Dog’s death caused by mysterious Alabama Rot disease after walks at St Catherine’s Hill

Bournemouth Echo: Five-year-old flat-coated retriever Erin Five-year-old flat-coated retriever Erin

A DOG who was taken ill after woodland walks in Christchurch died from the mysterious Alabama Rot condition, tests have confirmed.

Five-year-old flat-coated retriever Erin, who died earlier this month from acute kidney failure, was only ever walked at St Catherine’s Hill.

Vets who treated Erin have urged dog owners to be vigilant for the symptoms of Alabama Rot, which include unusual skin lesions.

But it is not clear how the condition is contracted and vets say there is no reason to avoid any particular places.

Erin’s owner Tracy Graham said: “No one knows how it’s spread. Everyone has their suspicions but nobody really knows.

“I know for a fact that my dog was eating soil.”

Alabama Rot has been linked to at least 12 previous dog deaths in the New Forest and seven elsewhere in the country.

David Walker, head of medicine at specialist vet Anderson Moores of Hursley near Winchester, said: “The message we’ve been giving out is very much the same – it’s worrying but we are still talking about a very small number of dogs that are involved.

“There’s no evidence for us to say to pet owners that they should be avoiding any particular areas because there’s nothing common – no common specific location, no common type of environment that those pets are being walked in.”

He was sceptical about theories that the outbreaks could be linked to former RAF bases.

“I can’t give out details but I’ve spoken to the people you would expect me to talk to about that sort of thing,” he said. He said no link had been found.

He said other cases had emerged in other parts of the UK once the story had reached the national media.

Mr Walker said the ‘working theory’ was that the toxin was ingested by dogs rather than absorbed through the skin lesions.

Tracy Graham’s other dog, Erin’s mother Holly, was not affected by Alabama Rot, although she has been seriously ill with an unrelated condition since.

Tracy said Holly had been pining for Erin. “She’s a totally changed dog,” she added.

Comments (13)

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9:07am Wed 26 Feb 14

Wesoblind says...

American created chemical warfare on our doorstep is the more worrying aspect, how did it get here?
American created chemical warfare on our doorstep is the more worrying aspect, how did it get here? Wesoblind
  • Score: -10

12:07pm Wed 26 Feb 14

bobsworthforever says...

Don't care what the specialist vet says wont be walking my dogs in the forest for the timebeing out of 19 dogs twelve deaths in the New Forest.We need more information like where did the dogs come from etc
Don't care what the specialist vet says wont be walking my dogs in the forest for the timebeing out of 19 dogs twelve deaths in the New Forest.We need more information like where did the dogs come from etc bobsworthforever
  • Score: 3

2:39pm Wed 26 Feb 14

crispy_pants says...

"a dog who".
.
Can you refer to a dog as "Who"?
.
I thought "Who" referred to a person.
"a dog who". . Can you refer to a dog as "Who"? . I thought "Who" referred to a person. crispy_pants
  • Score: -13

3:06pm Wed 26 Feb 14

Turtlebay says...

The condition is caused by being bitten by or even eating, a false widow spider, of which there were numerous in this area last autumn.
The condition is caused by being bitten by or even eating, a false widow spider, of which there were numerous in this area last autumn. Turtlebay
  • Score: -8

3:19pm Wed 26 Feb 14

MngsMnr says...

Be on the lookout for palm oil washed up on our beaches. It was reported in Southampton earlier in the month http://www.bbc.co.uk
/news/uk-england-262
39457 but I've heard a local dog being affected by it
Be on the lookout for palm oil washed up on our beaches. It was reported in Southampton earlier in the month http://www.bbc.co.uk /news/uk-england-262 39457 but I've heard a local dog being affected by it MngsMnr
  • Score: 3

5:11pm Wed 26 Feb 14

jazziewoo says...

Turtlebay wrote:
The condition is caused by being bitten by or even eating, a false widow spider, of which there were numerous in this area last autumn.
Where on earth do you have the evidence to support this theory? I would be very keen to see the source as we have been following these deaths very carefully and havent seen this one come up as a theory.
[quote][p][bold]Turtlebay[/bold] wrote: The condition is caused by being bitten by or even eating, a false widow spider, of which there were numerous in this area last autumn.[/p][/quote]Where on earth do you have the evidence to support this theory? I would be very keen to see the source as we have been following these deaths very carefully and havent seen this one come up as a theory. jazziewoo
  • Score: 3

5:20pm Wed 26 Feb 14

GeorgeW64 says...

They say keep your eye out for the symptoms but then what, watch your dog die slowly of kidney failure, has one been cured of this mysterious disease yet ?
They say keep your eye out for the symptoms but then what, watch your dog die slowly of kidney failure, has one been cured of this mysterious disease yet ? GeorgeW64
  • Score: 1

5:22pm Wed 26 Feb 14

GeorgeW64 says...

jazziewoo wrote:
Turtlebay wrote:
The condition is caused by being bitten by or even eating, a false widow spider, of which there were numerous in this area last autumn.
Where on earth do you have the evidence to support this theory? I would be very keen to see the source as we have been following these deaths very carefully and havent seen this one come up as a theory.
Probably a Daily Star reader have pity.
[quote][p][bold]jazziewoo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Turtlebay[/bold] wrote: The condition is caused by being bitten by or even eating, a false widow spider, of which there were numerous in this area last autumn.[/p][/quote]Where on earth do you have the evidence to support this theory? I would be very keen to see the source as we have been following these deaths very carefully and havent seen this one come up as a theory.[/p][/quote]Probably a Daily Star reader have pity. GeorgeW64
  • Score: -1

9:36pm Wed 26 Feb 14

Turtlebay says...

jazziewoo wrote:
Turtlebay wrote:
The condition is caused by being bitten by or even eating, a false widow spider, of which there were numerous in this area last autumn.
Where on earth do you have the evidence to support this theory? I would be very keen to see the source as we have been following these deaths very carefully and havent seen this one come up as a theory.
Scientific evidence which has already been presented to the autopsy vets in Winchester who have kept it under wraps for their own reasons.

If you had been reading the recent articles on the dog deaths on this site and their sister site, the Daily Echo at Southampton, you would have seen my posts revealing it.

Also bear in mind that the Alabama Rot disease has not been reported in any canines further north than The Wash which is the current range of the false widow spider.
[quote][p][bold]jazziewoo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Turtlebay[/bold] wrote: The condition is caused by being bitten by or even eating, a false widow spider, of which there were numerous in this area last autumn.[/p][/quote]Where on earth do you have the evidence to support this theory? I would be very keen to see the source as we have been following these deaths very carefully and havent seen this one come up as a theory.[/p][/quote]Scientific evidence which has already been presented to the autopsy vets in Winchester who have kept it under wraps for their own reasons. If you had been reading the recent articles on the dog deaths on this site and their sister site, the Daily Echo at Southampton, you would have seen my posts revealing it. Also bear in mind that the Alabama Rot disease has not been reported in any canines further north than The Wash which is the current range of the false widow spider. Turtlebay
  • Score: 0

12:14pm Thu 27 Feb 14

Daffadilly says...

GeorgeW64 wrote:
They say keep your eye out for the symptoms but then what, watch your dog die slowly of kidney failure, has one been cured of this mysterious disease yet ?
3 out of the 12 confirmed cases in the New Forest Area have survived. http://www.newforest
.gov.uk/index.cfm?ar
ticleid=14110
[quote][p][bold]GeorgeW64[/bold] wrote: They say keep your eye out for the symptoms but then what, watch your dog die slowly of kidney failure, has one been cured of this mysterious disease yet ?[/p][/quote]3 out of the 12 confirmed cases in the New Forest Area have survived. http://www.newforest .gov.uk/index.cfm?ar ticleid=14110 Daffadilly
  • Score: 0

4:46pm Thu 27 Feb 14

Emma241 says...

After hearing about this disease I have been reading around the subject to learn more. Hope this information helps some of you in knowing when is best to seek veterinary advice-

The disease has been around for some time but is very rare- only 13 cases have been investigated since the first case in December 2012. As it is a new disease it takes time for the direct cause to be identified, so the best steps to take in the fight against 'Alabama Rot' is to spot the signs early and get any potentially affected dogs treated. Once a direct cause is identified owners can be better informed about the steps they can take in stopping the disease from affecting their pets.
The media has called it 'Alabama Rot' as it is similar to the disease seen in USA racing greyhounds, but veterinary pathologists don't know as yet if it is the same disease. It characterizes itself as affecting the blood vessels in the skin and the kidneys.

Signs to look out for: skin lesions (particularly the lower legs)- looking almost like ulcers, or just reddened areas (which can happen within a week of walking dogs in the areas identified as affected.) Signs of renal (kidney) disease start to show 2-7 days of the appearance of skin lesions- lethargic, off their food, vomiting and generally being ‘off colour’. So therefore, it is recommended to take dogs showing these signs after walking in the areas where the disease has been present to their nearest vets to get treatment as early as possible.

Hope this helps!
After hearing about this disease I have been reading around the subject to learn more. Hope this information helps some of you in knowing when is best to seek veterinary advice- The disease has been around for some time but is very rare- only 13 cases have been investigated since the first case in December 2012. As it is a new disease it takes time for the direct cause to be identified, so the best steps to take in the fight against 'Alabama Rot' is to spot the signs early and get any potentially affected dogs treated. Once a direct cause is identified owners can be better informed about the steps they can take in stopping the disease from affecting their pets. The media has called it 'Alabama Rot' as it is similar to the disease seen in USA racing greyhounds, but veterinary pathologists don't know as yet if it is the same disease. It characterizes itself as affecting the blood vessels in the skin and the kidneys. Signs to look out for: skin lesions (particularly the lower legs)- looking almost like ulcers, or just reddened areas (which can happen within a week of walking dogs in the areas identified as affected.) Signs of renal (kidney) disease start to show 2-7 days of the appearance of skin lesions- lethargic, off their food, vomiting and generally being ‘off colour’. So therefore, it is recommended to take dogs showing these signs after walking in the areas where the disease has been present to their nearest vets to get treatment as early as possible. Hope this helps! Emma241
  • Score: 1

2:51pm Sat 1 Mar 14

crabsallover says...

Turtlebay wrote:
jazziewoo wrote:
Turtlebay wrote:
The condition is caused by being bitten by or even eating, a false widow spider, of which there were numerous in this area last autumn.
Where on earth do you have the evidence to support this theory? I would be very keen to see the source as we have been following these deaths very carefully and havent seen this one come up as a theory.
Scientific evidence which has already been presented to the autopsy vets in Winchester who have kept it under wraps for their own reasons.

If you had been reading the recent articles on the dog deaths on this site and their sister site, the Daily Echo at Southampton, you would have seen my posts revealing it.

Also bear in mind that the Alabama Rot disease has not been reported in any canines further north than The Wash which is the current range of the false widow spider.
"Also bear in mind that the Alabama Rot disease has not been reported in any canines further north than The Wash which is the current range of the false widow spider."

Alabama Rot has been confirmed north of The Wash in County Durham, Yorkshire and County Antrim.
reference: http://www.newforest
.gov.uk/index.cfm?ar
ticleid=14110

see map of locations of confirmed and unconfirmed cases: https://mapsengine.g
oogle.com/map/edit?h
l=en&authuser=0&mid=
zIJgTtl9x6zk.kif7awT
R9hAA

what evidence do you have that there is "scientific evidence which has already been presented to the autopsy vets in Winchester ." If you have seen that scientific or other evidence please present it here or on the Facebook group "new forest pathogen killing dogs".
[quote][p][bold]Turtlebay[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jazziewoo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Turtlebay[/bold] wrote: The condition is caused by being bitten by or even eating, a false widow spider, of which there were numerous in this area last autumn.[/p][/quote]Where on earth do you have the evidence to support this theory? I would be very keen to see the source as we have been following these deaths very carefully and havent seen this one come up as a theory.[/p][/quote]Scientific evidence which has already been presented to the autopsy vets in Winchester who have kept it under wraps for their own reasons. If you had been reading the recent articles on the dog deaths on this site and their sister site, the Daily Echo at Southampton, you would have seen my posts revealing it. Also bear in mind that the Alabama Rot disease has not been reported in any canines further north than The Wash which is the current range of the false widow spider.[/p][/quote]"Also bear in mind that the Alabama Rot disease has not been reported in any canines further north than The Wash which is the current range of the false widow spider." Alabama Rot has been confirmed north of The Wash in County Durham, Yorkshire and County Antrim. reference: http://www.newforest .gov.uk/index.cfm?ar ticleid=14110 see map of locations of confirmed and unconfirmed cases: https://mapsengine.g oogle.com/map/edit?h l=en&authuser=0&mid= zIJgTtl9x6zk.kif7awT R9hAA what evidence do you have that there is "scientific evidence which has already been presented to the autopsy vets in Winchester [Anderson Moores]." If you have seen that scientific or other evidence please present it here or on the Facebook group "new forest pathogen killing dogs". crabsallover
  • Score: 0

3:13pm Sat 1 Mar 14

crabsallover says...

crabsallover wrote:
Turtlebay wrote:
jazziewoo wrote:
Turtlebay wrote:
The condition is caused by being bitten by or even eating, a false widow spider, of which there were numerous in this area last autumn.
Where on earth do you have the evidence to support this theory? I would be very keen to see the source as we have been following these deaths very carefully and havent seen this one come up as a theory.
Scientific evidence which has already been presented to the autopsy vets in Winchester who have kept it under wraps for their own reasons.

If you had been reading the recent articles on the dog deaths on this site and their sister site, the Daily Echo at Southampton, you would have seen my posts revealing it.

Also bear in mind that the Alabama Rot disease has not been reported in any canines further north than The Wash which is the current range of the false widow spider.
"Also bear in mind that the Alabama Rot disease has not been reported in any canines further north than The Wash which is the current range of the false widow spider."

Alabama Rot has been confirmed north of The Wash in County Durham, Yorkshire and County Antrim.
reference: http://www.newforest

.gov.uk/index.cfm?ar

ticleid=14110

see map of locations of confirmed and unconfirmed cases: https://mapsengine.g

oogle.com/map/edit?h

l=en&authuser=0&
amp;mid=
zIJgTtl9x6zk.kif7awT

R9hAA

what evidence do you have that there is "scientific evidence which has already been presented to the autopsy vets in Winchester ." If you have seen that scientific or other evidence please present it here or on the Facebook group "new forest pathogen killing dogs".
this map shows spread of false widow spider. http://srs.britishsp
iders.org.uk/portal.
php/p/Summary/s/Stea
toda+nobilis

Alabama rot is confirmed outside the areas that false widow spiders are present. See: https://mapsengine.g
oogle.com/map/edit?h
l=en&authuser=0&mid=
zIJgTtl9x6zk.kif7awT
R9hAA

Therefore the hypothesis that aetiology of Alabama Rot is because dogs get poisoned by false widow spiders, is probably false.
[quote][p][bold]crabsallover[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Turtlebay[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jazziewoo[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Turtlebay[/bold] wrote: The condition is caused by being bitten by or even eating, a false widow spider, of which there were numerous in this area last autumn.[/p][/quote]Where on earth do you have the evidence to support this theory? I would be very keen to see the source as we have been following these deaths very carefully and havent seen this one come up as a theory.[/p][/quote]Scientific evidence which has already been presented to the autopsy vets in Winchester who have kept it under wraps for their own reasons. If you had been reading the recent articles on the dog deaths on this site and their sister site, the Daily Echo at Southampton, you would have seen my posts revealing it. Also bear in mind that the Alabama Rot disease has not been reported in any canines further north than The Wash which is the current range of the false widow spider.[/p][/quote]"Also bear in mind that the Alabama Rot disease has not been reported in any canines further north than The Wash which is the current range of the false widow spider." Alabama Rot has been confirmed north of The Wash in County Durham, Yorkshire and County Antrim. reference: http://www.newforest .gov.uk/index.cfm?ar ticleid=14110 see map of locations of confirmed and unconfirmed cases: https://mapsengine.g oogle.com/map/edit?h l=en&authuser=0& amp;mid= zIJgTtl9x6zk.kif7awT R9hAA what evidence do you have that there is "scientific evidence which has already been presented to the autopsy vets in Winchester [Anderson Moores]." If you have seen that scientific or other evidence please present it here or on the Facebook group "new forest pathogen killing dogs".[/p][/quote]this map shows spread of false widow spider. http://srs.britishsp iders.org.uk/portal. php/p/Summary/s/Stea toda+nobilis Alabama rot is confirmed outside the areas that false widow spiders are present. See: https://mapsengine.g oogle.com/map/edit?h l=en&authuser=0&mid= zIJgTtl9x6zk.kif7awT R9hAA Therefore the hypothesis that aetiology of Alabama Rot is because dogs get poisoned by false widow spiders, is probably false. crabsallover
  • Score: 0

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