'Worst weather for 30 years' - volunteers rally together to save Swanage businesses from rising tide

'Worst weather for 30 years' - volunteers rally together to save Swanage businesses from rising tide

'Worst weather for 30 years' - volunteers rally together to save Swanage businesses from rising tide

'Worst weather for 30 years' - volunteers rally together to save Swanage businesses from rising tide

First published in News
Last updated
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THE rising tide threatened to flood a number of businesses in Swanage during what traders described as some of the worst weather in 30 years.

Volunteers, many of them from the town’s business community, rallied together and used brooms and brushes to sweep flood water away from their premises into nearby drains.

And by the end of a frantic couple of hours work, they’d managed to turn back the sea and stave off potentially devastating water damage.

Swanage’s East Bar looked like it was going to take the brunt of the seawater, which locals said swept further up the High Street on Tuesday night compared to anytime in the past three decades

East Bar and Bar One manager, Michael Bird, said: “We knew high tide was coming, around 11.45pm, and by 10pm the sea started coming up the road.

 

@Bournemouthecho Half an hour b4 high tide last nite #swanage #purbeck #floodpictures pic.twitter.com/74i23QSmmH

— East Bar Swanage (@EastBar1) February 5, 2014

“We rustled together a load of sandbags as quickly as possible, got them all in place, built a sandbag wall in front of the main bar door and the patio entrances through both venues and the front door of Bar One next door.

“We were using brooms, trying to sweep the water down the drains. The seaweed was the worst. We were constantly picking it out of the drains.

@Bournemouthecho Community effort to keep water out, just after hight tide last nite #swanage #floodpictures pic.twitter.com/yVRrlGO2o9

— East Bar Swanage (@EastBar1) February 5, 2014

“By midnight, there were about 20 of us all with brooms. It was a great community effort.”

See more pictures of the storms in a gallery here

The next day, traffic officials closed parts of Shore Road and many businesses had taken the precaution of piling sandbags in front of doorways.

A digger was also drafted in to help shore up High Street defences, while scores of sightseers gathered around the seafront and Mowlem Theatre to photograph and film huge waves smashing against the sea wall.

On Tuesday night’s drama, Adrian Wright, of Swanage’s High Street Cafe, told the Daily Echo: “The water didn’t actually come into the cafe, because there was a whole bunch of us last night with brushes to push the sea water back. I don’t think we would have flooded, but East Bar certainly would have if we hadn’t all been there.

“Some large rocks came up last night, the sea just kicks them up.”

Martin Higgs, of Swanage Angling Centre, High Street, said: “The drains out there just cannot cope. I’ve been here three years and I’ve never seen seawater quite as far down the road as it was on Tuesday night.”

See more coverage in our weather section bournemouthecho.co.uk/dorsetweather

Comments (7)

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4:00am Thu 6 Feb 14

Jetwasher says...

30 years, phaa yeah ok.
30 years, phaa yeah ok. Jetwasher
  • Score: -7

8:56am Thu 6 Feb 14

hooplaa says...

Another made up statement!
Another made up statement! hooplaa
  • Score: 2

9:16am Thu 6 Feb 14

woby_tide says...

"by the end of a frantic couple of hours work, they’d managed to turn back the sea"

Are we suggesting that the brooms of Swanage are wielding power akin to Moses and his staff......

Has someone redirected the Wikipedia page on tides to an online Bible when the Echo staff researched it
"by the end of a frantic couple of hours work, they’d managed to turn back the sea" Are we suggesting that the brooms of Swanage are wielding power akin to Moses and his staff...... Has someone redirected the Wikipedia page on tides to an online Bible when the Echo staff researched it woby_tide
  • Score: 0

9:42am Thu 6 Feb 14

elite50 says...

This is, of course, another example of global warming.
If normal weather was being experienced this rain would fall as snow and hold back the rising tide.
Oh, by the way there is talk of another mini ice age on the horizon.
We will be able to walk to France for our summer holidays.
Why, oh why, is it that a few odd days are the precursor of the end of the world (again)?
This is, of course, another example of global warming. If normal weather was being experienced this rain would fall as snow and hold back the rising tide. Oh, by the way there is talk of another mini ice age on the horizon. We will be able to walk to France for our summer holidays. Why, oh why, is it that a few odd days are the precursor of the end of the world (again)? elite50
  • Score: -4

9:58am Thu 6 Feb 14

Lord Spring says...

Aldi have plenty of snow shovels beat the rush buy now.
Aldi have plenty of snow shovels beat the rush buy now. Lord Spring
  • Score: -1

11:00am Thu 6 Feb 14

Sir Beachy Head says...

Ok it's been a bit blowy and damp round here recently but it's hardly Typhoon Haiyan which wrecked the Philipines is it ?
Lets try and keep things in perspective shall we ?
Thankyou.


Storm strength: Equivalent of Category 5, the highest — and the strongest tropical cyclone to ever make landfall


Sustained wind speed at landfall: 195 miles per hour — breaking the previous highest record of 190 mph)


Wind gusts: Up to 235 miles per hour


Surge in sea level during the storm: 13 feet


World Health Organization disaster classification: Category 3, the highest — on par with the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the Haiti earthquake in 2010


People affected: 14.1 million — more than 13% of the country's population


Death toll: More than 6,000


People missing: 1,779


People injured: More than 27,000


People displaced: 4.1 million


People in need of food: 2.5 million


Amount of area destroyed in the storm's path: 70 to 80 percent


Homes damaged or destroyed: 1.2 million — over half of which were completely destroyed


Amount of homes lost in hardest-hit areas: 90 percent
Ok it's been a bit blowy and damp round here recently but it's hardly Typhoon Haiyan which wrecked the Philipines is it ? Lets try and keep things in perspective shall we ? Thankyou. Storm strength: Equivalent of Category 5, the highest — and the strongest tropical cyclone to ever make landfall • Sustained wind speed at landfall: 195 miles per hour — breaking the previous highest record of 190 mph) • Wind gusts: Up to 235 miles per hour • Surge in sea level during the storm: 13 feet • World Health Organization disaster classification: Category 3, the highest — on par with the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami and the Haiti earthquake in 2010 • People affected: 14.1 million — more than 13% of the country's population • Death toll: More than 6,000 • People missing: 1,779 • People injured: More than 27,000 • People displaced: 4.1 million • People in need of food: 2.5 million • Amount of area destroyed in the storm's path: 70 to 80 percent • Homes damaged or destroyed: 1.2 million — over half of which were completely destroyed • Amount of homes lost in hardest-hit areas: 90 percent Sir Beachy Head
  • Score: -5

11:31am Thu 6 Feb 14

curryandstella says...

Some people have too much time on their hands
Some people have too much time on their hands curryandstella
  • Score: 8

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