MP claims Ringwood couple deserve longer jail sentence for benefit fraud

JAILED: Nicola and Bryan Rogers

VIEW: MP Desmond Swayne

GENUINE: MP Chris Chope

First published in News by

A HUSBAND-and-wife benefit cheat couple who enjoyed lavish holidays and spending sprees were lucky not to have got longer jail sentences, an MP has claimed.

“Shopaholic” Nicola Rogers was sentenced to 14 months in prison, while her husband Bryan received nine months for a six-year fraud which between them reached a total of almost £69,000.

The couple of Poplar Way, Ringwood initially claimed benefits legally but then continued to claim while 48-year-old Mr Rogers was working for three family-owned companies, splashing out on luxury holidays, a Range Rover, scuba diving gear and lavish parties.

Desmond Swayne, the MP for New Forest West, said: “My gut view is that cheating on benefits is a serious matter and that message needs to be sent through the sentencing system.

“There’s nothing more infuriating for people who are working hard themselves and up against it, having to pay their bills, having to struggle, than seeing other people cheat the system.

“It’s only right that it should have been a custodial sentence, preferably a longer one.”

And Christchurch MP Chris Chope said: “People who scrounge or deceive the authorities in order to enrich themselves bring the genuine people who are genuine benefit claimants into disrepute.

“It’s very important that the integrity of the system is maintained and that those who are not entitled, do not receive.

“What we need to do is ensure that people who do try and better the system receive deterrent penalties.”

Passing sentence on Mr and Mrs Rogers, Judge John Harrow said: “In my judgement, this was deliberate, calculated, prolonged dishonesty.”

He added their spending, in particular Mrs Rogers’, had been “reckless and unnecessary.”

Comments (21)

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9:15am Sat 19 Apr 14

BournemouthMum says...

Their sentence was appropriate. If he wants harsher sentencing for benefit fraud, he should look closer to home and look at how MPs are dealt with when they fiddle their expenses. The same rules have to apply across the board. And that goes for tax evaders too.
Their sentence was appropriate. If he wants harsher sentencing for benefit fraud, he should look closer to home and look at how MPs are dealt with when they fiddle their expenses. The same rules have to apply across the board. And that goes for tax evaders too. BournemouthMum
  • Score: 52

9:20am Sat 19 Apr 14

drJones says...

BournemouthMum wrote:
Their sentence was appropriate. If he wants harsher sentencing for benefit fraud, he should look closer to home and look at how MPs are dealt with when they fiddle their expenses. The same rules have to apply across the board. And that goes for tax evaders too.
good point
[quote][p][bold]BournemouthMum[/bold] wrote: Their sentence was appropriate. If he wants harsher sentencing for benefit fraud, he should look closer to home and look at how MPs are dealt with when they fiddle their expenses. The same rules have to apply across the board. And that goes for tax evaders too.[/p][/quote]good point drJones
  • Score: 28

9:37am Sat 19 Apr 14

ShuttleX says...

MP's actually have the cheek to point fingers? There has been hundreds, if not thousands of case where MP's have abused the system, yet very few get anything but a smack on the hand. Swayne and Chope would be better off keeping their mouths shut on things like this, as most people will be thinking it's a case of the pot calling the kettle black.
MP's actually have the cheek to point fingers? There has been hundreds, if not thousands of case where MP's have abused the system, yet very few get anything but a smack on the hand. Swayne and Chope would be better off keeping their mouths shut on things like this, as most people will be thinking it's a case of the pot calling the kettle black. ShuttleX
  • Score: 37

10:32am Sat 19 Apr 14

Edna Cheese (Mrs) says...

Hard labour until the amount is repaid would be more like it.
Hard labour until the amount is repaid would be more like it. Edna Cheese (Mrs)
  • Score: 4

10:42am Sat 19 Apr 14

phonehome says...

ShuttleX wrote:
MP's actually have the cheek to point fingers? There has been hundreds, if not thousands of case where MP's have abused the system, yet very few get anything but a smack on the hand. Swayne and Chope would be better off keeping their mouths shut on things like this, as most people will be thinking it's a case of the pot calling the kettle black.
Totally agree!
[quote][p][bold]ShuttleX[/bold] wrote: MP's actually have the cheek to point fingers? There has been hundreds, if not thousands of case where MP's have abused the system, yet very few get anything but a smack on the hand. Swayne and Chope would be better off keeping their mouths shut on things like this, as most people will be thinking it's a case of the pot calling the kettle black.[/p][/quote]Totally agree! phonehome
  • Score: 11

10:50am Sat 19 Apr 14

funkyferret says...

If they had been MP's they would just have been asked to pay it back at a few quid a week "and we'll say nothing more about it".
Regrettably, many MP's have sullied the reputation of the honest hard working others who now bear the brunt of the tarnished expenses scam label.
The Proceeds of Crime Act can be used to recover financial gains, assets and monies.
If they had been MP's they would just have been asked to pay it back at a few quid a week "and we'll say nothing more about it". Regrettably, many MP's have sullied the reputation of the honest hard working others who now bear the brunt of the tarnished expenses scam label. The Proceeds of Crime Act can be used to recover financial gains, assets and monies. funkyferret
  • Score: 14

11:07am Sat 19 Apr 14

John T says...

The MP said: ' There's nothing more infuriating for people working hard themselves and up against it, having to pay their bills, having to struggle, than see other people cheating the system.'
Oh, yes there is, and that is to hear hypocrites like Cheetah Chope pontificating from his taxpayer - paid for Chesterfield, and the likes of Maria Miller and others, claiming that they originally claimed their MPs' benefit correctly and then made mistakes.
I don't recall hearing any of our local MPs calling for a jail sentence of any sort for Ms Miller, or other Conservative MPs, never mind a longer one, when they cheated the system.
The MP said: ' There's nothing more infuriating for people working hard themselves and up against it, having to pay their bills, having to struggle, than see other people cheating the system.' Oh, yes there is, and that is to hear hypocrites like Cheetah Chope pontificating from his taxpayer - paid for Chesterfield, and the likes of Maria Miller and others, claiming that they originally claimed their MPs' benefit correctly and then made mistakes. I don't recall hearing any of our local MPs calling for a jail sentence of any sort for Ms Miller, or other Conservative MPs, never mind a longer one, when they cheated the system. John T
  • Score: 22

11:07am Sat 19 Apr 14

60plus says...

Kettle calling pot black springs to mind.
Kettle calling pot black springs to mind. 60plus
  • Score: 11

11:15am Sat 19 Apr 14

joetheman says...

what a joke, an mp saying sentence was not severe enough, what the fXXX its got do with chope i dont know.he wants to get his **** of his taxpayer funded sofa and do something for the christchurch residents not ringwood
what a joke, an mp saying sentence was not severe enough, what the fXXX its got do with chope i dont know.he wants to get his **** of his taxpayer funded sofa and do something for the christchurch residents not ringwood joetheman
  • Score: 14

12:10pm Sat 19 Apr 14

contric says...

chope was on the comittee that let miller off
chope was on the comittee that let miller off contric
  • Score: 18

2:31pm Sat 19 Apr 14

Alpha 1 Legal says...

It does seem a little 'pot calling kettle black' doesn't it!?
It does seem a little 'pot calling kettle black' doesn't it!? Alpha 1 Legal
  • Score: 6

2:57pm Sat 19 Apr 14

Tango Charlie says...

Apparently Mr. Cameron has said that they have now received a full apology and that “That should be the end of it”.
Or was that a rich person and a member of his cabinet?
Apparently Mr. Cameron has said that they have now received a full apology and that “That should be the end of it”. Or was that a rich person and a member of his cabinet? Tango Charlie
  • Score: 7

3:44pm Sat 19 Apr 14

Tango Charlie says...

Just read Mr. Swayne's parliamentary record. A former Whip, he sat on the gay marriage committee while previously being backed by Christian Action Research and Education (CARE). The same people who claimed you could "cure" homosexuality!
Interesting. Look up “They work for you”.
Just read Mr. Swayne's parliamentary record. A former Whip, he sat on the gay marriage committee while previously being backed by Christian Action Research and Education (CARE). The same people who claimed you could "cure" homosexuality! Interesting. Look up “They work for you”. Tango Charlie
  • Score: 4

4:20pm Sat 19 Apr 14

Tango Charlie says...

Tango Charlie wrote:
Just read Mr. Swayne's parliamentary record. A former Whip, he sat on the gay marriage committee while previously being backed by Christian Action Research and Education (CARE). The same people who claimed you could "cure" homosexuality!
Interesting. Look up “They work for you”.
Delving further into his background. As a former teacher he does not know a lot about the history of our Union Jack.
In his blog “Kilts on the Slope” from 03 January 2014 he talks about Scottish independence and states; “ Would we have to abandon the Union Flag? I am very attached to it, it too fills me with pride wherever I see it flying, and I can’t see any good reason for giving it up. The flag predates the union with Scotland and represents the union of the Scottish and English Crowns under James the First of England and Sixth of Scotland, who succeeded Queen Elizabeth the First in 1603.”

I believe the flag he is actually talking about is the Flag of Great Britain, (Otherwise known as The Kings Colours, or the Union Flag) introduced after the acts of the union in 1707.
The Union Jack, that is flown today, was actually introduced after the introduction of Ireland to the Union in 1801.
But I do take into consideration that he is a TA Major. I know what Majors are like. My Officer Commanding in the Gulf (a Major) nearly started the war 3 weeks before anyone else, just because he could not read a map. We were 2 kn from the front line before an Apache helicopter stopped us and told us to turn back. (Even a private knows that you don't read a compass while within a moving vehicle.)
Lead on Macduff. Those of a lesser knowledge will surly follow.
[quote][p][bold]Tango Charlie[/bold] wrote: Just read Mr. Swayne's parliamentary record. A former Whip, he sat on the gay marriage committee while previously being backed by Christian Action Research and Education (CARE). The same people who claimed you could "cure" homosexuality! Interesting. Look up “They work for you”.[/p][/quote]Delving further into his background. As a former teacher he does not know a lot about the history of our Union Jack. In his blog “Kilts on the Slope” from 03 January 2014 he talks about Scottish independence and states; “ Would we have to abandon the Union Flag? I am very attached to it, it too fills me with pride wherever I see it flying, and I can’t see any good reason for giving it up. The flag predates the union with Scotland and represents the union of the Scottish and English Crowns under James the First of England and Sixth of Scotland, who succeeded Queen Elizabeth the First in 1603.” I believe the flag he is actually talking about is the Flag of Great Britain, (Otherwise known as The Kings Colours, or the Union Flag) introduced after the acts of the union in 1707. The Union Jack, that is flown today, was actually introduced after the introduction of Ireland to the Union in 1801. But I do take into consideration that he is a TA Major. I know what Majors are like. My Officer Commanding in the Gulf (a Major) nearly started the war 3 weeks before anyone else, just because he could not read a map. We were 2 kn from the front line before an Apache helicopter stopped us and told us to turn back. (Even a private knows that you don't read a compass while within a moving vehicle.) Lead on Macduff. Those of a lesser knowledge will surly follow. Tango Charlie
  • Score: 7

4:21pm Sat 19 Apr 14

breamoreboy says...

ShuttleX wrote:
MP's actually have the cheek to point fingers? There has been hundreds, if not thousands of case where MP's have abused the system, yet very few get anything but a smack on the hand. Swayne and Chope would be better off keeping their mouths shut on things like this, as most people will be thinking it's a case of the pot calling the kettle black.
I think that's very harsh. Mr Chope is a very generous employer. I believe that his secretary is on £45,000 per annum, an excellent amount for the Christchurch area. It's merely coincidence that his secretary is also his wife.
[quote][p][bold]ShuttleX[/bold] wrote: MP's actually have the cheek to point fingers? There has been hundreds, if not thousands of case where MP's have abused the system, yet very few get anything but a smack on the hand. Swayne and Chope would be better off keeping their mouths shut on things like this, as most people will be thinking it's a case of the pot calling the kettle black.[/p][/quote]I think that's very harsh. Mr Chope is a very generous employer. I believe that his secretary is on £45,000 per annum, an excellent amount for the Christchurch area. It's merely coincidence that his secretary is also his wife. breamoreboy
  • Score: 13

6:19pm Sat 19 Apr 14

SimonJB says...

MP's that make comments like this prove they have no grip on reality. And yet he'll get voted back in again by the Blue-rinse brigade. How dare those working class commoners take money from the crown (Which by the way I agree is totally wrong and they deserve the sentence handed down) that's our call...New duck pond anyone?
MP's that make comments like this prove they have no grip on reality. And yet he'll get voted back in again by the Blue-rinse brigade. How dare those working class commoners take money from the crown (Which by the way I agree is totally wrong and they deserve the sentence handed down) that's our call...New duck pond anyone? SimonJB
  • Score: 9

8:53pm Sat 19 Apr 14

stevobath says...

Tango Charlie wrote:
Tango Charlie wrote:
Just read Mr. Swayne's parliamentary record. A former Whip, he sat on the gay marriage committee while previously being backed by Christian Action Research and Education (CARE). The same people who claimed you could "cure" homosexuality!
Interesting. Look up “They work for you”.
Delving further into his background. As a former teacher he does not know a lot about the history of our Union Jack.
In his blog “Kilts on the Slope” from 03 January 2014 he talks about Scottish independence and states; “ Would we have to abandon the Union Flag? I am very attached to it, it too fills me with pride wherever I see it flying, and I can’t see any good reason for giving it up. The flag predates the union with Scotland and represents the union of the Scottish and English Crowns under James the First of England and Sixth of Scotland, who succeeded Queen Elizabeth the First in 1603.”

I believe the flag he is actually talking about is the Flag of Great Britain, (Otherwise known as The Kings Colours, or the Union Flag) introduced after the acts of the union in 1707.
The Union Jack, that is flown today, was actually introduced after the introduction of Ireland to the Union in 1801.
But I do take into consideration that he is a TA Major. I know what Majors are like. My Officer Commanding in the Gulf (a Major) nearly started the war 3 weeks before anyone else, just because he could not read a map. We were 2 kn from the front line before an Apache helicopter stopped us and told us to turn back. (Even a private knows that you don't read a compass while within a moving vehicle.)
Lead on Macduff. Those of a lesser knowledge will surly follow.
The 'Union Jack' is only called so when flown at sea.

It's plain old 'Union Flag' on land. :)

The Flag Institute says it was introduced in 1606 & called simply 'The Flag of Britain'
I'm sure the Flag Institute know their stuff?
[quote][p][bold]Tango Charlie[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Tango Charlie[/bold] wrote: Just read Mr. Swayne's parliamentary record. A former Whip, he sat on the gay marriage committee while previously being backed by Christian Action Research and Education (CARE). The same people who claimed you could "cure" homosexuality! Interesting. Look up “They work for you”.[/p][/quote]Delving further into his background. As a former teacher he does not know a lot about the history of our Union Jack. In his blog “Kilts on the Slope” from 03 January 2014 he talks about Scottish independence and states; “ Would we have to abandon the Union Flag? I am very attached to it, it too fills me with pride wherever I see it flying, and I can’t see any good reason for giving it up. The flag predates the union with Scotland and represents the union of the Scottish and English Crowns under James the First of England and Sixth of Scotland, who succeeded Queen Elizabeth the First in 1603.” I believe the flag he is actually talking about is the Flag of Great Britain, (Otherwise known as The Kings Colours, or the Union Flag) introduced after the acts of the union in 1707. The Union Jack, that is flown today, was actually introduced after the introduction of Ireland to the Union in 1801. But I do take into consideration that he is a TA Major. I know what Majors are like. My Officer Commanding in the Gulf (a Major) nearly started the war 3 weeks before anyone else, just because he could not read a map. We were 2 kn from the front line before an Apache helicopter stopped us and told us to turn back. (Even a private knows that you don't read a compass while within a moving vehicle.) Lead on Macduff. Those of a lesser knowledge will surly follow.[/p][/quote]The 'Union Jack' is only called so when flown at sea. It's plain old 'Union Flag' on land. :) The Flag Institute says it was introduced in 1606 & called simply 'The Flag of Britain' I'm sure the Flag Institute know their stuff? stevobath
  • Score: 0

8:58pm Sat 19 Apr 14

stevobath says...

Keep your' beak out Mr Chope. You're an MP, so talking about ripping off tax payers etc is a bit much.

Personally all you MPs & your free mortgages should be stopped.

One rule for you lot another for Joe Public.
Keep your' beak out Mr Chope. You're an MP, so talking about ripping off tax payers etc is a bit much. Personally all you MPs & your free mortgages should be stopped. One rule for you lot another for Joe Public. stevobath
  • Score: 1

3:10am Sun 20 Apr 14

breamoreboy says...

SimonJB wrote:
MP's that make comments like this prove they have no grip on reality. And yet he'll get voted back in again by the Blue-rinse brigade. How dare those working class commoners take money from the crown (Which by the way I agree is totally wrong and they deserve the sentence handed down) that's our call...New duck pond anyone?
Please get your facts right. Peter Viggers I believe it was got a new house for his ducks, not a pond. Which reminds me, I must book myself a new moat cleaner, mine has gone AWOL.
[quote][p][bold]SimonJB[/bold] wrote: MP's that make comments like this prove they have no grip on reality. And yet he'll get voted back in again by the Blue-rinse brigade. How dare those working class commoners take money from the crown (Which by the way I agree is totally wrong and they deserve the sentence handed down) that's our call...New duck pond anyone?[/p][/quote]Please get your facts right. Peter Viggers I believe it was got a new house for his ducks, not a pond. Which reminds me, I must book myself a new moat cleaner, mine has gone AWOL. breamoreboy
  • Score: 0

9:25am Sun 20 Apr 14

Tango Charlie says...

stevobath wrote:
Tango Charlie wrote:
Tango Charlie wrote:
Just read Mr. Swayne's parliamentary record. A former Whip, he sat on the gay marriage committee while previously being backed by Christian Action Research and Education (CARE). The same people who claimed you could "cure" homosexuality!
Interesting. Look up “They work for you”.
Delving further into his background. As a former teacher he does not know a lot about the history of our Union Jack.
In his blog “Kilts on the Slope” from 03 January 2014 he talks about Scottish independence and states; “ Would we have to abandon the Union Flag? I am very attached to it, it too fills me with pride wherever I see it flying, and I can’t see any good reason for giving it up. The flag predates the union with Scotland and represents the union of the Scottish and English Crowns under James the First of England and Sixth of Scotland, who succeeded Queen Elizabeth the First in 1603.”

I believe the flag he is actually talking about is the Flag of Great Britain, (Otherwise known as The Kings Colours, or the Union Flag) introduced after the acts of the union in 1707.
The Union Jack, that is flown today, was actually introduced after the introduction of Ireland to the Union in 1801.
But I do take into consideration that he is a TA Major. I know what Majors are like. My Officer Commanding in the Gulf (a Major) nearly started the war 3 weeks before anyone else, just because he could not read a map. We were 2 kn from the front line before an Apache helicopter stopped us and told us to turn back. (Even a private knows that you don't read a compass while within a moving vehicle.)
Lead on Macduff. Those of a lesser knowledge will surly follow.
The 'Union Jack' is only called so when flown at sea.

It's plain old 'Union Flag' on land. :)

The Flag Institute says it was introduced in 1606 & called simply 'The Flag of Britain'
I'm sure the Flag Institute know their stuff?
No. This has proved to be a myth popularized by the Navy. (You will notice that the writer of the piece from the Flag Institute is former Navy). This is similar to many myths created within the services, like the arguments between the Sappers and the Gunners about recovered guns during the Crimean War.

Before 1801 the Union Flag lacked the Cross of Saint Patrick.

While the name may originally have come from a Naval Term, the first time the flag was flown in a land battle (as opposed to a naval action) was during Second Anglo-Maratha War (1803–1805), led by Arthur Wellesley, who later became the Duke of Wellington. An excellent retelling of that story can be found in the Sharpe series by Bernard Cornwell.
[quote][p][bold]stevobath[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Tango Charlie[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Tango Charlie[/bold] wrote: Just read Mr. Swayne's parliamentary record. A former Whip, he sat on the gay marriage committee while previously being backed by Christian Action Research and Education (CARE). The same people who claimed you could "cure" homosexuality! Interesting. Look up “They work for you”.[/p][/quote]Delving further into his background. As a former teacher he does not know a lot about the history of our Union Jack. In his blog “Kilts on the Slope” from 03 January 2014 he talks about Scottish independence and states; “ Would we have to abandon the Union Flag? I am very attached to it, it too fills me with pride wherever I see it flying, and I can’t see any good reason for giving it up. The flag predates the union with Scotland and represents the union of the Scottish and English Crowns under James the First of England and Sixth of Scotland, who succeeded Queen Elizabeth the First in 1603.” I believe the flag he is actually talking about is the Flag of Great Britain, (Otherwise known as The Kings Colours, or the Union Flag) introduced after the acts of the union in 1707. The Union Jack, that is flown today, was actually introduced after the introduction of Ireland to the Union in 1801. But I do take into consideration that he is a TA Major. I know what Majors are like. My Officer Commanding in the Gulf (a Major) nearly started the war 3 weeks before anyone else, just because he could not read a map. We were 2 kn from the front line before an Apache helicopter stopped us and told us to turn back. (Even a private knows that you don't read a compass while within a moving vehicle.) Lead on Macduff. Those of a lesser knowledge will surly follow.[/p][/quote]The 'Union Jack' is only called so when flown at sea. It's plain old 'Union Flag' on land. :) The Flag Institute says it was introduced in 1606 & called simply 'The Flag of Britain' I'm sure the Flag Institute know their stuff?[/p][/quote]No. This has proved to be a myth popularized by the Navy. (You will notice that the writer of the piece from the Flag Institute is former Navy). This is similar to many myths created within the services, like the arguments between the Sappers and the Gunners about recovered guns during the Crimean War. Before 1801 the Union Flag lacked the Cross of Saint Patrick. While the name may originally have come from a Naval Term, the first time the flag was flown in a land battle (as opposed to a naval action) was during Second Anglo-Maratha War (1803–1805), led by Arthur Wellesley, who later became the Duke of Wellington. An excellent retelling of that story can be found in the Sharpe series by Bernard Cornwell. Tango Charlie
  • Score: 2

9:34am Sun 20 Apr 14

Tango Charlie says...

Sorry, I meant to state that the Naval action was the Battle of Copenhagen, 1801.
Sorry, I meant to state that the Naval action was the Battle of Copenhagen, 1801. Tango Charlie
  • Score: 0

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