  • Score: 3

11:13am Fri 25 Apr 14

Bournemouth Ohec says...

rozmister wrote:
Bournemouth Ohec wrote:
Could those that gave a thumbs down to my comment about using bags instead of bins explain why?

I'd be interested in the reasons.
I didn't score you down (I don't mind how you prefer your rubbish/recycling) but my biggest concern would be animals. My parents have a similar collection system where they live but they have to store the bags in an outbuilding and then place them under a very thick heavy blanket for collection because otherwise animals like foxes and seagulls rip them wide open and spread waste all over the kerb, grass and road.
Thanks.
[quote][p][bold]rozmister[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Bournemouth Ohec[/bold] wrote: Could those that gave a thumbs down to my comment about using bags instead of bins explain why? I'd be interested in the reasons.[/p][/quote]I didn't score you down (I don't mind how you prefer your rubbish/recycling) but my biggest concern would be animals. My parents have a similar collection system where they live but they have to store the bags in an outbuilding and then place them under a very thick heavy blanket for collection because otherwise animals like foxes and seagulls rip them wide open and spread waste all over the kerb, grass and road.[/p][/quote]Thanks. Bournemouth Ohec
  • Score: 8

12:28pm Fri 25 Apr 14

muscliffman says...

I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest.

Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.
I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest. Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work. muscliffman
  • Score: 0

12:52pm Fri 25 Apr 14

leotuttle says...

I grew up in a family of 7 and all we had was an old fashioned tin dustbin which was emptied once a week. The reason why we have to recycle is because the supermarkets produce to much packaging. Liquids such as milk, beer, soft drinks where sold in reusable bottles which often had a deposit on them. Produce was sold without being surrounded by plastic, nets and other surplus packing.
I grew up in a family of 7 and all we had was an old fashioned tin dustbin which was emptied once a week. The reason why we have to recycle is because the supermarkets produce to much packaging. Liquids such as milk, beer, soft drinks where sold in reusable bottles which often had a deposit on them. Produce was sold without being surrounded by plastic, nets and other surplus packing. leotuttle
  • Score: 20

1:00pm Fri 25 Apr 14

rozmister says...

muscliffman wrote:
I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest.

Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.
The cost of running a dirty MRF to sort all the rubbish & recycling if it's mixed together is extremely high and the quality of the recycling is often compromised meaning it is worth less at resale.

The reason recycling is so important to LAs is that it is a much cheaper method of disposal than the old method of everything in one bin. If council tax is to stay at a manageable levels cuts have to be made somewhere; separate your recycling or pay more for your refuse & recycling collections.
[quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest. Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.[/p][/quote]The cost of running a dirty MRF to sort all the rubbish & recycling if it's mixed together is extremely high and the quality of the recycling is often compromised meaning it is worth less at resale. The reason recycling is so important to LAs is that it is a much cheaper method of disposal than the old method of everything in one bin. If council tax is to stay at a manageable levels cuts have to be made somewhere; separate your recycling or pay more for your refuse & recycling collections. rozmister
  • Score: 7

1:36pm Fri 25 Apr 14

O'Reilly says...

Bournemouth Ohec wrote:
The best set up is the one that New Forest District Council run.

We put rubbish out in black bags, recyclable materials in a clear bag.

No unsightly and unwieldy bins in sight.
Totally agree with you.....I have seen New Forest DC binmen in action and I've always maintained this was the best and easiest collection method.
[quote][p][bold]Bournemouth Ohec[/bold] wrote: The best set up is the one that New Forest District Council run. We put rubbish out in black bags, recyclable materials in a clear bag. No unsightly and unwieldy bins in sight.[/p][/quote]Totally agree with you.....I have seen New Forest DC binmen in action and I've always maintained this was the best and easiest collection method. O'Reilly
  • Score: 0

2:01pm Fri 25 Apr 14

master plan says...

Old Colonial wrote:
master plan wrote:
So I have a large family and I have the large black bin and blue bin.
The black bin is over flowing every week and I recycle everything!
My blue bin is emptied every 2 weeks which is always over flowing and I take more than half my recycling to recycle points.

Poole council need to buck there ideas up.
People have had large families for generations but didn't produce mountains of trash every week. Start thinking for yourself, what is all this rubbish? Why expect someone else to clear up your mess?
Ok pleb so you think large family's produce one bag of rubbish a week? I don't think so I don't need to think about it. Anyway it's simple I pay my council tax so if the black bin is full there's a blue bin give some one a job they can sort it out!!!!
Thank old colonial you helped me out you pleb!!!
[quote][p][bold]Old Colonial[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: So I have a large family and I have the large black bin and blue bin. The black bin is over flowing every week and I recycle everything! My blue bin is emptied every 2 weeks which is always over flowing and I take more than half my recycling to recycle points. Poole council need to buck there ideas up.[/p][/quote]People have had large families for generations but didn't produce mountains of trash every week. Start thinking for yourself, what is all this rubbish? Why expect someone else to clear up your mess?[/p][/quote]Ok pleb so you think large family's produce one bag of rubbish a week? I don't think so I don't need to think about it. Anyway it's simple I pay my council tax so if the black bin is full there's a blue bin give some one a job they can sort it out!!!! Thank old colonial you helped me out you pleb!!! master plan
  • Score: -12

2:01pm Fri 25 Apr 14

master plan says...

Old Colonial wrote:
master plan wrote:
So I have a large family and I have the large black bin and blue bin.
The black bin is over flowing every week and I recycle everything!
My blue bin is emptied every 2 weeks which is always over flowing and I take more than half my recycling to recycle points.

Poole council need to buck there ideas up.
People have had large families for generations but didn't produce mountains of trash every week. Start thinking for yourself, what is all this rubbish? Why expect someone else to clear up your mess?
Ok pleb so you think large family's produce one bag of rubbish a week? I don't think so I don't need to think about it. Anyway it's simple I pay my council tax so if the black bin is full there's a blue bin give some one a job they can sort it out!!!!
Thank old colonial you helped me out you pleb!!!
[quote][p][bold]Old Colonial[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: So I have a large family and I have the large black bin and blue bin. The black bin is over flowing every week and I recycle everything! My blue bin is emptied every 2 weeks which is always over flowing and I take more than half my recycling to recycle points. Poole council need to buck there ideas up.[/p][/quote]People have had large families for generations but didn't produce mountains of trash every week. Start thinking for yourself, what is all this rubbish? Why expect someone else to clear up your mess?[/p][/quote]Ok pleb so you think large family's produce one bag of rubbish a week? I don't think so I don't need to think about it. Anyway it's simple I pay my council tax so if the black bin is full there's a blue bin give some one a job they can sort it out!!!! Thank old colonial you helped me out you pleb!!! master plan
  • Score: -11

2:06pm Fri 25 Apr 14

muscliffman says...

rozmister wrote:
muscliffman wrote:
I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest.

Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.
The cost of running a dirty MRF to sort all the rubbish & recycling if it's mixed together is extremely high and the quality of the recycling is often compromised meaning it is worth less at resale.

The reason recycling is so important to LAs is that it is a much cheaper method of disposal than the old method of everything in one bin. If council tax is to stay at a manageable levels cuts have to be made somewhere; separate your recycling or pay more for your refuse & recycling collections.
Of course that is correct, but only if we presume that we are going to embrace all of the 'green' and mostly EU imposed regulations being continually forced open us all without asking a single perfectly reasonable question about them.
[quote][p][bold]rozmister[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest. Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.[/p][/quote]The cost of running a dirty MRF to sort all the rubbish & recycling if it's mixed together is extremely high and the quality of the recycling is often compromised meaning it is worth less at resale. The reason recycling is so important to LAs is that it is a much cheaper method of disposal than the old method of everything in one bin. If council tax is to stay at a manageable levels cuts have to be made somewhere; separate your recycling or pay more for your refuse & recycling collections.[/p][/quote]Of course that is correct, but only if we presume that we are going to embrace all of the 'green' and mostly EU imposed regulations being continually forced open us all without asking a single perfectly reasonable question about them. muscliffman
  • Score: -1

2:12pm Fri 25 Apr 14

Teddy 1 says...

If it aint broke why change it. Do they really think people will recycle more than they do. Keep the cash and spend it on keeping dementia home places openninstead of closing them!
If it aint broke why change it. Do they really think people will recycle more than they do. Keep the cash and spend it on keeping dementia home places openninstead of closing them! Teddy 1
  • Score: 4

2:13pm Fri 25 Apr 14

Teddy 1 says...

Someone needs to set up a facebook campaign to stop this happening. People power!
Someone needs to set up a facebook campaign to stop this happening. People power! Teddy 1
  • Score: -2

2:25pm Fri 25 Apr 14

Dorset_villager says...

Cllr Xena Dion = Service degradation

I have a small recycling bin and a large black bin and that works for me so why do we HAVE to change
Cllr Xena Dion = Service degradation I have a small recycling bin and a large black bin and that works for me so why do we HAVE to change Dorset_villager
  • Score: 2

2:37pm Fri 25 Apr 14

master plan says...

If your going to go down the recycle route poole council may I make a suggestion as I have seen this in a few places

Small black bin = household waste non recyclable
Blue bin =cardboard, glass and plastic
Brown bin = food waste/compost
Green bin = garden waste
If your going to go down the recycle route poole council may I make a suggestion as I have seen this in a few places Small black bin = household waste non recyclable Blue bin =cardboard, glass and plastic Brown bin = food waste/compost Green bin = garden waste master plan
  • Score: -7

3:44pm Fri 25 Apr 14

rozmister says...

master plan wrote:
Old Colonial wrote:
master plan wrote:
So I have a large family and I have the large black bin and blue bin.
The black bin is over flowing every week and I recycle everything!
My blue bin is emptied every 2 weeks which is always over flowing and I take more than half my recycling to recycle points.

Poole council need to buck there ideas up.
People have had large families for generations but didn't produce mountains of trash every week. Start thinking for yourself, what is all this rubbish? Why expect someone else to clear up your mess?
Ok pleb so you think large family's produce one bag of rubbish a week? I don't think so I don't need to think about it. Anyway it's simple I pay my council tax so if the black bin is full there's a blue bin give some one a job they can sort it out!!!!
Thank old colonial you helped me out you pleb!!!
Why should everyone else who pays council tax subsidise disposing of your contaminated recycling? Recycling is significantly cheaper than disposing of refuse, it's needed to make the books balance. If everyone was so selfish they contaminated their recycling rather than going through the correct channels to request an additional bin the bill would be astronomical! And of course it's footed by the single and two people households who pay as much (or nearly as much) council tax as you for significantly less services!
[quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Old Colonial[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: So I have a large family and I have the large black bin and blue bin. The black bin is over flowing every week and I recycle everything! My blue bin is emptied every 2 weeks which is always over flowing and I take more than half my recycling to recycle points. Poole council need to buck there ideas up.[/p][/quote]People have had large families for generations but didn't produce mountains of trash every week. Start thinking for yourself, what is all this rubbish? Why expect someone else to clear up your mess?[/p][/quote]Ok pleb so you think large family's produce one bag of rubbish a week? I don't think so I don't need to think about it. Anyway it's simple I pay my council tax so if the black bin is full there's a blue bin give some one a job they can sort it out!!!! Thank old colonial you helped me out you pleb!!![/p][/quote]Why should everyone else who pays council tax subsidise disposing of your contaminated recycling? Recycling is significantly cheaper than disposing of refuse, it's needed to make the books balance. If everyone was so selfish they contaminated their recycling rather than going through the correct channels to request an additional bin the bill would be astronomical! And of course it's footed by the single and two people households who pay as much (or nearly as much) council tax as you for significantly less services! rozmister
  • Score: 11

3:47pm Fri 25 Apr 14

rozmister says...

muscliffman wrote:
rozmister wrote:
muscliffman wrote:
I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest.

Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.
The cost of running a dirty MRF to sort all the rubbish & recycling if it's mixed together is extremely high and the quality of the recycling is often compromised meaning it is worth less at resale.

The reason recycling is so important to LAs is that it is a much cheaper method of disposal than the old method of everything in one bin. If council tax is to stay at a manageable levels cuts have to be made somewhere; separate your recycling or pay more for your refuse & recycling collections.
Of course that is correct, but only if we presume that we are going to embrace all of the 'green' and mostly EU imposed regulations being continually forced open us all without asking a single perfectly reasonable question about them.
We can question them however we currently aren't in a position to challenge them (at least until after a referendum if we get them) and council's have been taking reduced central government contributions for years now. The sums need to add up this tax year, if we can change the situation in the future then that would change how we go about doing that but it's just rhetorical at present.

The manual cost of sorting recycling at disposal rather than before collection would always make it a more expensive option than recycling & refuse as a separate stream. The cost of landfill would be reduced if we left the EU but is continuing to fill landfills the best way to manage our waste?
[quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]rozmister[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest. Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.[/p][/quote]The cost of running a dirty MRF to sort all the rubbish & recycling if it's mixed together is extremely high and the quality of the recycling is often compromised meaning it is worth less at resale. The reason recycling is so important to LAs is that it is a much cheaper method of disposal than the old method of everything in one bin. If council tax is to stay at a manageable levels cuts have to be made somewhere; separate your recycling or pay more for your refuse & recycling collections.[/p][/quote]Of course that is correct, but only if we presume that we are going to embrace all of the 'green' and mostly EU imposed regulations being continually forced open us all without asking a single perfectly reasonable question about them.[/p][/quote]We can question them however we currently aren't in a position to challenge them (at least until after a referendum if we get them) and council's have been taking reduced central government contributions for years now. The sums need to add up this tax year, if we can change the situation in the future then that would change how we go about doing that but it's just rhetorical at present. The manual cost of sorting recycling at disposal rather than before collection would always make it a more expensive option than recycling & refuse as a separate stream. The cost of landfill would be reduced if we left the EU but is continuing to fill landfills the best way to manage our waste? rozmister
  • Score: 2

5:24pm Fri 25 Apr 14

master plan says...

rozmister wrote:
master plan wrote:
Old Colonial wrote:
master plan wrote:
So I have a large family and I have the large black bin and blue bin.
The black bin is over flowing every week and I recycle everything!
My blue bin is emptied every 2 weeks which is always over flowing and I take more than half my recycling to recycle points.

Poole council need to buck there ideas up.
People have had large families for generations but didn't produce mountains of trash every week. Start thinking for yourself, what is all this rubbish? Why expect someone else to clear up your mess?
Ok pleb so you think large family's produce one bag of rubbish a week? I don't think so I don't need to think about it. Anyway it's simple I pay my council tax so if the black bin is full there's a blue bin give some one a job they can sort it out!!!!
Thank old colonial you helped me out you pleb!!!
Why should everyone else who pays council tax subsidise disposing of your contaminated recycling? Recycling is significantly cheaper than disposing of refuse, it's needed to make the books balance. If everyone was so selfish they contaminated their recycling rather than going through the correct channels to request an additional bin the bill would be astronomical! And of course it's footed by the single and two people households who pay as much (or nearly as much) council tax as you for significantly less services!
I was only making a point ! I trash want I can't recycle I have bins that do overflow and I do go to the tips or recycle points to get rid of the overflow if some narrow minded fool thinks I need to think about my waste problem I will react!!
[quote][p][bold]rozmister[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Old Colonial[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: So I have a large family and I have the large black bin and blue bin. The black bin is over flowing every week and I recycle everything! My blue bin is emptied every 2 weeks which is always over flowing and I take more than half my recycling to recycle points. Poole council need to buck there ideas up.[/p][/quote]People have had large families for generations but didn't produce mountains of trash every week. Start thinking for yourself, what is all this rubbish? Why expect someone else to clear up your mess?[/p][/quote]Ok pleb so you think large family's produce one bag of rubbish a week? I don't think so I don't need to think about it. Anyway it's simple I pay my council tax so if the black bin is full there's a blue bin give some one a job they can sort it out!!!! Thank old colonial you helped me out you pleb!!![/p][/quote]Why should everyone else who pays council tax subsidise disposing of your contaminated recycling? Recycling is significantly cheaper than disposing of refuse, it's needed to make the books balance. If everyone was so selfish they contaminated their recycling rather than going through the correct channels to request an additional bin the bill would be astronomical! And of course it's footed by the single and two people households who pay as much (or nearly as much) council tax as you for significantly less services![/p][/quote]I was only making a point ! I trash want I can't recycle I have bins that do overflow and I do go to the tips or recycle points to get rid of the overflow if some narrow minded fool thinks I need to think about my waste problem I will react!! master plan
  • Score: -5

5:57pm Fri 25 Apr 14

Phixer says...

BarrHumbug wrote:
So at the moment Poole residents have a 240lt black bin and a 140lt blue bin and the council propose to take away your two bins and replace them with a 240lt Blue bin and a 140lt black one?

Surely Poole residents have enough intelligence to just be told to swap around the contents of their waste to the other bin?
Yes, but have you ever known a public serpent that trusted the public? This is another public job retention policy to spend your/my/our money without thought for who is paying their salary.
[quote][p][bold]BarrHumbug[/bold] wrote: So at the moment Poole residents have a 240lt black bin and a 140lt blue bin and the council propose to take away your two bins and replace them with a 240lt Blue bin and a 140lt black one? Surely Poole residents have enough intelligence to just be told to swap around the contents of their waste to the other bin?[/p][/quote]Yes, but have you ever known a public serpent that trusted the public? This is another public job retention policy to spend your/my/our money without thought for who is paying their salary. Phixer
  • Score: 1

6:05pm Fri 25 Apr 14

Phixer says...

muscliffman wrote:
I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest.

Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.
Given half a chance, I would take all my excess packaging back to the retailer; it's they that impose all this on us but know **** well that they don't have to pay either for the packaging or the recycling.
[quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest. Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.[/p][/quote]Given half a chance, I would take all my excess packaging back to the retailer; it's they that impose all this on us but know **** well that they don't have to pay either for the packaging or the recycling. Phixer
  • Score: 9

7:03pm Fri 25 Apr 14

Domingo De Santa Clara says...

Phixer wrote:
muscliffman wrote: I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest. Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.
Given half a chance, I would take all my excess packaging back to the retailer; it's they that impose all this on us but know **** well that they don't have to pay either for the packaging or the recycling.
I completely agree that packaging should be reduced at source,it disgusts me the amount of resources wasted on unnecessary packaging.
Not to mention the resources required to recover,transport and process it all.
Death of our planet (and therefore us) by "1000 cuts" is not out of the realm of possibility.
One bin,one collection,and one partly automated recycling/sorting centre for our region would save massive amounts of money.
[quote][p][bold]Phixer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest. Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.[/p][/quote]Given half a chance, I would take all my excess packaging back to the retailer; it's they that impose all this on us but know **** well that they don't have to pay either for the packaging or the recycling.[/p][/quote]I completely agree that packaging should be reduced at source,it disgusts me the amount of resources wasted on unnecessary packaging. Not to mention the resources required to recover,transport and process it all. Death of our planet (and therefore us) by "1000 cuts" is not out of the realm of possibility. One bin,one collection,and one partly automated recycling/sorting centre for our region would save massive amounts of money. Domingo De Santa Clara
  • Score: -2

7:31pm Fri 25 Apr 14

mooninpisces says...

New Earth Solutions' Canford site takes black bin waste from Bournemouth and Dorset, separates out materials that can be recycled or composted, and uses what is left to generate renewable energy.

I wonder why Poole doesn't take advantage of this facility that is located within the borough boundary?

www.newearthsolution
s.co.uk/facilities-p
rojects/microsites/c
anford/
New Earth Solutions' Canford site takes black bin waste from Bournemouth and Dorset, separates out materials that can be recycled or composted, and uses what is left to generate renewable energy. I wonder why Poole doesn't take advantage of this facility that is located within the borough boundary? www.newearthsolution s.co.uk/facilities-p rojects/microsites/c anford/ mooninpisces
  • Score: 0

8:30pm Fri 25 Apr 14

Baysider says...

Phixer wrote:
BarrHumbug wrote:
So at the moment Poole residents have a 240lt black bin and a 140lt blue bin and the council propose to take away your two bins and replace them with a 240lt Blue bin and a 140lt black one?

Surely Poole residents have enough intelligence to just be told to swap around the contents of their waste to the other bin?
Yes, but have you ever known a public serpent that trusted the public? This is another public job retention policy to spend your/my/our money without thought for who is paying their salary.
More of your usual rubbish Phixer, excuse the pun. Everyone's bin is getting old anyway it seems so rather than replace them twice in the space of a few years it makes perfect financial sense to move over to larger recycling bins at the same time. It's about saving money I'd suggest not saving jobs as you oh so predictably put it.
[quote][p][bold]Phixer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BarrHumbug[/bold] wrote: So at the moment Poole residents have a 240lt black bin and a 140lt blue bin and the council propose to take away your two bins and replace them with a 240lt Blue bin and a 140lt black one? Surely Poole residents have enough intelligence to just be told to swap around the contents of their waste to the other bin?[/p][/quote]Yes, but have you ever known a public serpent that trusted the public? This is another public job retention policy to spend your/my/our money without thought for who is paying their salary.[/p][/quote]More of your usual rubbish Phixer, excuse the pun. Everyone's bin is getting old anyway it seems so rather than replace them twice in the space of a few years it makes perfect financial sense to move over to larger recycling bins at the same time. It's about saving money I'd suggest not saving jobs as you oh so predictably put it. Baysider
  • Score: 4

8:51pm Fri 25 Apr 14

apm1954 says...

more waste of money, would it not pay to collect them more often .
more waste of money, would it not pay to collect them more often . apm1954
  • Score: -3

9:59pm Fri 25 Apr 14

rozmister says...

Domingo De Santa Clara wrote:
Phixer wrote:
muscliffman wrote: I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest. Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.
Given half a chance, I would take all my excess packaging back to the retailer; it's they that impose all this on us but know **** well that they don't have to pay either for the packaging or the recycling.
I completely agree that packaging should be reduced at source,it disgusts me the amount of resources wasted on unnecessary packaging.
Not to mention the resources required to recover,transport and process it all.
Death of our planet (and therefore us) by "1000 cuts" is not out of the realm of possibility.
One bin,one collection,and one partly automated recycling/sorting centre for our region would save massive amounts of money.
Recycling already goes to an automated recycling centre - a clean MRF sorts recycling for both Bournemouth & Poole & probably Dorset too.

As mooinpisces mentions Bournemouth's refuse goes to New Earth Solutions and is sorted at a dirty MRF, around 90% is recycled or composted, but this process costs loads more than sending separated recyclables to the clean MRF. It's significantly more expensive per tonne to send refuse to New Earth Solutions so how do you think this system will save money? Recyclables can be sold meaning a council breaks even, refuse will never have that kind of value.
[quote][p][bold]Domingo De Santa Clara[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Phixer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest. Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.[/p][/quote]Given half a chance, I would take all my excess packaging back to the retailer; it's they that impose all this on us but know **** well that they don't have to pay either for the packaging or the recycling.[/p][/quote]I completely agree that packaging should be reduced at source,it disgusts me the amount of resources wasted on unnecessary packaging. Not to mention the resources required to recover,transport and process it all. Death of our planet (and therefore us) by "1000 cuts" is not out of the realm of possibility. One bin,one collection,and one partly automated recycling/sorting centre for our region would save massive amounts of money.[/p][/quote]Recycling already goes to an automated recycling centre - a clean MRF sorts recycling for both Bournemouth & Poole & probably Dorset too. As mooinpisces mentions Bournemouth's refuse goes to New Earth Solutions and is sorted at a dirty MRF, around 90% is recycled or composted, but this process costs loads more than sending separated recyclables to the clean MRF. It's significantly more expensive per tonne to send refuse to New Earth Solutions so how do you think this system will save money? Recyclables can be sold meaning a council breaks even, refuse will never have that kind of value. rozmister
  • Score: 1

10:48pm Fri 25 Apr 14

mooninpisces says...

Mixing in one bin and then trying to sort and separate is probably the worst solution.

Separate and recycle as much as possible (blue bin), then try and recover as much as possible of what remains (black bin) is probably the best.
Mixing in one bin and then trying to sort and separate is probably the worst solution. Separate and recycle as much as possible (blue bin), then try and recover as much as possible of what remains (black bin) is probably the best. mooninpisces
  • Score: 5

12:41am Sat 26 Apr 14

Tony Trent says...

BarrHumbug wrote:
So at the moment Poole residents have a 240lt black bin and a 140lt blue bin and the council propose to take away your two bins and replace them with a 240lt Blue bin and a 140lt black one?

Surely Poole residents have enough intelligence to just be told to swap around the contents of their waste to the other bin?
For some reason the Echo report is wrong. Scrutiny recommended the use of 180 litre black bins and not 140 litre as reported, although that was the original suggestion. The slightly larger bin has been approved by Council and re-affirmed only last Tuesday. I had spotted during the process a rogue draft report that still said 140 ltr but that was pulled. There is the need to reduce the ammount of waste going to landfill as it costs around £126 a ton of your money to dispose of, compared to a potential small income if recycled. As for overfull bins, there are some larger families that seem able to get all their waste in the bins easily, and some smaller families that struggle to contain waste. Simple things like flattening boxes and cans can help, but it is surprising how many people put a box of fresh air in a bin. Though some old black bins (like the one I've had for years) would probably last a lot longer many are failing each week. This is another reason why now is the optimum time for a bin swap - and the Council is using grant money to ease the cost to the Council Tax payers, which may not be there in the future. Hopefully there might be food waste collections to follow in a couple of years when Poole Council replace the current vehicle fleet. Our neighbours in Bournemouth were able to take the process a lot further as they received a much higher grant from what has been dubbed "The Pickles Fund".
[quote][p][bold]BarrHumbug[/bold] wrote: So at the moment Poole residents have a 240lt black bin and a 140lt blue bin and the council propose to take away your two bins and replace them with a 240lt Blue bin and a 140lt black one? Surely Poole residents have enough intelligence to just be told to swap around the contents of their waste to the other bin?[/p][/quote]For some reason the Echo report is wrong. Scrutiny recommended the use of 180 litre black bins and not 140 litre as reported, although that was the original suggestion. The slightly larger bin has been approved by Council and re-affirmed only last Tuesday. I had spotted during the process a rogue draft report that still said 140 ltr but that was pulled. There is the need to reduce the ammount of waste going to landfill as it costs around £126 a ton of your money to dispose of, compared to a potential small income if recycled. As for overfull bins, there are some larger families that seem able to get all their waste in the bins easily, and some smaller families that struggle to contain waste. Simple things like flattening boxes and cans can help, but it is surprising how many people put a box of fresh air in a bin. Though some old black bins (like the one I've had for years) would probably last a lot longer many are failing each week. This is another reason why now is the optimum time for a bin swap - and the Council is using grant money to ease the cost to the Council Tax payers, which may not be there in the future. Hopefully there might be food waste collections to follow in a couple of years when Poole Council replace the current vehicle fleet. Our neighbours in Bournemouth were able to take the process a lot further as they received a much higher grant from what has been dubbed "The Pickles Fund". Tony Trent
  • Score: 2

12:43am Sat 26 Apr 14

Tony Trent says...

bosco1 wrote:
The trouble is there are so many different rules for every council around the uk regarding recycling, a simple system that eveyone followed would make sense.
It all depends on the waste contract you have, even down to what is acceptd for recycling.
[quote][p][bold]bosco1[/bold] wrote: The trouble is there are so many different rules for every council around the uk regarding recycling, a simple system that eveyone followed would make sense.[/p][/quote]It all depends on the waste contract you have, even down to what is acceptd for recycling. Tony Trent
  • Score: 3

6:48am Sat 26 Apr 14

Domingo De Santa Clara says...

rozmister wrote:
Domingo De Santa Clara wrote:
Phixer wrote:
muscliffman wrote: I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest. Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.
Given half a chance, I would take all my excess packaging back to the retailer; it's they that impose all this on us but know **** well that they don't have to pay either for the packaging or the recycling.
I completely agree that packaging should be reduced at source,it disgusts me the amount of resources wasted on unnecessary packaging. Not to mention the resources required to recover,transport and process it all. Death of our planet (and therefore us) by "1000 cuts" is not out of the realm of possibility. One bin,one collection,and one partly automated recycling/sorting centre for our region would save massive amounts of money.
Recycling already goes to an automated recycling centre - a clean MRF sorts recycling for both Bournemouth & Poole & probably Dorset too. As mooinpisces mentions Bournemouth's refuse goes to New Earth Solutions and is sorted at a dirty MRF, around 90% is recycled or composted, but this process costs loads more than sending separated recyclables to the clean MRF. It's significantly more expensive per tonne to send refuse to New Earth Solutions so how do you think this system will save money? Recyclables can be sold meaning a council breaks even, refuse will never have that kind of value.
The savings made by cutting the amount of collection vehicles and staff would outweigh the cost of a single sorting facility.Currently our sorted waste gets transported to Kent for processing.
Surely this can be done locally and shipped abroad from our own port.
The way its done currently means that every housholder is entrusted with sorting their own recycling,i'm sorry to say many just don't give a stuff and will cram anything into the recycling bin.
Our councils get a very low return on mixed recyclables compared to what they could achieve if it was fully separated here.
The waste from this process could still go to New Earth for conversion to energy.
Seems like a win all round for ratepayers and local employment.
[quote][p][bold]rozmister[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Domingo De Santa Clara[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Phixer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest. Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.[/p][/quote]Given half a chance, I would take all my excess packaging back to the retailer; it's they that impose all this on us but know **** well that they don't have to pay either for the packaging or the recycling.[/p][/quote]I completely agree that packaging should be reduced at source,it disgusts me the amount of resources wasted on unnecessary packaging. Not to mention the resources required to recover,transport and process it all. Death of our planet (and therefore us) by "1000 cuts" is not out of the realm of possibility. One bin,one collection,and one partly automated recycling/sorting centre for our region would save massive amounts of money.[/p][/quote]Recycling already goes to an automated recycling centre - a clean MRF sorts recycling for both Bournemouth & Poole & probably Dorset too. As mooinpisces mentions Bournemouth's refuse goes to New Earth Solutions and is sorted at a dirty MRF, around 90% is recycled or composted, but this process costs loads more than sending separated recyclables to the clean MRF. It's significantly more expensive per tonne to send refuse to New Earth Solutions so how do you think this system will save money? Recyclables can be sold meaning a council breaks even, refuse will never have that kind of value.[/p][/quote]The savings made by cutting the amount of collection vehicles and staff would outweigh the cost of a single sorting facility.Currently our sorted waste gets transported to Kent for processing. Surely this can be done locally and shipped abroad from our own port. The way its done currently means that every housholder is entrusted with sorting their own recycling,i'm sorry to say many just don't give a stuff and will cram anything into the recycling bin. Our councils get a very low return on mixed recyclables compared to what they could achieve if it was fully separated here. The waste from this process could still go to New Earth for conversion to energy. Seems like a win all round for ratepayers and local employment. Domingo De Santa Clara
  • Score: 0

12:14pm Sat 26 Apr 14

Claris says...

Will Poole Council rethink their rubbish collection policy over the Christmas holiday when you can miss up to three collections at a time of year when waste is at a premium? Bournemouth Council manage to collect as normal - maybe they should take over the whole area?
Will Poole Council rethink their rubbish collection policy over the Christmas holiday when you can miss up to three collections at a time of year when waste is at a premium? Bournemouth Council manage to collect as normal - maybe they should take over the whole area? Claris
  • Score: -1

3:28pm Sat 26 Apr 14

rozmister says...

Domingo De Santa Clara wrote:
rozmister wrote:
Domingo De Santa Clara wrote:
Phixer wrote:
muscliffman wrote: I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest. Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.
Given half a chance, I would take all my excess packaging back to the retailer; it's they that impose all this on us but know **** well that they don't have to pay either for the packaging or the recycling.
I completely agree that packaging should be reduced at source,it disgusts me the amount of resources wasted on unnecessary packaging. Not to mention the resources required to recover,transport and process it all. Death of our planet (and therefore us) by "1000 cuts" is not out of the realm of possibility. One bin,one collection,and one partly automated recycling/sorting centre for our region would save massive amounts of money.
Recycling already goes to an automated recycling centre - a clean MRF sorts recycling for both Bournemouth & Poole & probably Dorset too. As mooinpisces mentions Bournemouth's refuse goes to New Earth Solutions and is sorted at a dirty MRF, around 90% is recycled or composted, but this process costs loads more than sending separated recyclables to the clean MRF. It's significantly more expensive per tonne to send refuse to New Earth Solutions so how do you think this system will save money? Recyclables can be sold meaning a council breaks even, refuse will never have that kind of value.
The savings made by cutting the amount of collection vehicles and staff would outweigh the cost of a single sorting facility.Currently our sorted waste gets transported to Kent for processing.
Surely this can be done locally and shipped abroad from our own port.
The way its done currently means that every housholder is entrusted with sorting their own recycling,i'm sorry to say many just don't give a stuff and will cram anything into the recycling bin.
Our councils get a very low return on mixed recyclables compared to what they could achieve if it was fully separated here.
The waste from this process could still go to New Earth for conversion to energy.
Seems like a win all round for ratepayers and local employment.
They're in the process of putting a clean MRF in Dorset run by Bournemouth Council & Dorset Waste Partnership. They received funding well over a year so they're already doing exactly as you suggest.

The cost of collections is not more than disposal if it all went in one stream and the vehicles don't have the spare capacity to carry extra rubbish. Your talking about fitting nearly double the volume into vehicles that are on full capacity rounds ( often collecting 2 full loads per day). You'd be sending rubbish trucks out for twice as long negating any financial benefits.
[quote][p][bold]Domingo De Santa Clara[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]rozmister[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Domingo De Santa Clara[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Phixer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest. Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.[/p][/quote]Given half a chance, I would take all my excess packaging back to the retailer; it's they that impose all this on us but know **** well that they don't have to pay either for the packaging or the recycling.[/p][/quote]I completely agree that packaging should be reduced at source,it disgusts me the amount of resources wasted on unnecessary packaging. Not to mention the resources required to recover,transport and process it all. Death of our planet (and therefore us) by "1000 cuts" is not out of the realm of possibility. One bin,one collection,and one partly automated recycling/sorting centre for our region would save massive amounts of money.[/p][/quote]Recycling already goes to an automated recycling centre - a clean MRF sorts recycling for both Bournemouth & Poole & probably Dorset too. As mooinpisces mentions Bournemouth's refuse goes to New Earth Solutions and is sorted at a dirty MRF, around 90% is recycled or composted, but this process costs loads more than sending separated recyclables to the clean MRF. It's significantly more expensive per tonne to send refuse to New Earth Solutions so how do you think this system will save money? Recyclables can be sold meaning a council breaks even, refuse will never have that kind of value.[/p][/quote]The savings made by cutting the amount of collection vehicles and staff would outweigh the cost of a single sorting facility.Currently our sorted waste gets transported to Kent for processing. Surely this can be done locally and shipped abroad from our own port. The way its done currently means that every housholder is entrusted with sorting their own recycling,i'm sorry to say many just don't give a stuff and will cram anything into the recycling bin. Our councils get a very low return on mixed recyclables compared to what they could achieve if it was fully separated here. The waste from this process could still go to New Earth for conversion to energy. Seems like a win all round for ratepayers and local employment.[/p][/quote]They're in the process of putting a clean MRF in Dorset run by Bournemouth Council & Dorset Waste Partnership. They received funding well over a year so they're already doing exactly as you suggest. The cost of collections is not more than disposal if it all went in one stream and the vehicles don't have the spare capacity to carry extra rubbish. Your talking about fitting nearly double the volume into vehicles that are on full capacity rounds ( often collecting 2 full loads per day). You'd be sending rubbish trucks out for twice as long negating any financial benefits. rozmister
  • Score: 1

3:38pm Sat 26 Apr 14

spyinthesky says...

Bournemouth Ohec wrote:
Could those that gave a thumbs down to my comment about using bags instead of bins explain why?

I'd be interested in the reasons.
I will tell why New Forest District Council are so inept rats, seagulls, foxes ripping open the bags.
[quote][p][bold]Bournemouth Ohec[/bold] wrote: Could those that gave a thumbs down to my comment about using bags instead of bins explain why? I'd be interested in the reasons.[/p][/quote]I will tell why New Forest District Council are so inept rats, seagulls, foxes ripping open the bags. spyinthesky
  • Score: 2

10:30pm Sat 26 Apr 14

guisselle says...

The Pied Piper is on his merry way the rats to slay!
The Pied Piper is on his merry way the rats to slay! guisselle
  • Score: -2

10:47pm Sat 26 Apr 14

Domingo De Santa Clara says...

rozmister wrote:
Domingo De Santa Clara wrote:
rozmister wrote:
Domingo De Santa Clara wrote:
Phixer wrote:
muscliffman wrote: I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest. Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.
Given half a chance, I would take all my excess packaging back to the retailer; it's they that impose all this on us but know **** well that they don't have to pay either for the packaging or the recycling.
I completely agree that packaging should be reduced at source,it disgusts me the amount of resources wasted on unnecessary packaging. Not to mention the resources required to recover,transport and process it all. Death of our planet (and therefore us) by "1000 cuts" is not out of the realm of possibility. One bin,one collection,and one partly automated recycling/sorting centre for our region would save massive amounts of money.
Recycling already goes to an automated recycling centre - a clean MRF sorts recycling for both Bournemouth & Poole & probably Dorset too. As mooinpisces mentions Bournemouth's refuse goes to New Earth Solutions and is sorted at a dirty MRF, around 90% is recycled or composted, but this process costs loads more than sending separated recyclables to the clean MRF. It's significantly more expensive per tonne to send refuse to New Earth Solutions so how do you think this system will save money? Recyclables can be sold meaning a council breaks even, refuse will never have that kind of value.
The savings made by cutting the amount of collection vehicles and staff would outweigh the cost of a single sorting facility.Currently our sorted waste gets transported to Kent for processing. Surely this can be done locally and shipped abroad from our own port. The way its done currently means that every housholder is entrusted with sorting their own recycling,i'm sorry to say many just don't give a stuff and will cram anything into the recycling bin. Our councils get a very low return on mixed recyclables compared to what they could achieve if it was fully separated here. The waste from this process could still go to New Earth for conversion to energy. Seems like a win all round for ratepayers and local employment.
They're in the process of putting a clean MRF in Dorset run by Bournemouth Council & Dorset Waste Partnership. They received funding well over a year so they're already doing exactly as you suggest. The cost of collections is not more than disposal if it all went in one stream and the vehicles don't have the spare capacity to carry extra rubbish. Your talking about fitting nearly double the volume into vehicles that are on full capacity rounds ( often collecting 2 full loads per day). You'd be sending rubbish trucks out for twice as long negating any financial benefits.
Currently the refuse fleet has 4 man crews,the recycling fleet has 3 man crews as do the green waste fleet.If it was a single pass system the majority of those vehicles and staff would be redundant.It could easily be done with just a smaller refuse fleet with 3 man crews,providing work practices were updated to a similar standard of private industry.
Refuse trucks are a huge investment,you state they currently do two loads a day,why not 4 or 5? They are sitting in a yard for approx. 17 hours a day doing nothing,plus 24 hours a day in the weekend,its laughable that we the ratepayers are forced to pay for such a service.how can this be efficient?
Not to mention the huge infrastructure savings made by only having to provide one bin,and also remove the eyesore of bins taking over every available space around homes and businesses.
As i stated previously,the councils are only getting minimum return on the unsorted recycling collected at the gate,and nil return on recyclables that enter the refuse stream.
Returns would be far greater if it was sorted in one location and clean recycling sent on to the final destination,also cutting out the middle men in the process and maximizing returns.
[quote][p][bold]rozmister[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Domingo De Santa Clara[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]rozmister[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Domingo De Santa Clara[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Phixer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest. Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.[/p][/quote]Given half a chance, I would take all my excess packaging back to the retailer; it's they that impose all this on us but know **** well that they don't have to pay either for the packaging or the recycling.[/p][/quote]I completely agree that packaging should be reduced at source,it disgusts me the amount of resources wasted on unnecessary packaging. Not to mention the resources required to recover,transport and process it all. Death of our planet (and therefore us) by "1000 cuts" is not out of the realm of possibility. One bin,one collection,and one partly automated recycling/sorting centre for our region would save massive amounts of money.[/p][/quote]Recycling already goes to an automated recycling centre - a clean MRF sorts recycling for both Bournemouth & Poole & probably Dorset too. As mooinpisces mentions Bournemouth's refuse goes to New Earth Solutions and is sorted at a dirty MRF, around 90% is recycled or composted, but this process costs loads more than sending separated recyclables to the clean MRF. It's significantly more expensive per tonne to send refuse to New Earth Solutions so how do you think this system will save money? Recyclables can be sold meaning a council breaks even, refuse will never have that kind of value.[/p][/quote]The savings made by cutting the amount of collection vehicles and staff would outweigh the cost of a single sorting facility.Currently our sorted waste gets transported to Kent for processing. Surely this can be done locally and shipped abroad from our own port. The way its done currently means that every housholder is entrusted with sorting their own recycling,i'm sorry to say many just don't give a stuff and will cram anything into the recycling bin. Our councils get a very low return on mixed recyclables compared to what they could achieve if it was fully separated here. The waste from this process could still go to New Earth for conversion to energy. Seems like a win all round for ratepayers and local employment.[/p][/quote]They're in the process of putting a clean MRF in Dorset run by Bournemouth Council & Dorset Waste Partnership. They received funding well over a year so they're already doing exactly as you suggest. The cost of collections is not more than disposal if it all went in one stream and the vehicles don't have the spare capacity to carry extra rubbish. Your talking about fitting nearly double the volume into vehicles that are on full capacity rounds ( often collecting 2 full loads per day). You'd be sending rubbish trucks out for twice as long negating any financial benefits.[/p][/quote]Currently the refuse fleet has 4 man crews,the recycling fleet has 3 man crews as do the green waste fleet.If it was a single pass system the majority of those vehicles and staff would be redundant.It could easily be done with just a smaller refuse fleet with 3 man crews,providing work practices were updated to a similar standard of private industry. Refuse trucks are a huge investment,you state they currently do two loads a day,why not 4 or 5? They are sitting in a yard for approx. 17 hours a day doing nothing,plus 24 hours a day in the weekend,its laughable that we the ratepayers are forced to pay for such a service.how can this be efficient? Not to mention the huge infrastructure savings made by only having to provide one bin,and also remove the eyesore of bins taking over every available space around homes and businesses. As i stated previously,the councils are only getting minimum return on the unsorted recycling collected at the gate,and nil return on recyclables that enter the refuse stream. Returns would be far greater if it was sorted in one location and clean recycling sent on to the final destination,also cutting out the middle men in the process and maximizing returns. Domingo De Santa Clara
  • Score: 0

8:43am Sun 27 Apr 14

Teddy 1 says...

Mr trent. We don't all want bigger blue bins and smaller black wheelie bins. Give people a choice, how many moan that the blue bin is inadequate? I for one am fed up with everything being dumbed down and being told what I want...seems like people in the council are bored in their jobs and just keep thinking of changing things for the sake of it. We in my house certainly dont want slop buckets too and like many in bournemouth will not use them. Three waste bins are by far enough...blue, black and green.
Mr trent. We don't all want bigger blue bins and smaller black wheelie bins. Give people a choice, how many moan that the blue bin is inadequate? I for one am fed up with everything being dumbed down and being told what I want...seems like people in the council are bored in their jobs and just keep thinking of changing things for the sake of it. We in my house certainly dont want slop buckets too and like many in bournemouth will not use them. Three waste bins are by far enough...blue, black and green. Teddy 1
  • Score: -1

11:14pm Sun 27 Apr 14

rozmister says...

Domingo De Santa Clara wrote:
rozmister wrote:
Domingo De Santa Clara wrote:
rozmister wrote:
Domingo De Santa Clara wrote:
Phixer wrote:
muscliffman wrote: I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest. Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.
Given half a chance, I would take all my excess packaging back to the retailer; it's they that impose all this on us but know **** well that they don't have to pay either for the packaging or the recycling.
I completely agree that packaging should be reduced at source,it disgusts me the amount of resources wasted on unnecessary packaging. Not to mention the resources required to recover,transport and process it all. Death of our planet (and therefore us) by "1000 cuts" is not out of the realm of possibility. One bin,one collection,and one partly automated recycling/sorting centre for our region would save massive amounts of money.
Recycling already goes to an automated recycling centre - a clean MRF sorts recycling for both Bournemouth & Poole & probably Dorset too. As mooinpisces mentions Bournemouth's refuse goes to New Earth Solutions and is sorted at a dirty MRF, around 90% is recycled or composted, but this process costs loads more than sending separated recyclables to the clean MRF. It's significantly more expensive per tonne to send refuse to New Earth Solutions so how do you think this system will save money? Recyclables can be sold meaning a council breaks even, refuse will never have that kind of value.
The savings made by cutting the amount of collection vehicles and staff would outweigh the cost of a single sorting facility.Currently our sorted waste gets transported to Kent for processing. Surely this can be done locally and shipped abroad from our own port. The way its done currently means that every housholder is entrusted with sorting their own recycling,i'm sorry to say many just don't give a stuff and will cram anything into the recycling bin. Our councils get a very low return on mixed recyclables compared to what they could achieve if it was fully separated here. The waste from this process could still go to New Earth for conversion to energy. Seems like a win all round for ratepayers and local employment.
They're in the process of putting a clean MRF in Dorset run by Bournemouth Council & Dorset Waste Partnership. They received funding well over a year so they're already doing exactly as you suggest. The cost of collections is not more than disposal if it all went in one stream and the vehicles don't have the spare capacity to carry extra rubbish. Your talking about fitting nearly double the volume into vehicles that are on full capacity rounds ( often collecting 2 full loads per day). You'd be sending rubbish trucks out for twice as long negating any financial benefits.
Currently the refuse fleet has 4 man crews,the recycling fleet has 3 man crews as do the green waste fleet.If it was a single pass system the majority of those vehicles and staff would be redundant.It could easily be done with just a smaller refuse fleet with 3 man crews,providing work practices were updated to a similar standard of private industry.
Refuse trucks are a huge investment,you state they currently do two loads a day,why not 4 or 5? They are sitting in a yard for approx. 17 hours a day doing nothing,plus 24 hours a day in the weekend,its laughable that we the ratepayers are forced to pay for such a service.how can this be efficient?
Not to mention the huge infrastructure savings made by only having to provide one bin,and also remove the eyesore of bins taking over every available space around homes and businesses.
As i stated previously,the councils are only getting minimum return on the unsorted recycling collected at the gate,and nil return on recyclables that enter the refuse stream.
Returns would be far greater if it was sorted in one location and clean recycling sent on to the final destination,also cutting out the middle men in the process and maximizing returns.
If they do four or five loads a day the money saved by having half the labour savings you previously mentioned are instantly lost as you're paying additional crews. Your redundancies wouldn't exist because you'd simply move crew members onto different shifts - you'd have the same volume of waste to collect which needs roughly the same number of staff to get around. Even with less vehicles you're talking about using them out of current hours to pick up a much larger capacity, they couldn't collect in some places an additional 140 - 240l each week and still do the same rounds because of capacity limitations. Maybe 3 crew members on refuse instead of 4 is possible. As well you would need a much larger bin than is currently issued to hold all the refuse/recycling/gre
en waste in one - about 330l per household per week so all new bins would need to be purchased for everyone.

If all your recycling was mixed in with your general kitchen bin there wouldn't be clean recycling - food waste would contaminate newspapers/cardboard and plastic/tins/cartons would all need to be washed before they could be sold on. Green waste would also be contaminated with food meaning it couldn't be processed how it currently is because it could have been in contact with animal products. The savings made by running half your fleet would be negated by the cost of manning a huge dirty MRF where all the refuse is processed and then all useful recyclables (excluding paper/cardboard which is no longer recyclable due to contamination) would need to be cleaned before it could be bundled and sold on.

As I stated the system is constantly evolving, the unsorted recycling will be processed in a different way soon providing a much greater return. This is a much more sensible solution than a complete overhaul on the system that would render a lot of the recyclable materials no longer recyclable and use a huge additional amount of man power negating any savings for sale of recyclable materials.
[quote][p][bold]Domingo De Santa Clara[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]rozmister[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Domingo De Santa Clara[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]rozmister[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Domingo De Santa Clara[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Phixer[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: I rather suspect that one day, at least when some common sense is allowed back into this matter, it will be concluded that the most efficient and truly environmentally friendly method of collecting domestic residential refuse will be to collect it once a week in a single bin. Following this procedure any toxic items and those of significant recycle value would be removed at the point of final landfill or land reclamation disposal - and then mother nature would be left to efficiently and very inexpensively do the rest. Maybe this idea is a little too simple and of course it lacks all of the money making 'green' opportunities and scams, but it most certainly used to work.[/p][/quote]Given half a chance, I would take all my excess packaging back to the retailer; it's they that impose all this on us but know **** well that they don't have to pay either for the packaging or the recycling.[/p][/quote]I completely agree that packaging should be reduced at source,it disgusts me the amount of resources wasted on unnecessary packaging. Not to mention the resources required to recover,transport and process it all. Death of our planet (and therefore us) by "1000 cuts" is not out of the realm of possibility. One bin,one collection,and one partly automated recycling/sorting centre for our region would save massive amounts of money.[/p][/quote]Recycling already goes to an automated recycling centre - a clean MRF sorts recycling for both Bournemouth & Poole & probably Dorset too. As mooinpisces mentions Bournemouth's refuse goes to New Earth Solutions and is sorted at a dirty MRF, around 90% is recycled or composted, but this process costs loads more than sending separated recyclables to the clean MRF. It's significantly more expensive per tonne to send refuse to New Earth Solutions so how do you think this system will save money? Recyclables can be sold meaning a council breaks even, refuse will never have that kind of value.[/p][/quote]The savings made by cutting the amount of collection vehicles and staff would outweigh the cost of a single sorting facility.Currently our sorted waste gets transported to Kent for processing. Surely this can be done locally and shipped abroad from our own port. The way its done currently means that every housholder is entrusted with sorting their own recycling,i'm sorry to say many just don't give a stuff and will cram anything into the recycling bin. Our councils get a very low return on mixed recyclables compared to what they could achieve if it was fully separated here. The waste from this process could still go to New Earth for conversion to energy. Seems like a win all round for ratepayers and local employment.[/p][/quote]They're in the process of putting a clean MRF in Dorset run by Bournemouth Council & Dorset Waste Partnership. They received funding well over a year so they're already doing exactly as you suggest. The cost of collections is not more than disposal if it all went in one stream and the vehicles don't have the spare capacity to carry extra rubbish. Your talking about fitting nearly double the volume into vehicles that are on full capacity rounds ( often collecting 2 full loads per day). You'd be sending rubbish trucks out for twice as long negating any financial benefits.[/p][/quote]Currently the refuse fleet has 4 man crews,the recycling fleet has 3 man crews as do the green waste fleet.If it was a single pass system the majority of those vehicles and staff would be redundant.It could easily be done with just a smaller refuse fleet with 3 man crews,providing work practices were updated to a similar standard of private industry. Refuse trucks are a huge investment,you state they currently do two loads a day,why not 4 or 5? They are sitting in a yard for approx. 17 hours a day doing nothing,plus 24 hours a day in the weekend,its laughable that we the ratepayers are forced to pay for such a service.how can this be efficient? Not to mention the huge infrastructure savings made by only having to provide one bin,and also remove the eyesore of bins taking over every available space around homes and businesses. As i stated previously,the councils are only getting minimum return on the unsorted recycling collected at the gate,and nil return on recyclables that enter the refuse stream. Returns would be far greater if it was sorted in one location and clean recycling sent on to the final destination,also cutting out the middle men in the process and maximizing returns.[/p][/quote]If they do four or five loads a day the money saved by having half the labour savings you previously mentioned are instantly lost as you're paying additional crews. Your redundancies wouldn't exist because you'd simply move crew members onto different shifts - you'd have the same volume of waste to collect which needs roughly the same number of staff to get around. Even with less vehicles you're talking about using them out of current hours to pick up a much larger capacity, they couldn't collect in some places an additional 140 - 240l each week and still do the same rounds because of capacity limitations. Maybe 3 crew members on refuse instead of 4 is possible. As well you would need a much larger bin than is currently issued to hold all the refuse/recycling/gre en waste in one - about 330l per household per week so all new bins would need to be purchased for everyone. If all your recycling was mixed in with your general kitchen bin there wouldn't be clean recycling - food waste would contaminate newspapers/cardboard and plastic/tins/cartons would all need to be washed before they could be sold on. Green waste would also be contaminated with food meaning it couldn't be processed how it currently is because it could have been in contact with animal products. The savings made by running half your fleet would be negated by the cost of manning a huge dirty MRF where all the refuse is processed and then all useful recyclables (excluding paper/cardboard which is no longer recyclable due to contamination) would need to be cleaned before it could be bundled and sold on. As I stated the system is constantly evolving, the unsorted recycling will be processed in a different way soon providing a much greater return. This is a much more sensible solution than a complete overhaul on the system that would render a lot of the recyclable materials no longer recyclable and use a huge additional amount of man power negating any savings for sale of recyclable materials. rozmister
  • Score: -2

10:47am Tue 29 Apr 14

Maverick1979 says...

Teddy 1 wrote:
Mr trent. We don't all want bigger blue bins and smaller black wheelie bins. Give people a choice, how many moan that the blue bin is inadequate? I for one am fed up with everything being dumbed down and being told what I want...seems like people in the council are bored in their jobs and just keep thinking of changing things for the sake of it. We in my house certainly dont want slop buckets too and like many in bournemouth will not use them. Three waste bins are by far enough...blue, black and green.
If people like you are given a choice then what hope does this planet have?
[quote][p][bold]Teddy 1[/bold] wrote: Mr trent. We don't all want bigger blue bins and smaller black wheelie bins. Give people a choice, how many moan that the blue bin is inadequate? I for one am fed up with everything being dumbed down and being told what I want...seems like people in the council are bored in their jobs and just keep thinking of changing things for the sake of it. We in my house certainly dont want slop buckets too and like many in bournemouth will not use them. Three waste bins are by far enough...blue, black and green.[/p][/quote]If people like you are given a choice then what hope does this planet have? Maverick1979
  • Score: 0

2:30pm Thu 8 May 14

Illiterate says...

@@@ Also please note, the smaller 'new' black bins are due to be collected only every other week from November 2016/- @@@

http://ha2.boroughof
poole.com/akspoole/u
sers/public/admin/ka
b12.pl?cmte=COU&meet
=110&arc=71

For details please read C147.14
@@@ Also please note, the smaller 'new' black bins are due to be collected only every other week from November 2016/- @@@ http://ha2.boroughof poole.com/akspoole/u sers/public/admin/ka b12.pl?cmte=COU&meet =110&arc=71 For details please read C147.14 Illiterate
  • Score: 0

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