Thousands of teachers walk out on national strike but many schools in Dorset keep their doors open

Thousands of teachers walk out on national strike but many schools in Dorset keep their doors open

Teachers on a strike rally in Bristol

Geoff Cooke, a former teacher who is angry over cuts

First published in News
Last updated
by

THOUSANDS of teachers across Dorset and Hampshire have walked out of their classrooms in the latest strike over working conditions.

The industrial action has given pupils an extra day at home but has forced many working parents to take time off to look after their children.

Many schools have closed their doors but more have taken the decision to remain open on this occasion.

See which schools are open, closed and partially open across Dorset

Several secondary schools are open for senior pupils who are preparing for exams but closed to younger pupils.

Council chiefs in Dorset said they have done all they can to ensure as many children as possible can attend lessons today.

Mark Loveys, lead advisor for school improvement with the county council said: “We are encouraging schools to stay open, where it is feasible and poses no risk to pupils as a result. However, the final decision as to whether a school remains open, closed or partially closed lies with the head teacher and the chair of governors.

“All schools have been asked to give parents, transport and pupils as much notice as possible.”

The strike is unlikely to have as much impact as the last one in November because only members of the National Union of Teachers (NUT) are involved.

Last time they were joined by the National Association of Schoolmasters and Union of Women Teachers but their members have decided to continue negotiations with Education Secretary Michael Gove instead.

Dorset NUT secretary Geoff Cooke said members wanted to discuss changes to conditions but Mr Gove refused to do so.

He said strike action is a last resort and said teachers did not want to take the action. “They don’t want to do it, it’s against their instincts to affect parents or children.”

A rally was due to take place in Wimborne from 11am until 1pm today.

Head of Hill View primary in Bournemouth, Amanda Jones, warned parents last week and said: “I am aware that class/school closures inconvenience parents and carers.”

And at Highcliffe School head teacher Judith Potts said they would do their best to run lessons as usual for the sixth form but closed the school for Years 7-11.

Comments (68)

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6:11am Wed 26 Mar 14

master plan says...

Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.
Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all. master plan
  • Score: -12

6:28am Wed 26 Mar 14

Tango Charlie says...

Personally I think that the teachers are in an impossible situation.
When the kids in class are disruptive they get sent out so missing lessons., but when they don't pass their exams the teachers get the blame. Not too long ago the kids got the blame for not studying. We would never dare have disrupted the others, all our teachers were ex WW2 combat veterans and we would have got the cane!
How can you put performance related pay into schools? It forces the teachers to just teach the parts of the lessons that will get examined. The kids come out with no in depth understanding of the subject. That is not learning.
Teachers can not be asked to do the job of parents. Discipline is something that the kids should be learning at home.
Personally I think that the teachers are in an impossible situation. When the kids in class are disruptive they get sent out so missing lessons., but when they don't pass their exams the teachers get the blame. Not too long ago the kids got the blame for not studying. We would never dare have disrupted the others, all our teachers were ex WW2 combat veterans and we would have got the cane! How can you put performance related pay into schools? It forces the teachers to just teach the parts of the lessons that will get examined. The kids come out with no in depth understanding of the subject. That is not learning. Teachers can not be asked to do the job of parents. Discipline is something that the kids should be learning at home. Tango Charlie
  • Score: 55

6:32am Wed 26 Mar 14

we-shall-see says...

Over the years I have lost all sympathy with teachers who strike. Why go into a profession knowing the hours and pay, and then strike for more money?

One of my daughter-in-laws is a teacher (not on strike today). She does put in a lot of hours at home and after hours at school, but she also gets what I would consider a good wage to compensate for that, coupled with around 12 weeks paid leave each year in the form of school holidays. Yes, she puts in work during some of those weeks, but let me tell you, she also has a LOT of free time.

Teachers are not in it for the children - they have got greedy. I have no sympathy for them when they are effectively holding the future of our children's education to ransom - and by doing so, many other people like my neighbour, have had to LOSE A DAYS WAGES to take time off because her son cannot go to school. She works in a supermarket on minimum wage and losing a days pay is a lot of money to her family. How fair is THAT? >:o(
Over the years I have lost all sympathy with teachers who strike. Why go into a profession knowing the hours and pay, and then strike for more money? One of my daughter-in-laws is a teacher (not on strike today). She does put in a lot of hours at home and after hours at school, but she also gets what I would consider a good wage to compensate for that, coupled with around 12 weeks paid leave each year in the form of school holidays. Yes, she puts in work during some of those weeks, but let me tell you, she also has a LOT of free time. Teachers are not in it for the children - they have got greedy. I have no sympathy for them when they are effectively holding the future of our children's education to ransom - and by doing so, many other people like my neighbour, have had to LOSE A DAYS WAGES to take time off because her son cannot go to school. She works in a supermarket on minimum wage and losing a days pay is a lot of money to her family. How fair is THAT? >:o( we-shall-see
  • Score: 17

6:55am Wed 26 Mar 14

High Treason says...

master plan wrote:
Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.
My granddaughter recently went on a school trip to the Somme, Every child should go. The teachers were at the school at 4-00 am. They had the work and responsibility of the children aged around 11 until their return 3 days later at 10-30 pm. Believe me a group of girls can be extremely demanding.
Overtime pay, not a chance, it does not exist for teachers. Not for trips, parent evenings, department meetings, extra activities etcetera.
[quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.[/p][/quote]My granddaughter recently went on a school trip to the Somme, Every child should go. The teachers were at the school at 4-00 am. They had the work and responsibility of the children aged around 11 until their return 3 days later at 10-30 pm. Believe me a group of girls can be extremely demanding. Overtime pay, not a chance, it does not exist for teachers. Not for trips, parent evenings, department meetings, extra activities etcetera. High Treason
  • Score: 31

6:57am Wed 26 Mar 14

Jetwasher says...

Bunch of work shy slackers, sack the striking ones and replace with new young teachers that are willing to work hard for a living !
Bunch of work shy slackers, sack the striking ones and replace with new young teachers that are willing to work hard for a living ! Jetwasher
  • Score: -33

7:22am Wed 26 Mar 14

morita says...

we-shall-see wrote:
Over the years I have lost all sympathy with teachers who strike. Why go into a profession knowing the hours and pay, and then strike for more money?

One of my daughter-in-laws is a teacher (not on strike today). She does put in a lot of hours at home and after hours at school, but she also gets what I would consider a good wage to compensate for that, coupled with around 12 weeks paid leave each year in the form of school holidays. Yes, she puts in work during some of those weeks, but let me tell you, she also has a LOT of free time.

Teachers are not in it for the children - they have got greedy. I have no sympathy for them when they are effectively holding the future of our children's education to ransom - and by doing so, many other people like my neighbour, have had to LOSE A DAYS WAGES to take time off because her son cannot go to school. She works in a supermarket on minimum wage and losing a days pay is a lot of money to her family. How fair is THAT? >:o(
12 weeks paid leave? Are you sure?
[quote][p][bold]we-shall-see[/bold] wrote: Over the years I have lost all sympathy with teachers who strike. Why go into a profession knowing the hours and pay, and then strike for more money? One of my daughter-in-laws is a teacher (not on strike today). She does put in a lot of hours at home and after hours at school, but she also gets what I would consider a good wage to compensate for that, coupled with around 12 weeks paid leave each year in the form of school holidays. Yes, she puts in work during some of those weeks, but let me tell you, she also has a LOT of free time. Teachers are not in it for the children - they have got greedy. I have no sympathy for them when they are effectively holding the future of our children's education to ransom - and by doing so, many other people like my neighbour, have had to LOSE A DAYS WAGES to take time off because her son cannot go to school. She works in a supermarket on minimum wage and losing a days pay is a lot of money to her family. How fair is THAT? >:o([/p][/quote]12 weeks paid leave? Are you sure? morita
  • Score: -14

7:22am Wed 26 Mar 14

susi.m says...

If they are not happy in their jobs then leave and go and find another one. Stop moaning. Not good role models for the children.
If they are not happy in their jobs then leave and go and find another one. Stop moaning. Not good role models for the children. susi.m
  • Score: -18

7:45am Wed 26 Mar 14

skydriver says...

Jetwasher wrote:
Bunch of work shy slackers, sack the striking ones and replace with new young teachers that are willing to work hard for a living !
You idiot that's the problem the young people are not going into teaching because of the pay, clearly not educated yourself are you?
Still I guess your pay and pension are nice and secure.
Selfish individual, you are , it's a case of ,I'm all right jack, and **** the rest of you.
And no I'm not a teacher,
[quote][p][bold]Jetwasher[/bold] wrote: Bunch of work shy slackers, sack the striking ones and replace with new young teachers that are willing to work hard for a living ![/p][/quote]You idiot that's the problem the young people are not going into teaching because of the pay, clearly not educated yourself are you? Still I guess your pay and pension are nice and secure. Selfish individual, you are , it's a case of ,I'm all right jack, and **** the rest of you. And no I'm not a teacher, skydriver
  • Score: 16

7:47am Wed 26 Mar 14

skydriver says...

susi.m wrote:
If they are not happy in their jobs then leave and go and find another one. Stop moaning. Not good role models for the children.
Another one who has to take a day off work to look after their children,shame, your pay and pension ok then.?
[quote][p][bold]susi.m[/bold] wrote: If they are not happy in their jobs then leave and go and find another one. Stop moaning. Not good role models for the children.[/p][/quote]Another one who has to take a day off work to look after their children,shame, your pay and pension ok then.? skydriver
  • Score: 6

7:51am Wed 26 Mar 14

skydriver says...

master plan wrote:
Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.
So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon.
I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone.
So I suggest you think before you comment.
[quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.[/p][/quote]So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon. I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone. So I suggest you think before you comment. skydriver
  • Score: 31

8:00am Wed 26 Mar 14

FrogKiss says...

Charge them £100 each for each pupil they don't teach! As parents we are fined if we take holiday during term time. The private sector pay raises have been awful for years.. But the rest of us are just happy we are still employed!
Even if it does cost a blinking fortune to holiday in July and August!
Charge them £100 each for each pupil they don't teach! As parents we are fined if we take holiday during term time. The private sector pay raises have been awful for years.. But the rest of us are just happy we are still employed! Even if it does cost a blinking fortune to holiday in July and August! FrogKiss
  • Score: -8

8:06am Wed 26 Mar 14

master plan says...

skydriver wrote:
master plan wrote:
Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.
So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon.
I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone.
So I suggest you think before you comment.
As I have said before
Share
Print
At a minimum of £21,804 (or £27,270 in inner London), the starting salary in teaching is high compared to other graduate starting salaries. Leading practitioners can earn up to £64,677 in London and £57,520 outside London, while head teachers can reach a salary of between £42,803 and £113,303.

High performing teachers can progress faster up the pay ranges on the basis of annual appraisals.

This is on the education website and goes into more detail if you can say its a poor wage then your a joker
[quote][p][bold]skydriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.[/p][/quote]So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon. I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone. So I suggest you think before you comment.[/p][/quote]As I have said before Share Print At a minimum of £21,804 (or £27,270 in inner London), the starting salary in teaching is high compared to other graduate starting salaries. Leading practitioners can earn up to £64,677 in London and £57,520 outside London, while head teachers can reach a salary of between £42,803 and £113,303. High performing teachers can progress faster up the pay ranges on the basis of annual appraisals. This is on the education website and goes into more detail if you can say its a poor wage then your a joker master plan
  • Score: 7

8:06am Wed 26 Mar 14

skydriver says...

FrogKiss wrote:
Charge them £100 each for each pupil they don't teach! As parents we are fined if we take holiday during term time. The private sector pay raises have been awful for years.. But the rest of us are just happy we are still employed!
Even if it does cost a blinking fortune to holiday in July and August!
Another speaking through the rear end anger that's what it's all about as yet another has to be inconvienced for a day, are you ok with your pension and pay...... Think about the professionals for a change , rather than yourself.
No I'm not a teacher
[quote][p][bold]FrogKiss[/bold] wrote: Charge them £100 each for each pupil they don't teach! As parents we are fined if we take holiday during term time. The private sector pay raises have been awful for years.. But the rest of us are just happy we are still employed! Even if it does cost a blinking fortune to holiday in July and August![/p][/quote]Another speaking through the rear end anger that's what it's all about as yet another has to be inconvienced for a day, are you ok with your pension and pay...... Think about the professionals for a change , rather than yourself. No I'm not a teacher skydriver
  • Score: 12

8:15am Wed 26 Mar 14

CroneofDelphi says...

High Treason wrote:
master plan wrote:
Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.
My granddaughter recently went on a school trip to the Somme, Every child should go. The teachers were at the school at 4-00 am. They had the work and responsibility of the children aged around 11 until their return 3 days later at 10-30 pm. Believe me a group of girls can be extremely demanding.
Overtime pay, not a chance, it does not exist for teachers. Not for trips, parent evenings, department meetings, extra activities etcetera.
Lots of volunteer youth leaders do trips like that for free, including myself.

Most teachers do a fantastic job, some would do better in other professions. Likewise, some parents do a great job bringing up responsible and likeable children, some do not. Mix those teachers and children up the wrong way, and they all fail. Parents need to start reclaiming responsibility for their children's behaviour and empowering teachers to assist in their discipline, and the government would do well to back this up. Children leaving school, without special needs, unable to read, write and use numbers correctly is inexcusable.

No, I'm not a teacher, nor in a job with a pension or good pay. It is one that I enjoy, mostly, though. My child is in school today, his refused to close, according to him, not the school I might add, it's only the history department that strike there ;). Before anyone says it, yes, very smug parent, at the moment, but wait till hormones kick in!
[quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.[/p][/quote]My granddaughter recently went on a school trip to the Somme, Every child should go. The teachers were at the school at 4-00 am. They had the work and responsibility of the children aged around 11 until their return 3 days later at 10-30 pm. Believe me a group of girls can be extremely demanding. Overtime pay, not a chance, it does not exist for teachers. Not for trips, parent evenings, department meetings, extra activities etcetera.[/p][/quote]Lots of volunteer youth leaders do trips like that for free, including myself. Most teachers do a fantastic job, some would do better in other professions. Likewise, some parents do a great job bringing up responsible and likeable children, some do not. Mix those teachers and children up the wrong way, and they all fail. Parents need to start reclaiming responsibility for their children's behaviour and empowering teachers to assist in their discipline, and the government would do well to back this up. Children leaving school, without special needs, unable to read, write and use numbers correctly is inexcusable. No, I'm not a teacher, nor in a job with a pension or good pay. It is one that I enjoy, mostly, though. My child is in school today, his refused to close, according to him, not the school I might add, it's only the history department that strike there ;). Before anyone says it, yes, very smug parent, at the moment, but wait till hormones kick in! CroneofDelphi
  • Score: 7

8:18am Wed 26 Mar 14

Derf says...

Given there doesn't seem to be much 'Unity' over pay and pensions going by the number of schools still open, is the point the (NUT) teachers are trying to make valid or are they just complaining for the sake of complaing?
I thought the idea of Unions was 'one out, all out'
Given there doesn't seem to be much 'Unity' over pay and pensions going by the number of schools still open, is the point the (NUT) teachers are trying to make valid or are they just complaining for the sake of complaing? I thought the idea of Unions was 'one out, all out' Derf
  • Score: 5

8:22am Wed 26 Mar 14

Carolyn43 says...

skydriver wrote:
susi.m wrote:
If they are not happy in their jobs then leave and go and find another one. Stop moaning. Not good role models for the children.
Another one who has to take a day off work to look after their children,shame, your pay and pension ok then.?
Oh dear. Having to look after your own children! Why did you have them if you don't want to look after them?
......
How do you judge whether or not a teacher is good? Is it on exam results? What about those who teach children with learning difficulties? If a teacher can get some to the stage where they can hold down a job and look after themselves in the real world, then they might have done a fantastic job. How would you judge their performance against a teacher teaching grade A students?
......
I really do despair at all these experts on the teaching profession who have not been near a classroom since they left school themselves and have no idea what goes on when teachers aren't actually in the classroom. All parents should have to shadow a teacher for a month. Then we'd see if they still think they have an easy job with short hours on high pay.
[quote][p][bold]skydriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]susi.m[/bold] wrote: If they are not happy in their jobs then leave and go and find another one. Stop moaning. Not good role models for the children.[/p][/quote]Another one who has to take a day off work to look after their children,shame, your pay and pension ok then.?[/p][/quote]Oh dear. Having to look after your own children! Why did you have them if you don't want to look after them? ...... How do you judge whether or not a teacher is good? Is it on exam results? What about those who teach children with learning difficulties? If a teacher can get some to the stage where they can hold down a job and look after themselves in the real world, then they might have done a fantastic job. How would you judge their performance against a teacher teaching grade A students? ...... I really do despair at all these experts on the teaching profession who have not been near a classroom since they left school themselves and have no idea what goes on when teachers aren't actually in the classroom. All parents should have to shadow a teacher for a month. Then we'd see if they still think they have an easy job with short hours on high pay. Carolyn43
  • Score: 11

8:28am Wed 26 Mar 14

Wesoblind says...

Stupid comments, strike is one off the only powers humans have left to get things done. Good for them i hope they get listened too. I think i would go on strike if i was a teacher as they dont get paid enough to deal with the poor excuse for children they have to teach these days.
Stupid comments, strike is one off the only powers humans have left to get things done. Good for them i hope they get listened too. I think i would go on strike if i was a teacher as they dont get paid enough to deal with the poor excuse for children they have to teach these days. Wesoblind
  • Score: 17

8:32am Wed 26 Mar 14

jafcb1988 says...

master plan wrote:
skydriver wrote:
master plan wrote:
Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.
So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon.
I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone.
So I suggest you think before you comment.
As I have said before
Share
Print
At a minimum of £21,804 (or £27,270 in inner London), the starting salary in teaching is high compared to other graduate starting salaries. Leading practitioners can earn up to £64,677 in London and £57,520 outside London, while head teachers can reach a salary of between £42,803 and £113,303.

High performing teachers can progress faster up the pay ranges on the basis of annual appraisals.

This is on the education website and goes into more detail if you can say its a poor wage then your a joker
You're or you are
[quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]skydriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.[/p][/quote]So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon. I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone. So I suggest you think before you comment.[/p][/quote]As I have said before Share Print At a minimum of £21,804 (or £27,270 in inner London), the starting salary in teaching is high compared to other graduate starting salaries. Leading practitioners can earn up to £64,677 in London and £57,520 outside London, while head teachers can reach a salary of between £42,803 and £113,303. High performing teachers can progress faster up the pay ranges on the basis of annual appraisals. This is on the education website and goes into more detail if you can say its a poor wage then your a joker[/p][/quote]You're or you are jafcb1988
  • Score: 1

9:35am Wed 26 Mar 14

muscliffman says...

One very important aspect of this strike is that it appears to have far more to do with the political aspirations of some very fearsome Trade Union leaders than it actually does with the teacher's own employment terms and conditions.

Even in these posts very few are mentioning anything about the rights and wrongs of the alleged reasons for the strike but instead are heading straight into far more basic politics - exactly as the Union intended. Perhaps most of the teachers (and there are a huge number) who are working normally today have a similar view and do not want to be used as fodder in their Trade Union's political warfare.

Maybe like many other things, if only we could remove all the politics from our education system then we 'adults' and our children might actually learn something.
One very important aspect of this strike is that it appears to have far more to do with the political aspirations of some very fearsome Trade Union leaders than it actually does with the teacher's own employment terms and conditions. Even in these posts very few are mentioning anything about the rights and wrongs of the alleged reasons for the strike but instead are heading straight into far more basic politics - exactly as the Union intended. Perhaps most of the teachers (and there are a huge number) who are working normally today have a similar view and do not want to be used as fodder in their Trade Union's political warfare. Maybe like many other things, if only we could remove all the politics from our education system then we 'adults' and our children might actually learn something. muscliffman
  • Score: 7

9:38am Wed 26 Mar 14

elite50 says...

skydriver wrote:
master plan wrote:
Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.
So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon.
I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone.
So I suggest you think before you comment.
Wow!
32 kids in ONE class?
When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes.
The school was Winton & Moordown boys school.
What happened?
It appears that the "know all" is you.
[quote][p][bold]skydriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.[/p][/quote]So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon. I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone. So I suggest you think before you comment.[/p][/quote]Wow! 32 kids in ONE class? When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes. The school was Winton & Moordown boys school. What happened? It appears that the "know all" is you. elite50
  • Score: -13

9:44am Wed 26 Mar 14

rusty james says...

elite50 wrote:
skydriver wrote:
master plan wrote:
Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.
So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon.
I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone.
So I suggest you think before you comment.
Wow!
32 kids in ONE class?
When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes.
The school was Winton & Moordown boys school.
What happened?
It appears that the "know all" is you.
Eee, and we 'nowt to eat but an old dusty brick....
[quote][p][bold]elite50[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]skydriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.[/p][/quote]So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon. I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone. So I suggest you think before you comment.[/p][/quote]Wow! 32 kids in ONE class? When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes. The school was Winton & Moordown boys school. What happened? It appears that the "know all" is you.[/p][/quote]Eee, and we 'nowt to eat but an old dusty brick.... rusty james
  • Score: 11

10:03am Wed 26 Mar 14

Carolyn43 says...

elite50 wrote:
skydriver wrote:
master plan wrote:
Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.
So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon.
I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone.
So I suggest you think before you comment.
Wow!
32 kids in ONE class?
When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes.
The school was Winton & Moordown boys school.
What happened?
It appears that the "know all" is you.
Difference being that when you went to school, parents respected teachers and disciplined their own children. Nowadays parents expect teachers to take their place and do everything for children that parents should be doing, but which many aren't.
......
52 children with parents taking responsibility for teaching such things as manners, honesty, respect for others and good behaviour would be a doddle. 30 well brought up children plus 2 allowed by parents to do just as they like is a nightmare for everyone except those parents who have abdicated their responsibilities. What type of parent are you?
[quote][p][bold]elite50[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]skydriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.[/p][/quote]So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon. I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone. So I suggest you think before you comment.[/p][/quote]Wow! 32 kids in ONE class? When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes. The school was Winton & Moordown boys school. What happened? It appears that the "know all" is you.[/p][/quote]Difference being that when you went to school, parents respected teachers and disciplined their own children. Nowadays parents expect teachers to take their place and do everything for children that parents should be doing, but which many aren't. ...... 52 children with parents taking responsibility for teaching such things as manners, honesty, respect for others and good behaviour would be a doddle. 30 well brought up children plus 2 allowed by parents to do just as they like is a nightmare for everyone except those parents who have abdicated their responsibilities. What type of parent are you? Carolyn43
  • Score: 12

10:05am Wed 26 Mar 14

The Seasider says...

Derf wrote:
Given there doesn't seem to be much 'Unity' over pay and pensions going by the number of schools still open, is the point the (NUT) teachers are trying to make valid or are they just complaining for the sake of complaing?
I thought the idea of Unions was 'one out, all out'
There are genuine reasons to strike, but this news article, along with most newspapers don't bother to actually tell the readers in any depth (or even in summary) what the reasons actually are. All it says, in the whole article is 'striking over working conditions'. What does that mean?

If the public really knew what was going on, they would support the teachers, but the message isn't getting out.

As for 'lack of unity', I think that ideally both the NUT AND NASUWT need to strike on the same day to make a point. By splitting the actions of the two big unions the government has effectively weakened the teaching professions ability to stand up to political interference.

Another point is that although many teachers may be at work today, whether a member of a union or not, they may sympathise greatly with the strikers cause.

If teachers didn't strike the government would slash education funding, like they did with the police, cutting budgets by 30 - 40%. The only difference is that the police have no right to strike. There is a lot more to this than what appears in this article.
[quote][p][bold]Derf[/bold] wrote: Given there doesn't seem to be much 'Unity' over pay and pensions going by the number of schools still open, is the point the (NUT) teachers are trying to make valid or are they just complaining for the sake of complaing? I thought the idea of Unions was 'one out, all out'[/p][/quote]There are genuine reasons to strike, but this news article, along with most newspapers don't bother to actually tell the readers in any depth (or even in summary) what the reasons actually are. All it says, in the whole article is 'striking over working conditions'. What does that mean? If the public really knew what was going on, they would support the teachers, but the message isn't getting out. As for 'lack of unity', I think that ideally both the NUT AND NASUWT need to strike on the same day to make a point. By splitting the actions of the two big unions the government has effectively weakened the teaching professions ability to stand up to political interference. Another point is that although many teachers may be at work today, whether a member of a union or not, they may sympathise greatly with the strikers cause. If teachers didn't strike the government would slash education funding, like they did with the police, cutting budgets by 30 - 40%. The only difference is that the police have no right to strike. There is a lot more to this than what appears in this article. The Seasider
  • Score: 7

10:11am Wed 26 Mar 14

elite50 says...

rusty james wrote:
elite50 wrote:
skydriver wrote:
master plan wrote:
Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.
So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon.
I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone.
So I suggest you think before you comment.
Wow!
32 kids in ONE class?
When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes.
The school was Winton & Moordown boys school.
What happened?
It appears that the "know all" is you.
Eee, and we 'nowt to eat but an old dusty brick....
Drop out of school at an early age did we?
If you like I will tell you how to put a sentence together.
It seems to be getting more difficult for you people as time goes by.
[quote][p][bold]rusty james[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]elite50[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]skydriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.[/p][/quote]So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon. I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone. So I suggest you think before you comment.[/p][/quote]Wow! 32 kids in ONE class? When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes. The school was Winton & Moordown boys school. What happened? It appears that the "know all" is you.[/p][/quote]Eee, and we 'nowt to eat but an old dusty brick....[/p][/quote]Drop out of school at an early age did we? If you like I will tell you how to put a sentence together. It seems to be getting more difficult for you people as time goes by. elite50
  • Score: -11

10:19am Wed 26 Mar 14

rusty james says...

elite50 wrote:
rusty james wrote:
elite50 wrote:
skydriver wrote:
master plan wrote:
Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.
So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon.
I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone.
So I suggest you think before you comment.
Wow!
32 kids in ONE class?
When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes.
The school was Winton & Moordown boys school.
What happened?
It appears that the "know all" is you.
Eee, and we 'nowt to eat but an old dusty brick....
Drop out of school at an early age did we?
If you like I will tell you how to put a sentence together.
It seems to be getting more difficult for you people as time goes by.
On the contrary, old bean, I stayed at school to do A-levels, then went on to college to earn a respectable degree. Sadly though, no amount of education could prepare my future sausage fingers for screen typing on a mobile phone.

:-)
[quote][p][bold]elite50[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]rusty james[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]elite50[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]skydriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.[/p][/quote]So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon. I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone. So I suggest you think before you comment.[/p][/quote]Wow! 32 kids in ONE class? When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes. The school was Winton & Moordown boys school. What happened? It appears that the "know all" is you.[/p][/quote]Eee, and we 'nowt to eat but an old dusty brick....[/p][/quote]Drop out of school at an early age did we? If you like I will tell you how to put a sentence together. It seems to be getting more difficult for you people as time goes by.[/p][/quote]On the contrary, old bean, I stayed at school to do A-levels, then went on to college to earn a respectable degree. Sadly though, no amount of education could prepare my future sausage fingers for screen typing on a mobile phone. :-) rusty james
  • Score: 12

10:20am Wed 26 Mar 14

elite50 says...

Carolyn43 wrote:
elite50 wrote:
skydriver wrote:
master plan wrote:
Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.
So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon.
I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone.
So I suggest you think before you comment.
Wow!
32 kids in ONE class?
When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes.
The school was Winton & Moordown boys school.
What happened?
It appears that the "know all" is you.
Difference being that when you went to school, parents respected teachers and disciplined their own children. Nowadays parents expect teachers to take their place and do everything for children that parents should be doing, but which many aren't.
......
52 children with parents taking responsibility for teaching such things as manners, honesty, respect for others and good behaviour would be a doddle. 30 well brought up children plus 2 allowed by parents to do just as they like is a nightmare for everyone except those parents who have abdicated their responsibilities. What type of parent are you?
What type of parent am I?
What has that got to do with anything?
If you have an argument to make, make it.
If you cannot handle 2 ill behaved children out of a class of 32 you should change your mode of employment.
[quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]elite50[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]skydriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.[/p][/quote]So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon. I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone. So I suggest you think before you comment.[/p][/quote]Wow! 32 kids in ONE class? When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes. The school was Winton & Moordown boys school. What happened? It appears that the "know all" is you.[/p][/quote]Difference being that when you went to school, parents respected teachers and disciplined their own children. Nowadays parents expect teachers to take their place and do everything for children that parents should be doing, but which many aren't. ...... 52 children with parents taking responsibility for teaching such things as manners, honesty, respect for others and good behaviour would be a doddle. 30 well brought up children plus 2 allowed by parents to do just as they like is a nightmare for everyone except those parents who have abdicated their responsibilities. What type of parent are you?[/p][/quote]What type of parent am I? What has that got to do with anything? If you have an argument to make, make it. If you cannot handle 2 ill behaved children out of a class of 32 you should change your mode of employment. elite50
  • Score: -10

10:30am Wed 26 Mar 14

new2it says...

Carolyn43 wrote:
elite50 wrote:
skydriver wrote:
master plan wrote:
Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.
So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon.
I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone.
So I suggest you think before you comment.
Wow!
32 kids in ONE class?
When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes.
The school was Winton & Moordown boys school.
What happened?
It appears that the "know all" is you.
Difference being that when you went to school, parents respected teachers and disciplined their own children. Nowadays parents expect teachers to take their place and do everything for children that parents should be doing, but which many aren't.
......
52 children with parents taking responsibility for teaching such things as manners, honesty, respect for others and good behaviour would be a doddle. 30 well brought up children plus 2 allowed by parents to do just as they like is a nightmare for everyone except those parents who have abdicated their responsibilities. What type of parent are you?
Children also had more respect for their teachers. We would never have dared to be as badly behaved as they are nowadays. Would there have ever been a 6 year old child punching and kicking a teacher and giving them a black eye? I think not, it would have been very effectively dealt with. One disruptive, badly behaved child in a class of 32 can totally ruin the lesson that their teacher has spent much thought and planning for the rest of the class. I am not a teacher, but my daughter is and over 25 years I have seen her enthusiasm for the job drained, and working longer and longer hours. She always loved teaching but all the extra pressure of so much more paper work she is expected to do leaves less time for job she trained to do.
[quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]elite50[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]skydriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.[/p][/quote]So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon. I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone. So I suggest you think before you comment.[/p][/quote]Wow! 32 kids in ONE class? When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes. The school was Winton & Moordown boys school. What happened? It appears that the "know all" is you.[/p][/quote]Difference being that when you went to school, parents respected teachers and disciplined their own children. Nowadays parents expect teachers to take their place and do everything for children that parents should be doing, but which many aren't. ...... 52 children with parents taking responsibility for teaching such things as manners, honesty, respect for others and good behaviour would be a doddle. 30 well brought up children plus 2 allowed by parents to do just as they like is a nightmare for everyone except those parents who have abdicated their responsibilities. What type of parent are you?[/p][/quote]Children also had more respect for their teachers. We would never have dared to be as badly behaved as they are nowadays. Would there have ever been a 6 year old child punching and kicking a teacher and giving them a black eye? I think not, it would have been very effectively dealt with. One disruptive, badly behaved child in a class of 32 can totally ruin the lesson that their teacher has spent much thought and planning for the rest of the class. I am not a teacher, but my daughter is and over 25 years I have seen her enthusiasm for the job drained, and working longer and longer hours. She always loved teaching but all the extra pressure of so much more paper work she is expected to do leaves less time for job she trained to do. new2it
  • Score: 11

10:40am Wed 26 Mar 14

Carolyn43 says...

elite50 wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
elite50 wrote:
skydriver wrote:
master plan wrote:
Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.
So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon.
I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone.
So I suggest you think before you comment.
Wow!
32 kids in ONE class?
When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes.
The school was Winton & Moordown boys school.
What happened?
It appears that the "know all" is you.
Difference being that when you went to school, parents respected teachers and disciplined their own children. Nowadays parents expect teachers to take their place and do everything for children that parents should be doing, but which many aren't.
......
52 children with parents taking responsibility for teaching such things as manners, honesty, respect for others and good behaviour would be a doddle. 30 well brought up children plus 2 allowed by parents to do just as they like is a nightmare for everyone except those parents who have abdicated their responsibilities. What type of parent are you?
What type of parent am I?
What has that got to do with anything?
If you have an argument to make, make it.
If you cannot handle 2 ill behaved children out of a class of 32 you should change your mode of employment.
What type of parent you are has a very important bearing on how your children turn out. You obviously have no respect for teachers, so how can you expect your children to have? That means they'll think nothing of disrupting a class.
......
Handling 2 ill-behaved children in a class means you are depriving the rest of the children of your attention and education - you can't do both at the same time.
......
I suggest you try it, but you won't because you'd rather stick with your ill-informed opinion than find out the truth.
[quote][p][bold]elite50[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]elite50[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]skydriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.[/p][/quote]So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon. I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone. So I suggest you think before you comment.[/p][/quote]Wow! 32 kids in ONE class? When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes. The school was Winton & Moordown boys school. What happened? It appears that the "know all" is you.[/p][/quote]Difference being that when you went to school, parents respected teachers and disciplined their own children. Nowadays parents expect teachers to take their place and do everything for children that parents should be doing, but which many aren't. ...... 52 children with parents taking responsibility for teaching such things as manners, honesty, respect for others and good behaviour would be a doddle. 30 well brought up children plus 2 allowed by parents to do just as they like is a nightmare for everyone except those parents who have abdicated their responsibilities. What type of parent are you?[/p][/quote]What type of parent am I? What has that got to do with anything? If you have an argument to make, make it. If you cannot handle 2 ill behaved children out of a class of 32 you should change your mode of employment.[/p][/quote]What type of parent you are has a very important bearing on how your children turn out. You obviously have no respect for teachers, so how can you expect your children to have? That means they'll think nothing of disrupting a class. ...... Handling 2 ill-behaved children in a class means you are depriving the rest of the children of your attention and education - you can't do both at the same time. ...... I suggest you try it, but you won't because you'd rather stick with your ill-informed opinion than find out the truth. Carolyn43
  • Score: 14

10:55am Wed 26 Mar 14

Carolyn43 says...

I should add that I went into teaching at age 32, having worked in the private sector. I taught in a comprehensive for 26 years before having to retire on physical ill-health grounds, which meant could no longer move around the classroom. I taught various groupings, including school excluded youngsters and, for the last three years, disruptive 15 and 16 year-old girls, who can be absolute ****. I found it hard work, rewarding and satisfying.
......
My non-teaching jobs were far easier and less-satisfying than my teaching career. But I wouldn't go into teaching now. Attitudes would now make it soul destroying.
I should add that I went into teaching at age 32, having worked in the private sector. I taught in a comprehensive for 26 years before having to retire on physical ill-health grounds, which meant could no longer move around the classroom. I taught various groupings, including school excluded youngsters and, for the last three years, disruptive 15 and 16 year-old girls, who can be absolute ****. I found it hard work, rewarding and satisfying. ...... My non-teaching jobs were far easier and less-satisfying than my teaching career. But I wouldn't go into teaching now. Attitudes would now make it soul destroying. Carolyn43
  • Score: 13

10:56am Wed 26 Mar 14

wiltshireboy says...

What do You expect Teachers and other Workers to do with a bunch of Rich over paid Government MP,s Mostly old Eton boys running this Country. They are not interested in Hard Working People,otherwise than keeping them selves where they are.
What do You expect Teachers and other Workers to do with a bunch of Rich over paid Government MP,s Mostly old Eton boys running this Country. They are not interested in Hard Working People,otherwise than keeping them selves where they are. wiltshireboy
  • Score: 4

11:06am Wed 26 Mar 14

elite50 says...

Carolyn43 wrote:
elite50 wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
elite50 wrote:
skydriver wrote:
master plan wrote:
Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.
So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon.
I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone.
So I suggest you think before you comment.
Wow!
32 kids in ONE class?
When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes.
The school was Winton & Moordown boys school.
What happened?
It appears that the "know all" is you.
Difference being that when you went to school, parents respected teachers and disciplined their own children. Nowadays parents expect teachers to take their place and do everything for children that parents should be doing, but which many aren't.
......
52 children with parents taking responsibility for teaching such things as manners, honesty, respect for others and good behaviour would be a doddle. 30 well brought up children plus 2 allowed by parents to do just as they like is a nightmare for everyone except those parents who have abdicated their responsibilities. What type of parent are you?
What type of parent am I?
What has that got to do with anything?
If you have an argument to make, make it.
If you cannot handle 2 ill behaved children out of a class of 32 you should change your mode of employment.
What type of parent you are has a very important bearing on how your children turn out. You obviously have no respect for teachers, so how can you expect your children to have? That means they'll think nothing of disrupting a class.
......
Handling 2 ill-behaved children in a class means you are depriving the rest of the children of your attention and education - you can't do both at the same time.
......
I suggest you try it, but you won't because you'd rather stick with your ill-informed opinion than find out the truth.
If you think your job is tough you should try the one that I had for 20 years.
I was in charge of 120 rabid unionists (not the grinning crowd pictured in this story).
It is too easy to wilt and give up in front of a couple of little brats.
Then again, re-mount your hobby horse and cry about how tough life is.
If you cant stand the heat, get out of the kitchen, or in other words "Don't just stand there, DO something"!
That does NOT mean , run away and go on strike.
[quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]elite50[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]elite50[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]skydriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.[/p][/quote]So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon. I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone. So I suggest you think before you comment.[/p][/quote]Wow! 32 kids in ONE class? When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes. The school was Winton & Moordown boys school. What happened? It appears that the "know all" is you.[/p][/quote]Difference being that when you went to school, parents respected teachers and disciplined their own children. Nowadays parents expect teachers to take their place and do everything for children that parents should be doing, but which many aren't. ...... 52 children with parents taking responsibility for teaching such things as manners, honesty, respect for others and good behaviour would be a doddle. 30 well brought up children plus 2 allowed by parents to do just as they like is a nightmare for everyone except those parents who have abdicated their responsibilities. What type of parent are you?[/p][/quote]What type of parent am I? What has that got to do with anything? If you have an argument to make, make it. If you cannot handle 2 ill behaved children out of a class of 32 you should change your mode of employment.[/p][/quote]What type of parent you are has a very important bearing on how your children turn out. You obviously have no respect for teachers, so how can you expect your children to have? That means they'll think nothing of disrupting a class. ...... Handling 2 ill-behaved children in a class means you are depriving the rest of the children of your attention and education - you can't do both at the same time. ...... I suggest you try it, but you won't because you'd rather stick with your ill-informed opinion than find out the truth.[/p][/quote]If you think your job is tough you should try the one that I had for 20 years. I was in charge of 120 rabid unionists (not the grinning crowd pictured in this story). It is too easy to wilt and give up in front of a couple of little brats. Then again, re-mount your hobby horse and cry about how tough life is. If you cant stand the heat, get out of the kitchen, or in other words "Don't just stand there, DO something"! That does NOT mean , run away and go on strike. elite50
  • Score: -8

11:12am Wed 26 Mar 14

kalebmoledirt says...

Never seem to go on strike during the summer holiday ,half term, or weekends,
Never seem to go on strike during the summer holiday ,half term, or weekends, kalebmoledirt
  • Score: -6

11:19am Wed 26 Mar 14

TheDistrict says...

Who is this Skydriver, who obviously is on this forum to get you all to bite. He or she has no clue or is a bot from the council, or a trog from another forum. Whichever, do not rise to his jibes and idiotic comments.

As I pointed out before regarding this teachers strike. Serving and reservists of the Armed Forces receive less pay than the teachers, and less leave. They when on active service cannot go home at night, but live in squaller in deserts. They cannot strike for better pay, better conditions, or better pensions. Some will not get pensions such as the 400+ who lost their lives in Afghanistan. But, they have to just get on with the job, or face the consequences of a court martial.
Who is this Skydriver, who obviously is on this forum to get you all to bite. He or she has no clue or is a bot from the council, or a trog from another forum. Whichever, do not rise to his jibes and idiotic comments. As I pointed out before regarding this teachers strike. Serving and reservists of the Armed Forces receive less pay than the teachers, and less leave. They when on active service cannot go home at night, but live in squaller in deserts. They cannot strike for better pay, better conditions, or better pensions. Some will not get pensions such as the 400+ who lost their lives in Afghanistan. But, they have to just get on with the job, or face the consequences of a court martial. TheDistrict
  • Score: -4

11:48am Wed 26 Mar 14

The Liberal says...

master plan wrote:
skydriver wrote:
master plan wrote:
Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.
So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon.
I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone.
So I suggest you think before you comment.
As I have said before
Share
Print
At a minimum of £21,804 (or £27,270 in inner London), the starting salary in teaching is high compared to other graduate starting salaries. Leading practitioners can earn up to £64,677 in London and £57,520 outside London, while head teachers can reach a salary of between £42,803 and £113,303.

High performing teachers can progress faster up the pay ranges on the basis of annual appraisals.

This is on the education website and goes into more detail if you can say its a poor wage then your a joker
In fact, when it comes to average (median) starting salaries for graduates, the public sector (including education) is at the bottom of the 15 main industries/sectors, at £23K. Even the retail sector comes in higher…
bit.ly/1lFeUXc
 
Yes, teachers' pay does increase with years of experience, but still, it seems, at a lower rate than the pay progression of graduates in most other sectors. Quoting the maximum salary for leading practitioners (a specialised leadership role only available to the most experienced and outstanding teachers) is highly misleading.
[quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]skydriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.[/p][/quote]So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon. I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone. So I suggest you think before you comment.[/p][/quote]As I have said before Share Print At a minimum of £21,804 (or £27,270 in inner London), the starting salary in teaching is high compared to other graduate starting salaries. Leading practitioners can earn up to £64,677 in London and £57,520 outside London, while head teachers can reach a salary of between £42,803 and £113,303. High performing teachers can progress faster up the pay ranges on the basis of annual appraisals. This is on the education website and goes into more detail if you can say its a poor wage then your a joker[/p][/quote]In fact, when it comes to average (median) starting salaries for graduates, the public sector (including education) is at the bottom of the 15 main industries/sectors, at £23K. Even the retail sector comes in higher… bit.ly/1lFeUXc   Yes, teachers' pay does increase with years of experience, but still, it seems, at a lower rate than the pay progression of graduates in most other sectors. Quoting the maximum salary for leading practitioners (a specialised leadership role only available to the most experienced and outstanding teachers) is highly misleading. The Liberal
  • Score: 9

12:03pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Valerie W. says...

FrogKiss wrote:
Charge them £100 each for each pupil they don't teach! As parents we are fined if we take holiday during term time. The private sector pay raises have been awful for years.. But the rest of us are just happy we are still employed!
Even if it does cost a blinking fortune to holiday in July and August!
This comment is scary. A lot of people like you are 'just happy we are still employed' because the idea of shifting themselves and doing something to actively improve their lot would never occur to them. Yours is an attitude of destructive passivity and individualism. Good luck to you, but let the teachers be for standing up for themselves.
[quote][p][bold]FrogKiss[/bold] wrote: Charge them £100 each for each pupil they don't teach! As parents we are fined if we take holiday during term time. The private sector pay raises have been awful for years.. But the rest of us are just happy we are still employed! Even if it does cost a blinking fortune to holiday in July and August![/p][/quote]This comment is scary. A lot of people like you are 'just happy we are still employed' because the idea of shifting themselves and doing something to actively improve their lot would never occur to them. Yours is an attitude of destructive passivity and individualism. Good luck to you, but let the teachers be for standing up for themselves. Valerie W.
  • Score: 11

12:06pm Wed 26 Mar 14

LeGrove says...

When will the parents on here who treat teachers like a babysitting service realise that it's the COUNCIL who charge parents for taking children out of school during term time, NOT the school or teachers...
When will the parents on here who treat teachers like a babysitting service realise that it's the COUNCIL who charge parents for taking children out of school during term time, NOT the school or teachers... LeGrove
  • Score: 12

12:16pm Wed 26 Mar 14

hadvar says...

So.....exactly what's wrong with Teacher's pay and conditions then? Genuine questions to the teachers out there 'that do no work today'. (Bonus points available to English teachers who can name the Shakespeare play that bit in quotes comes from).
So.....exactly what's wrong with Teacher's pay and conditions then? Genuine questions to the teachers out there 'that do no work today'. (Bonus points available to English teachers who can name the Shakespeare play that bit in quotes comes from). hadvar
  • Score: 0

12:28pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Not again !! says...

TheDistrict wrote:
Who is this Skydriver, who obviously is on this forum to get you all to bite. He or she has no clue or is a bot from the council, or a trog from another forum. Whichever, do not rise to his jibes and idiotic comments.

As I pointed out before regarding this teachers strike. Serving and reservists of the Armed Forces receive less pay than the teachers, and less leave. They when on active service cannot go home at night, but live in squaller in deserts. They cannot strike for better pay, better conditions, or better pensions. Some will not get pensions such as the 400+ who lost their lives in Afghanistan. But, they have to just get on with the job, or face the consequences of a court martial.
I work with many who are ex-services and they are all intelligent forward thinking members of society. They chose to join the forces at a relatively young age and most did not further their education in any way and none that I am aware of have degrees. They do receive less pay than teachers but this is not the teachers fault. I do feel that our forces deserve better pay, but I'm not too sure what you want us to do about them going home at night. It sort of comes with the job that you might have to stay in barracks or in a field tent on service. You know this when you sign up.
With regard to pensions I'm not to sure how much the military pay in, but they appear to do quite well with the number of years they get back when transferring their pension in.
Your argument smacks of 'I don't get that so why should you' , which is pretty much where most people who oppose the teachers are coming from. Once again you are in the 'race to the bottom' and those pension stealing Eton boys in Westminster want us all to join in. They manipulate the media, hide the truth and continuously make cuts to vital services while lining their own pockets and the pockets of those around them.
Do we really believe that educated people are willing lose several days pay and cause all this disruption for nothing. They are fighting for a schooling system that works and that will provide a better future for our children and this will only happen by providing support, fair working conditions and fair reward. If you can't see what's really going on then maybe we need to do a bit more reading and not just listen to all the government spin !
Good luck teachers, you have my full support.
[quote][p][bold]TheDistrict[/bold] wrote: Who is this Skydriver, who obviously is on this forum to get you all to bite. He or she has no clue or is a bot from the council, or a trog from another forum. Whichever, do not rise to his jibes and idiotic comments. As I pointed out before regarding this teachers strike. Serving and reservists of the Armed Forces receive less pay than the teachers, and less leave. They when on active service cannot go home at night, but live in squaller in deserts. They cannot strike for better pay, better conditions, or better pensions. Some will not get pensions such as the 400+ who lost their lives in Afghanistan. But, they have to just get on with the job, or face the consequences of a court martial.[/p][/quote]I work with many who are ex-services and they are all intelligent forward thinking members of society. They chose to join the forces at a relatively young age and most did not further their education in any way and none that I am aware of have degrees. They do receive less pay than teachers but this is not the teachers fault. I do feel that our forces deserve better pay, but I'm not too sure what you want us to do about them going home at night. It sort of comes with the job that you might have to stay in barracks or in a field tent on service. You know this when you sign up. With regard to pensions I'm not to sure how much the military pay in, but they appear to do quite well with the number of years they get back when transferring their pension in. Your argument smacks of 'I don't get that so why should you' , which is pretty much where most people who oppose the teachers are coming from. Once again you are in the 'race to the bottom' and those pension stealing Eton boys in Westminster want us all to join in. They manipulate the media, hide the truth and continuously make cuts to vital services while lining their own pockets and the pockets of those around them. Do we really believe that educated people are willing lose several days pay and cause all this disruption for nothing. They are fighting for a schooling system that works and that will provide a better future for our children and this will only happen by providing support, fair working conditions and fair reward. If you can't see what's really going on then maybe we need to do a bit more reading and not just listen to all the government spin ! Good luck teachers, you have my full support. Not again !!
  • Score: 11

12:30pm Wed 26 Mar 14

agp1337 says...

kalebmoledirt wrote:
Never seem to go on strike during the summer holiday ,half term, or weekends,
I think you'll find that there's not a lot of point in that, as they're usually working at home. (I'm a retired teacher with 36 years' experience who never joined a strike once and wouldn't do if I was still teaching now.)
[quote][p][bold]kalebmoledirt[/bold] wrote: Never seem to go on strike during the summer holiday ,half term, or weekends,[/p][/quote]I think you'll find that there's not a lot of point in that, as they're usually working at home. (I'm a retired teacher with 36 years' experience who never joined a strike once and wouldn't do if I was still teaching now.) agp1337
  • Score: 4

1:15pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Not again !! says...

kalebmoledirt wrote:
Never seem to go on strike during the summer holiday ,half term, or weekends,
Bonjour
You really do struggle with regard to how and why people go on strike. It's funny really as you always feel the need to comment when it appears that you know nothing about it and from previous knowledge of you, it has absolutely no impact on you.
[quote][p][bold]kalebmoledirt[/bold] wrote: Never seem to go on strike during the summer holiday ,half term, or weekends,[/p][/quote]Bonjour You really do struggle with regard to how and why people go on strike. It's funny really as you always feel the need to comment when it appears that you know nothing about it and from previous knowledge of you, it has absolutely no impact on you. Not again !!
  • Score: 2

1:20pm Wed 26 Mar 14

nickynoodah says...

When knobdirt was a little lad at school in the early 40s the teachers stayed and calmed the children when Hitler dropped his bombs on the school.
To day the teachers would run away, to be the first ones in the air raid shelters,
pooing their pants on the way, they don't care about the children you know,
just themselves.
When knobdirt was a little lad at school in the early 40s the teachers stayed and calmed the children when Hitler dropped his bombs on the school. To day the teachers would run away, to be the first ones in the air raid shelters, pooing their pants on the way, they don't care about the children you know, just themselves. nickynoodah
  • Score: -10

1:21pm Wed 26 Mar 14

jafcb1988 says...

kalebmoledirt wrote:
Never seem to go on strike during the summer holiday ,half term, or weekends,
Stupid comment, wouldn't work then would it. Come back with something more valuable next time.
[quote][p][bold]kalebmoledirt[/bold] wrote: Never seem to go on strike during the summer holiday ,half term, or weekends,[/p][/quote]Stupid comment, wouldn't work then would it. Come back with something more valuable next time. jafcb1988
  • Score: 7

1:24pm Wed 26 Mar 14

jafcb1988 says...

nickynoodah wrote:
When knobdirt was a little lad at school in the early 40s the teachers stayed and calmed the children when Hitler dropped his bombs on the school.
To day the teachers would run away, to be the first ones in the air raid shelters,
pooing their pants on the way, they don't care about the children you know,
just themselves.
Wow. I assume you are so bitter as your own teachers clearly let you leave school with no common sense?
[quote][p][bold]nickynoodah[/bold] wrote: When knobdirt was a little lad at school in the early 40s the teachers stayed and calmed the children when Hitler dropped his bombs on the school. To day the teachers would run away, to be the first ones in the air raid shelters, pooing their pants on the way, they don't care about the children you know, just themselves.[/p][/quote]Wow. I assume you are so bitter as your own teachers clearly let you leave school with no common sense? jafcb1988
  • Score: 6

1:26pm Wed 26 Mar 14

poolemaninscotland says...

skydriver wrote:
Jetwasher wrote:
Bunch of work shy slackers, sack the striking ones and replace with new young teachers that are willing to work hard for a living !
You idiot that's the problem the young people are not going into teaching because of the pay, clearly not educated yourself are you?
Still I guess your pay and pension are nice and secure.
Selfish individual, you are , it's a case of ,I'm all right jack, and **** the rest of you.
And no I'm not a teacher,
I dont know what planet you actually live on Skydriveer but its not the same one as me thats for sure. If teachers are employed then they are told what there salary is going to be just like everyone else who works in this country. If the salary is not enough then go and find another job that will pay you what you need. The same goes with everyone who strikes in this country. I would love to work 8 hrs a day and earn the money that teachers earn but instead I decided to run my own company and employ people and make a better living for myself and my family. Shame on all the teachers who have cost this country so much money today because parents are not able to work. Its also a disgusting attitude to present to the children who look up to there peers. My 13yr old child is disgusted and so is all my family. Rant over
[quote][p][bold]skydriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Jetwasher[/bold] wrote: Bunch of work shy slackers, sack the striking ones and replace with new young teachers that are willing to work hard for a living ![/p][/quote]You idiot that's the problem the young people are not going into teaching because of the pay, clearly not educated yourself are you? Still I guess your pay and pension are nice and secure. Selfish individual, you are , it's a case of ,I'm all right jack, and **** the rest of you. And no I'm not a teacher,[/p][/quote]I dont know what planet you actually live on Skydriveer but its not the same one as me thats for sure. If teachers are employed then they are told what there salary is going to be just like everyone else who works in this country. If the salary is not enough then go and find another job that will pay you what you need. The same goes with everyone who strikes in this country. I would love to work 8 hrs a day and earn the money that teachers earn but instead I decided to run my own company and employ people and make a better living for myself and my family. Shame on all the teachers who have cost this country so much money today because parents are not able to work. Its also a disgusting attitude to present to the children who look up to there peers. My 13yr old child is disgusted and so is all my family. Rant over poolemaninscotland
  • Score: -4

1:39pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Not again !! says...

poolemaninscotland wrote:
skydriver wrote:
Jetwasher wrote:
Bunch of work shy slackers, sack the striking ones and replace with new young teachers that are willing to work hard for a living !
You idiot that's the problem the young people are not going into teaching because of the pay, clearly not educated yourself are you?
Still I guess your pay and pension are nice and secure.
Selfish individual, you are , it's a case of ,I'm all right jack, and **** the rest of you.
And no I'm not a teacher,
I dont know what planet you actually live on Skydriveer but its not the same one as me thats for sure. If teachers are employed then they are told what there salary is going to be just like everyone else who works in this country. If the salary is not enough then go and find another job that will pay you what you need. The same goes with everyone who strikes in this country. I would love to work 8 hrs a day and earn the money that teachers earn but instead I decided to run my own company and employ people and make a better living for myself and my family. Shame on all the teachers who have cost this country so much money today because parents are not able to work. Its also a disgusting attitude to present to the children who look up to there peers. My 13yr old child is disgusted and so is all my family. Rant over
You really must have been the school dunce.
Shame on you for not having the slightest clue why teachers are on strike. Do some homework before you make any further comments.
Double detention for you !
[quote][p][bold]poolemaninscotland[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]skydriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Jetwasher[/bold] wrote: Bunch of work shy slackers, sack the striking ones and replace with new young teachers that are willing to work hard for a living ![/p][/quote]You idiot that's the problem the young people are not going into teaching because of the pay, clearly not educated yourself are you? Still I guess your pay and pension are nice and secure. Selfish individual, you are , it's a case of ,I'm all right jack, and **** the rest of you. And no I'm not a teacher,[/p][/quote]I dont know what planet you actually live on Skydriveer but its not the same one as me thats for sure. If teachers are employed then they are told what there salary is going to be just like everyone else who works in this country. If the salary is not enough then go and find another job that will pay you what you need. The same goes with everyone who strikes in this country. I would love to work 8 hrs a day and earn the money that teachers earn but instead I decided to run my own company and employ people and make a better living for myself and my family. Shame on all the teachers who have cost this country so much money today because parents are not able to work. Its also a disgusting attitude to present to the children who look up to there peers. My 13yr old child is disgusted and so is all my family. Rant over[/p][/quote]You really must have been the school dunce. Shame on you for not having the slightest clue why teachers are on strike. Do some homework before you make any further comments. Double detention for you ! Not again !!
  • Score: 6

1:40pm Wed 26 Mar 14

kalebmoledirt says...

jafcb1988 wrote:
kalebmoledirt wrote:
Never seem to go on strike during the summer holiday ,half term, or weekends,
Stupid comment, wouldn't work then would it. Come back with something more valuable next time.
Sorry if I challenged your intellect .I think you'll find it won't work this time which is why the other two unions that represent teachers didn't strike with this 1970 style union
[quote][p][bold]jafcb1988[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kalebmoledirt[/bold] wrote: Never seem to go on strike during the summer holiday ,half term, or weekends,[/p][/quote]Stupid comment, wouldn't work then would it. Come back with something more valuable next time.[/p][/quote]Sorry if I challenged your intellect .I think you'll find it won't work this time which is why the other two unions that represent teachers didn't strike with this 1970 style union kalebmoledirt
  • Score: -3

1:40pm Wed 26 Mar 14

kalebmoledirt says...

jafcb1988 wrote:
kalebmoledirt wrote:
Never seem to go on strike during the summer holiday ,half term, or weekends,
Stupid comment, wouldn't work then would it. Come back with something more valuable next time.
Sorry if I challenged your intellect .I think you'll find it won't work this time which is why the other two unions that represent teachers didn't strike with this 1970 style union
[quote][p][bold]jafcb1988[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]kalebmoledirt[/bold] wrote: Never seem to go on strike during the summer holiday ,half term, or weekends,[/p][/quote]Stupid comment, wouldn't work then would it. Come back with something more valuable next time.[/p][/quote]Sorry if I challenged your intellect .I think you'll find it won't work this time which is why the other two unions that represent teachers didn't strike with this 1970 style union kalebmoledirt
  • Score: -2

1:40pm Wed 26 Mar 14

samjdavis says...

we-shall-see wrote:
Over the years I have lost all sympathy with teachers who strike. Why go into a profession knowing the hours and pay, and then strike for more money?

One of my daughter-in-laws is a teacher (not on strike today). She does put in a lot of hours at home and after hours at school, but she also gets what I would consider a good wage to compensate for that, coupled with around 12 weeks paid leave each year in the form of school holidays. Yes, she puts in work during some of those weeks, but let me tell you, she also has a LOT of free time.

Teachers are not in it for the children - they have got greedy. I have no sympathy for them when they are effectively holding the future of our children's education to ransom - and by doing so, many other people like my neighbour, have had to LOSE A DAYS WAGES to take time off because her son cannot go to school. She works in a supermarket on minimum wage and losing a days pay is a lot of money to her family. How fair is THAT? >:o(
Do you also think it's fair that your child, over the long term, is probably getting less of a good quality of education because teaching resources are so stretched?

Depends who you care more about I suppose..
[quote][p][bold]we-shall-see[/bold] wrote: Over the years I have lost all sympathy with teachers who strike. Why go into a profession knowing the hours and pay, and then strike for more money? One of my daughter-in-laws is a teacher (not on strike today). She does put in a lot of hours at home and after hours at school, but she also gets what I would consider a good wage to compensate for that, coupled with around 12 weeks paid leave each year in the form of school holidays. Yes, she puts in work during some of those weeks, but let me tell you, she also has a LOT of free time. Teachers are not in it for the children - they have got greedy. I have no sympathy for them when they are effectively holding the future of our children's education to ransom - and by doing so, many other people like my neighbour, have had to LOSE A DAYS WAGES to take time off because her son cannot go to school. She works in a supermarket on minimum wage and losing a days pay is a lot of money to her family. How fair is THAT? >:o([/p][/quote]Do you also think it's fair that your child, over the long term, is probably getting less of a good quality of education because teaching resources are so stretched? Depends who you care more about I suppose.. samjdavis
  • Score: 9

1:42pm Wed 26 Mar 14

cherrygood says...

I don't particularly agree with strike action, but I have nothing but admiration for the majority of our teachers.

There was an excellent documentary series on BBC3 or 4 a short while back following a group of six young teachers starting out on their first year at various secondary schools in the London area. Everyone of them worked their socks off and most of them were up until all hours preparing for lessons the next day. They were under massive pressure to achieve and the passion and emotion they put into teaching and dealing with kids was obvious to see.

I could never do their job in a million years and if they were paid double what they're currently on I wouldn't have a problem.
I don't particularly agree with strike action, but I have nothing but admiration for the majority of our teachers. There was an excellent documentary series on BBC3 or 4 a short while back following a group of six young teachers starting out on their first year at various secondary schools in the London area. Everyone of them worked their socks off and most of them were up until all hours preparing for lessons the next day. They were under massive pressure to achieve and the passion and emotion they put into teaching and dealing with kids was obvious to see. I could never do their job in a million years and if they were paid double what they're currently on I wouldn't have a problem. cherrygood
  • Score: 15

1:43pm Wed 26 Mar 14

samjdavis says...

elite50 wrote:
skydriver wrote:
master plan wrote:
Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.
So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon.
I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone.
So I suggest you think before you comment.
Wow!
32 kids in ONE class?
When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes.
The school was Winton & Moordown boys school.
What happened?
It appears that the "know all" is you.
Evolution elite50.

Surprised you haven't sent your comment in via telegram.
[quote][p][bold]elite50[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]skydriver[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.[/p][/quote]So another know all, so what is a huge amount of pay? These people go to uni to become teachers and as such expect to get a fair salary, and pension. If you want to vent your anger have a go at the man involved in this, just incase you don't know it's GOVE the education minister, the conservative goon. I wonder how you would cope with up to 32 children in one room alone. So I suggest you think before you comment.[/p][/quote]Wow! 32 kids in ONE class? When I went to school, back in the 50s, we had 52 kids in our class with one teacher. We could all read and write, maths was done without a calculator, history and geography were not the mystery that they seem to be today and the teachers rode to school on pushbikes. The school was Winton & Moordown boys school. What happened? It appears that the "know all" is you.[/p][/quote]Evolution elite50. Surprised you haven't sent your comment in via telegram. samjdavis
  • Score: 2

1:48pm Wed 26 Mar 14

rusty james says...

Not again !! wrote:
TheDistrict wrote:
Who is this Skydriver, who obviously is on this forum to get you all to bite. He or she has no clue or is a bot from the council, or a trog from another forum. Whichever, do not rise to his jibes and idiotic comments.

As I pointed out before regarding this teachers strike. Serving and reservists of the Armed Forces receive less pay than the teachers, and less leave. They when on active service cannot go home at night, but live in squaller in deserts. They cannot strike for better pay, better conditions, or better pensions. Some will not get pensions such as the 400+ who lost their lives in Afghanistan. But, they have to just get on with the job, or face the consequences of a court martial.
I work with many who are ex-services and they are all intelligent forward thinking members of society. They chose to join the forces at a relatively young age and most did not further their education in any way and none that I am aware of have degrees. They do receive less pay than teachers but this is not the teachers fault. I do feel that our forces deserve better pay, but I'm not too sure what you want us to do about them going home at night. It sort of comes with the job that you might have to stay in barracks or in a field tent on service. You know this when you sign up.
With regard to pensions I'm not to sure how much the military pay in, but they appear to do quite well with the number of years they get back when transferring their pension in.
Your argument smacks of 'I don't get that so why should you' , which is pretty much where most people who oppose the teachers are coming from. Once again you are in the 'race to the bottom' and those pension stealing Eton boys in Westminster want us all to join in. They manipulate the media, hide the truth and continuously make cuts to vital services while lining their own pockets and the pockets of those around them.
Do we really believe that educated people are willing lose several days pay and cause all this disruption for nothing. They are fighting for a schooling system that works and that will provide a better future for our children and this will only happen by providing support, fair working conditions and fair reward. If you can't see what's really going on then maybe we need to do a bit more reading and not just listen to all the government spin !
Good luck teachers, you have my full support.
Excellent post.
[quote][p][bold]Not again !![/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]TheDistrict[/bold] wrote: Who is this Skydriver, who obviously is on this forum to get you all to bite. He or she has no clue or is a bot from the council, or a trog from another forum. Whichever, do not rise to his jibes and idiotic comments. As I pointed out before regarding this teachers strike. Serving and reservists of the Armed Forces receive less pay than the teachers, and less leave. They when on active service cannot go home at night, but live in squaller in deserts. They cannot strike for better pay, better conditions, or better pensions. Some will not get pensions such as the 400+ who lost their lives in Afghanistan. But, they have to just get on with the job, or face the consequences of a court martial.[/p][/quote]I work with many who are ex-services and they are all intelligent forward thinking members of society. They chose to join the forces at a relatively young age and most did not further their education in any way and none that I am aware of have degrees. They do receive less pay than teachers but this is not the teachers fault. I do feel that our forces deserve better pay, but I'm not too sure what you want us to do about them going home at night. It sort of comes with the job that you might have to stay in barracks or in a field tent on service. You know this when you sign up. With regard to pensions I'm not to sure how much the military pay in, but they appear to do quite well with the number of years they get back when transferring their pension in. Your argument smacks of 'I don't get that so why should you' , which is pretty much where most people who oppose the teachers are coming from. Once again you are in the 'race to the bottom' and those pension stealing Eton boys in Westminster want us all to join in. They manipulate the media, hide the truth and continuously make cuts to vital services while lining their own pockets and the pockets of those around them. Do we really believe that educated people are willing lose several days pay and cause all this disruption for nothing. They are fighting for a schooling system that works and that will provide a better future for our children and this will only happen by providing support, fair working conditions and fair reward. If you can't see what's really going on then maybe we need to do a bit more reading and not just listen to all the government spin ! Good luck teachers, you have my full support.[/p][/quote]Excellent post. rusty james
  • Score: 6

2:06pm Wed 26 Mar 14

debrunho says...

Hi,

I'm a 34 year old male primary teacher myself . 4 years ago I left my previous (higher paid) career to pursue a more worthwhile career path. I am driven by dong my very best for my children; inspiring them, giving them a sense of self worth and positively influencing who they will become. When embarking on this career change I thought I had found my purpose. Throughout my training I received regular 'outstanding' observations and had some of my research published in an international Journal. Since becoming a teacher, I have received many outstanding observations and, in this day and age, I am considered an 'outstanding' teacher.

Doing my best for my children is the most important thing for me. I am driven by having the most positive of influence on their lives. This is why I have been on strike today and maybe why I am seriously considering leaving the profession.

Why? For me, and many of my like minded colleagues, it is not about the money. Having come from a corporate background myself I understand how some may view teachers if you consider it merely monetary. It is because of the unnecessary bureaucracy whereby I am working over 60 hours a week with most of the 'out of hours' work spent doing basic administrative tasks, analysing and assessing data, reporting on what I have been doing, documenting evidence on what I have been doing etc etc. Whereby this may seem reasonable to some the only people this really has a negative impact upon is the children. I spend most of these hours outside of work and in the holidays proving how I'm doing my job through documentation . If I was able to spend just a quarter of this 'outside of hours' work on actual planning and preparation to make everyday magical and inspiring for my children then surely this would be more beneficial in the long run?

I am naturally devastated that this profession at which was initially my 'lifes calling' has turned out to be some sort of data game of proof. As a dedicated professional who always has my children's interests in mind, I do not see how I can continue playing this game and not being able to focus on the things that are really important to me ...... my children. 60 + hours a week, stress, fear, abuse - Suddenly my corporate office life seems more appealing.

Over 50% of newly qualified teachers leave the profession within 5 years. This is not always because they 'cant handle the pace' - it's often because they are passionate, they are child centred and they are driven. The profession kicks them down until they realise they either have to sacrifice their values which took them into teaching or leave.

Sorry for the rant.
Hi, I'm a 34 year old male primary teacher myself . 4 years ago I left my previous (higher paid) career to pursue a more worthwhile career path. I am driven by dong my very best for my children; inspiring them, giving them a sense of self worth and positively influencing who they will become. When embarking on this career change I thought I had found my purpose. Throughout my training I received regular 'outstanding' observations and had some of my research published in an international Journal. Since becoming a teacher, I have received many outstanding observations and, in this day and age, I am considered an 'outstanding' teacher. Doing my best for my children is the most important thing for me. I am driven by having the most positive of influence on their lives. This is why I have been on strike today and maybe why I am seriously considering leaving the profession. Why? For me, and many of my like minded colleagues, it is not about the money. Having come from a corporate background myself I understand how some may view teachers if you consider it merely monetary. It is because of the unnecessary bureaucracy whereby I am working over 60 hours a week with most of the 'out of hours' work spent doing basic administrative tasks, analysing and assessing data, reporting on what I have been doing, documenting evidence on what I have been doing etc etc. Whereby this may seem reasonable to some the only people this really has a negative impact upon is the children. I spend most of these hours outside of work and in the holidays proving how I'm doing my job through documentation . If I was able to spend just a quarter of this 'outside of hours' work on actual planning and preparation to make everyday magical and inspiring for my children then surely this would be more beneficial in the long run? I am naturally devastated that this profession at which was initially my 'lifes calling' has turned out to be some sort of data game of proof. As a dedicated professional who always has my children's interests in mind, I do not see how I can continue playing this game and not being able to focus on the things that are really important to me ...... my children. 60 + hours a week, stress, fear, abuse - Suddenly my corporate office life seems more appealing. Over 50% of newly qualified teachers leave the profession within 5 years. This is not always because they 'cant handle the pace' - it's often because they are passionate, they are child centred and they are driven. The profession kicks them down until they realise they either have to sacrifice their values which took them into teaching or leave. Sorry for the rant. debrunho
  • Score: 19

2:24pm Wed 26 Mar 14

sammmymac says...

FrogKiss wrote:
Charge them £100 each for each pupil they don't teach! As parents we are fined if we take holiday during term time. The private sector pay raises have been awful for years.. But the rest of us are just happy we are still employed!
Even if it does cost a blinking fortune to holiday in July and August!
Striking teachers are being fined...they loose roughly £75 - 100 of their pay today. You say they should be grateful to just have a job.
Why should any of us 'just be happy to be employed'/ Working for a living is not a privelege and you sound like you've become so downtrodden that you think it is! Why do you think private sector pay has not increased either lately? Banking crisis maybe. The rich get rich whilst the poor should 'just be happy to have a job'. Should we doff our caps too!?
The gap is widening between the haves and havenots because the working / middle classes are being made to feel grateful and priveleged just to be in work. Have some pride and don't just be happy to be employed. You are one of the country's greatest resources - a tax payer - so deserve proper pay and conditions, which is what the teachers are fighting for.
[quote][p][bold]FrogKiss[/bold] wrote: Charge them £100 each for each pupil they don't teach! As parents we are fined if we take holiday during term time. The private sector pay raises have been awful for years.. But the rest of us are just happy we are still employed! Even if it does cost a blinking fortune to holiday in July and August![/p][/quote]Striking teachers are being fined...they loose roughly £75 - 100 of their pay today. You say they should be grateful to just have a job. Why should any of us 'just be happy to be employed'/ Working for a living is not a privelege and you sound like you've become so downtrodden that you think it is! Why do you think private sector pay has not increased either lately? Banking crisis maybe. The rich get rich whilst the poor should 'just be happy to have a job'. Should we doff our caps too!? The gap is widening between the haves and havenots because the working / middle classes are being made to feel grateful and priveleged just to be in work. Have some pride and don't just be happy to be employed. You are one of the country's greatest resources - a tax payer - so deserve proper pay and conditions, which is what the teachers are fighting for. sammmymac
  • Score: 12

2:29pm Wed 26 Mar 14

nobull says...

hadvar wrote:
So.....exactly what's wrong with Teacher's pay and conditions then? Genuine questions to the teachers out there 'that do no work today'. (Bonus points available to English teachers who can name the Shakespeare play that bit in quotes comes from).
Henry v act 4 scene 3.
Teachers well paid their career choice. xx
[quote][p][bold]hadvar[/bold] wrote: So.....exactly what's wrong with Teacher's pay and conditions then? Genuine questions to the teachers out there 'that do no work today'. (Bonus points available to English teachers who can name the Shakespeare play that bit in quotes comes from).[/p][/quote]Henry v act 4 scene 3. Teachers well paid their career choice. xx nobull
  • Score: -1

2:31pm Wed 26 Mar 14

sammmymac says...

LeGrove wrote:
When will the parents on here who treat teachers like a babysitting service realise that it's the COUNCIL who charge parents for taking children out of school during term time, NOT the school or teachers...
....and who imposed this new ill thought out rule of charging/fining parents for absence....the Government! The very people the teachers have issue with.
[quote][p][bold]LeGrove[/bold] wrote: When will the parents on here who treat teachers like a babysitting service realise that it's the COUNCIL who charge parents for taking children out of school during term time, NOT the school or teachers...[/p][/quote]....and who imposed this new ill thought out rule of charging/fining parents for absence....the Government! The very people the teachers have issue with. sammmymac
  • Score: 6

2:40pm Wed 26 Mar 14

BmthNewshound says...

Trouble is most teachers have no idea about the economic realities that people working in business and commerce are only to clearly aware of. Most go straight from school to university, straight back to school.
.
Running my own business I have to work long hours, don't get anywhere near the number of days holiday that teachers receive, don't have a nice index linked pension to look forward to, and my pay is based on my performance not some figure agreed by a union for all of its members irrespective of whether they are any good at their job.
.
Yes teachers face challenges and get stressed, but so do thousands of other people working in many different professions. Its the way that you deal with these issues just imagine what would happen if every time we didn't get our own way we all threw our toys out of our pram and went on strike. I think all teachers should be made to spend time working outside of education then perhaps they'd realise that theirs isn't such a bad deal after all.
Trouble is most teachers have no idea about the economic realities that people working in business and commerce are only to clearly aware of. Most go straight from school to university, straight back to school. . Running my own business I have to work long hours, don't get anywhere near the number of days holiday that teachers receive, don't have a nice index linked pension to look forward to, and my pay is based on my performance not some figure agreed by a union for all of its members irrespective of whether they are any good at their job. . Yes teachers face challenges and get stressed, but so do thousands of other people working in many different professions. Its the way that you deal with these issues just imagine what would happen if every time we didn't get our own way we all threw our toys out of our pram and went on strike. I think all teachers should be made to spend time working outside of education then perhaps they'd realise that theirs isn't such a bad deal after all. BmthNewshound
  • Score: -7

2:47pm Wed 26 Mar 14

hadvar says...

nobull wrote:
hadvar wrote:
So.....exactly what's wrong with Teacher's pay and conditions then? Genuine questions to the teachers out there 'that do no work today'. (Bonus points available to English teachers who can name the Shakespeare play that bit in quotes comes from).
Henry v act 4 scene 3.
Teachers well paid their career choice. xx
nobull, you win an 'up-vote'.
[quote][p][bold]nobull[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]hadvar[/bold] wrote: So.....exactly what's wrong with Teacher's pay and conditions then? Genuine questions to the teachers out there 'that do no work today'. (Bonus points available to English teachers who can name the Shakespeare play that bit in quotes comes from).[/p][/quote]Henry v act 4 scene 3. Teachers well paid their career choice. xx[/p][/quote]nobull, you win an 'up-vote'. hadvar
  • Score: -2

3:05pm Wed 26 Mar 14

cherrygood says...

BmthNewshound wrote:
Trouble is most teachers have no idea about the economic realities that people working in business and commerce are only to clearly aware of. Most go straight from school to university, straight back to school. . Running my own business I have to work long hours, don't get anywhere near the number of days holiday that teachers receive, don't have a nice index linked pension to look forward to, and my pay is based on my performance not some figure agreed by a union for all of its members irrespective of whether they are any good at their job. . Yes teachers face challenges and get stressed, but so do thousands of other people working in many different professions. Its the way that you deal with these issues just imagine what would happen if every time we didn't get our own way we all threw our toys out of our pram and went on strike. I think all teachers should be made to spend time working outside of education then perhaps they'd realise that theirs isn't such a bad deal after all.
Might be worth reading debrunho's post.
[quote][p][bold]BmthNewshound[/bold] wrote: Trouble is most teachers have no idea about the economic realities that people working in business and commerce are only to clearly aware of. Most go straight from school to university, straight back to school. . Running my own business I have to work long hours, don't get anywhere near the number of days holiday that teachers receive, don't have a nice index linked pension to look forward to, and my pay is based on my performance not some figure agreed by a union for all of its members irrespective of whether they are any good at their job. . Yes teachers face challenges and get stressed, but so do thousands of other people working in many different professions. Its the way that you deal with these issues just imagine what would happen if every time we didn't get our own way we all threw our toys out of our pram and went on strike. I think all teachers should be made to spend time working outside of education then perhaps they'd realise that theirs isn't such a bad deal after all.[/p][/quote]Might be worth reading debrunho's post. cherrygood
  • Score: 7

4:11pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Hessenford says...

High Treason wrote:
master plan wrote:
Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.
My granddaughter recently went on a school trip to the Somme, Every child should go. The teachers were at the school at 4-00 am. They had the work and responsibility of the children aged around 11 until their return 3 days later at 10-30 pm. Believe me a group of girls can be extremely demanding.
Overtime pay, not a chance, it does not exist for teachers. Not for trips, parent evenings, department meetings, extra activities etcetera.
Nice free holiday for the teachers though.
[quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.[/p][/quote]My granddaughter recently went on a school trip to the Somme, Every child should go. The teachers were at the school at 4-00 am. They had the work and responsibility of the children aged around 11 until their return 3 days later at 10-30 pm. Believe me a group of girls can be extremely demanding. Overtime pay, not a chance, it does not exist for teachers. Not for trips, parent evenings, department meetings, extra activities etcetera.[/p][/quote]Nice free holiday for the teachers though. Hessenford
  • Score: -9

4:55pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Hessenford says...

133.000 teachers out of 327.000 who belong to N.U.T bothered to vote on whether to take strike action, out of the 133.000 only around 120.000 voted the actually take part in the strike action, hardly a majority of union members is it, so it seems that two thirds of N.U.T members did not want to take part in any strike action.
It seems that the majority of N.U.T members didn't want to take any strike or couldn't be bothered to vote so what's the point of all the disruption.
133.000 teachers out of 327.000 who belong to N.U.T bothered to vote on whether to take strike action, out of the 133.000 only around 120.000 voted the actually take part in the strike action, hardly a majority of union members is it, so it seems that two thirds of N.U.T members did not want to take part in any strike action. It seems that the majority of N.U.T members didn't want to take any strike or couldn't be bothered to vote so what's the point of all the disruption. Hessenford
  • Score: 0

5:24pm Wed 26 Mar 14

cromwell9 says...

Tango Charlie wrote:
Personally I think that the teachers are in an impossible situation.
When the kids in class are disruptive they get sent out so missing lessons., but when they don't pass their exams the teachers get the blame. Not too long ago the kids got the blame for not studying. We would never dare have disrupted the others, all our teachers were ex WW2 combat veterans and we would have got the cane!
How can you put performance related pay into schools? It forces the teachers to just teach the parts of the lessons that will get examined. The kids come out with no in depth understanding of the subject. That is not learning.
Teachers can not be asked to do the job of parents. Discipline is something that the kids should be learning at home.
Labour /Lib Dems have killed the Discipline in our schools over the last 50 yrs,
They are also responsable for the decline in morals in the UK as well,
This is the reason why this country is finished,
GOOD LUCK,
[quote][p][bold]Tango Charlie[/bold] wrote: Personally I think that the teachers are in an impossible situation. When the kids in class are disruptive they get sent out so missing lessons., but when they don't pass their exams the teachers get the blame. Not too long ago the kids got the blame for not studying. We would never dare have disrupted the others, all our teachers were ex WW2 combat veterans and we would have got the cane! How can you put performance related pay into schools? It forces the teachers to just teach the parts of the lessons that will get examined. The kids come out with no in depth understanding of the subject. That is not learning. Teachers can not be asked to do the job of parents. Discipline is something that the kids should be learning at home.[/p][/quote]Labour /Lib Dems have killed the Discipline in our schools over the last 50 yrs, They are also responsable for the decline in morals in the UK as well, This is the reason why this country is finished, GOOD LUCK, cromwell9
  • Score: -1

5:29pm Wed 26 Mar 14

cromwell9 says...

Hessenford wrote:
High Treason wrote:
master plan wrote:
Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.
My granddaughter recently went on a school trip to the Somme, Every child should go. The teachers were at the school at 4-00 am. They had the work and responsibility of the children aged around 11 until their return 3 days later at 10-30 pm. Believe me a group of girls can be extremely demanding.
Overtime pay, not a chance, it does not exist for teachers. Not for trips, parent evenings, department meetings, extra activities etcetera.
Nice free holiday for the teachers though.
Its what we do in the Private Secter all the time,And we dont get paid.
[quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]master plan[/bold] wrote: Here we go teachers moaning that they don't get paid for all the extra hours they put in and should have a pay rise to help with that! Well welcome to the real world millions of people do this everyday. You get paid a huge amount already so don't be greedy and just get on with the job if you really cared about the children then you wouldn't strike at all.[/p][/quote]My granddaughter recently went on a school trip to the Somme, Every child should go. The teachers were at the school at 4-00 am. They had the work and responsibility of the children aged around 11 until their return 3 days later at 10-30 pm. Believe me a group of girls can be extremely demanding. Overtime pay, not a chance, it does not exist for teachers. Not for trips, parent evenings, department meetings, extra activities etcetera.[/p][/quote]Nice free holiday for the teachers though.[/p][/quote]Its what we do in the Private Secter all the time,And we dont get paid. cromwell9
  • Score: -4

5:31pm Wed 26 Mar 14

cromwell9 says...

cherrygood wrote:
BmthNewshound wrote:
Trouble is most teachers have no idea about the economic realities that people working in business and commerce are only to clearly aware of. Most go straight from school to university, straight back to school. . Running my own business I have to work long hours, don't get anywhere near the number of days holiday that teachers receive, don't have a nice index linked pension to look forward to, and my pay is based on my performance not some figure agreed by a union for all of its members irrespective of whether they are any good at their job. . Yes teachers face challenges and get stressed, but so do thousands of other people working in many different professions. Its the way that you deal with these issues just imagine what would happen if every time we didn't get our own way we all threw our toys out of our pram and went on strike. I think all teachers should be made to spend time working outside of education then perhaps they'd realise that theirs isn't such a bad deal after all.
Might be worth reading debrunho's post.
Well said,
[quote][p][bold]cherrygood[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BmthNewshound[/bold] wrote: Trouble is most teachers have no idea about the economic realities that people working in business and commerce are only to clearly aware of. Most go straight from school to university, straight back to school. . Running my own business I have to work long hours, don't get anywhere near the number of days holiday that teachers receive, don't have a nice index linked pension to look forward to, and my pay is based on my performance not some figure agreed by a union for all of its members irrespective of whether they are any good at their job. . Yes teachers face challenges and get stressed, but so do thousands of other people working in many different professions. Its the way that you deal with these issues just imagine what would happen if every time we didn't get our own way we all threw our toys out of our pram and went on strike. I think all teachers should be made to spend time working outside of education then perhaps they'd realise that theirs isn't such a bad deal after all.[/p][/quote]Might be worth reading debrunho's post.[/p][/quote]Well said, cromwell9
  • Score: 2

5:47pm Wed 26 Mar 14

cromwell9 says...

sammmymac wrote:
FrogKiss wrote:
Charge them £100 each for each pupil they don't teach! As parents we are fined if we take holiday during term time. The private sector pay raises have been awful for years.. But the rest of us are just happy we are still employed!
Even if it does cost a blinking fortune to holiday in July and August!
Striking teachers are being fined...they loose roughly £75 - 100 of their pay today. You say they should be grateful to just have a job.
Why should any of us 'just be happy to be employed'/ Working for a living is not a privelege and you sound like you've become so downtrodden that you think it is! Why do you think private sector pay has not increased either lately? Banking crisis maybe. The rich get rich whilst the poor should 'just be happy to have a job'. Should we doff our caps too!?
The gap is widening between the haves and havenots because the working / middle classes are being made to feel grateful and priveleged just to be in work. Have some pride and don't just be happy to be employed. You are one of the country's greatest resources - a tax payer - so deserve proper pay and conditions, which is what the teachers are fighting for.
We in the Private Secter will never catch up with all the benefits ,your Labour Unions have managed to aquire through threats and intimidation for Public Secter Employees,
You have to dum down the Public Secter,If you dont they will become a Mill Stone around the rest of the Private Working Secter ,who fund their life stile ,Including their Salarys.,and Pentions.
For every £1 the Public Secter put in their pentions ,They take £4 out.
We in the Private Secter would have to invest £1 millon in a pention scheme to recieve the same pention as a teacher .on retirement,
I would make ilegal for Teachers to go on stike ,As the Police,
[quote][p][bold]sammmymac[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]FrogKiss[/bold] wrote: Charge them £100 each for each pupil they don't teach! As parents we are fined if we take holiday during term time. The private sector pay raises have been awful for years.. But the rest of us are just happy we are still employed! Even if it does cost a blinking fortune to holiday in July and August![/p][/quote]Striking teachers are being fined...they loose roughly £75 - 100 of their pay today. You say they should be grateful to just have a job. Why should any of us 'just be happy to be employed'/ Working for a living is not a privelege and you sound like you've become so downtrodden that you think it is! Why do you think private sector pay has not increased either lately? Banking crisis maybe. The rich get rich whilst the poor should 'just be happy to have a job'. Should we doff our caps too!? The gap is widening between the haves and havenots because the working / middle classes are being made to feel grateful and priveleged just to be in work. Have some pride and don't just be happy to be employed. You are one of the country's greatest resources - a tax payer - so deserve proper pay and conditions, which is what the teachers are fighting for.[/p][/quote]We in the Private Secter will never catch up with all the benefits ,your Labour Unions have managed to aquire through threats and intimidation for Public Secter Employees, You have to dum down the Public Secter,If you dont they will become a Mill Stone around the rest of the Private Working Secter ,who fund their life stile ,Including their Salarys.,and Pentions. For every £1 the Public Secter put in their pentions ,They take £4 out. We in the Private Secter would have to invest £1 millon in a pention scheme to recieve the same pention as a teacher .on retirement, I would make ilegal for Teachers to go on stike ,As the Police, cromwell9
  • Score: -4

5:55pm Wed 26 Mar 14

cromwell9 says...

debrunho wrote:
Hi,

I'm a 34 year old male primary teacher myself . 4 years ago I left my previous (higher paid) career to pursue a more worthwhile career path. I am driven by dong my very best for my children; inspiring them, giving them a sense of self worth and positively influencing who they will become. When embarking on this career change I thought I had found my purpose. Throughout my training I received regular 'outstanding' observations and had some of my research published in an international Journal. Since becoming a teacher, I have received many outstanding observations and, in this day and age, I am considered an 'outstanding' teacher.

Doing my best for my children is the most important thing for me. I am driven by having the most positive of influence on their lives. This is why I have been on strike today and maybe why I am seriously considering leaving the profession.

Why? For me, and many of my like minded colleagues, it is not about the money. Having come from a corporate background myself I understand how some may view teachers if you consider it merely monetary. It is because of the unnecessary bureaucracy whereby I am working over 60 hours a week with most of the 'out of hours' work spent doing basic administrative tasks, analysing and assessing data, reporting on what I have been doing, documenting evidence on what I have been doing etc etc. Whereby this may seem reasonable to some the only people this really has a negative impact upon is the children. I spend most of these hours outside of work and in the holidays proving how I'm doing my job through documentation . If I was able to spend just a quarter of this 'outside of hours' work on actual planning and preparation to make everyday magical and inspiring for my children then surely this would be more beneficial in the long run?

I am naturally devastated that this profession at which was initially my 'lifes calling' has turned out to be some sort of data game of proof. As a dedicated professional who always has my children's interests in mind, I do not see how I can continue playing this game and not being able to focus on the things that are really important to me ...... my children. 60 + hours a week, stress, fear, abuse - Suddenly my corporate office life seems more appealing.

Over 50% of newly qualified teachers leave the profession within 5 years. This is not always because they 'cant handle the pace' - it's often because they are passionate, they are child centred and they are driven. The profession kicks them down until they realise they either have to sacrifice their values which took them into teaching or leave.

Sorry for the rant.
Stay where you are my friend .The Private Secter is a differnt animal since you last worked in it ,
You have a wonderfull salary,fantastic pention ,10 wks leave ,No wknd /bank holiday working,wonderfull sick leave ,scheme,
And no chance of getting made redundant .
ARE YOU MAD
[quote][p][bold]debrunho[/bold] wrote: Hi, I'm a 34 year old male primary teacher myself . 4 years ago I left my previous (higher paid) career to pursue a more worthwhile career path. I am driven by dong my very best for my children; inspiring them, giving them a sense of self worth and positively influencing who they will become. When embarking on this career change I thought I had found my purpose. Throughout my training I received regular 'outstanding' observations and had some of my research published in an international Journal. Since becoming a teacher, I have received many outstanding observations and, in this day and age, I am considered an 'outstanding' teacher. Doing my best for my children is the most important thing for me. I am driven by having the most positive of influence on their lives. This is why I have been on strike today and maybe why I am seriously considering leaving the profession. Why? For me, and many of my like minded colleagues, it is not about the money. Having come from a corporate background myself I understand how some may view teachers if you consider it merely monetary. It is because of the unnecessary bureaucracy whereby I am working over 60 hours a week with most of the 'out of hours' work spent doing basic administrative tasks, analysing and assessing data, reporting on what I have been doing, documenting evidence on what I have been doing etc etc. Whereby this may seem reasonable to some the only people this really has a negative impact upon is the children. I spend most of these hours outside of work and in the holidays proving how I'm doing my job through documentation . If I was able to spend just a quarter of this 'outside of hours' work on actual planning and preparation to make everyday magical and inspiring for my children then surely this would be more beneficial in the long run? I am naturally devastated that this profession at which was initially my 'lifes calling' has turned out to be some sort of data game of proof. As a dedicated professional who always has my children's interests in mind, I do not see how I can continue playing this game and not being able to focus on the things that are really important to me ...... my children. 60 + hours a week, stress, fear, abuse - Suddenly my corporate office life seems more appealing. Over 50% of newly qualified teachers leave the profession within 5 years. This is not always because they 'cant handle the pace' - it's often because they are passionate, they are child centred and they are driven. The profession kicks them down until they realise they either have to sacrifice their values which took them into teaching or leave. Sorry for the rant.[/p][/quote]Stay where you are my friend .The Private Secter is a differnt animal since you last worked in it , You have a wonderfull salary,fantastic pention ,10 wks leave ,No wknd /bank holiday working,wonderfull sick leave ,scheme, And no chance of getting made redundant . ARE YOU MAD cromwell9
  • Score: -4

6:56pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Carolyn43 says...

Cromwell9 said: "And no chance of getting made redundant ."
......
Untrue. Every few years there is a recruitment drive for teachers and many decide to enter the profession. Then there's a public financial crisis and some teachers have to be made redundant. That's what happened the year I retired on ill health grounds. I retired that year rather than the following one to save a job for someone else. The most expensive (the most experienced) teachers are in the firing line. Then it's found that there are insufficient teachers and there's a recruitment drive for. Then there's a public financial crisis ....................
...................
.......
Doesn't happen as often now because many entering teaching decide it's not what they thought because there's so much reporting and paperwork rather than actual teaching and they leave.
......
Unless you've experienced it you have no idea what you can be faced with from parents. My prime one was being blamed by parents for a 15 year-old girl's pregnancy for not teaching her about contraception (as if that was even my job) , when the parents both worked in the evenings and left her alone in the house with her boyfriend. They couldn't see that it was because they gave her the opportunity to have sex. Another told me it was my duty to instil discipline their child, not theirs.
Cromwell9 said: "And no chance of getting made redundant ." ...... Untrue. Every few years there is a recruitment drive for teachers and many decide to enter the profession. Then there's a public financial crisis and some teachers have to be made redundant. That's what happened the year I retired on ill health grounds. I retired that year rather than the following one to save a job for someone else. The most expensive (the most experienced) teachers are in the firing line. Then it's found that there are insufficient teachers and there's a recruitment drive for. Then there's a public financial crisis .................... ................... ....... Doesn't happen as often now because many entering teaching decide it's not what they thought because there's so much reporting and paperwork rather than actual teaching and they leave. ...... Unless you've experienced it you have no idea what you can be faced with from parents. My prime one was being blamed by parents for a 15 year-old girl's pregnancy for not teaching her about contraception (as if that was even my job) , when the parents both worked in the evenings and left her alone in the house with her boyfriend. They couldn't see that it was because they gave her the opportunity to have sex. Another told me it was my duty to instil discipline their child, not theirs. Carolyn43
  • Score: 5

8:36pm Wed 26 Mar 14

Abc1970 says...

Perhaps if parents actually did some parenting rather than handing their children over to a range of electronic babysitters, it would make the teachers lives easier, the pressure is therefore removed and the striking stops. School is not day care, children are there to learn, but if a teacher dare try to discipline a child all he'll breaks loose. Children need to learn manners and respect, which they should be learning at home! I'm not a teacher, but it am married to one, we have 2 school age children, I also work full time and am also studying a degree in my own time and at my own expense in order to progress in my career. I therefore feel I am in a position to comment, most of the other muppets are not!
Perhaps if parents actually did some parenting rather than handing their children over to a range of electronic babysitters, it would make the teachers lives easier, the pressure is therefore removed and the striking stops. School is not day care, children are there to learn, but if a teacher dare try to discipline a child all he'll breaks loose. Children need to learn manners and respect, which they should be learning at home! I'm not a teacher, but it am married to one, we have 2 school age children, I also work full time and am also studying a degree in my own time and at my own expense in order to progress in my career. I therefore feel I am in a position to comment, most of the other muppets are not! Abc1970
  • Score: 2

5:21pm Sat 29 Mar 14

Tango Charlie says...

It does not matter what any informed person will say on here. The 10 second sound bite will work better. I went on strike with the ambulance service, we lost. You now will have paramedics up to 70 years old to carry 25 stone patients down the stairs.
Why did we loose? Because everyone knew our position better than us! Well done to everyone who supported us, you must have been a history teacher specializing in German political doctrine from the 1930s.
It maddens me that the general public seem to have the memory span attributed to a goldfish. It used to be the Conservatives that used to champion the nurses, saying that they are are underpaid. Guess what? They still are! Coming from a background where you are covered in vomit, urine, or other body material and working 15 hour shifts (including the last call out 2 minutes before your shift ends) I find the governments handling of the public sector deplorable.
Everyone has their point of view, and rightly so. But how many really examine the true situation? Research the arguments? My guess would be under 10%.
The difference between a belief and a fact is that facts get tested and examined. I WILL NOT tell you what to believe. The government will tell you that, I would suggest that everyone looks at the points of view and research them for themselves.
It does not matter what any informed person will say on here. The 10 second sound bite will work better. I went on strike with the ambulance service, we lost. You now will have paramedics up to 70 years old to carry 25 stone patients down the stairs. Why did we loose? Because everyone knew our position better than us! Well done to everyone who supported us, you must have been a history teacher specializing in German political doctrine from the 1930s. It maddens me that the general public seem to have the memory span attributed to a goldfish. It used to be the Conservatives that used to champion the nurses, saying that they are are underpaid. Guess what? They still are! Coming from a background where you are covered in vomit, urine, or other body material and working 15 hour shifts (including the last call out 2 minutes before your shift ends) I find the governments handling of the public sector deplorable. Everyone has their point of view, and rightly so. But how many really examine the true situation? Research the arguments? My guess would be under 10%. The difference between a belief and a fact is that facts get tested and examined. I WILL NOT tell you what to believe. The government will tell you that, I would suggest that everyone looks at the points of view and research them for themselves. Tango Charlie
  • Score: 3

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