UPDATE: 'Taken too soon': friends pay tribute to motorcyclist Daniel Robins, killed on the A31 - but IPCC will not investigate

Bournemouth Echo: Daniel Robins Daniel Robins

SHOCKED friends of the Bournemouth man killed on the A31 on Wednesday night have paid tribute to him.

Daniel Robins, 31, of Alumhurst Road, was identified today as being one of two riders involved in the crash on the westbound carriageway close to Picket Post at around 6.15pm.

The second rider, a 47-year-old man from Broadstone, remains in hospital in a serious condition.

Former school friends took to Facebook to pay tribute to Daniel.

Marc Watts posted: “Such sad news. RIP Dan Robins. Another sad loss from the class of ’98. Stay strong guys.”

Nick Dearden said: “Shocked at another person being taken from that year at Hardley School. Little sporting superstar whose mum treasured him so much. RIP dude and thinking of all the boys who have lost another school brother.”

Wade Horton said: “Such a top bloke who will be missed by so many. Can’t believe another friend was taken from us far too soon. RIP Robins you legend.”

Alice Burch said: “One of my life-long best friends was tragically taken from us. Just last Sunday we were sat eating, joking, laughing, hugging and planning the year. I miss you so much already. RIP Dan Robins.”

Greg Livermore called Daniel “one in a million” and added: “Heaven has gained an angel far too soon.”

The collision and subsequent police investigation caused the road to be closed and many drivers were stuck until the early hours of Thursday morning.

Hampshire Police were criticised by motorists and the county’s Police and Crime Commissioner, Simon Hayes, for not dealing with the situation properly.

Drivers complained of a lack of organisation, with many stranded without access to food, water or even a toilet.

Mr Hayes also called for an investigation into restoring gaps in the central reservation that would allow police to release traffic trapped in tailbacks.

Before the crash, both riders had been held in a queue of traffic while police officers dealt with reports of a horse that had got loose on the carriageway.

Police were advising motorists to proceed carefully, a spokesman said.

As reported, that element of the incident was referred by Hampshire Constabulary to the Independent Police Complaints Commission.

Tonight, Mr Hayes confirmed that the IPCC had decided to hand the matter back to Hampshire Police to investigate internally.

The horse was also killed in the crash.

It is being investigated by the Road Death Investigation team and anyone with information about it is asked to contact them at Eastleigh police station on 101, quoting Operation Hedingham.

 

 

Comments (25)

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2:00pm Fri 24 Jan 14

nospinnaker says...

This business about the police advising motorists to proceed carefully - is that what the Police said? It's certainly on their web site, and I'm sure they would like us all to believe it.

Maybe it was true later, but I don't think it was true when the first hold-up was released. There were no warnings, just an empty road in front of them. With utterly tragic results.
This business about the police advising motorists to proceed carefully - is that what the Police said? It's certainly on their web site, and I'm sure they would like us all to believe it. Maybe it was true later, but I don't think it was true when the first hold-up was released. There were no warnings, just an empty road in front of them. With utterly tragic results. nospinnaker
  • Score: -9

2:03pm Fri 24 Jan 14

funkyferret says...

I wasn't involved, but it appears there is some jumping to conclusions going on here..
The Police have a duty of care to everyone, hence the road being slowed whilst the errant horse was located & contained, then a fatal accident occurs whilst the police are there. ANY fatal accident (quite rightly) necessitates a thorough enquiry to ascertain the cause - especially in this case if the Police actions might have been a cause which will necessitate a separate enquiry.
The very geography of the road means there are no other options for the traffic, and the police would be severely criticised if the lengthy scene were compromised in any way.
Coupled with the cutbacks in Traffic policing, and this is going to be the norm with insuffiicent staff to deal with the vast numbers involved.
Damned if you do / damned if you don't.
My thoughts are with those families directly affected.
I wasn't involved, but it appears there is some jumping to conclusions going on here.. The Police have a duty of care to everyone, hence the road being slowed whilst the errant horse was located & contained, then a fatal accident occurs whilst the police are there. ANY fatal accident (quite rightly) necessitates a thorough enquiry to ascertain the cause - especially in this case if the Police actions might have been a cause which will necessitate a separate enquiry. The very geography of the road means there are no other options for the traffic, and the police would be severely criticised if the lengthy scene were compromised in any way. Coupled with the cutbacks in Traffic policing, and this is going to be the norm with insuffiicent staff to deal with the vast numbers involved. Damned if you do / damned if you don't. My thoughts are with those families directly affected. funkyferret
  • Score: 69

2:36pm Fri 24 Jan 14

suzigirl says...

RIP Daniel and everybody else forget about speculating and wait for the inquest.............
RIP Daniel and everybody else forget about speculating and wait for the inquest............. suzigirl
  • Score: 54

3:18pm Fri 24 Jan 14

big white bear says...

despite all the comments above, it still left mothers with very young babies + diabetics in the queue for hours. And this should not be allowed to happen, I'm sure the police don't want more problems happening.
despite all the comments above, it still left mothers with very young babies + diabetics in the queue for hours. And this should not be allowed to happen, I'm sure the police don't want more problems happening. big white bear
  • Score: -70

3:33pm Fri 24 Jan 14

blackdog1 says...

big white bear wrote:
despite all the comments above, it still left mothers with very young babies + diabetics in the queue for hours. And this should not be allowed to happen, I'm sure the police don't want more problems happening.
Young mothers and diabetics? Come on for gods sake..someone has died and your moaning about being stuck in a queue ...get a grip!
[quote][p][bold]big white bear[/bold] wrote: despite all the comments above, it still left mothers with very young babies + diabetics in the queue for hours. And this should not be allowed to happen, I'm sure the police don't want more problems happening.[/p][/quote]Young mothers and diabetics? Come on for gods sake..someone has died and your moaning about being stuck in a queue ...get a grip! blackdog1
  • Score: 54

3:38pm Fri 24 Jan 14

dribydal says...

big white bear wrote:
despite all the comments above, it still left mothers with very young babies + diabetics in the queue for hours. And this should not be allowed to happen, I'm sure the police don't want more problems happening.
If you're diabetic or have a young baby you should go out prepared for the worst, extra food, drink, nappies, injections etc, in case of traffic hold ups or in case your car breaks down or anything else unplanned happening. Not to do so would be stupid.
I'm not speculating as I I don't know the full circumstances but truth is a man was killed R.I.P. and police investigating the accident only have one chance to gather evidence to try to find out exactly what happenned before the road is re-opened and the evidence is lost forever. I was also stuck in the traffic, and no I wasn't home in time to eat my dinner, but so what? That doesn't really matter when you're talking about life and death.
[quote][p][bold]big white bear[/bold] wrote: despite all the comments above, it still left mothers with very young babies + diabetics in the queue for hours. And this should not be allowed to happen, I'm sure the police don't want more problems happening.[/p][/quote]If you're diabetic or have a young baby you should go out prepared for the worst, extra food, drink, nappies, injections etc, in case of traffic hold ups or in case your car breaks down or anything else unplanned happening. Not to do so would be stupid. I'm not speculating as I I don't know the full circumstances but truth is a man was killed R.I.P. and police investigating the accident only have one chance to gather evidence to try to find out exactly what happenned before the road is re-opened and the evidence is lost forever. I was also stuck in the traffic, and no I wasn't home in time to eat my dinner, but so what? That doesn't really matter when you're talking about life and death. dribydal
  • Score: 111

3:55pm Fri 24 Jan 14

delta3 says...

suzigirl wrote:
RIP Daniel and everybody else forget about speculating and wait for the inquest.............
RIP Daniel. Condolences to you family & friends. Please do not speculate on why, how etc that is what the inquest is for.
[quote][p][bold]suzigirl[/bold] wrote: RIP Daniel and everybody else forget about speculating and wait for the inquest.............[/p][/quote]RIP Daniel. Condolences to you family & friends. Please do not speculate on why, how etc that is what the inquest is for. delta3
  • Score: 12

5:12pm Fri 24 Jan 14

hopper765 says...

I have been travelling A31 daily for 8 years and in that time the volume of traffic must have doubled. This road is in need of a major upgrade with some proper exit routes of of the road for when it has to be closed. The piece through Ringwood is an absolute nightmare with 2 lanes going into 4 and the constant lane changes as the Bournemouth traffic exits along with hazards of traffic joining from Fish Inn access and then a garage and Verwood exit.
A start would be to apply 50 limit down Poulner Hill and to stop the queue jumpers using Poulner Hill exit and access routes, but much more needs to be done.
I have been travelling A31 daily for 8 years and in that time the volume of traffic must have doubled. This road is in need of a major upgrade with some proper exit routes of of the road for when it has to be closed. The piece through Ringwood is an absolute nightmare with 2 lanes going into 4 and the constant lane changes as the Bournemouth traffic exits along with hazards of traffic joining from Fish Inn access and then a garage and Verwood exit. A start would be to apply 50 limit down Poulner Hill and to stop the queue jumpers using Poulner Hill exit and access routes, but much more needs to be done. hopper765
  • Score: 25

5:37pm Fri 24 Jan 14

Kevin_123 says...

This is such sad news. I want to again give my deepest thoughts to the family and friends of this young man. I hope that in time you will get closure on this event and remember that Daniel is always in your heart and he now is with the angels above. God bless
This is such sad news. I want to again give my deepest thoughts to the family and friends of this young man. I hope that in time you will get closure on this event and remember that Daniel is always in your heart and he now is with the angels above. God bless Kevin_123
  • Score: 18

5:50pm Fri 24 Jan 14

Sir Beachy Head says...

Was it a proper horse or one of those forest pony types that wander about ?
Was it a proper horse or one of those forest pony types that wander about ? Sir Beachy Head
  • Score: -54

8:15pm Fri 24 Jan 14

scrumpyjack says...

dribydal wrote:
big white bear wrote:
despite all the comments above, it still left mothers with very young babies + diabetics in the queue for hours. And this should not be allowed to happen, I'm sure the police don't want more problems happening.
If you're diabetic or have a young baby you should go out prepared for the worst, extra food, drink, nappies, injections etc, in case of traffic hold ups or in case your car breaks down or anything else unplanned happening. Not to do so would be stupid.
I'm not speculating as I I don't know the full circumstances but truth is a man was killed R.I.P. and police investigating the accident only have one chance to gather evidence to try to find out exactly what happenned before the road is re-opened and the evidence is lost forever. I was also stuck in the traffic, and no I wasn't home in time to eat my dinner, but so what? That doesn't really matter when you're talking about life and death.
Evidence?

Evidence of a motorbike rider hitting a horse on a dual carriageway after it was known horses had broken loose earlier?

Your point of view is very popular but to me it is sanctimonious at best.

"you should be prepared for the worst". So, so easy to say after the event.

Who leaves home every time expecting to be trapped in a car miles from anywhere for 6 hours? Really, who?

Personally I find it self righteous for someone to be sat at home sipping at their beverage of choice in a warm comfy chair telling people how they should feel.

A tragic and awful, awful event but to get all high and mighty about people daring to say "this is sad but was it really handled as well as it might be? Should we at least look if it did warrant people (possibly vulnerable people) should have been better looked after by our professional services".

People can ask questions without being selfish or disrespectful and the people who say you can't are the main reason this country is starting to slide in the direction it is and it smacks of PC bullying to say they can't.

If the family or friends of the deceased or the owner of the horse are reading this I would just like to say I am sorry for your terrible loss.
[quote][p][bold]dribydal[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]big white bear[/bold] wrote: despite all the comments above, it still left mothers with very young babies + diabetics in the queue for hours. And this should not be allowed to happen, I'm sure the police don't want more problems happening.[/p][/quote]If you're diabetic or have a young baby you should go out prepared for the worst, extra food, drink, nappies, injections etc, in case of traffic hold ups or in case your car breaks down or anything else unplanned happening. Not to do so would be stupid. I'm not speculating as I I don't know the full circumstances but truth is a man was killed R.I.P. and police investigating the accident only have one chance to gather evidence to try to find out exactly what happenned before the road is re-opened and the evidence is lost forever. I was also stuck in the traffic, and no I wasn't home in time to eat my dinner, but so what? That doesn't really matter when you're talking about life and death.[/p][/quote]Evidence? Evidence of a motorbike rider hitting a horse on a dual carriageway after it was known horses had broken loose earlier? Your point of view is very popular but to me it is sanctimonious at best. "you should be prepared for the worst". So, so easy to say after the event. Who leaves home every time expecting to be trapped in a car miles from anywhere for 6 hours? Really, who? Personally I find it self righteous for someone to be sat at home sipping at their beverage of choice in a warm comfy chair telling people how they should feel. A tragic and awful, awful event but to get all high and mighty about people daring to say "this is sad but was it really handled as well as it might be? Should we at least look if it did warrant people (possibly vulnerable people) should have been better looked after by our professional services". People can ask questions without being selfish or disrespectful and the people who say you can't are the main reason this country is starting to slide in the direction it is and it smacks of PC bullying to say they can't. If the family or friends of the deceased or the owner of the horse are reading this I would just like to say I am sorry for your terrible loss. scrumpyjack
  • Score: 0

8:42pm Fri 24 Jan 14

jimbob32 says...

How can IPCC decide not to investigate? The police had already lied to cover try and cover their backs?! They have said that they told people to proceed with caution, and yet hundreds of motorists have stated that no such warning was given (as per South Today New and other comments on the Echo website). Some one has needlessly lost their life, and another is in a critical condition - People are going to want answers.
How can IPCC decide not to investigate? The police had already lied to cover try and cover their backs?! They have said that they told people to proceed with caution, and yet hundreds of motorists have stated that no such warning was given (as per South Today New and other comments on the Echo website). Some one has needlessly lost their life, and another is in a critical condition - People are going to want answers. jimbob32
  • Score: -18

9:03pm Fri 24 Jan 14

Dorset Outsider says...

jimbob32 wrote:
How can IPCC decide not to investigate? The police had already lied to cover try and cover their backs?! They have said that they told people to proceed with caution, and yet hundreds of motorists have stated that no such warning was given (as per South Today New and other comments on the Echo website). Some one has needlessly lost their life, and another is in a critical condition - People are going to want answers.
That's funny, because the echo story yesterday cited witnesses as saying 'we were held for ages, then slowly allowed to pass in a single lane to relieve the build up.' - The truth is, that once past the police, many road users would have seen the chance to make up lost time. The more cars that do it, the more everyone assumes it is ok to speed up. Maybe the police didn't tell every driver, but they did certainly release it all slowly. The actions of people stuck in stationary traffic lead to the belief it was fine to continue at speed. Sadly leading to a very nasty accident. Yes they should investigate, and see that all was done that could have been leading up to the accident. And it was handled as well as could be after in a long road with no hard shoulder or turn offs. I would love to hear what would have been said if the a31 had been closed fo 3 days whilst they looked for a horse. If only they had though, there would not be one life lost and another fighting for it.
[quote][p][bold]jimbob32[/bold] wrote: How can IPCC decide not to investigate? The police had already lied to cover try and cover their backs?! They have said that they told people to proceed with caution, and yet hundreds of motorists have stated that no such warning was given (as per South Today New and other comments on the Echo website). Some one has needlessly lost their life, and another is in a critical condition - People are going to want answers.[/p][/quote]That's funny, because the echo story yesterday cited witnesses as saying 'we were held for ages, then slowly allowed to pass in a single lane to relieve the build up.' - The truth is, that once past the police, many road users would have seen the chance to make up lost time. The more cars that do it, the more everyone assumes it is ok to speed up. Maybe the police didn't tell every driver, but they did certainly release it all slowly. The actions of people stuck in stationary traffic lead to the belief it was fine to continue at speed. Sadly leading to a very nasty accident. Yes they should investigate, and see that all was done that could have been leading up to the accident. And it was handled as well as could be after in a long road with no hard shoulder or turn offs. I would love to hear what would have been said if the a31 had been closed fo 3 days whilst they looked for a horse. If only they had though, there would not be one life lost and another fighting for it. Dorset Outsider
  • Score: 20

9:04pm Fri 24 Jan 14

keith milton says...

police lie as much as politicians,

police are here to serve there political and masonic masters,not serve the public.
police lie as much as politicians, police are here to serve there political and masonic masters,not serve the public. keith milton
  • Score: -34

9:38pm Fri 24 Jan 14

jimbob32 says...

Dorset Outsider wrote:
jimbob32 wrote:
How can IPCC decide not to investigate? The police had already lied to cover try and cover their backs?! They have said that they told people to proceed with caution, and yet hundreds of motorists have stated that no such warning was given (as per South Today New and other comments on the Echo website). Some one has needlessly lost their life, and another is in a critical condition - People are going to want answers.
That's funny, because the echo story yesterday cited witnesses as saying 'we were held for ages, then slowly allowed to pass in a single lane to relieve the build up.' - The truth is, that once past the police, many road users would have seen the chance to make up lost time. The more cars that do it, the more everyone assumes it is ok to speed up. Maybe the police didn't tell every driver, but they did certainly release it all slowly. The actions of people stuck in stationary traffic lead to the belief it was fine to continue at speed. Sadly leading to a very nasty accident. Yes they should investigate, and see that all was done that could have been leading up to the accident. And it was handled as well as could be after in a long road with no hard shoulder or turn offs. I would love to hear what would have been said if the a31 had been closed fo 3 days whilst they looked for a horse. If only they had though, there would not be one life lost and another fighting for it.
The police were obviously under pressure to re-open the road. However, given the circumstances should they not have reopened the stretch with a rolling road block - just to be on the safe side. They obviously were convinced enough of the animal's presence to close the road during rush hour in the first place, so I think that it was reckless and irresponsible to just open the flood gates and hope for the best.
[quote][p][bold]Dorset Outsider[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jimbob32[/bold] wrote: How can IPCC decide not to investigate? The police had already lied to cover try and cover their backs?! They have said that they told people to proceed with caution, and yet hundreds of motorists have stated that no such warning was given (as per South Today New and other comments on the Echo website). Some one has needlessly lost their life, and another is in a critical condition - People are going to want answers.[/p][/quote]That's funny, because the echo story yesterday cited witnesses as saying 'we were held for ages, then slowly allowed to pass in a single lane to relieve the build up.' - The truth is, that once past the police, many road users would have seen the chance to make up lost time. The more cars that do it, the more everyone assumes it is ok to speed up. Maybe the police didn't tell every driver, but they did certainly release it all slowly. The actions of people stuck in stationary traffic lead to the belief it was fine to continue at speed. Sadly leading to a very nasty accident. Yes they should investigate, and see that all was done that could have been leading up to the accident. And it was handled as well as could be after in a long road with no hard shoulder or turn offs. I would love to hear what would have been said if the a31 had been closed fo 3 days whilst they looked for a horse. If only they had though, there would not be one life lost and another fighting for it.[/p][/quote]The police were obviously under pressure to re-open the road. However, given the circumstances should they not have reopened the stretch with a rolling road block - just to be on the safe side. They obviously were convinced enough of the animal's presence to close the road during rush hour in the first place, so I think that it was reckless and irresponsible to just open the flood gates and hope for the best. jimbob32
  • Score: -14

10:07pm Fri 24 Jan 14

nickynoodah says...

The police had not got the brains to tether a solitary horse
no surprise there then
I doubt they could tie their own boot laces
they are a load of lying scruffs you know
The police had not got the brains to tether a solitary horse no surprise there then I doubt they could tie their own boot laces they are a load of lying scruffs you know nickynoodah
  • Score: -39

10:14pm Fri 24 Jan 14

muscliffman says...

scrumpyjack wrote:
dribydal wrote:
big white bear wrote:
despite all the comments above, it still left mothers with very young babies + diabetics in the queue for hours. And this should not be allowed to happen, I'm sure the police don't want more problems happening.
If you're diabetic or have a young baby you should go out prepared for the worst, extra food, drink, nappies, injections etc, in case of traffic hold ups or in case your car breaks down or anything else unplanned happening. Not to do so would be stupid.
I'm not speculating as I I don't know the full circumstances but truth is a man was killed R.I.P. and police investigating the accident only have one chance to gather evidence to try to find out exactly what happenned before the road is re-opened and the evidence is lost forever. I was also stuck in the traffic, and no I wasn't home in time to eat my dinner, but so what? That doesn't really matter when you're talking about life and death.
Evidence?

Evidence of a motorbike rider hitting a horse on a dual carriageway after it was known horses had broken loose earlier?

Your point of view is very popular but to me it is sanctimonious at best.

"you should be prepared for the worst". So, so easy to say after the event.

Who leaves home every time expecting to be trapped in a car miles from anywhere for 6 hours? Really, who?

Personally I find it self righteous for someone to be sat at home sipping at their beverage of choice in a warm comfy chair telling people how they should feel.

A tragic and awful, awful event but to get all high and mighty about people daring to say "this is sad but was it really handled as well as it might be? Should we at least look if it did warrant people (possibly vulnerable people) should have been better looked after by our professional services".

People can ask questions without being selfish or disrespectful and the people who say you can't are the main reason this country is starting to slide in the direction it is and it smacks of PC bullying to say they can't.

If the family or friends of the deceased or the owner of the horse are reading this I would just like to say I am sorry for your terrible loss.
Well said - Nobody is disputing this was a terrible tragedy, although you could be forgiven for thinking that they were by some of the immature and inappropriately emotive hostility extended to those querying (only) the Police's reactions to it.

Maybe we have to wait until there is a another secondary tragedy directly arising from these poorly handled incidents before it will be 'PC' enough for some people that anyone dare to suggest there may actually be a serious problem with these unnecessarily disruptive and lengthy Police RTA responses.

Because if the authorities don't restore some basic common sense to these situations that second tragedy is certainly only a matter of time away.
[quote][p][bold]scrumpyjack[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]dribydal[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]big white bear[/bold] wrote: despite all the comments above, it still left mothers with very young babies + diabetics in the queue for hours. And this should not be allowed to happen, I'm sure the police don't want more problems happening.[/p][/quote]If you're diabetic or have a young baby you should go out prepared for the worst, extra food, drink, nappies, injections etc, in case of traffic hold ups or in case your car breaks down or anything else unplanned happening. Not to do so would be stupid. I'm not speculating as I I don't know the full circumstances but truth is a man was killed R.I.P. and police investigating the accident only have one chance to gather evidence to try to find out exactly what happenned before the road is re-opened and the evidence is lost forever. I was also stuck in the traffic, and no I wasn't home in time to eat my dinner, but so what? That doesn't really matter when you're talking about life and death.[/p][/quote]Evidence? Evidence of a motorbike rider hitting a horse on a dual carriageway after it was known horses had broken loose earlier? Your point of view is very popular but to me it is sanctimonious at best. "you should be prepared for the worst". So, so easy to say after the event. Who leaves home every time expecting to be trapped in a car miles from anywhere for 6 hours? Really, who? Personally I find it self righteous for someone to be sat at home sipping at their beverage of choice in a warm comfy chair telling people how they should feel. A tragic and awful, awful event but to get all high and mighty about people daring to say "this is sad but was it really handled as well as it might be? Should we at least look if it did warrant people (possibly vulnerable people) should have been better looked after by our professional services". People can ask questions without being selfish or disrespectful and the people who say you can't are the main reason this country is starting to slide in the direction it is and it smacks of PC bullying to say they can't. If the family or friends of the deceased or the owner of the horse are reading this I would just like to say I am sorry for your terrible loss.[/p][/quote]Well said - Nobody is disputing this was a terrible tragedy, although you could be forgiven for thinking that they were by some of the immature and inappropriately emotive hostility extended to those querying (only) the Police's reactions to it. Maybe we have to wait until there is a another secondary tragedy directly arising from these poorly handled incidents before it will be 'PC' enough for some people that anyone dare to suggest there may actually be a serious problem with these unnecessarily disruptive and lengthy Police RTA responses. Because if the authorities don't restore some basic common sense to these situations that second tragedy is certainly only a matter of time away. muscliffman
  • Score: 10

10:53pm Fri 24 Jan 14

Motornmiss says...

I'm not interested in the hold ups, they still got home eventually, unlike my friend Dan.......RIP to a man who was kind, caring and considerate! Tragic! You will be very missed and my thoughts are with his family at this very sad time!x
I'm not interested in the hold ups, they still got home eventually, unlike my friend Dan.......RIP to a man who was kind, caring and considerate! Tragic! You will be very missed and my thoughts are with his family at this very sad time!x Motornmiss
  • Score: 37

2:11am Sat 25 Jan 14

Robin Christchurch says...

muscliffman wrote:
scrumpyjack wrote:
dribydal wrote:
big white bear wrote: despite all the comments above, it still left mothers with very young babies + diabetics in the queue for hours. And this should not be allowed to happen, I'm sure the police don't want more problems happening.
If you're diabetic or have a young baby you should go out prepared for the worst, extra food, drink, nappies, injections etc, in case of traffic hold ups or in case your car breaks down or anything else unplanned happening. Not to do so would be stupid. I'm not speculating as I I don't know the full circumstances but truth is a man was killed R.I.P. and police investigating the accident only have one chance to gather evidence to try to find out exactly what happenned before the road is re-opened and the evidence is lost forever. I was also stuck in the traffic, and no I wasn't home in time to eat my dinner, but so what? That doesn't really matter when you're talking about life and death.
Evidence? Evidence of a motorbike rider hitting a horse on a dual carriageway after it was known horses had broken loose earlier? Your point of view is very popular but to me it is sanctimonious at best. "you should be prepared for the worst". So, so easy to say after the event. Who leaves home every time expecting to be trapped in a car miles from anywhere for 6 hours? Really, who? Personally I find it self righteous for someone to be sat at home sipping at their beverage of choice in a warm comfy chair telling people how they should feel. A tragic and awful, awful event but to get all high and mighty about people daring to say "this is sad but was it really handled as well as it might be? Should we at least look if it did warrant people (possibly vulnerable people) should have been better looked after by our professional services". People can ask questions without being selfish or disrespectful and the people who say you can't are the main reason this country is starting to slide in the direction it is and it smacks of PC bullying to say they can't. If the family or friends of the deceased or the owner of the horse are reading this I would just like to say I am sorry for your terrible loss.
Well said - Nobody is disputing this was a terrible tragedy, although you could be forgiven for thinking that they were by some of the immature and inappropriately emotive hostility extended to those querying (only) the Police's reactions to it. Maybe we have to wait until there is a another secondary tragedy directly arising from these poorly handled incidents before it will be 'PC' enough for some people that anyone dare to suggest there may actually be a serious problem with these unnecessarily disruptive and lengthy Police RTA responses. Because if the authorities don't restore some basic common sense to these situations that second tragedy is certainly only a matter of time away.
I agree with much of what has been said here. It was a terrible tragedy and my thoughts are very much with the motorcylists' families and friends . That said, there are many unanswered questions around this sad incident; the police's inability to find or deal with the horse (and once again we have the police policing the police with the IPCC evidently not considering this accident serious enough for their lofty attentions), and their reasons for failing to deploy the obvious solution of a rolling road block using those cars they have with Do Not Pass in the rear window. Then in the aftermath another example of what is a modern scourge - what the previous writer aptly described as 'unnecessarily disruptive and lengthy police RTA responses'.
I fully agree that the inconvenience of being stuck in a queue for hours is insignificant compared to the death of anyone, but to draw that comparison suggests that somehow the queue helps the outcome in some way, or in some way mitigates the sadness of the incident. It doesn't. What is at issue here is the spurious reasons for hours and hours of road closures - not just this one but many many others. Sometimes the police blame their actions on 'health and safety ' - theirs that is - not the the travelling public's, and sometimes, as in this case, on the need to gather evidence. Now I do believe that the police and other emergency services should be kept as safe as possible, but in 35 years of motoring I have never seen anyone speeding past the scene of an accident. I cannot understand why in these days of digital cameras and other technologies why it should take so much longer to get things moving again today than say 30 years ago. The plain fact is that these closures for hours and hours on end ( once the ambulance service has attnede to and left with any casualties of course) rarely benefit the casualty or the public, rather they are for the benefit of the police who seem to be much slower these days than their forebears of prior times at doing their job. Once I learned that they were possibly implicated in failing to remove the horse or manage traffic speeds, suddenly the real reason for the length of the delays became much clearer.
The previous writer is also right to say that it will take a secondary tragedy to occur before common sense is restored to these situations, and the police understand that their duty of care is not confined to their own narrow purposes in the aftermath of a tragic incident, but to other road users as well.
I have already witnessed the results of their keenness to shut roads - sometimes when it is totally not necessary. On the M25 a few months ago, approaching the scene of what was fortunately a non- fatal RTA which was blocking the two middle lanes, I noticed drivers moving aside to allow ambulances and fire engines to pass as is right and proper, but passively impeding the police ( who were the last to arrive) because of the high likelihood of an iminent over-the- top road closure.
Expect a vanilla report, regrets expressed, satisfied they did all they could in the circumstances etc etc once they have finished looking into themselves. I agree with not speculating but I will be interested to see how much more we will learn from their investigations than that two motocyclists, who evidently were not made aware of the potential hazard ahead, sadly collided with a horse which should not have been there. I 'd be surprised if there was anything wrong with their machines, or their conduct or any other factors which warranted a seven hour closure other than this was a very sad accident.
[quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scrumpyjack[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]dribydal[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]big white bear[/bold] wrote: despite all the comments above, it still left mothers with very young babies + diabetics in the queue for hours. And this should not be allowed to happen, I'm sure the police don't want more problems happening.[/p][/quote]If you're diabetic or have a young baby you should go out prepared for the worst, extra food, drink, nappies, injections etc, in case of traffic hold ups or in case your car breaks down or anything else unplanned happening. Not to do so would be stupid. I'm not speculating as I I don't know the full circumstances but truth is a man was killed R.I.P. and police investigating the accident only have one chance to gather evidence to try to find out exactly what happenned before the road is re-opened and the evidence is lost forever. I was also stuck in the traffic, and no I wasn't home in time to eat my dinner, but so what? That doesn't really matter when you're talking about life and death.[/p][/quote]Evidence? Evidence of a motorbike rider hitting a horse on a dual carriageway after it was known horses had broken loose earlier? Your point of view is very popular but to me it is sanctimonious at best. "you should be prepared for the worst". So, so easy to say after the event. Who leaves home every time expecting to be trapped in a car miles from anywhere for 6 hours? Really, who? Personally I find it self righteous for someone to be sat at home sipping at their beverage of choice in a warm comfy chair telling people how they should feel. A tragic and awful, awful event but to get all high and mighty about people daring to say "this is sad but was it really handled as well as it might be? Should we at least look if it did warrant people (possibly vulnerable people) should have been better looked after by our professional services". People can ask questions without being selfish or disrespectful and the people who say you can't are the main reason this country is starting to slide in the direction it is and it smacks of PC bullying to say they can't. If the family or friends of the deceased or the owner of the horse are reading this I would just like to say I am sorry for your terrible loss.[/p][/quote]Well said - Nobody is disputing this was a terrible tragedy, although you could be forgiven for thinking that they were by some of the immature and inappropriately emotive hostility extended to those querying (only) the Police's reactions to it. Maybe we have to wait until there is a another secondary tragedy directly arising from these poorly handled incidents before it will be 'PC' enough for some people that anyone dare to suggest there may actually be a serious problem with these unnecessarily disruptive and lengthy Police RTA responses. Because if the authorities don't restore some basic common sense to these situations that second tragedy is certainly only a matter of time away.[/p][/quote]I agree with much of what has been said here. It was a terrible tragedy and my thoughts are very much with the motorcylists' families and friends . That said, there are many unanswered questions around this sad incident; the police's inability to find or deal with the horse (and once again we have the police policing the police with the IPCC evidently not considering this accident serious enough for their lofty attentions), and their reasons for failing to deploy the obvious solution of a rolling road block using those cars they have with Do Not Pass in the rear window. Then in the aftermath another example of what is a modern scourge - what the previous writer aptly described as 'unnecessarily disruptive and lengthy police RTA responses'. I fully agree that the inconvenience of being stuck in a queue for hours is insignificant compared to the death of anyone, but to draw that comparison suggests that somehow the queue helps the outcome in some way, or in some way mitigates the sadness of the incident. It doesn't. What is at issue here is the spurious reasons for hours and hours of road closures - not just this one but many many others. Sometimes the police blame their actions on 'health and safety ' - theirs that is - not the the travelling public's, and sometimes, as in this case, on the need to gather evidence. Now I do believe that the police and other emergency services should be kept as safe as possible, but in 35 years of motoring I have never seen anyone speeding past the scene of an accident. I cannot understand why in these days of digital cameras and other technologies why it should take so much longer to get things moving again today than say 30 years ago. The plain fact is that these closures for hours and hours on end ( once the ambulance service has attnede to and left with any casualties of course) rarely benefit the casualty or the public, rather they are for the benefit of the police who seem to be much slower these days than their forebears of prior times at doing their job. Once I learned that they were possibly implicated in failing to remove the horse or manage traffic speeds, suddenly the real reason for the length of the delays became much clearer. The previous writer is also right to say that it will take a secondary tragedy to occur before common sense is restored to these situations, and the police understand that their duty of care is not confined to their own narrow purposes in the aftermath of a tragic incident, but to other road users as well. I have already witnessed the results of their keenness to shut roads - sometimes when it is totally not necessary. On the M25 a few months ago, approaching the scene of what was fortunately a non- fatal RTA which was blocking the two middle lanes, I noticed drivers moving aside to allow ambulances and fire engines to pass as is right and proper, but passively impeding the police ( who were the last to arrive) because of the high likelihood of an iminent over-the- top road closure. Expect a vanilla report, regrets expressed, satisfied they did all they could in the circumstances etc etc once they have finished looking into themselves. I agree with not speculating but I will be interested to see how much more we will learn from their investigations than that two motocyclists, who evidently were not made aware of the potential hazard ahead, sadly collided with a horse which should not have been there. I 'd be surprised if there was anything wrong with their machines, or their conduct or any other factors which warranted a seven hour closure other than this was a very sad accident. Robin Christchurch
  • Score: 6

9:41am Sat 25 Jan 14

scrumpyjack says...

I just want to quote from the post above.....

"I fully agree that the inconvenience of being stuck in a queue for hours is insignificant compared to the death of anyone, but to draw that comparison suggests that somehow the queue helps the outcome in some way, or in some way mitigates the sadness of the incident".
I just want to quote from the post above..... "I fully agree that the inconvenience of being stuck in a queue for hours is insignificant compared to the death of anyone, but to draw that comparison suggests that somehow the queue helps the outcome in some way, or in some way mitigates the sadness of the incident". scrumpyjack
  • Score: 10

2:42pm Sat 25 Jan 14

we-shall-see says...

Tragic all round when this sort of thing happens - but - is it not common sense to drive carefully around that whole area when the likely hood of an animal getting onto the road is a REAL possibility at any time? There are warning signs all along the road of animals …..

There could be anything from horses to dear on that road coming through and out of the New Forest - so common sense means slow down to be on the safe side. Do we HAVE to be told by the Police to do so? I mean REALLY?! :o/
Tragic all round when this sort of thing happens - but - is it not common sense to drive carefully around that whole area when the likely hood of an animal getting onto the road is a REAL possibility at any time? There are warning signs all along the road of animals ….. There could be anything from horses to dear on that road coming through and out of the New Forest - so common sense means slow down to be on the safe side. Do we HAVE to be told by the Police to do so? I mean REALLY?! :o/ we-shall-see
  • Score: 9

5:35pm Sat 25 Jan 14

ekimnoslen says...

A horse is generally speaking a creature of substance. It seems unlikely that the motorcyclists would travel at speed if they were aware that such a creature was loose on the road. We're they warned or weren't they is the pertinent question.
A horse is generally speaking a creature of substance. It seems unlikely that the motorcyclists would travel at speed if they were aware that such a creature was loose on the road. We're they warned or weren't they is the pertinent question. ekimnoslen
  • Score: 2

6:32pm Sat 25 Jan 14

red/whitearmy says...

The man killed was a work colleague of mine Dan 31 , He was on his way home to bournemouth from work up at Eastleigh. He was amongst the traffic slowly cruising through when the police allowed the traffic to carry on slowly but to be aware and cautious as there is a loose horse on the run. This aint easy to write. Dan carried on through the traffic bearing in mind this is quite late and dark with no street lights and basically the horse ran into dan and the other motorcylist then horse and dan died. Why the police never just kept the traffic stopped or even do a slow rolling road block.
The man killed was a work colleague of mine Dan 31 , He was on his way home to bournemouth from work up at Eastleigh. He was amongst the traffic slowly cruising through when the police allowed the traffic to carry on slowly but to be aware and cautious as there is a loose horse on the run. This aint easy to write. Dan carried on through the traffic bearing in mind this is quite late and dark with no street lights and basically the horse ran into dan and the other motorcylist then horse and dan died. Why the police never just kept the traffic stopped or even do a slow rolling road block. red/whitearmy
  • Score: -5

11:31am Sun 26 Jan 14

allopinionscount says...

nickynoodah wrote:
The police had not got the brains to tether a solitary horse
no surprise there then
I doubt they could tie their own boot laces
they are a load of lying scruffs you know
Judging by this comments neither do you. What do know about tethering horses, fast roads policing or collision investigation? I'm guessing nothing other than you had a bad experience with the police once and now you're so traumatised you have to make inane comments. Sad.
[quote][p][bold]nickynoodah[/bold] wrote: The police had not got the brains to tether a solitary horse no surprise there then I doubt they could tie their own boot laces they are a load of lying scruffs you know[/p][/quote]Judging by this comments neither do you. What do know about tethering horses, fast roads policing or collision investigation? I'm guessing nothing other than you had a bad experience with the police once and now you're so traumatised you have to make inane comments. Sad. allopinionscount
  • Score: 6

5:41pm Sun 26 Jan 14

pirateecho says...

Dorset Outsider wrote:
jimbob32 wrote:
How can IPCC decide not to investigate? The police had already lied to cover try and cover their backs?! They have said that they told people to proceed with caution, and yet hundreds of motorists have stated that no such warning was given (as per South Today New and other comments on the Echo website). Some one has needlessly lost their life, and another is in a critical condition - People are going to want answers.
That's funny, because the echo story yesterday cited witnesses as saying 'we were held for ages, then slowly allowed to pass in a single lane to relieve the build up.' - The truth is, that once past the police, many road users would have seen the chance to make up lost time. The more cars that do it, the more everyone assumes it is ok to speed up. Maybe the police didn't tell every driver, but they did certainly release it all slowly. The actions of people stuck in stationary traffic lead to the belief it was fine to continue at speed. Sadly leading to a very nasty accident. Yes they should investigate, and see that all was done that could have been leading up to the accident. And it was handled as well as could be after in a long road with no hard shoulder or turn offs. I would love to hear what would have been said if the a31 had been closed fo 3 days whilst they looked for a horse. If only they had though, there would not be one life lost and another fighting for it.
perhaps Dorset outrider didn't understand that there were two separate incidents and twice the traffic was let through.
The first incident , the traffic was led to believe the road had been cleared of horses as it had been shut for over an hour. how would a warning have been given verbally to hundreds of vehicles, you would expect that the reason for the hold up to have been removed before letting the traffic go.The traffic would have moved off from stationary and driven through the cordon then proceeded as road allowed it was a duel carriageway, as it happened the horse appeared a short distance along the road, even if the bikers were doing 30 miles an hour hitting a horse running into the carriageway would be catastrophic .The second time after the accident when the traffic was let go they had to drive slowly as the debris from the two bikes was still littering the road.
[quote][p][bold]Dorset Outsider[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jimbob32[/bold] wrote: How can IPCC decide not to investigate? The police had already lied to cover try and cover their backs?! They have said that they told people to proceed with caution, and yet hundreds of motorists have stated that no such warning was given (as per South Today New and other comments on the Echo website). Some one has needlessly lost their life, and another is in a critical condition - People are going to want answers.[/p][/quote]That's funny, because the echo story yesterday cited witnesses as saying 'we were held for ages, then slowly allowed to pass in a single lane to relieve the build up.' - The truth is, that once past the police, many road users would have seen the chance to make up lost time. The more cars that do it, the more everyone assumes it is ok to speed up. Maybe the police didn't tell every driver, but they did certainly release it all slowly. The actions of people stuck in stationary traffic lead to the belief it was fine to continue at speed. Sadly leading to a very nasty accident. Yes they should investigate, and see that all was done that could have been leading up to the accident. And it was handled as well as could be after in a long road with no hard shoulder or turn offs. I would love to hear what would have been said if the a31 had been closed fo 3 days whilst they looked for a horse. If only they had though, there would not be one life lost and another fighting for it.[/p][/quote]perhaps Dorset outrider didn't understand that there were two separate incidents and twice the traffic was let through. The first incident , the traffic was led to believe the road had been cleared of horses as it had been shut for over an hour. how would a warning have been given verbally to hundreds of vehicles, you would expect that the reason for the hold up to have been removed before letting the traffic go.The traffic would have moved off from stationary and driven through the cordon then proceeded as road allowed it was a duel carriageway, as it happened the horse appeared a short distance along the road, even if the bikers were doing 30 miles an hour hitting a horse running into the carriageway would be catastrophic .The second time after the accident when the traffic was let go they had to drive slowly as the debris from the two bikes was still littering the road. pirateecho
  • Score: 0

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