“One per cent for all” – Bournemouth University staff stage two-hour strike over pay offer

STANCE: Bournemouth University staff on strike as part of UCU action in a row over pay

STANCE: Bournemouth University staff on strike as part of UCU action in a row over pay

First published in News by

ACADEMIC staff at Bournemouth University held a two-hour strike yesterday in protest at a one per cent pay offer.

They have contrasted the national offer with the 19 per cent pay rise taken by Bournemouth’s vice-chancellor John Vinney, whose salary rose to £211,000 last year.

Maike Helmers, branch secretary of the University and College Union, said: “The one per cent pay offer came on the back of several years of below inflation pay offers, which has resulted in a real terms cut of 13 per cent on our salaries. This has been given sharper focus by the vice-chancellor taking a 19 per cent pay rise.”

She added: “Our argument is that if there’s a climate of austerity, when they decided to give us one per cent it should have been one per cent for all.”

Strikers handed out leaflets at the university’s Talbot Campus for an hour yesterday, before branch chairman John Brissenden led a “teach-in” event highlighting the union’s pay stance. They plan a day of action on February 6 and another two-hour stoppage on February 10.

Maike Helmers said the strike had been “well supported” by staff. Around half the 500 staff on the campus are members of the UCU. The university has defended the pay award to the vice-chancellor, saying it was set by an independent committee according to “benchmark data for the sector”.

It said he was paid below the average for UK vice-chancellors.

A university statement yesterday on the pay dispute said: “This is a national dispute and BU does not endorse the strike action and has asked academic staff to ensure that any potential effects on students are minimised.”

Comments (12)

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7:06am Wed 29 Jan 14

dorsetjack says...

People in the private sector - you know, those people that pay the taxes that keep the public sector workers in a job - have not had pay rises for many years. This is because in the private sector businesses work on profit and loss to stay afloat, unlike the bloated public sector.

Personally, I have not had a pay rise since 2008, I work in the private sector. At one stage the company asked employees to take a 5 percent pay cut so tha they could stay in business and save jobs. We did this and no-one was made redundant. We have since received the 5 percent back, but helping out the company saved us.

Contrast this with the bloated public sector who seem to believe that it is their right to have pay rises every year - at the taxpayers expense. Perhaps some education in profit and loss would help them.
People in the private sector - you know, those people that pay the taxes that keep the public sector workers in a job - have not had pay rises for many years. This is because in the private sector businesses work on profit and loss to stay afloat, unlike the bloated public sector. Personally, I have not had a pay rise since 2008, I work in the private sector. At one stage the company asked employees to take a 5 percent pay cut so tha they could stay in business and save jobs. We did this and no-one was made redundant. We have since received the 5 percent back, but helping out the company saved us. Contrast this with the bloated public sector who seem to believe that it is their right to have pay rises every year - at the taxpayers expense. Perhaps some education in profit and loss would help them. dorsetjack
  • Score: -7

7:10am Wed 29 Jan 14

Richard 1976 says...

Think you may be missing the point of their protest as it would be interesting to know the pay rises and perks of the vice chancellor etc..
Think you may be missing the point of their protest as it would be interesting to know the pay rises and perks of the vice chancellor etc.. Richard 1976
  • Score: 14

7:51am Wed 29 Jan 14

Dorset Mitch says...

dorsetjack wrote:
People in the private sector - you know, those people that pay the taxes that keep the public sector workers in a job - have not had pay rises for many years. This is because in the private sector businesses work on profit and loss to stay afloat, unlike the bloated public sector. Personally, I have not had a pay rise since 2008, I work in the private sector. At one stage the company asked employees to take a 5 percent pay cut so tha they could stay in business and save jobs. We did this and no-one was made redundant. We have since received the 5 percent back, but helping out the company saved us. Contrast this with the bloated public sector who seem to believe that it is their right to have pay rises every year - at the taxpayers expense. Perhaps some education in profit and loss would help them.
How do you expect certain services to work on profit or loss?

Bloated public sector? We need nurses, doctors, teachers, Police Officers, Firefighters, Paramedics, refuse collectors...in fact the only area I can think of that is bloated is Councilers!

I work in the both sectors and the private isn't as hard dumby as it makes out, after all the share holders of big firms don't take a hit do they!
[quote][p][bold]dorsetjack[/bold] wrote: People in the private sector - you know, those people that pay the taxes that keep the public sector workers in a job - have not had pay rises for many years. This is because in the private sector businesses work on profit and loss to stay afloat, unlike the bloated public sector. Personally, I have not had a pay rise since 2008, I work in the private sector. At one stage the company asked employees to take a 5 percent pay cut so tha they could stay in business and save jobs. We did this and no-one was made redundant. We have since received the 5 percent back, but helping out the company saved us. Contrast this with the bloated public sector who seem to believe that it is their right to have pay rises every year - at the taxpayers expense. Perhaps some education in profit and loss would help them.[/p][/quote]How do you expect certain services to work on profit or loss? Bloated public sector? We need nurses, doctors, teachers, Police Officers, Firefighters, Paramedics, refuse collectors...in fact the only area I can think of that is bloated is Councilers! I work in the both sectors and the private isn't as hard dumby as it makes out, after all the share holders of big firms don't take a hit do they! Dorset Mitch
  • Score: 8

8:35am Wed 29 Jan 14

High Treason says...

Education has become another business now fees are being charged. BU is a prime example of what s to come with our schools as can be seen by opting for academy status. £211,000 pa, plus all the perks is disgusting and reminds me of Tony Sportswood at RBH. The sad fact is, students are being ripped off with Mickey Mouse degrees that are becoming worthless as time goes by.
Education has become another business now fees are being charged. BU is a prime example of what s to come with our schools as can be seen by opting for academy status. £211,000 pa, plus all the perks is disgusting and reminds me of Tony Sportswood at RBH. The sad fact is, students are being ripped off with Mickey Mouse degrees that are becoming worthless as time goes by. High Treason
  • Score: 8

8:49am Wed 29 Jan 14

Hessenford says...

dorsetjack wrote:
People in the private sector - you know, those people that pay the taxes that keep the public sector workers in a job - have not had pay rises for many years. This is because in the private sector businesses work on profit and loss to stay afloat, unlike the bloated public sector.

Personally, I have not had a pay rise since 2008, I work in the private sector. At one stage the company asked employees to take a 5 percent pay cut so tha they could stay in business and save jobs. We did this and no-one was made redundant. We have since received the 5 percent back, but helping out the company saved us.

Contrast this with the bloated public sector who seem to believe that it is their right to have pay rises every year - at the taxpayers expense. Perhaps some education in profit and loss would help them.
Your taxes do not keep public sector workers in jobs, your taxes supply money to pay the wages of people employed in the vital public services that this country couldn't do without, perhaps you should remember that fact when you next need an ambulance in an emergency or the fire brigade when your home is in danger, I would also remind you that every worker in the public services also pay the same taxes out of their measly pay packets as you which helps to keep the public services going to ensure that snobs such as you can benefit from these services in any emergency.
[quote][p][bold]dorsetjack[/bold] wrote: People in the private sector - you know, those people that pay the taxes that keep the public sector workers in a job - have not had pay rises for many years. This is because in the private sector businesses work on profit and loss to stay afloat, unlike the bloated public sector. Personally, I have not had a pay rise since 2008, I work in the private sector. At one stage the company asked employees to take a 5 percent pay cut so tha they could stay in business and save jobs. We did this and no-one was made redundant. We have since received the 5 percent back, but helping out the company saved us. Contrast this with the bloated public sector who seem to believe that it is their right to have pay rises every year - at the taxpayers expense. Perhaps some education in profit and loss would help them.[/p][/quote]Your taxes do not keep public sector workers in jobs, your taxes supply money to pay the wages of people employed in the vital public services that this country couldn't do without, perhaps you should remember that fact when you next need an ambulance in an emergency or the fire brigade when your home is in danger, I would also remind you that every worker in the public services also pay the same taxes out of their measly pay packets as you which helps to keep the public services going to ensure that snobs such as you can benefit from these services in any emergency. Hessenford
  • Score: 10

9:55am Wed 29 Jan 14

scrumpyjack says...

2 hours?

Do they think anyone will have noticed?
2 hours? Do they think anyone will have noticed? scrumpyjack
  • Score: 5

11:47am Wed 29 Jan 14

sea poole says...

Dorsetjackass - That's an apt name for you and your pathetic comments. Two of my children have recently been made redundant -one as a teacher and another from local government. I'm sure they'd like to meet you face to face so you can explain your comment and they could have a deeper understanding of your philosophy!
Dorsetjackass - That's an apt name for you and your pathetic comments. Two of my children have recently been made redundant -one as a teacher and another from local government. I'm sure they'd like to meet you face to face so you can explain your comment and they could have a deeper understanding of your philosophy! sea poole
  • Score: 2

12:05pm Wed 29 Jan 14

muscliffman says...

Dorset Mitch wrote:
dorsetjack wrote:
People in the private sector - you know, those people that pay the taxes that keep the public sector workers in a job - have not had pay rises for many years. This is because in the private sector businesses work on profit and loss to stay afloat, unlike the bloated public sector. Personally, I have not had a pay rise since 2008, I work in the private sector. At one stage the company asked employees to take a 5 percent pay cut so tha they could stay in business and save jobs. We did this and no-one was made redundant. We have since received the 5 percent back, but helping out the company saved us. Contrast this with the bloated public sector who seem to believe that it is their right to have pay rises every year - at the taxpayers expense. Perhaps some education in profit and loss would help them.
How do you expect certain services to work on profit or loss?

Bloated public sector? We need nurses, doctors, teachers, Police Officers, Firefighters, Paramedics, refuse collectors...in fact the only area I can think of that is bloated is Councilers!

I work in the both sectors and the private isn't as hard dumby as it makes out, after all the share holders of big firms don't take a hit do they!
Nonsense of course the public sector is very seriously bloated.

Although of course we do need more family and Hospital Doctors - who don't dodge weekends, intelligent Teachers - who actually can, traditional Police Officers - with old style integrity, realistic Firefighters - who don't strike for pensions beyond most people's wildest dreams, and more old style NHS Nurses - who really do care.......

And of course the shareholders in any private sector Company take a direct hit if the business they have invested in is failing - they loose their money, something that NEVER happens to people working in the public sector!

That rant over, I do support the position of these academics. The fat cats are taking the micky out of us all with their ludicrous 19% type pay awards but none more than their own unfortunate colleagues - who in this case are being offered only 1%.
[quote][p][bold]Dorset Mitch[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]dorsetjack[/bold] wrote: People in the private sector - you know, those people that pay the taxes that keep the public sector workers in a job - have not had pay rises for many years. This is because in the private sector businesses work on profit and loss to stay afloat, unlike the bloated public sector. Personally, I have not had a pay rise since 2008, I work in the private sector. At one stage the company asked employees to take a 5 percent pay cut so tha they could stay in business and save jobs. We did this and no-one was made redundant. We have since received the 5 percent back, but helping out the company saved us. Contrast this with the bloated public sector who seem to believe that it is their right to have pay rises every year - at the taxpayers expense. Perhaps some education in profit and loss would help them.[/p][/quote]How do you expect certain services to work on profit or loss? Bloated public sector? We need nurses, doctors, teachers, Police Officers, Firefighters, Paramedics, refuse collectors...in fact the only area I can think of that is bloated is Councilers! I work in the both sectors and the private isn't as hard dumby as it makes out, after all the share holders of big firms don't take a hit do they![/p][/quote]Nonsense of course the public sector is very seriously bloated. Although of course we do need more family and Hospital Doctors - who don't dodge weekends, intelligent Teachers - who actually can, traditional Police Officers - with old style integrity, realistic Firefighters - who don't strike for pensions beyond most people's wildest dreams, and more old style NHS Nurses - who really do care....... And of course the shareholders in any private sector Company take a direct hit if the business they have invested in is failing - they loose their money, something that NEVER happens to people working in the public sector! That rant over, I do support the position of these academics. The fat cats are taking the micky out of us all with their ludicrous 19% type pay awards but none more than their own unfortunate colleagues - who in this case are being offered only 1%. muscliffman
  • Score: 2

1:39pm Wed 29 Jan 14

gileto says...

Hessenford wrote:
dorsetjack wrote:
People in the private sector - you know, those people that pay the taxes that keep the public sector workers in a job - have not had pay rises for many years. This is because in the private sector businesses work on profit and loss to stay afloat, unlike the bloated public sector.

Personally, I have not had a pay rise since 2008, I work in the private sector. At one stage the company asked employees to take a 5 percent pay cut so tha they could stay in business and save jobs. We did this and no-one was made redundant. We have since received the 5 percent back, but helping out the company saved us.

Contrast this with the bloated public sector who seem to believe that it is their right to have pay rises every year - at the taxpayers expense. Perhaps some education in profit and loss would help them.
Your taxes do not keep public sector workers in jobs, your taxes supply money to pay the wages of people employed in the vital public services that this country couldn't do without, perhaps you should remember that fact when you next need an ambulance in an emergency or the fire brigade when your home is in danger, I would also remind you that every worker in the public services also pay the same taxes out of their measly pay packets as you which helps to keep the public services going to ensure that snobs such as you can benefit from these services in any emergency.
Absolutely! Also, there are many private sector workers (the majority of my friends and relations) who have been having pay rises EVERY year and significantly more so than experienced throughout the public sector - those working in the council, as an example, have received rises averaging less than 1% for 5-7 years now. With no share schemes, no overtime, no bonuses - and before anyone comments otherwise - only a CONTRIBUTORY non-gold-plated (for the masses) pension scheme.
[quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]dorsetjack[/bold] wrote: People in the private sector - you know, those people that pay the taxes that keep the public sector workers in a job - have not had pay rises for many years. This is because in the private sector businesses work on profit and loss to stay afloat, unlike the bloated public sector. Personally, I have not had a pay rise since 2008, I work in the private sector. At one stage the company asked employees to take a 5 percent pay cut so tha they could stay in business and save jobs. We did this and no-one was made redundant. We have since received the 5 percent back, but helping out the company saved us. Contrast this with the bloated public sector who seem to believe that it is their right to have pay rises every year - at the taxpayers expense. Perhaps some education in profit and loss would help them.[/p][/quote]Your taxes do not keep public sector workers in jobs, your taxes supply money to pay the wages of people employed in the vital public services that this country couldn't do without, perhaps you should remember that fact when you next need an ambulance in an emergency or the fire brigade when your home is in danger, I would also remind you that every worker in the public services also pay the same taxes out of their measly pay packets as you which helps to keep the public services going to ensure that snobs such as you can benefit from these services in any emergency.[/p][/quote]Absolutely! Also, there are many private sector workers (the majority of my friends and relations) who have been having pay rises EVERY year and significantly more so than experienced throughout the public sector - those working in the council, as an example, have received rises averaging less than 1% for 5-7 years now. With no share schemes, no overtime, no bonuses - and before anyone comments otherwise - only a CONTRIBUTORY non-gold-plated (for the masses) pension scheme. gileto
  • Score: 1

1:59pm Wed 29 Jan 14

Niel says...

Richard 1976 wrote:
Think you may be missing the point of their protest as it would be interesting to know the pay rises and perks of the vice chancellor etc..
VC got 19% with some 'senior managers', so not academic teaching staff, getting 30% last year.

1% for those doing the teaching work, 30% for those managing the 'business' cutting teaching posts...

It's all about 'Bums on Seats' and the fee's too all often.
[quote][p][bold]Richard 1976[/bold] wrote: Think you may be missing the point of their protest as it would be interesting to know the pay rises and perks of the vice chancellor etc..[/p][/quote]VC got 19% with some 'senior managers', so not academic teaching staff, getting 30% last year. 1% for those doing the teaching work, 30% for those managing the 'business' cutting teaching posts... It's all about 'Bums on Seats' and the fee's too all often. Niel
  • Score: -1

3:23pm Wed 29 Jan 14

SeafaringMan says...

Niel wrote:
Richard 1976 wrote:
Think you may be missing the point of their protest as it would be interesting to know the pay rises and perks of the vice chancellor etc..
VC got 19% with some 'senior managers', so not academic teaching staff, getting 30% last year.

1% for those doing the teaching work, 30% for those managing the 'business' cutting teaching posts...

It's all about 'Bums on Seats' and the fee's too all often.
As an ex BU academic I can say with some feeling that even in the days of 'Big Mac' there was not such naked greed as is apparent in the latest rise for the VC, and slap in the face for those at the 'chalk face'.
[quote][p][bold]Niel[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Richard 1976[/bold] wrote: Think you may be missing the point of their protest as it would be interesting to know the pay rises and perks of the vice chancellor etc..[/p][/quote]VC got 19% with some 'senior managers', so not academic teaching staff, getting 30% last year. 1% for those doing the teaching work, 30% for those managing the 'business' cutting teaching posts... It's all about 'Bums on Seats' and the fee's too all often.[/p][/quote]As an ex BU academic I can say with some feeling that even in the days of 'Big Mac' there was not such naked greed as is apparent in the latest rise for the VC, and slap in the face for those at the 'chalk face'. SeafaringMan
  • Score: 0

5:55pm Wed 29 Jan 14

sea poole says...

I'm sure Mr Vinney will donate at least half of his pay rise to a deserving cause...and takers? any odds he'll do that...?
I'm sure Mr Vinney will donate at least half of his pay rise to a deserving cause...and takers? any odds he'll do that...? sea poole
  • Score: -1

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