Bournemouth manufacturer unveils gearbox for golf trolleys

GETTING INTO GEAR: The Parvalux factory

GETTING INTO GEAR: The GB41 gearbox made especially for golf trolleys

First published in News by

A MANUFACTURER has unveiled a new gearbox designed especially for golf trolleys.

And after developing the product, Bournemouth-based Parvalux put it through a test that involved simulating 250 rounds of golf.

Parvalux technical director Martin Pennock said: “We recognised that a universally mounted gearbox would benefit our OEM (original equipment manufacturer) and MRO (maintenance, repair and operations) customers, who wish to retrofit existing golf trolleys on the market.

The GB41 is also available in low volume for fast turnaround from our Parvalux Service Centre.”

The GB41 gearbox has mounting holes located to ensure it can be retrofitted to any golf trolley on the UK market.

It was created by Parvalux’s in-house product design and development facility, which consists of 17 engineers who design bespoke motors for a range of industry segments.

The application engineers at Parvalux’s test facility carried out an ‘accelerated life’ test on the GB41, using a golf trolley test rig.

An electromagnetic particle break was used to apply a variable load on the product, replicating the steep slopes of a typical golf course.

The rig performs 4,000 cycles on the gearbox, simulating 250 rounds of golf.

Parvalux, based at Wallisdown Road, is the UK’s largest manufacturer of small-geared motors, with 18 million of its geared motors installed around the world.

It was founded in Romford by Leslie J Clark, who began selling motor rewinds in 1947.

The company relocated to Bournemouth in 1957 and moved from re-winding motors to designing and manufacturing complete gear-motor units for industry. It is part of the Clark Group under chief executive Steven Clark.

Comments (7)

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10:07am Thu 6 Feb 14

Lord Spring says...

Will that stop the bad language when a putt is missed.
Will that stop the bad language when a putt is missed. Lord Spring
  • Score: 1

10:39am Thu 6 Feb 14

RED on tour says...

"An electromagnetic particle "break" was used to apply a variable load on the product"
If Mr Slade is the "chief" god knows what the spelling standard is amongst his fellow reporters. His understanding of the story he is reporting is at the very best woeful.
"An electromagnetic particle "break" was used to apply a variable load on the product" If Mr Slade is the "chief" god knows what the spelling standard is amongst his fellow reporters. His understanding of the story he is reporting is at the very best woeful. RED on tour
  • Score: 4

11:10am Thu 6 Feb 14

whataboutthat says...

Busy day for cuttin' and pastin' press releases at the Echo - the weekend is nigh.
Busy day for cuttin' and pastin' press releases at the Echo - the weekend is nigh. whataboutthat
  • Score: 4

1:07pm Thu 6 Feb 14

The-Bleeding-Obvious says...

Is this news item appearing in response to 'muscliffmans' comment posted yesterday concerning the story/advertisement regarding that well known legal firms recruitment exploits I wonder?
Is this news item appearing in response to 'muscliffmans' comment posted yesterday concerning the story/advertisement regarding that well known legal firms recruitment exploits I wonder? The-Bleeding-Obvious
  • Score: 2

2:04am Fri 7 Feb 14

billd766 says...

I used to work for Parvalux for a couple of months at the end of 1959 not long after I left school. I quit to join the RAF as a Boy Entrant in January 1960. I worked on the finishing line stamping the metal labels and riviting them on the motors.
Going to the stores was scary for an innocent 15 year old boy as I had to go through the workshops which were full of WOMEN and some of them you wouldn't want to take home to your Mum.
I was sent for long stands, glass or rubber hammers, long weights, left handed screwdrivers etc. All the usual things new kids were sent for.
I used to work for Parvalux for a couple of months at the end of 1959 not long after I left school. I quit to join the RAF as a Boy Entrant in January 1960. I worked on the finishing line stamping the metal labels and riviting them on the motors. Going to the stores was scary for an innocent 15 year old boy as I had to go through the workshops which were full of WOMEN and some of them you wouldn't want to take home to your Mum. I was sent for long stands, glass or rubber hammers, long weights, left handed screwdrivers etc. All the usual things new kids were sent for. billd766
  • Score: 0

10:15am Fri 7 Feb 14

elite50 says...

billd766 wrote:
I used to work for Parvalux for a couple of months at the end of 1959 not long after I left school. I quit to join the RAF as a Boy Entrant in January 1960. I worked on the finishing line stamping the metal labels and riviting them on the motors.
Going to the stores was scary for an innocent 15 year old boy as I had to go through the workshops which were full of WOMEN and some of them you wouldn't want to take home to your Mum.
I was sent for long stands, glass or rubber hammers, long weights, left handed screwdrivers etc. All the usual things new kids were sent for.
Oh nostalgia!
I was an apprentice printer for Richmond Hill Printers.
As a young boy I used to hate having to work in the Bindery section, nearly all women and not a virgin in sight (except me).
They knew. My God, I never knew an eight hour day could take so long!
[quote][p][bold]billd766[/bold] wrote: I used to work for Parvalux for a couple of months at the end of 1959 not long after I left school. I quit to join the RAF as a Boy Entrant in January 1960. I worked on the finishing line stamping the metal labels and riviting them on the motors. Going to the stores was scary for an innocent 15 year old boy as I had to go through the workshops which were full of WOMEN and some of them you wouldn't want to take home to your Mum. I was sent for long stands, glass or rubber hammers, long weights, left handed screwdrivers etc. All the usual things new kids were sent for.[/p][/quote]Oh nostalgia! I was an apprentice printer for Richmond Hill Printers. As a young boy I used to hate having to work in the Bindery section, nearly all women and not a virgin in sight (except me). They knew. My God, I never knew an eight hour day could take so long! elite50
  • Score: 1

2:13pm Fri 7 Feb 14

billd766 says...

elite50 wrote:
billd766 wrote:
I used to work for Parvalux for a couple of months at the end of 1959 not long after I left school. I quit to join the RAF as a Boy Entrant in January 1960. I worked on the finishing line stamping the metal labels and riviting them on the motors.
Going to the stores was scary for an innocent 15 year old boy as I had to go through the workshops which were full of WOMEN and some of them you wouldn't want to take home to your Mum.
I was sent for long stands, glass or rubber hammers, long weights, left handed screwdrivers etc. All the usual things new kids were sent for.
Oh nostalgia!
I was an apprentice printer for Richmond Hill Printers.
As a young boy I used to hate having to work in the Bindery section, nearly all women and not a virgin in sight (except me).
They knew. My God, I never knew an eight hour day could take so long!
Or be so scary.
[quote][p][bold]elite50[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]billd766[/bold] wrote: I used to work for Parvalux for a couple of months at the end of 1959 not long after I left school. I quit to join the RAF as a Boy Entrant in January 1960. I worked on the finishing line stamping the metal labels and riviting them on the motors. Going to the stores was scary for an innocent 15 year old boy as I had to go through the workshops which were full of WOMEN and some of them you wouldn't want to take home to your Mum. I was sent for long stands, glass or rubber hammers, long weights, left handed screwdrivers etc. All the usual things new kids were sent for.[/p][/quote]Oh nostalgia! I was an apprentice printer for Richmond Hill Printers. As a young boy I used to hate having to work in the Bindery section, nearly all women and not a virgin in sight (except me). They knew. My God, I never knew an eight hour day could take so long![/p][/quote]Or be so scary. billd766
  • Score: 0

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