Disability Wessex says reforms on bedroom tax and spare room subsidy ‘punish most vulnerable’

Bournemouth Echo: BATTLE: Nikki Haswell has had to support many service users in their fight to avoid losing vital benefits BATTLE: Nikki Haswell has had to support many service users in their fight to avoid losing vital benefits

A DORSET disability charity has hit out at government reforms on bedroom tax and spare room subsidy, saying they will cause financial hardship to vulnerable people.

Disability Wessex, the advice service of Diverse Abilities Plus, says the reforms to the support provided for housing costs and the household benefit cap, including the social sector size criteria (SSSC), are affecting those with disabilities, who were not the originally intended targets and are unlikely to be able to change their circumstance without government help.

Nikki Haswell, advice manager at Disability Wessex, said: “The SSSC is having a particular impact on people with disabilities who have adapted homes or need a room to accommodate a support worker and we witness the distress caused by the welfare reforms brought in 2012 on an almost daily basis.

“Last year we supported 94 people with a disability at their appeal hearings and are proud to say that 71 per cent were successful, but nevertheless it is very sad to see that some are not when the reforms are hitting genuinely sick and disabled people.”

A report published by the Work and Pensions Committee on April 2 recommends that anyone living in a home that has been significantly adapted for them should be exempt from the SSSC.

The report further urges the government to exempt all households that contain a person in receipt of higher level disability benefits (DLA or PIP) from the SSSC.

Nikki added: “The welfare changes are punishing some of the most vulnerable people in our society who are genuinely sick and disabled. The report could be a positive way forward and I hope the government take on board the report’s recommendations to support those with disabilities.”

To find out more visit parliament.uk or call Nikki Haswell, advice service manager on 07880 197332 or 01202 718266.

Comments (9)

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11:24am Sat 12 Apr 14

High Treason says...

Be serious, the disabled do very nicely. It is unfortunate that they are disabled but they want for nothing. Many even get a free car, even if they do not hold a driving licence. I know of two cases where a car is provided, one where it is the neighbour who takes the disabled person shopping once a week but is able to use the car for her own benefit the rest of the time. Very nice thank you. The other is a self employed man who's wife gets a car because she is classed as disabled through drink and drug abuse but he uses the car for his business. Very nice thank you.
Be serious, the disabled do very nicely. It is unfortunate that they are disabled but they want for nothing. Many even get a free car, even if they do not hold a driving licence. I know of two cases where a car is provided, one where it is the neighbour who takes the disabled person shopping once a week but is able to use the car for her own benefit the rest of the time. Very nice thank you. The other is a self employed man who's wife gets a car because she is classed as disabled through drink and drug abuse but he uses the car for his business. Very nice thank you. High Treason
  • Score: -11

12:00pm Sat 12 Apr 14

EGHH says...

Yet the rich can live in mansions with bedrooms to spare and they pay no mansion tax. I predicted that this govt would hit the young, sick and elderly. I'm afraid I've been proven right.
Yet the rich can live in mansions with bedrooms to spare and they pay no mansion tax. I predicted that this govt would hit the young, sick and elderly. I'm afraid I've been proven right. EGHH
  • Score: 0

1:52pm Sat 12 Apr 14

fedupwithfedupjobsworths says...

They can apply for DHP (Discretionary Housing Payment) to top up what they have lost. Its looked at on a case by case basis. Cant she tell them that ! And its NOT a tax. The echo getting it wrong again its the spare room subsidy. Those in private rented accommodation are unaffected.
They can apply for DHP (Discretionary Housing Payment) to top up what they have lost. Its looked at on a case by case basis. Cant she tell them that ! And its NOT a tax. The echo getting it wrong again its the spare room subsidy. Those in private rented accommodation are unaffected. fedupwithfedupjobsworths
  • Score: -2

2:36pm Sat 12 Apr 14

boardsandphotos says...

EGHH wrote:
Yet the rich can live in mansions with bedrooms to spare and they pay no mansion tax. I predicted that this govt would hit the young, sick and elderly. I'm afraid I've been proven right.
What a ridiculous comment!

A 'Rich person' pays more of their own money for a bigger house, thus resulting in bigger bills such as a higher council tax banding.

Whereas what is happening in this story is NOT a bedroom tax, they are not being asked to pay more per room, unlike when you purchase a big house, it's a removal of a subsidy that we have bern paying for a very long time.

Buy a big house = pay more money the more rooms you want.
'Bedroom Tax' = Removal of subsidy NOT charged per room.
[quote][p][bold]EGHH[/bold] wrote: Yet the rich can live in mansions with bedrooms to spare and they pay no mansion tax. I predicted that this govt would hit the young, sick and elderly. I'm afraid I've been proven right.[/p][/quote]What a ridiculous comment! A 'Rich person' pays more of their own money for a bigger house, thus resulting in bigger bills such as a higher council tax banding. Whereas what is happening in this story is NOT a bedroom tax, they are not being asked to pay more per room, unlike when you purchase a big house, it's a removal of a subsidy that we have bern paying for a very long time. Buy a big house = pay more money the more rooms you want. 'Bedroom Tax' = Removal of subsidy NOT charged per room. boardsandphotos
  • Score: 3

2:58pm Sat 12 Apr 14

retry69 says...

High Treason wrote:
Be serious, the disabled do very nicely. It is unfortunate that they are disabled but they want for nothing. Many even get a free car, even if they do not hold a driving licence. I know of two cases where a car is provided, one where it is the neighbour who takes the disabled person shopping once a week but is able to use the car for her own benefit the rest of the time. Very nice thank you. The other is a self employed man who's wife gets a car because she is classed as disabled through drink and drug abuse but he uses the car for his business. Very nice thank you.
Then you report them to the people concerned not bleat on here
[quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: Be serious, the disabled do very nicely. It is unfortunate that they are disabled but they want for nothing. Many even get a free car, even if they do not hold a driving licence. I know of two cases where a car is provided, one where it is the neighbour who takes the disabled person shopping once a week but is able to use the car for her own benefit the rest of the time. Very nice thank you. The other is a self employed man who's wife gets a car because she is classed as disabled through drink and drug abuse but he uses the car for his business. Very nice thank you.[/p][/quote]Then you report them to the people concerned not bleat on here retry69
  • Score: 8

4:13pm Sat 12 Apr 14

boardsandphotos says...

Once again the 'fingers in ears' readers are out giving thumbs down to factual statements. It might make you feel better it doesn't change anything.......
Once again the 'fingers in ears' readers are out giving thumbs down to factual statements. It might make you feel better it doesn't change anything....... boardsandphotos
  • Score: -5

6:54pm Sat 12 Apr 14

HRH of Boscombe says...

High Treason wrote:
Be serious, the disabled do very nicely. It is unfortunate that they are disabled but they want for nothing. Many even get a free car, even if they do not hold a driving licence. I know of two cases where a car is provided, one where it is the neighbour who takes the disabled person shopping once a week but is able to use the car for her own benefit the rest of the time. Very nice thank you. The other is a self employed man who's wife gets a car because she is classed as disabled through drink and drug abuse but he uses the car for his business. Very nice thank you.
Exactly. Why does a disabled person need a spare room too?
[quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: Be serious, the disabled do very nicely. It is unfortunate that they are disabled but they want for nothing. Many even get a free car, even if they do not hold a driving licence. I know of two cases where a car is provided, one where it is the neighbour who takes the disabled person shopping once a week but is able to use the car for her own benefit the rest of the time. Very nice thank you. The other is a self employed man who's wife gets a car because she is classed as disabled through drink and drug abuse but he uses the car for his business. Very nice thank you.[/p][/quote]Exactly. Why does a disabled person need a spare room too? HRH of Boscombe
  • Score: -9

8:02am Sun 13 Apr 14

Time_Traveller says...

HRH of Boscombe wrote:
High Treason wrote:
Be serious, the disabled do very nicely. It is unfortunate that they are disabled but they want for nothing. Many even get a free car, even if they do not hold a driving licence. I know of two cases where a car is provided, one where it is the neighbour who takes the disabled person shopping once a week but is able to use the car for her own benefit the rest of the time. Very nice thank you. The other is a self employed man who's wife gets a car because she is classed as disabled through drink and drug abuse but he uses the car for his business. Very nice thank you.
Exactly. Why does a disabled person need a spare room too?
Some disabled people need to store large equipment such as wheelchairs, breathing apparatus and dressings/medication - which would probably be difficult in a tiny flat for example. Others may need a bedroom for an over-night carer to stay etc.

Yes, discretionary housing payments are available - but there is only so much money in that pot, so it can not possibly cover everyone who is disabled and who may need the extra room - not when it is being abused by the likes of someone I know who is claiming disability payments and living in a 4 bedroomed house. Having 3 spare rooms subsidised is unnecessary and an abuse of the system, yet a former councillor and his wife are doing just that. He certainly knows how to play the system ....
[quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: Be serious, the disabled do very nicely. It is unfortunate that they are disabled but they want for nothing. Many even get a free car, even if they do not hold a driving licence. I know of two cases where a car is provided, one where it is the neighbour who takes the disabled person shopping once a week but is able to use the car for her own benefit the rest of the time. Very nice thank you. The other is a self employed man who's wife gets a car because she is classed as disabled through drink and drug abuse but he uses the car for his business. Very nice thank you.[/p][/quote]Exactly. Why does a disabled person need a spare room too?[/p][/quote]Some disabled people need to store large equipment such as wheelchairs, breathing apparatus and dressings/medication - which would probably be difficult in a tiny flat for example. Others may need a bedroom for an over-night carer to stay etc. Yes, discretionary housing payments are available - but there is only so much money in that pot, so it can not possibly cover everyone who is disabled and who may need the extra room - not when it is being abused by the likes of someone I know who is claiming disability payments and living in a 4 bedroomed house. Having 3 spare rooms subsidised is unnecessary and an abuse of the system, yet a former councillor and his wife are doing just that. He certainly knows how to play the system .... Time_Traveller
  • Score: 6

9:16am Sun 13 Apr 14

retry69 says...

Time_Traveller wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
High Treason wrote:
Be serious, the disabled do very nicely. It is unfortunate that they are disabled but they want for nothing. Many even get a free car, even if they do not hold a driving licence. I know of two cases where a car is provided, one where it is the neighbour who takes the disabled person shopping once a week but is able to use the car for her own benefit the rest of the time. Very nice thank you. The other is a self employed man who's wife gets a car because she is classed as disabled through drink and drug abuse but he uses the car for his business. Very nice thank you.
Exactly. Why does a disabled person need a spare room too?
Some disabled people need to store large equipment such as wheelchairs, breathing apparatus and dressings/medication - which would probably be difficult in a tiny flat for example. Others may need a bedroom for an over-night carer to stay etc.

Yes, discretionary housing payments are available - but there is only so much money in that pot, so it can not possibly cover everyone who is disabled and who may need the extra room - not when it is being abused by the likes of someone I know who is claiming disability payments and living in a 4 bedroomed house. Having 3 spare rooms subsidised is unnecessary and an abuse of the system, yet a former councillor and his wife are doing just that. He certainly knows how to play the system ....
Name him !
[quote][p][bold]Time_Traveller[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: Be serious, the disabled do very nicely. It is unfortunate that they are disabled but they want for nothing. Many even get a free car, even if they do not hold a driving licence. I know of two cases where a car is provided, one where it is the neighbour who takes the disabled person shopping once a week but is able to use the car for her own benefit the rest of the time. Very nice thank you. The other is a self employed man who's wife gets a car because she is classed as disabled through drink and drug abuse but he uses the car for his business. Very nice thank you.[/p][/quote]Exactly. Why does a disabled person need a spare room too?[/p][/quote]Some disabled people need to store large equipment such as wheelchairs, breathing apparatus and dressings/medication - which would probably be difficult in a tiny flat for example. Others may need a bedroom for an over-night carer to stay etc. Yes, discretionary housing payments are available - but there is only so much money in that pot, so it can not possibly cover everyone who is disabled and who may need the extra room - not when it is being abused by the likes of someone I know who is claiming disability payments and living in a 4 bedroomed house. Having 3 spare rooms subsidised is unnecessary and an abuse of the system, yet a former councillor and his wife are doing just that. He certainly knows how to play the system ....[/p][/quote]Name him ! retry69
  • Score: 5

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