Parents at Bournemouth Catholic primary school “feel pressured” to pay £50 to keep child’s place

Bournemouth Echo: BUILDING: Corpus Christi Catholic Primary School BUILDING: Corpus Christi Catholic Primary School

PARENTS at a Catholic primary school in Bournemouth have said they felt “pressured” to pay £50 a year to keep their child’s place.

A letter sent to all parents at Corpus Christi school states that part of the “deal” of attending a Catholic school is the parental contribution to the School Building Fund.

The letter signed by Headmaster Declan Goodwin said: “One of the stipulations of attending a Catholic School is the contribution to the School Building Fund, expected from the parents of children who attend.”

Parents are expected to pay £5 per month spread over a full calendar year – excluding December and January – to cover the cost of any refurbishment or improvement works on the school building and grounds.

Matt Clarke, who has a friend with a child at the school, said: “Does this mean that Catholic schools are now able to charge and only those who agree to pay will be offered places?

“Many parents were upset at the tone of this letter.”

A concerned mother, who wished to remain anonymous, added: “We had no idea that we would be expected to pay £50 each year and felt under a lot of pressure to pay the required amount.

“I was worried my daughter might lose her place if we didn’t pay.”

The letter was sent out as a regular reminder to parents and said that there were many families who failed to pay, resulting in the school falling short of the required amount of funds.

Mr Goodwin said: “The parental contribution then helps pay our percentage of any proposed works such as classroom and playground improvements for the benefit of the children’s education.

“This is a voluntary contribution and we always know that some parents cannot afford to pay this.”

Comments (36)

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9:28am Sun 15 Dec 13

sammmymac says...

I bet the government loves this school, encouraging parents to foot the bill that the state should be paying. Parents paying for the building works is unacceptable. It's a state funded school and parents pay through their taxes.
I bet the government loves this school, encouraging parents to foot the bill that the state should be paying. Parents paying for the building works is unacceptable. It's a state funded school and parents pay through their taxes. sammmymac

9:29am Sun 15 Dec 13

BIGTONE says...

Stand and Deliver...
Stand and Deliver... BIGTONE

9:54am Sun 15 Dec 13

Squars says...

Religionists, eh?
Religionists, eh? Squars

10:00am Sun 15 Dec 13

Hobie18007 says...

Read the last paragraph.....'Volun
tary contributions'.
Read the last paragraph.....'Volun tary contributions'. Hobie18007

10:27am Sun 15 Dec 13

nickynoodah says...

DO or DIE
DO or DIE nickynoodah

10:35am Sun 15 Dec 13

Adrian XX says...

When I was at a state grammar school a long time ago and a long way from here, parents were also required to make a "voluntary contribution". I don't think it is right, but it's not unique to catholic schools.
When I was at a state grammar school a long time ago and a long way from here, parents were also required to make a "voluntary contribution". I don't think it is right, but it's not unique to catholic schools. Adrian XX

11:40am Sun 15 Dec 13

madras says...

£5/month sounds like a bargain - we get hit from all angles for 'voluntary' contributions / prizes / gifts / etc / etc...
£5/month sounds like a bargain - we get hit from all angles for 'voluntary' contributions / prizes / gifts / etc / etc... madras

11:46am Sun 15 Dec 13

Pablo23 says...

Why would anyone send their kid to a Catholic school in this day and age.
Why would anyone send their kid to a Catholic school in this day and age. Pablo23

11:51am Sun 15 Dec 13

nickynoodah says...

Sitting here in my office singing carols in Spanish
I pick up the phone, a caller from USA asks if I'm a descendant of King Nicholas
am I **** I said
just think Prince Nickynoodah of Bere Regis
Sitting here in my office singing carols in Spanish I pick up the phone, a caller from USA asks if I'm a descendant of King Nicholas am I **** I said just think Prince Nickynoodah of Bere Regis nickynoodah

12:09pm Sun 15 Dec 13

reeve007 says...

Hobie18007 wrote:
Read the last paragraph.....'Volun

tary contributions'.
Then let the Pope make it from his wealth
[quote][p][bold]Hobie18007[/bold] wrote: Read the last paragraph.....'Volun tary contributions'.[/p][/quote]Then let the Pope make it from his wealth reeve007

12:55pm Sun 15 Dec 13

muscliffman says...

The report says "The letter signed by Headmaster Declan Goodwin said: “One of the stipulations of attending a Catholic School is the contribution to the School Building Fund, expected from the parents of children who attend.”

To 'stipulate' is to impose a condition, as I read it there is nothing voluntary suggested by use of that word in the letter. If any state schools are allowed to begin 'stipulating' even small £50 payments from parents where will it end - £12,000/annum like a private school?
The report says "The letter signed by Headmaster Declan Goodwin said: “One of the stipulations of attending a Catholic School is the contribution to the School Building Fund, expected from the parents of children who attend.” To 'stipulate' is to impose a condition, as I read it there is nothing voluntary suggested by use of that word in the letter. If any state schools are allowed to begin 'stipulating' even small £50 payments from parents where will it end - £12,000/annum like a private school? muscliffman

1:22pm Sun 15 Dec 13

PokesdownMark says...

Its interesting that we allow religion to run some of our educational establishments. Its interesting that religions actually want to run educational establishments. They pick these alone among the range of public services more typically provided by the state.

For example, no religion seems keen on running a library. Or a bus service. Or providing deck chairs on the prom. But schools. There must be something that appeals to religions about being involved in schools. Mostly primary schools.

Think about that for a while.
Its interesting that we allow religion to run some of our educational establishments. Its interesting that religions actually want to run educational establishments. They pick these alone among the range of public services more typically provided by the state. For example, no religion seems keen on running a library. Or a bus service. Or providing deck chairs on the prom. But schools. There must be something that appeals to religions about being involved in schools. Mostly primary schools. Think about that for a while. PokesdownMark

1:44pm Sun 15 Dec 13

muscliffman says...

PokesdownMark wrote:
Its interesting that we allow religion to run some of our educational establishments. Its interesting that religions actually want to run educational establishments. They pick these alone among the range of public services more typically provided by the state.

For example, no religion seems keen on running a library. Or a bus service. Or providing deck chairs on the prom. But schools. There must be something that appeals to religions about being involved in schools. Mostly primary schools.

Think about that for a while.
Brainwashing future generations is certainly one of the main historic reasons religions became involved in schools, another possibility which I think you might imply is probably best left unsaid!
[quote][p][bold]PokesdownMark[/bold] wrote: Its interesting that we allow religion to run some of our educational establishments. Its interesting that religions actually want to run educational establishments. They pick these alone among the range of public services more typically provided by the state. For example, no religion seems keen on running a library. Or a bus service. Or providing deck chairs on the prom. But schools. There must be something that appeals to religions about being involved in schools. Mostly primary schools. Think about that for a while.[/p][/quote]Brainwashing future generations is certainly one of the main historic reasons religions became involved in schools, another possibility which I think you might imply is probably best left unsaid! muscliffman

3:16pm Sun 15 Dec 13

PokesdownMark says...

No, I was implying the indoctrination primarily. The other thing, in my view, isn't related to religions need to run schools. Although religious organisations allowed clever, life long, highly committed child abusers to take full advantage of their endemic, by definition, religious 'virtues': huge gullibility, reluctance to critically appraise, extreme naivety, forgiveness being highly prized etc... I don't think the church as an organisation itself wanted to access children for the purposes of physically abusing them.
No, I was implying the indoctrination primarily. The other thing, in my view, isn't related to religions need to run schools. Although religious organisations allowed clever, life long, highly committed child abusers to take full advantage of their endemic, by definition, religious 'virtues': huge gullibility, reluctance to critically appraise, extreme naivety, forgiveness being highly prized etc... I don't think the church as an organisation itself wanted to access children for the purposes of physically abusing them. PokesdownMark

3:26pm Sun 15 Dec 13

PokesdownMark says...

Anyway how does funding work for church schools exactly? Clearly they enjoy taxpayers money. I imagine that the religious organisations themselves also contribute? How much? How is this decided? Who decided this? Do all religious schools get the same amount of taxpayer money for building maintenance costs?

The head says: QUOTE The parental contribution then helps pay our percentage of any proposed works such as classroom and playground improvements for the benefit of the children’s education. UNQUOTE

What is the percentage? Is that a percentage of a two way split between the church's money and that from everyone's Bournemouth Council Tax? Or does central government also chip in? And again.... what is the percentage?
Anyway how does funding work for church schools exactly? Clearly they enjoy taxpayers money. I imagine that the religious organisations themselves also contribute? How much? How is this decided? Who decided this? Do all religious schools get the same amount of taxpayer money for building maintenance costs? The head says: QUOTE The parental contribution then helps pay our percentage of any proposed works such as classroom and playground improvements for the benefit of the children’s education. UNQUOTE What is the percentage? Is that a percentage of a two way split between the church's money and that from everyone's Bournemouth Council Tax? Or does central government also chip in? And again.... what is the percentage? PokesdownMark

4:55pm Sun 15 Dec 13

Bob49 says...

I would think that it is the Catholic church who should be complaining. All that money they raise for their imaginary friend and he is no where to be seen.

Barely a few millenia back he was regularly helping out . Parting waves, setting fire to bushes and making water spring forth from rocks.

Surely he could spare a bit of time to sort out a few classrooms. After all if folk like the Catholics can't get the odd miracle now and again what hope is there for the rest of us ?

Maybe they should pray a bit louder as the old fellow might be getting a bit deaf in his old age.
I would think that it is the Catholic church who should be complaining. All that money they raise for their imaginary friend and he is no where to be seen. Barely a few millenia back he was regularly helping out . Parting waves, setting fire to bushes and making water spring forth from rocks. Surely he could spare a bit of time to sort out a few classrooms. After all if folk like the Catholics can't get the odd miracle now and again what hope is there for the rest of us ? Maybe they should pray a bit louder as the old fellow might be getting a bit deaf in his old age. Bob49

5:08pm Sun 15 Dec 13

jonesyd says...

I believe the church pay 10% (half from parishioners and half from parental cintributions).

https://www.gov.uk/g
overnment/uploads/sy
stem/uploads/attachm
ent_data/file/175382
/Blue_Book_-_Capital
_Funding.pdf
I believe the church pay 10% (half from parishioners and half from parental cintributions). https://www.gov.uk/g overnment/uploads/sy stem/uploads/attachm ent_data/file/175382 /Blue_Book_-_Capital _Funding.pdf jonesyd

5:09pm Sun 15 Dec 13

ShuttleX says...

Bob49 wrote:
I would think that it is the Catholic church who should be complaining. All that money they raise for their imaginary friend and he is no where to be seen.

Barely a few millenia back he was regularly helping out . Parting waves, setting fire to bushes and making water spring forth from rocks.

Surely he could spare a bit of time to sort out a few classrooms. After all if folk like the Catholics can't get the odd miracle now and again what hope is there for the rest of us ?

Maybe they should pray a bit louder as the old fellow might be getting a bit deaf in his old age.
Love it.
[quote][p][bold]Bob49[/bold] wrote: I would think that it is the Catholic church who should be complaining. All that money they raise for their imaginary friend and he is no where to be seen. Barely a few millenia back he was regularly helping out . Parting waves, setting fire to bushes and making water spring forth from rocks. Surely he could spare a bit of time to sort out a few classrooms. After all if folk like the Catholics can't get the odd miracle now and again what hope is there for the rest of us ? Maybe they should pray a bit louder as the old fellow might be getting a bit deaf in his old age.[/p][/quote]Love it. ShuttleX

5:10pm Sun 15 Dec 13

jonesyd says...

Contributions
Contributions jonesyd

5:27pm Sun 15 Dec 13

portia6 says...

jonesyd wrote:
Contributions
Do they still drink Blue Nun?
[quote][p][bold]jonesyd[/bold] wrote: Contributions[/p][/quote]Do they still drink Blue Nun? portia6

7:34pm Sun 15 Dec 13

glendower2909 says...

Non story. My kids attended same school. Got same
Letter each year. Went in same place each time
The bin.

Come on guys grow some balls. If you don't want to
Or can't afford to pay then simply follow my example
And bin it. Don't grow crying to the echo. Are you really that
Naive that you think non payment will result in
Expulsion of your child.

At end of day it Is made clear that an
Payment to the building fund is expected
so no sudden surprises.

With regards to church schools of all persuasions
For all their faults they Do instill a moral code which
Is often missing in secular state schools.
Non story. My kids attended same school. Got same Letter each year. Went in same place each time The bin. Come on guys grow some balls. If you don't want to Or can't afford to pay then simply follow my example And bin it. Don't grow crying to the echo. Are you really that Naive that you think non payment will result in Expulsion of your child. At end of day it Is made clear that an Payment to the building fund is expected so no sudden surprises. With regards to church schools of all persuasions For all their faults they Do instill a moral code which Is often missing in secular state schools. glendower2909

11:14pm Sun 15 Dec 13

Murphster says...

My nippers go there too, it is a good school and our kids are happy and doing well. The letter is poorly thought out and I must admit to feeling a bit 'cheesed off ' when we got it the first time (before Mr Goodwin's time) and it does give the impression of being an 'or else' attitude.
However for some, including us, who both work, £5 a month is nothing to worry about and if it helps then I can think of lots of worse things to spend money on. As Glendower says, it's really a non story, if you can't afford it don't worry about it, they can't get rid of your kids just because you can't . But can't and won't aren't the same thing. There's always other ways of helping the school out if you can't afford it....
My nippers go there too, it is a good school and our kids are happy and doing well. The letter is poorly thought out and I must admit to feeling a bit 'cheesed off ' when we got it the first time (before Mr Goodwin's time) and it does give the impression of being an 'or else' attitude. However for some, including us, who both work, £5 a month is nothing to worry about and if it helps then I can think of lots of worse things to spend money on. As Glendower says, it's really a non story, if you can't afford it don't worry about it, they can't get rid of your kids just because you can't . But can't and won't aren't the same thing. There's always other ways of helping the school out if you can't afford it.... Murphster

1:10am Mon 16 Dec 13

billd766 says...

IF it is voluntary then make it known from day 1 and that nothing will happen if parents do not pay.
If it is compulsory then the school is in the wrong.

Here in Thailand it is known as team money and is a form of corruption and paid "under the table" in a "brown envelope".
IF it is voluntary then make it known from day 1 and that nothing will happen if parents do not pay. If it is compulsory then the school is in the wrong. Here in Thailand it is known as team money and is a form of corruption and paid "under the table" in a "brown envelope". billd766

10:36am Mon 16 Dec 13

LouBy 20 says...

I am happy to pay what is approx 26p per school day (based on approx 190 days of school) for both my children (that's 13p each) to go to a brilliant safe and inspiring school - I would happily pay that to any school where my children were happy and getting a good education. Religious or not our schools need parental input both financially and personally.
I am happy to pay what is approx 26p per school day (based on approx 190 days of school) for both my children (that's 13p each) to go to a brilliant safe and inspiring school - I would happily pay that to any school where my children were happy and getting a good education. Religious or not our schools need parental input both financially and personally. LouBy 20

11:59am Mon 16 Dec 13

ranger_bob says...

If given my time over I would move heaven and earth (pun intended) for our daughter to go to a parochial school rather than one of the poorly run state schools in this area. We have had nothing but disappointment from primary through to secondary education from the various schools that our daughter has attended.

At least with the parochial schools get they get a sound education, usually from a better calibre of teacher and the moral code followed at home would be backed up at scool rather than the free for all that seems to be followed in the LEAs these days.
If given my time over I would move heaven and earth (pun intended) for our daughter to go to a parochial school rather than one of the poorly run state schools in this area. We have had nothing but disappointment from primary through to secondary education from the various schools that our daughter has attended. At least with the parochial schools get they get a sound education, usually from a better calibre of teacher and the moral code followed at home would be backed up at scool rather than the free for all that seems to be followed in the LEAs these days. ranger_bob

1:28pm Mon 16 Dec 13

kingstonpaul says...

It's the equivalent of one month's Sky subscription. So, set in that context, what's more important?
Surely every school is tucking-up parents for contributions?
It's the equivalent of one month's Sky subscription. So, set in that context, what's more important? Surely every school is tucking-up parents for contributions? kingstonpaul

1:50pm Mon 16 Dec 13

casualtyofchocolate says...

Incidentally, this isn't confined to church schools - we pay a lesser amount each year - also "voluntarily" to Glenmoor. At least at Corpus Christi they get a decent education, not sure I can say the same about our daughter's school.
Incidentally, this isn't confined to church schools - we pay a lesser amount each year - also "voluntarily" to Glenmoor. At least at Corpus Christi they get a decent education, not sure I can say the same about our daughter's school. casualtyofchocolate

3:16pm Mon 16 Dec 13

Southbourne Mike says...

As a contributor to this fund I feel that we have a right to reply on here. It is money that is obtained from those that can afford it and will help all those children who attend the school now and in the future. We all wish our children to have the best facilities available and as these cant be achieved by relying on the government and local authorities then fundraising is essetial. To those parents who cant afford it then clearly nobody would expect them to try and help, what's galling is those parents who can help and afford it and wan their children to benefit from improved facilities but are unwilling to contribute in any way. These are the people who should be taking a long hard look at themselves.
As a contributor to this fund I feel that we have a right to reply on here. It is money that is obtained from those that can afford it and will help all those children who attend the school now and in the future. We all wish our children to have the best facilities available and as these cant be achieved by relying on the government and local authorities then fundraising is essetial. To those parents who cant afford it then clearly nobody would expect them to try and help, what's galling is those parents who can help and afford it and wan their children to benefit from improved facilities but are unwilling to contribute in any way. These are the people who should be taking a long hard look at themselves. Southbourne Mike

4:54pm Mon 16 Dec 13

stevobath says...

Southbourne Mike wrote:
As a contributor to this fund I feel that we have a right to reply on here. It is money that is obtained from those that can afford it and will help all those children who attend the school now and in the future. We all wish our children to have the best facilities available and as these cant be achieved by relying on the government and local authorities then fundraising is essetial. To those parents who cant afford it then clearly nobody would expect them to try and help, what's galling is those parents who can help and afford it and wan their children to benefit from improved facilities but are unwilling to contribute in any way. These are the people who should be taking a long hard look at themselves.
Seems that anything that is said about the negative aspect of Catholic Schools & beliefs, is removed from the ECHO?
[quote][p][bold]Southbourne Mike[/bold] wrote: As a contributor to this fund I feel that we have a right to reply on here. It is money that is obtained from those that can afford it and will help all those children who attend the school now and in the future. We all wish our children to have the best facilities available and as these cant be achieved by relying on the government and local authorities then fundraising is essetial. To those parents who cant afford it then clearly nobody would expect them to try and help, what's galling is those parents who can help and afford it and wan their children to benefit from improved facilities but are unwilling to contribute in any way. These are the people who should be taking a long hard look at themselves.[/p][/quote]Seems that anything that is said about the negative aspect of Catholic Schools & beliefs, is removed from the ECHO? stevobath

5:19pm Mon 16 Dec 13

retry69 says...

Looks like we have a pupil from the school commenting who needs to grow up and stop sulking :)
Looks like we have a pupil from the school commenting who needs to grow up and stop sulking :) retry69

5:41pm Mon 16 Dec 13

nickynoodah says...

stevobath wrote:
Southbourne Mike wrote:
As a contributor to this fund I feel that we have a right to reply on here. It is money that is obtained from those that can afford it and will help all those children who attend the school now and in the future. We all wish our children to have the best facilities available and as these cant be achieved by relying on the government and local authorities then fundraising is essetial. To those parents who cant afford it then clearly nobody would expect them to try and help, what's galling is those parents who can help and afford it and wan their children to benefit from improved facilities but are unwilling to contribute in any way. These are the people who should be taking a long hard look at themselves.
Seems that anything that is said about the negative aspect of Catholic Schools & beliefs, is removed from the ECHO?
Seems that anything that is said about the negative aspect of Catholic Schools & beliefs, is removed from the ECHO


Stick to your own Muslim schools george
[quote][p][bold]stevobath[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Southbourne Mike[/bold] wrote: As a contributor to this fund I feel that we have a right to reply on here. It is money that is obtained from those that can afford it and will help all those children who attend the school now and in the future. We all wish our children to have the best facilities available and as these cant be achieved by relying on the government and local authorities then fundraising is essetial. To those parents who cant afford it then clearly nobody would expect them to try and help, what's galling is those parents who can help and afford it and wan their children to benefit from improved facilities but are unwilling to contribute in any way. These are the people who should be taking a long hard look at themselves.[/p][/quote]Seems that anything that is said about the negative aspect of Catholic Schools & beliefs, is removed from the ECHO?[/p][/quote]Seems that anything that is said about the negative aspect of Catholic Schools & beliefs, is removed from the ECHO Stick to your own Muslim schools george nickynoodah

5:45pm Mon 16 Dec 13

retry69 says...

How many schools in Bere Regis ? :)
How many schools in Bere Regis ? :) retry69

6:47pm Mon 16 Dec 13

nickynoodah says...

It will be better for you to keep away from schools
unless you want POLICE knocking your bedsit door down George.
It will be better for you to keep away from schools unless you want POLICE knocking your bedsit door down George. nickynoodah

7:13pm Mon 16 Dec 13

retry69 says...

You use POLICE in a threatening way,could that be a clue to your identity ?
You use POLICE in a threatening way,could that be a clue to your identity ? retry69

9:25pm Mon 16 Dec 13

PokesdownMark says...

Well that escalated quickly.
Well that escalated quickly. PokesdownMark

4:12pm Thu 19 Dec 13

pookie* says...

For those who have had children at the school in the past or now, it is very clearly stated from the outset, via school prospectus, introductory parents meetings, website etc, etc. that the school do request this voluntary payment towards the upkeep of the fabric of the building itself, (it is per family not per child). It is my understanding if the school is able to meets it's required figure for the year, that the diocese is then also able to commit a figure that considerably more than matches it. As a result the school, which was in danger of becoming rundown in parts, has been able to undergo some considerable updating of facilities in the last few years, no more blocked drains and toilet floods that were once commonplace .
It is made very clear that it is voluntary, but also that the contribution is vital for the schools much needed ongoing improvement. I for one, actually appreciate the reminders, as in this busy world of ours it is to easy to put on the 'to do' pile and forget it. Mr Goodwin has been at the school for only a few years, and has not been afraid to makes changes, that haven't always been popular, but I have to agree have been for the better. The school has improved significantly in a number of ways under his leadership, the buildings fund contribution request is nothing new and is not something that he has brought in.
Also to roll out someone who has a ‘friend with a child at the school’ for a quote is pretty lame, and if this came as a surprise to any current parent then they have not read the school before applying for a place there. I do not know of any parent who is unaware of this annual voluntary request or feels pressured by the school in any way, in fact I would say that perhaps they need to engage with the school a little more as their understanding of families on low incomes or in difficulties is exactly what you would expect from a faith based school whose pastoral care for their pupils truly reflects the school ethos of 'care, courtesy and concern', even letters for school trips and other extra's, always feature a note advising that where a family may not be able to afford the extra cost to family contact the school so that arrangements can be made so that the child does not miss out.

This is a very handbaggy little non- 'story', (the journalist surely Daily Mail material if ever there was), a bit more thorough research and they may have discovered that there really is no story here at all!
For those who have had children at the school in the past or now, it is very clearly stated from the outset, via school prospectus, introductory parents meetings, website etc, etc. that the school do request this voluntary payment towards the upkeep of the fabric of the building itself, (it is per family not per child). It is my understanding if the school is able to meets it's required figure for the year, that the diocese is then also able to commit a figure that considerably more than matches it. As a result the school, which was in danger of becoming rundown in parts, has been able to undergo some considerable updating of facilities in the last few years, no more blocked drains and toilet floods that were once commonplace . It is made very clear that it is voluntary, but also that the contribution is vital for the schools much needed ongoing improvement. I for one, actually appreciate the reminders, as in this busy world of ours it is to easy to put on the 'to do' pile and forget it. Mr Goodwin has been at the school for only a few years, and has not been afraid to makes changes, that haven't always been popular, but I have to agree have been for the better. The school has improved significantly in a number of ways under his leadership, the buildings fund contribution request is nothing new and is not something that he has brought in. Also to roll out someone who has a ‘friend with a child at the school’ for a quote is pretty lame, and if this came as a surprise to any current parent then they have not read the school before applying for a place there. I do not know of any parent who is unaware of this annual voluntary request or feels pressured by the school in any way, in fact I would say that perhaps they need to engage with the school a little more as their understanding of families on low incomes or in difficulties is exactly what you would expect from a faith based school whose pastoral care for their pupils truly reflects the school ethos of 'care, courtesy and concern', even letters for school trips and other extra's, always feature a note advising that where a family may not be able to afford the extra cost to family contact the school so that arrangements can be made so that the child does not miss out. This is a very handbaggy little non- 'story', (the journalist surely Daily Mail material if ever there was), a bit more thorough research and they may have discovered that there really is no story here at all! pookie*

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