Woman rescued from tree after geo cache search

FIREFIGHTERS rescued a young woman hunting for a geo cache capsule from a tree in Poole on Saturday afternoon.

The 20-year-old climbed the tree in the Parkstone Heights area while geocaching, an popular international game where participants track down hidden caches using GPS and smartphone clues, at around 12pm.

Crews from Westbourne and Poole, including the technical rescue unit, used a 13.5m ladder to get the woman to the ground. She was unharmed, but shaken by the ordeal.

In a Tweet, Dorset Fire Control said: “Lady rescued from tree in Poole attempting to reach Geo Cache capsule – ensure you assess the risks before climbing!”

Comments (79)

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2:51pm Sat 1 Jun 13

oversixty says...

Idiot!
Idiot! oversixty
  • Score: 0

3:02pm Sat 1 Jun 13

ranger_bob says...

oversixty wrote:
Idiot!
Yes you probably are. What the story doesn't tell you is that the young lady had the appropriate climbing equipment but that one of the ropes got stuck.

But then I suppose you've never had an accident or made a mistake in your life have you? What must it be like to be perfect?
[quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: Idiot![/p][/quote]Yes you probably are. What the story doesn't tell you is that the young lady had the appropriate climbing equipment but that one of the ropes got stuck. But then I suppose you've never had an accident or made a mistake in your life have you? What must it be like to be perfect? ranger_bob
  • Score: 0

3:17pm Sat 1 Jun 13

sc61 says...

ranger_bob wrote:
oversixty wrote:
Idiot!
Yes you probably are. What the story doesn't tell you is that the young lady had the appropriate climbing equipment but that one of the ropes got stuck.

But then I suppose you've never had an accident or made a mistake in your life have you? What must it be like to be perfect?
Spot on ranger_bob !
[quote][p][bold]ranger_bob[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: Idiot![/p][/quote]Yes you probably are. What the story doesn't tell you is that the young lady had the appropriate climbing equipment but that one of the ropes got stuck. But then I suppose you've never had an accident or made a mistake in your life have you? What must it be like to be perfect?[/p][/quote]Spot on ranger_bob ! sc61
  • Score: 0

3:24pm Sat 1 Jun 13

GAHmusic says...

Must have been using Apple maps :-)
Must have been using Apple maps :-) GAHmusic
  • Score: 0

3:30pm Sat 1 Jun 13

oversixty says...

Where are you a "Ranger"?
Not a nature reserve I hope!

So the lady had special equipment to climb the tree to collect the cache? How sad!
Were there birds nesting in the tree?

Sorry but these people are trampling all over protected areas in some cases!
The latest craze-Munzees!!
Dotted all over our nature reserves in Bournemouth!
No permission asked of the local authority who own these special places!
Geo-caching was refused and what a stink it caused!
Where are you a "Ranger"? Not a nature reserve I hope! So the lady had special equipment to climb the tree to collect the cache? How sad! Were there birds nesting in the tree? Sorry but these people are trampling all over protected areas in some cases! The latest craze-Munzees!! Dotted all over our nature reserves in Bournemouth! No permission asked of the local authority who own these special places! Geo-caching was refused and what a stink it caused! oversixty
  • Score: 0

3:41pm Sat 1 Jun 13

ranger_bob says...

I guess some people just can't bear the thought of others enjoying themselves.

I know, let's ban everything just in case people start to go out and enjoy themselves and the countryside and also because I don't like what they're doing!
I guess some people just can't bear the thought of others enjoying themselves. I know, let's ban everything just in case people start to go out and enjoy themselves and the countryside and also because I don't like what they're doing! ranger_bob
  • Score: 0

4:00pm Sat 1 Jun 13

oversixty says...

In a Tweet, Dorset Fire Control said: “Lady rescued from tree in Poole attempting to reach Geo Cache capsule – ensure you assess the risks before climbing!”
In a Tweet, Dorset Fire Control said: “Lady rescued from tree in Poole attempting to reach Geo Cache capsule – ensure you assess the risks before climbing!” oversixty
  • Score: 0

4:17pm Sat 1 Jun 13

wezie100 says...

If you want to experience munzee before you set yourself against it I will be happy to show you it. I have qualifications in conservation and ecology and I love both geocaching and munzee. So please become informed before you make a decision.
If you want to experience munzee before you set yourself against it I will be happy to show you it. I have qualifications in conservation and ecology and I love both geocaching and munzee. So please become informed before you make a decision. wezie100
  • Score: 0

4:25pm Sat 1 Jun 13

bourne free says...

oversixty wrote:
Where are you a "Ranger"?
Not a nature reserve I hope!

So the lady had special equipment to climb the tree to collect the cache? How sad!
Were there birds nesting in the tree?

Sorry but these people are trampling all over protected areas in some cases!
The latest craze-Munzees!!
Dotted all over our nature reserves in Bournemouth!
No permission asked of the local authority who own these special places!
Geo-caching was refused and what a stink it caused!
you narrow minded fool !
[quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: Where are you a "Ranger"? Not a nature reserve I hope! So the lady had special equipment to climb the tree to collect the cache? How sad! Were there birds nesting in the tree? Sorry but these people are trampling all over protected areas in some cases! The latest craze-Munzees!! Dotted all over our nature reserves in Bournemouth! No permission asked of the local authority who own these special places! Geo-caching was refused and what a stink it caused![/p][/quote]you narrow minded fool ! bourne free
  • Score: 0

4:30pm Sat 1 Jun 13

oversixty says...

wezie100 wrote:
If you want to experience munzee before you set yourself against it I will be happy to show you it. I have qualifications in conservation and ecology and I love both geocaching and munzee. So please become informed before you make a decision.
There are over 40 Munzee tags on our nature reserve which are there without permission!
The Council are in the process of getting them removed.
You have no idea on the impact of people scurrying about in protected areas on our wildlife!
[quote][p][bold]wezie100[/bold] wrote: If you want to experience munzee before you set yourself against it I will be happy to show you it. I have qualifications in conservation and ecology and I love both geocaching and munzee. So please become informed before you make a decision.[/p][/quote]There are over 40 Munzee tags on our nature reserve which are there without permission! The Council are in the process of getting them removed. You have no idea on the impact of people scurrying about in protected areas on our wildlife! oversixty
  • Score: 0

4:52pm Sat 1 Jun 13

manyogie says...

Regardless or not, if you volentarily engage in any sport that caries a risk, you should have insurance.
2 teams called out is not cheap.
Regardless or not, if you volentarily engage in any sport that caries a risk, you should have insurance. 2 teams called out is not cheap. manyogie
  • Score: 0

5:01pm Sat 1 Jun 13

oversixty says...

manyogie wrote:
Regardless or not, if you volentarily engage in any sport that caries a risk, you should have insurance.
2 teams called out is not cheap.
Very good point!
However I always though that geo-caching was hiding treasure on the ground?
[quote][p][bold]manyogie[/bold] wrote: Regardless or not, if you volentarily engage in any sport that caries a risk, you should have insurance. 2 teams called out is not cheap.[/p][/quote]Very good point! However I always though that geo-caching was hiding treasure on the ground? oversixty
  • Score: 0

5:02pm Sat 1 Jun 13

bourne free says...

manyogie wrote:
Regardless or not, if you volentarily engage in any sport that caries a risk, you should have insurance.
2 teams called out is not cheap.
whether there called out or not they still get paid or perhaps you think they get paid per job ?
[quote][p][bold]manyogie[/bold] wrote: Regardless or not, if you volentarily engage in any sport that caries a risk, you should have insurance. 2 teams called out is not cheap.[/p][/quote]whether there called out or not they still get paid or perhaps you think they get paid per job ? bourne free
  • Score: 0

5:09pm Sat 1 Jun 13

oversixty says...

bourne free wrote:
manyogie wrote:
Regardless or not, if you volentarily engage in any sport that caries a risk, you should have insurance.
2 teams called out is not cheap.
whether there called out or not they still get paid or perhaps you think they get paid per job ?
Their main work is fighting fires !
[quote][p][bold]bourne free[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]manyogie[/bold] wrote: Regardless or not, if you volentarily engage in any sport that caries a risk, you should have insurance. 2 teams called out is not cheap.[/p][/quote]whether there called out or not they still get paid or perhaps you think they get paid per job ?[/p][/quote]Their main work is fighting fires ! oversixty
  • Score: 0

5:18pm Sat 1 Jun 13

portia6 says...

Seems like we are returning to planet
of the apes or monkeys!
Seems like we are returning to planet of the apes or monkeys! portia6
  • Score: 0

5:36pm Sat 1 Jun 13

wezie100 says...

I should have known better than to try to communicate in here. Full of nimby and trolls. My offer stands to anyone who cares to form opinions on fact and make informed decisions . I won't bother to be on here again.
I should have known better than to try to communicate in here. Full of nimby and trolls. My offer stands to anyone who cares to form opinions on fact and make informed decisions . I won't bother to be on here again. wezie100
  • Score: 0

5:36pm Sat 1 Jun 13

High Treason says...

At least the young lady has an interest unlike many who spend their time binge drinking. Why the concern about the costs of the fire service, binge drinkers cost a lot more with extra police, ambulance service and A&E.
At least the young lady has an interest unlike many who spend their time binge drinking. Why the concern about the costs of the fire service, binge drinkers cost a lot more with extra police, ambulance service and A&E. High Treason
  • Score: 0

5:45pm Sat 1 Jun 13

retry69 says...

ranger_bob wrote:
oversixty wrote:
Idiot!
Yes you probably are. What the story doesn't tell you is that the young lady had the appropriate climbing equipment but that one of the ropes got stuck.

But then I suppose you've never had an accident or made a mistake in your life have you? What must it be like to be perfect?
Just a genuine serious question that will hopefully get an adult answer rather than the children that seem to be leaving comments here.Was the lady that had all the climbing equipment actually alone when this took place?
[quote][p][bold]ranger_bob[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: Idiot![/p][/quote]Yes you probably are. What the story doesn't tell you is that the young lady had the appropriate climbing equipment but that one of the ropes got stuck. But then I suppose you've never had an accident or made a mistake in your life have you? What must it be like to be perfect?[/p][/quote]Just a genuine serious question that will hopefully get an adult answer rather than the children that seem to be leaving comments here.Was the lady that had all the climbing equipment actually alone when this took place? retry69
  • Score: 0

7:52pm Sat 1 Jun 13

MartyBartfast says...

retry69 wrote:
ranger_bob wrote:
oversixty wrote:
Idiot!
Yes you probably are. What the story doesn't tell you is that the young lady had the appropriate climbing equipment but that one of the ropes got stuck.

But then I suppose you've never had an accident or made a mistake in your life have you? What must it be like to be perfect?
Just a genuine serious question that will hopefully get an adult answer rather than the children that seem to be leaving comments here.Was the lady that had all the climbing equipment actually alone when this took place?
No she was not alone.
[quote][p][bold]retry69[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ranger_bob[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: Idiot![/p][/quote]Yes you probably are. What the story doesn't tell you is that the young lady had the appropriate climbing equipment but that one of the ropes got stuck. But then I suppose you've never had an accident or made a mistake in your life have you? What must it be like to be perfect?[/p][/quote]Just a genuine serious question that will hopefully get an adult answer rather than the children that seem to be leaving comments here.Was the lady that had all the climbing equipment actually alone when this took place?[/p][/quote]No she was not alone. MartyBartfast
  • Score: 0

8:57pm Sat 1 Jun 13

theoldfolk says...

oversixty wrote:
Where are you a "Ranger"?
Not a nature reserve I hope!

So the lady had special equipment to climb the tree to collect the cache? How sad!
Were there birds nesting in the tree?

Sorry but these people are trampling all over protected areas in some cases!
The latest craze-Munzees!!
Dotted all over our nature reserves in Bournemouth!
No permission asked of the local authority who own these special places!
Geo-caching was refused and what a stink it caused!
Obvious troll is obvious.
[quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: Where are you a "Ranger"? Not a nature reserve I hope! So the lady had special equipment to climb the tree to collect the cache? How sad! Were there birds nesting in the tree? Sorry but these people are trampling all over protected areas in some cases! The latest craze-Munzees!! Dotted all over our nature reserves in Bournemouth! No permission asked of the local authority who own these special places! Geo-caching was refused and what a stink it caused![/p][/quote]Obvious troll is obvious. theoldfolk
  • Score: 0

9:38pm Sat 1 Jun 13

manyogie says...

portia6 wrote:
Seems like we are returning to planet
of the apes or monkeys!
No,
They would be able to get out of trees on their own
[quote][p][bold]portia6[/bold] wrote: Seems like we are returning to planet of the apes or monkeys![/p][/quote]No, They would be able to get out of trees on their own manyogie
  • Score: 0

9:42pm Sat 1 Jun 13

manyogie says...

bourne free wrote:
manyogie wrote:
Regardless or not, if you volentarily engage in any sport that caries a risk, you should have insurance.
2 teams called out is not cheap.
whether there called out or not they still get paid or perhaps you think they get paid per job ?
So, your one of these people that think the emergency services are there for your beck and call, no matter how trite, or that you may be tying up valuable resources tending to a stubbed to or a lost ring, while some poor sods left waiting for urgent aid then,
Good on you, we need more like you.
[quote][p][bold]bourne free[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]manyogie[/bold] wrote: Regardless or not, if you volentarily engage in any sport that caries a risk, you should have insurance. 2 teams called out is not cheap.[/p][/quote]whether there called out or not they still get paid or perhaps you think they get paid per job ?[/p][/quote]So, your one of these people that think the emergency services are there for your beck and call, no matter how trite, or that you may be tying up valuable resources tending to a stubbed to or a lost ring, while some poor sods left waiting for urgent aid then, Good on you, we need more like you. manyogie
  • Score: 0

9:58pm Sat 1 Jun 13

oversixty says...

theoldfolk wrote:
oversixty wrote:
Where are you a "Ranger"?
Not a nature reserve I hope!

So the lady had special equipment to climb the tree to collect the cache? How sad!
Were there birds nesting in the tree?

Sorry but these people are trampling all over protected areas in some cases!
The latest craze-Munzees!!
Dotted all over our nature reserves in Bournemouth!
No permission asked of the local authority who own these special places!
Geo-caching was refused and what a stink it caused!
Obvious troll is obvious.
Call me what you want but I prefer enjoying nature normally rather than hiding objects in out of the way places which cause people to get stuck up a tree!
Hope health & safety were aware of her plight? Was she risk assessed?
[quote][p][bold]theoldfolk[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: Where are you a "Ranger"? Not a nature reserve I hope! So the lady had special equipment to climb the tree to collect the cache? How sad! Were there birds nesting in the tree? Sorry but these people are trampling all over protected areas in some cases! The latest craze-Munzees!! Dotted all over our nature reserves in Bournemouth! No permission asked of the local authority who own these special places! Geo-caching was refused and what a stink it caused![/p][/quote]Obvious troll is obvious.[/p][/quote]Call me what you want but I prefer enjoying nature normally rather than hiding objects in out of the way places which cause people to get stuck up a tree! Hope health & safety were aware of her plight? Was she risk assessed? oversixty
  • Score: 0

10:23pm Sat 1 Jun 13

typ nowhere says...

Oversixty
Live and let live, just as you enjoy nature in you way other people enjoy it in such ways as geocaching, on bikes, running etc. Calling someone an Idiot because you dont like it is quite frankly childish, and judging by your user name I would have thought that you would have grown up by now, still as I said live and let live.
Oversixty Live and let live, just as you enjoy nature in you way other people enjoy it in such ways as geocaching, on bikes, running etc. Calling someone an Idiot because you dont like it is quite frankly childish, and judging by your user name I would have thought that you would have grown up by now, still as I said live and let live. typ nowhere
  • Score: 0

10:47pm Sat 1 Jun 13

Cache on Wheels says...

oversixty wrote:
Where are you a "Ranger"?
Not a nature reserve I hope!

So the lady had special equipment to climb the tree to collect the cache? How sad!
Were there birds nesting in the tree?

Sorry but these people are trampling all over protected areas in some cases!
The latest craze-Munzees!!
Dotted all over our nature reserves in Bournemouth!
No permission asked of the local authority who own these special places!
Geo-caching was refused and what a stink it caused!
I appreciate your concerns about the countryside - I am a Geocacher and have been for about 4 years now.

I would firstly like to point out that Munzees are totally different to geocaching and are in now way conected to geocaching. With Munzees, the people who run the company do not have guidlines as to where they are placed and how far apart they must be, or in what way they are hidden.

With Geocaching, there are very strict guidlines as to where they are allowed to be placed, and they have to be set with a minimun distance between them - as the crow flies.

When we submit a cache that we would like to be placed for people to find - this goes through trained Reviewers who check that permissions are in place when need eg Nature Reserves, forestry commisions. When these are placed on such lands, the person in charge of such nature reserve will check and authorise a cache to be placed there. All things are considered when placing a cache and a reviewer checking it, such as are there nesting birds in the area, is it a SSSI area etc - so caches are not put out unless they meet the strict guidlines.

I would like to inform you that there are over 5 million geocachers worldwide who play the game - this has so many benefits to it, such as quality family time, making new friends, bringing people together - for me, it is a way of getting out with my family and enjoying the country side, using my mobility scooter. As a young mum, only 37, it is so important to be able to enjoy geocahing with my family.

I would also like to point out to you that Geocachers on the whole are very environmentally concious. Many will colect litter as they go for walks. We also hold special events to do this called CITO's - Cache in Trash Out.

There are 2 aspects to a CITO, one is where we will get together and help plant trees, remove invasive species or establish new paths - working with the person in charge of that land.
I held such an event on 20/4 where Geocachers all over the world all joined in organising and hosting, attending or both CITO events.

Only today, i hosted an event for the Dorset Wildlife trust where we helped clear an area from rubbish / litter. - We do this all for free.

I invite you to look at 3 links:
1 - http://www.geocachin
g.com/ - Groundspeak own this site, you can see lots of information on there about what Geocaching is about and the strict rules and guidlines.

2 - Is the Geocaching Association of Great Britain & Ireland who liase with land owners, suport geocachers, give information and guidlines that are relevant to our country and have information on best practice of geocachers:
http://gagb.co.uk/

3 - A page from the offical blog for Geocaching.com all about CITO's
http://blog.geocachi
ng.com/category/cach
e-in-trash-out/

There are 3 sources there where you can obtain information from.

I do hope you will look at these sites and be reassurred that geocachers do not go around the countryside trashing it, we love our envirment and do more than most people to help keep it clean.

The other positive side is we do alert the poice to any suspicious activity so it saves them time and money in dealing with situations.

We alert the council of any items that are dangerous and need clearing away.

I would be happy to give more information and even show people more about the game and how beneficial it is to the millions of people all around the world.

If you do find an area that is being spoilt and you know for sure that they are geocachers, then you can contact the GAGB or Geocaching.com to get some further advice - if a cache is causing a problem in a certain are, then this will be looked into immediatley and reviewed.

I hope you will find this information useful.
[quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: Where are you a "Ranger"? Not a nature reserve I hope! So the lady had special equipment to climb the tree to collect the cache? How sad! Were there birds nesting in the tree? Sorry but these people are trampling all over protected areas in some cases! The latest craze-Munzees!! Dotted all over our nature reserves in Bournemouth! No permission asked of the local authority who own these special places! Geo-caching was refused and what a stink it caused![/p][/quote]I appreciate your concerns about the countryside - I am a Geocacher and have been for about 4 years now. I would firstly like to point out that Munzees are totally different to geocaching and are in now way conected to geocaching. With Munzees, the people who run the company do not have guidlines as to where they are placed and how far apart they must be, or in what way they are hidden. With Geocaching, there are very strict guidlines as to where they are allowed to be placed, and they have to be set with a minimun distance between them - as the crow flies. When we submit a cache that we would like to be placed for people to find - this goes through trained Reviewers who check that permissions are in place when need eg Nature Reserves, forestry commisions. When these are placed on such lands, the person in charge of such nature reserve will check and authorise a cache to be placed there. All things are considered when placing a cache and a reviewer checking it, such as are there nesting birds in the area, is it a SSSI area etc - so caches are not put out unless they meet the strict guidlines. I would like to inform you that there are over 5 million geocachers worldwide who play the game - this has so many benefits to it, such as quality family time, making new friends, bringing people together - for me, it is a way of getting out with my family and enjoying the country side, using my mobility scooter. As a young mum, only 37, it is so important to be able to enjoy geocahing with my family. I would also like to point out to you that Geocachers on the whole are very environmentally concious. Many will colect litter as they go for walks. We also hold special events to do this called CITO's - Cache in Trash Out. There are 2 aspects to a CITO, one is where we will get together and help plant trees, remove invasive species or establish new paths - working with the person in charge of that land. I held such an event on 20/4 where Geocachers all over the world all joined in organising and hosting, attending or both CITO events. Only today, i hosted an event for the Dorset Wildlife trust where we helped clear an area from rubbish / litter. - We do this all for free. I invite you to look at 3 links: 1 - http://www.geocachin g.com/ - Groundspeak own this site, you can see lots of information on there about what Geocaching is about and the strict rules and guidlines. 2 - Is the Geocaching Association of Great Britain & Ireland who liase with land owners, suport geocachers, give information and guidlines that are relevant to our country and have information on best practice of geocachers: http://gagb.co.uk/ 3 - A page from the offical blog for Geocaching.com all about CITO's http://blog.geocachi ng.com/category/cach e-in-trash-out/ There are 3 sources there where you can obtain information from. I do hope you will look at these sites and be reassurred that geocachers do not go around the countryside trashing it, we love our envirment and do more than most people to help keep it clean. The other positive side is we do alert the poice to any suspicious activity so it saves them time and money in dealing with situations. We alert the council of any items that are dangerous and need clearing away. I would be happy to give more information and even show people more about the game and how beneficial it is to the millions of people all around the world. If you do find an area that is being spoilt and you know for sure that they are geocachers, then you can contact the GAGB or Geocaching.com to get some further advice - if a cache is causing a problem in a certain are, then this will be looked into immediatley and reviewed. I hope you will find this information useful. Cache on Wheels
  • Score: 0

11:07pm Sat 1 Jun 13

Cache on Wheels says...

PS Although Bournemouth Councl now have a blanket ban of all geocaches on their land, which is very unfortunate, there are far more councils and Trusts - Including the National Trust, who not only allow geocaches on their property, but they encourage it, The National Trust now even activiley promote it on their land and hide some caches themselved!! - i can't see them doing that if they felt that it would trash the countryside or have an adverse effect on the wildlife and the delicate plants etc.

I meant to say that it is very unfortunate that this young lady needed assistance from the emergency services - however far more people that are out walking their do or go walking in the same areas that geocaches are hidden, require assistance if they injure themselves. - The most imprtant message the above organiisations put across is that you only go within your limits, it's not adised that you do things like this young lady unless you are experienced and have other experiend people with you - as i mentioned above - all the caches placed are checked by a reviewer who has the exact coordinates of where all the caches are placed - thinkgs like birds nesting in the trees are also checked.

There are 20 caches that are hidden in one certain reserve where much of it is SSSI - they were all placed with the land owner and placed sympathetically within the surroundings.

Here is a link to the Land Owners agreement where you can view all the Trusts, Councils and Associations in a spreadsheet to see which areas have approved / denied caches to be placed on their land.

You will see that many areas such as The National Trust, The New Forest, and lots of councils around the country allow and welcome geocaches on their land. You can also view each agreement on the right of the place name.

May i suggest that those who are not fully aware of what Geoching is, how it works, what the strict rules are according to Groundspeak's Geocaching.com have a look at the links, before commenting - as you will then be able to comment from an informed point of view.

Just to emphasise - Munzees have nothing to do with Geocaching and are a totally sperate game, with not many specific guidlines or rules like Geocaching has.

I am more than happy to do an interview with the Echo are chat direcctly with anyone who may want to know more about Geocaching, or even have a go at it.

Yours Faithfully
Mrs B aka Cache on Wheels

http://gagb.co.uk/la
nd-agreements-databa
se/
PS Although Bournemouth Councl now have a blanket ban of all geocaches on their land, which is very unfortunate, there are far more councils and Trusts - Including the National Trust, who not only allow geocaches on their property, but they encourage it, The National Trust now even activiley promote it on their land and hide some caches themselved!! - i can't see them doing that if they felt that it would trash the countryside or have an adverse effect on the wildlife and the delicate plants etc. I meant to say that it is very unfortunate that this young lady needed assistance from the emergency services - however far more people that are out walking their do or go walking in the same areas that geocaches are hidden, require assistance if they injure themselves. - The most imprtant message the above organiisations put across is that you only go within your limits, it's not adised that you do things like this young lady unless you are experienced and have other experiend people with you - as i mentioned above - all the caches placed are checked by a reviewer who has the exact coordinates of where all the caches are placed - thinkgs like birds nesting in the trees are also checked. There are 20 caches that are hidden in one certain reserve where much of it is SSSI - they were all placed with the land owner and placed sympathetically within the surroundings. Here is a link to the Land Owners agreement where you can view all the Trusts, Councils and Associations in a spreadsheet to see which areas have approved / denied caches to be placed on their land. You will see that many areas such as The National Trust, The New Forest, and lots of councils around the country allow and welcome geocaches on their land. You can also view each agreement on the right of the place name. May i suggest that those who are not fully aware of what Geoching is, how it works, what the strict rules are according to Groundspeak's Geocaching.com have a look at the links, before commenting - as you will then be able to comment from an informed point of view. Just to emphasise - Munzees have nothing to do with Geocaching and are a totally sperate game, with not many specific guidlines or rules like Geocaching has. I am more than happy to do an interview with the Echo are chat direcctly with anyone who may want to know more about Geocaching, or even have a go at it. Yours Faithfully Mrs B aka Cache on Wheels http://gagb.co.uk/la nd-agreements-databa se/ Cache on Wheels
  • Score: 0

11:20pm Sat 1 Jun 13

Turtlebay says...

GAHmusic wrote:
Must have been using Apple maps :-)
Was it an Apple tree?
[quote][p][bold]GAHmusic[/bold] wrote: Must have been using Apple maps :-)[/p][/quote]Was it an Apple tree? Turtlebay
  • Score: 0

11:47pm Sat 1 Jun 13

portia6 says...

manyogie wrote:
portia6 wrote:
Seems like we are returning to planet
of the apes or monkeys!
No,
They would be able to get out of trees on their own
This is a new phenomenon to me so will
have to find out more about it! Munzees
geocaching its all a bit James Bond!
[quote][p][bold]manyogie[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]portia6[/bold] wrote: Seems like we are returning to planet of the apes or monkeys![/p][/quote]No, They would be able to get out of trees on their own[/p][/quote]This is a new phenomenon to me so will have to find out more about it! Munzees geocaching its all a bit James Bond! portia6
  • Score: 0

11:51pm Sat 1 Jun 13

portia6 says...

wezie100 wrote:
If you want to experience munzee before you set yourself against it I will be happy to show you it. I have qualifications in conservation and ecology and I love both geocaching and munzee. So please become informed before you make a decision.
Not heard of this geocaching before
so would be interested to find out more
especially as I have a student son who
would probably love it! Conservation
and ecology are very worthwhile in this
day and age!
[quote][p][bold]wezie100[/bold] wrote: If you want to experience munzee before you set yourself against it I will be happy to show you it. I have qualifications in conservation and ecology and I love both geocaching and munzee. So please become informed before you make a decision.[/p][/quote]Not heard of this geocaching before so would be interested to find out more especially as I have a student son who would probably love it! Conservation and ecology are very worthwhile in this day and age! portia6
  • Score: 0

9:58am Sun 2 Jun 13

retry69 says...

MartyBartfast wrote:
retry69 wrote:
ranger_bob wrote:
oversixty wrote:
Idiot!
Yes you probably are. What the story doesn't tell you is that the young lady had the appropriate climbing equipment but that one of the ropes got stuck.

But then I suppose you've never had an accident or made a mistake in your life have you? What must it be like to be perfect?
Just a genuine serious question that will hopefully get an adult answer rather than the children that seem to be leaving comments here.Was the lady that had all the climbing equipment actually alone when this took place?
No she was not alone.
But nobody who accompanied her where capable of assisting her in getting down from a tree, although i have sympathy for the lady i find that a little irresponsible of all those that were with her and also to the person who placed the object in the tree
[quote][p][bold]MartyBartfast[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]retry69[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ranger_bob[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: Idiot![/p][/quote]Yes you probably are. What the story doesn't tell you is that the young lady had the appropriate climbing equipment but that one of the ropes got stuck. But then I suppose you've never had an accident or made a mistake in your life have you? What must it be like to be perfect?[/p][/quote]Just a genuine serious question that will hopefully get an adult answer rather than the children that seem to be leaving comments here.Was the lady that had all the climbing equipment actually alone when this took place?[/p][/quote]No she was not alone.[/p][/quote]But nobody who accompanied her where capable of assisting her in getting down from a tree, although i have sympathy for the lady i find that a little irresponsible of all those that were with her and also to the person who placed the object in the tree retry69
  • Score: 0

10:04am Sun 2 Jun 13

oversixty says...

Cache on Wheels wrote:
PS Although Bournemouth Councl now have a blanket ban of all geocaches on their land, which is very unfortunate, there are far more councils and Trusts - Including the National Trust, who not only allow geocaches on their property, but they encourage it, The National Trust now even activiley promote it on their land and hide some caches themselved!! - i can't see them doing that if they felt that it would trash the countryside or have an adverse effect on the wildlife and the delicate plants etc.

I meant to say that it is very unfortunate that this young lady needed assistance from the emergency services - however far more people that are out walking their do or go walking in the same areas that geocaches are hidden, require assistance if they injure themselves. - The most imprtant message the above organiisations put across is that you only go within your limits, it's not adised that you do things like this young lady unless you are experienced and have other experiend people with you - as i mentioned above - all the caches placed are checked by a reviewer who has the exact coordinates of where all the caches are placed - thinkgs like birds nesting in the trees are also checked.

There are 20 caches that are hidden in one certain reserve where much of it is SSSI - they were all placed with the land owner and placed sympathetically within the surroundings.

Here is a link to the Land Owners agreement where you can view all the Trusts, Councils and Associations in a spreadsheet to see which areas have approved / denied caches to be placed on their land.

You will see that many areas such as The National Trust, The New Forest, and lots of councils around the country allow and welcome geocaches on their land. You can also view each agreement on the right of the place name.

May i suggest that those who are not fully aware of what Geoching is, how it works, what the strict rules are according to Groundspeak's Geocaching.com have a look at the links, before commenting - as you will then be able to comment from an informed point of view.

Just to emphasise - Munzees have nothing to do with Geocaching and are a totally sperate game, with not many specific guidlines or rules like Geocaching has.

I am more than happy to do an interview with the Echo are chat direcctly with anyone who may want to know more about Geocaching, or even have a go at it.

Yours Faithfully
Mrs B aka Cache on Wheels

http://gagb.co.uk/la

nd-agreements-databa

se/
Thanks Mrs B!
I welcome your input and as I am only aware of Bournemouth Council's guidelines on geo-caching cannot express any other views elsewhere.I am involved with an SSSI in Bournemouth and fully support their stance because I feel it will disturb the flora and fauna.
Surely it must disturb the habitat in some way?
Munzees are in some ways the same as geo caching as according to their website,they can be hidden in containers.The lady I saw was running around with smart phone in hand( in her work clothes!) amongst the undergrowth with two dogs out of control.As you will I am sure agree, this is very concerning when it's the time for birds nesting?
The Munzee tags are also plastic and not therefore environmentally friendly! As I have said before, no permission was asked for these Munzees! Permission was on the other hand asked for geo-caching but the response when it was refused was pretty nasty on the website!
[quote][p][bold]Cache on Wheels[/bold] wrote: PS Although Bournemouth Councl now have a blanket ban of all geocaches on their land, which is very unfortunate, there are far more councils and Trusts - Including the National Trust, who not only allow geocaches on their property, but they encourage it, The National Trust now even activiley promote it on their land and hide some caches themselved!! - i can't see them doing that if they felt that it would trash the countryside or have an adverse effect on the wildlife and the delicate plants etc. I meant to say that it is very unfortunate that this young lady needed assistance from the emergency services - however far more people that are out walking their do or go walking in the same areas that geocaches are hidden, require assistance if they injure themselves. - The most imprtant message the above organiisations put across is that you only go within your limits, it's not adised that you do things like this young lady unless you are experienced and have other experiend people with you - as i mentioned above - all the caches placed are checked by a reviewer who has the exact coordinates of where all the caches are placed - thinkgs like birds nesting in the trees are also checked. There are 20 caches that are hidden in one certain reserve where much of it is SSSI - they were all placed with the land owner and placed sympathetically within the surroundings. Here is a link to the Land Owners agreement where you can view all the Trusts, Councils and Associations in a spreadsheet to see which areas have approved / denied caches to be placed on their land. You will see that many areas such as The National Trust, The New Forest, and lots of councils around the country allow and welcome geocaches on their land. You can also view each agreement on the right of the place name. May i suggest that those who are not fully aware of what Geoching is, how it works, what the strict rules are according to Groundspeak's Geocaching.com have a look at the links, before commenting - as you will then be able to comment from an informed point of view. Just to emphasise - Munzees have nothing to do with Geocaching and are a totally sperate game, with not many specific guidlines or rules like Geocaching has. I am more than happy to do an interview with the Echo are chat direcctly with anyone who may want to know more about Geocaching, or even have a go at it. Yours Faithfully Mrs B aka Cache on Wheels http://gagb.co.uk/la nd-agreements-databa se/[/p][/quote]Thanks Mrs B! I welcome your input and as I am only aware of Bournemouth Council's guidelines on geo-caching cannot express any other views elsewhere.I am involved with an SSSI in Bournemouth and fully support their stance because I feel it will disturb the flora and fauna. Surely it must disturb the habitat in some way? Munzees are in some ways the same as geo caching as according to their website,they can be hidden in containers.The lady I saw was running around with smart phone in hand( in her work clothes!) amongst the undergrowth with two dogs out of control.As you will I am sure agree, this is very concerning when it's the time for birds nesting? The Munzee tags are also plastic and not therefore environmentally friendly! As I have said before, no permission was asked for these Munzees! Permission was on the other hand asked for geo-caching but the response when it was refused was pretty nasty on the website! oversixty
  • Score: 0

10:22am Sun 2 Jun 13

portia6 says...

wezie100 wrote:
I should have known better than to try to communicate in here. Full of nimby and trolls. My offer stands to anyone who cares to form opinions on fact and make informed decisions . I won't bother to be on here again.
I am interested to find out more about
this sport, got to be good exercise and
gets people off the lap top!
[quote][p][bold]wezie100[/bold] wrote: I should have known better than to try to communicate in here. Full of nimby and trolls. My offer stands to anyone who cares to form opinions on fact and make informed decisions . I won't bother to be on here again.[/p][/quote]I am interested to find out more about this sport, got to be good exercise and gets people off the lap top! portia6
  • Score: 0

10:26am Sun 2 Jun 13

oversixty says...

Cache on Wheels wrote:
PS Although Bournemouth Councl now have a blanket ban of all geocaches on their land, which is very unfortunate, there are far more councils and Trusts - Including the National Trust, who not only allow geocaches on their property, but they encourage it, The National Trust now even activiley promote it on their land and hide some caches themselved!! - i can't see them doing that if they felt that it would trash the countryside or have an adverse effect on the wildlife and the delicate plants etc.

I meant to say that it is very unfortunate that this young lady needed assistance from the emergency services - however far more people that are out walking their do or go walking in the same areas that geocaches are hidden, require assistance if they injure themselves. - The most imprtant message the above organiisations put across is that you only go within your limits, it's not adised that you do things like this young lady unless you are experienced and have other experiend people with you - as i mentioned above - all the caches placed are checked by a reviewer who has the exact coordinates of where all the caches are placed - thinkgs like birds nesting in the trees are also checked.

There are 20 caches that are hidden in one certain reserve where much of it is SSSI - they were all placed with the land owner and placed sympathetically within the surroundings.

Here is a link to the Land Owners agreement where you can view all the Trusts, Councils and Associations in a spreadsheet to see which areas have approved / denied caches to be placed on their land.

You will see that many areas such as The National Trust, The New Forest, and lots of councils around the country allow and welcome geocaches on their land. You can also view each agreement on the right of the place name.

May i suggest that those who are not fully aware of what Geoching is, how it works, what the strict rules are according to Groundspeak's Geocaching.com have a look at the links, before commenting - as you will then be able to comment from an informed point of view.

Just to emphasise - Munzees have nothing to do with Geocaching and are a totally sperate game, with not many specific guidlines or rules like Geocaching has.

I am more than happy to do an interview with the Echo are chat direcctly with anyone who may want to know more about Geocaching, or even have a go at it.

Yours Faithfully
Mrs B aka Cache on Wheels

http://gagb.co.uk/la

nd-agreements-databa

se/
Hello again Mrs B!

Am I correct in saying that most of the reserves you mention outside of Bournemouth are probably not in urban environments and not designated as Public Open Spaces?
The 10 Local Nature Reserves in Bournemouth are all urban and Public Open Spaces with those having heathland under particular stress for various reasons.There are plans to relieve the pressure on these sites which was probably one of the reasons that geo-caching was refused.
Munzees are even more worrying as they cover most of Bournemouth it seems!
[quote][p][bold]Cache on Wheels[/bold] wrote: PS Although Bournemouth Councl now have a blanket ban of all geocaches on their land, which is very unfortunate, there are far more councils and Trusts - Including the National Trust, who not only allow geocaches on their property, but they encourage it, The National Trust now even activiley promote it on their land and hide some caches themselved!! - i can't see them doing that if they felt that it would trash the countryside or have an adverse effect on the wildlife and the delicate plants etc. I meant to say that it is very unfortunate that this young lady needed assistance from the emergency services - however far more people that are out walking their do or go walking in the same areas that geocaches are hidden, require assistance if they injure themselves. - The most imprtant message the above organiisations put across is that you only go within your limits, it's not adised that you do things like this young lady unless you are experienced and have other experiend people with you - as i mentioned above - all the caches placed are checked by a reviewer who has the exact coordinates of where all the caches are placed - thinkgs like birds nesting in the trees are also checked. There are 20 caches that are hidden in one certain reserve where much of it is SSSI - they were all placed with the land owner and placed sympathetically within the surroundings. Here is a link to the Land Owners agreement where you can view all the Trusts, Councils and Associations in a spreadsheet to see which areas have approved / denied caches to be placed on their land. You will see that many areas such as The National Trust, The New Forest, and lots of councils around the country allow and welcome geocaches on their land. You can also view each agreement on the right of the place name. May i suggest that those who are not fully aware of what Geoching is, how it works, what the strict rules are according to Groundspeak's Geocaching.com have a look at the links, before commenting - as you will then be able to comment from an informed point of view. Just to emphasise - Munzees have nothing to do with Geocaching and are a totally sperate game, with not many specific guidlines or rules like Geocaching has. I am more than happy to do an interview with the Echo are chat direcctly with anyone who may want to know more about Geocaching, or even have a go at it. Yours Faithfully Mrs B aka Cache on Wheels http://gagb.co.uk/la nd-agreements-databa se/[/p][/quote]Hello again Mrs B! Am I correct in saying that most of the reserves you mention outside of Bournemouth are probably not in urban environments and not designated as Public Open Spaces? The 10 Local Nature Reserves in Bournemouth are all urban and Public Open Spaces with those having heathland under particular stress for various reasons.There are plans to relieve the pressure on these sites which was probably one of the reasons that geo-caching was refused. Munzees are even more worrying as they cover most of Bournemouth it seems! oversixty
  • Score: 0

12:55pm Sun 2 Jun 13

wezie100 says...

As for munzee causing damage I can assure you I make no more impact than yourself having worked on some internationaly important sites I would never be involed in something that had as much impact as you assume munzee does. Please tell me what your qualification are to make a environmental impact assement? I also educate the people i meet through the hobby in consevation and wildlife identification.
As for munzee causing damage I can assure you I make no more impact than yourself having worked on some internationaly important sites I would never be involed in something that had as much impact as you assume munzee does. Please tell me what your qualification are to make a environmental impact assement? I also educate the people i meet through the hobby in consevation and wildlife identification. wezie100
  • Score: 0

1:00pm Sun 2 Jun 13

retry69 says...

wezie100 wrote:
As for munzee causing damage I can assure you I make no more impact than yourself having worked on some internationaly important sites I would never be involed in something that had as much impact as you assume munzee does. Please tell me what your qualification are to make a environmental impact assement? I also educate the people i meet through the hobby in consevation and wildlife identification.
So getting back to the topic of the article, surely the climbing of trees is not to be encouraged for several reasons?
[quote][p][bold]wezie100[/bold] wrote: As for munzee causing damage I can assure you I make no more impact than yourself having worked on some internationaly important sites I would never be involed in something that had as much impact as you assume munzee does. Please tell me what your qualification are to make a environmental impact assement? I also educate the people i meet through the hobby in consevation and wildlife identification.[/p][/quote]So getting back to the topic of the article, surely the climbing of trees is not to be encouraged for several reasons? retry69
  • Score: 0

1:14pm Sun 2 Jun 13

oversixty says...

wezie100 wrote:
As for munzee causing damage I can assure you I make no more impact than yourself having worked on some internationaly important sites I would never be involed in something that had as much impact as you assume munzee does. Please tell me what your qualification are to make a environmental impact assement? I also educate the people i meet through the hobby in consevation and wildlife identification.
I get the info from those I work with who are highly qualified!
I wonder what Natural England would think of Munzees?
So you are happy that they are placed around a wetland of international importance then?

It appears they are placed on such sites at random and by more than one person.Where will that end?
[quote][p][bold]wezie100[/bold] wrote: As for munzee causing damage I can assure you I make no more impact than yourself having worked on some internationaly important sites I would never be involed in something that had as much impact as you assume munzee does. Please tell me what your qualification are to make a environmental impact assement? I also educate the people i meet through the hobby in consevation and wildlife identification.[/p][/quote]I get the info from those I work with who are highly qualified! I wonder what Natural England would think of Munzees? So you are happy that they are placed around a wetland of international importance then? It appears they are placed on such sites at random and by more than one person.Where will that end? oversixty
  • Score: 0

3:54pm Sun 2 Jun 13

GrooveDaddy says...

So wait! Did she get the cache or not???
So wait! Did she get the cache or not??? GrooveDaddy
  • Score: 0

4:53pm Sun 2 Jun 13

paragun says...

oversixty wrote:
wezie100 wrote:
As for munzee causing damage I can assure you I make no more impact than yourself having worked on some internationaly important sites I would never be involed in something that had as much impact as you assume munzee does. Please tell me what your qualification are to make a environmental impact assement? I also educate the people i meet through the hobby in consevation and wildlife identification.
I get the info from those I work with who are highly qualified!
I wonder what Natural England would think of Munzees?
So you are happy that they are placed around a wetland of international importance then?

It appears they are placed on such sites at random and by more than one person.Where will that end?
So oversixty do you work for the council? Are these experts you work with the same ones that state that nothing can be placed in any of the public open spaces and sssi's? There seems to be a lot of overzealous officious individuals working to protect our flora and fauna these days instead of striking a happy medium which also takes into account the human element!
[quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wezie100[/bold] wrote: As for munzee causing damage I can assure you I make no more impact than yourself having worked on some internationaly important sites I would never be involed in something that had as much impact as you assume munzee does. Please tell me what your qualification are to make a environmental impact assement? I also educate the people i meet through the hobby in consevation and wildlife identification.[/p][/quote]I get the info from those I work with who are highly qualified! I wonder what Natural England would think of Munzees? So you are happy that they are placed around a wetland of international importance then? It appears they are placed on such sites at random and by more than one person.Where will that end?[/p][/quote]So oversixty do you work for the council? Are these experts you work with the same ones that state that nothing can be placed in any of the public open spaces and sssi's? There seems to be a lot of overzealous officious individuals working to protect our flora and fauna these days instead of striking a happy medium which also takes into account the human element! paragun
  • Score: 0

5:18pm Sun 2 Jun 13

oversixty says...

paragun wrote:
oversixty wrote:
wezie100 wrote:
As for munzee causing damage I can assure you I make no more impact than yourself having worked on some internationaly important sites I would never be involed in something that had as much impact as you assume munzee does. Please tell me what your qualification are to make a environmental impact assement? I also educate the people i meet through the hobby in consevation and wildlife identification.
I get the info from those I work with who are highly qualified!
I wonder what Natural England would think of Munzees?
So you are happy that they are placed around a wetland of international importance then?

It appears they are placed on such sites at random and by more than one person.Where will that end?
So oversixty do you work for the council? Are these experts you work with the same ones that state that nothing can be placed in any of the public open spaces and sssi's? There seems to be a lot of overzealous officious individuals working to protect our flora and fauna these days instead of striking a happy medium which also takes into account the human element!
No but I work with them as a volunteer and we already have problems with irresponsible dog owners, litter and anti-social behavior!
These sites need protection and that is why these steps are being taken -
http://www.dorsetfor
you.com/387392
[quote][p][bold]paragun[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wezie100[/bold] wrote: As for munzee causing damage I can assure you I make no more impact than yourself having worked on some internationaly important sites I would never be involed in something that had as much impact as you assume munzee does. Please tell me what your qualification are to make a environmental impact assement? I also educate the people i meet through the hobby in consevation and wildlife identification.[/p][/quote]I get the info from those I work with who are highly qualified! I wonder what Natural England would think of Munzees? So you are happy that they are placed around a wetland of international importance then? It appears they are placed on such sites at random and by more than one person.Where will that end?[/p][/quote]So oversixty do you work for the council? Are these experts you work with the same ones that state that nothing can be placed in any of the public open spaces and sssi's? There seems to be a lot of overzealous officious individuals working to protect our flora and fauna these days instead of striking a happy medium which also takes into account the human element![/p][/quote]No but I work with them as a volunteer and we already have problems with irresponsible dog owners, litter and anti-social behavior! These sites need protection and that is why these steps are being taken - http://www.dorsetfor you.com/387392 oversixty
  • Score: 0

5:56pm Sun 2 Jun 13

paragun says...

oversixty wrote:
paragun wrote:
oversixty wrote:
wezie100 wrote:
As for munzee causing damage I can assure you I make no more impact than yourself having worked on some internationaly important sites I would never be involed in something that had as much impact as you assume munzee does. Please tell me what your qualification are to make a environmental impact assement? I also educate the people i meet through the hobby in consevation and wildlife identification.
I get the info from those I work with who are highly qualified!
I wonder what Natural England would think of Munzees?
So you are happy that they are placed around a wetland of international importance then?

It appears they are placed on such sites at random and by more than one person.Where will that end?
So oversixty do you work for the council? Are these experts you work with the same ones that state that nothing can be placed in any of the public open spaces and sssi's? There seems to be a lot of overzealous officious individuals working to protect our flora and fauna these days instead of striking a happy medium which also takes into account the human element!
No but I work with them as a volunteer and we already have problems with irresponsible dog owners, litter and anti-social behavior!
These sites need protection and that is why these steps are being taken -
http://www.dorsetfor

you.com/387392
Now we get to it, so you are a volunteer for the council, but when you use the proverbial "WE" you are really saying "THEY", we all live in this area, sometimes when only one side of an argument is taken into account without any counter argument you will always end up with the result you want, don't you agree? Especially when experts are the ones making those aruguments! I am a dog owner, I am a responsible dog owner, I know that due to the late spring that birds are nesting about 6 weeks late on average but the layperson wouldn't, if there are signs warning people that they are in a certain area where they are then there is no excuse if they have the dogs off lead. Over officious use of notices means that putting a sign on an open space like a cricket ground will incite refusal to abide by it!

Now I also agree with you about litter and antisocial behavior so are you saying that geocaching and munzees are antisocial behavior? Has anyone carried out any form of research or analysis to establish the age profile or class category of those taken part in the above? I doubt it because if they did they would find that contrary to what has been assumed the results would show the majority to be middle to upper class, category A1 through B3! Remember I said the majority, these are not the type of people you would accuse of antisocial behavior especially when most of this country accepts and welcomes these outdoor pursuits and any form of outdoor pursuit taking part in ones hobby is much better than no exercise at all, do you agree?

I could go on but this is best served by education which should start by a meeting of both parties because only through dialogue is a fair result achieved, for the record, a munzee is on average 1.5 inches on a square not cubed, how much damage can something that size do? As for covering all of Bournemouth, if you actually knew how ridiculous that statement is you wouldn't have made it, as I said, education is the key and it works both ways!

Geocachers should know that there are rules and regulations for munzees and there are distance rules also so please get the correct facts before stating facts! Thank you, oh for the record, I am a bird lover and a animal lover, I love nature as a whole, so would not do anything to harm it but I do object to officials decimating heathland of trees to make it the way it was for the benefit of fauna! I loved the trees!
[quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]paragun[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wezie100[/bold] wrote: As for munzee causing damage I can assure you I make no more impact than yourself having worked on some internationaly important sites I would never be involed in something that had as much impact as you assume munzee does. Please tell me what your qualification are to make a environmental impact assement? I also educate the people i meet through the hobby in consevation and wildlife identification.[/p][/quote]I get the info from those I work with who are highly qualified! I wonder what Natural England would think of Munzees? So you are happy that they are placed around a wetland of international importance then? It appears they are placed on such sites at random and by more than one person.Where will that end?[/p][/quote]So oversixty do you work for the council? Are these experts you work with the same ones that state that nothing can be placed in any of the public open spaces and sssi's? There seems to be a lot of overzealous officious individuals working to protect our flora and fauna these days instead of striking a happy medium which also takes into account the human element![/p][/quote]No but I work with them as a volunteer and we already have problems with irresponsible dog owners, litter and anti-social behavior! These sites need protection and that is why these steps are being taken - http://www.dorsetfor you.com/387392[/p][/quote]Now we get to it, so you are a volunteer for the council, but when you use the proverbial "WE" you are really saying "THEY", we all live in this area, sometimes when only one side of an argument is taken into account without any counter argument you will always end up with the result you want, don't you agree? Especially when experts are the ones making those aruguments! I am a dog owner, I am a responsible dog owner, I know that due to the late spring that birds are nesting about 6 weeks late on average but the layperson wouldn't, if there are signs warning people that they are in a certain area where they are then there is no excuse if they have the dogs off lead. Over officious use of notices means that putting a sign on an open space like a cricket ground will incite refusal to abide by it! Now I also agree with you about litter and antisocial behavior so are you saying that geocaching and munzees are antisocial behavior? Has anyone carried out any form of research or analysis to establish the age profile or class category of those taken part in the above? I doubt it because if they did they would find that contrary to what has been assumed the results would show the majority to be middle to upper class, category A1 through B3! Remember I said the majority, these are not the type of people you would accuse of antisocial behavior especially when most of this country accepts and welcomes these outdoor pursuits and any form of outdoor pursuit taking part in ones hobby is much better than no exercise at all, do you agree? I could go on but this is best served by education which should start by a meeting of both parties because only through dialogue is a fair result achieved, for the record, a munzee is on average 1.5 inches on a square not cubed, how much damage can something that size do? As for covering all of Bournemouth, if you actually knew how ridiculous that statement is you wouldn't have made it, as I said, education is the key and it works both ways! Geocachers should know that there are rules and regulations for munzees and there are distance rules also so please get the correct facts before stating facts! Thank you, oh for the record, I am a bird lover and a animal lover, I love nature as a whole, so would not do anything to harm it but I do object to officials decimating heathland of trees to make it the way it was for the benefit of fauna! I loved the trees! paragun
  • Score: 0

6:14pm Sun 2 Jun 13

retry69 says...

I find this all very interesting but do these geocachers actually use any commonsense in this pastime eg placing geocaches up trees is hardly appropriate for a family to track down and a comparison to a dog walker in a previous comment, not seen many of them up trees.
I find this all very interesting but do these geocachers actually use any commonsense in this pastime eg placing geocaches up trees is hardly appropriate for a family to track down and a comparison to a dog walker in a previous comment, not seen many of them up trees. retry69
  • Score: 0

9:25pm Sun 2 Jun 13

buzzie1 says...

retry69 wrote:
I find this all very interesting but do these geocachers actually use any commonsense in this pastime eg placing geocaches up trees is hardly appropriate for a family to track down and a comparison to a dog walker in a previous comment, not seen many of them up trees.
Of course they do. All caches are rated according to difficulty and ranked on a rating of 1-5. I would imagine if climbing equipment was needed, this would be a higher ranking cache, so families would know probably to stay away from it. As a family we tend to stick with the lower rating caches as they are easier to find and more accessable.

My own personal stance on this is there simply has to be room for compromise. I think it is totally unfair of Bournemouth Council to have a complete blanket ban on this. Whilst I do understand the concerns around SSI's (although funny how other councils will allow them under certain conditions), to say they cannot be placed in an open space where you are doing nothing more than walking along a main path and just deviating off of it is just unfair. In an age where childhood and adult obesity is a major issue, anything that encourages people outside should be embraced and not totally dismissed. As a family, we spend hours outside doing this, so are keeping fit and encouraging family time. My child is also learning about wildlife and heath preservation having chatted to some lovely wardens.

We have as much right to use a public open space as anyone and at the end of the day it is a harmless hobby. Just as a cheeky aside, it is quite enviromentally friendly as we are walking more places than using the car :) Lower carbon emmisions and all of that!
[quote][p][bold]retry69[/bold] wrote: I find this all very interesting but do these geocachers actually use any commonsense in this pastime eg placing geocaches up trees is hardly appropriate for a family to track down and a comparison to a dog walker in a previous comment, not seen many of them up trees.[/p][/quote]Of course they do. All caches are rated according to difficulty and ranked on a rating of 1-5. I would imagine if climbing equipment was needed, this would be a higher ranking cache, so families would know probably to stay away from it. As a family we tend to stick with the lower rating caches as they are easier to find and more accessable. My own personal stance on this is there simply has to be room for compromise. I think it is totally unfair of Bournemouth Council to have a complete blanket ban on this. Whilst I do understand the concerns around SSI's (although funny how other councils will allow them under certain conditions), to say they cannot be placed in an open space where you are doing nothing more than walking along a main path and just deviating off of it is just unfair. In an age where childhood and adult obesity is a major issue, anything that encourages people outside should be embraced and not totally dismissed. As a family, we spend hours outside doing this, so are keeping fit and encouraging family time. My child is also learning about wildlife and heath preservation having chatted to some lovely wardens. We have as much right to use a public open space as anyone and at the end of the day it is a harmless hobby. Just as a cheeky aside, it is quite enviromentally friendly as we are walking more places than using the car :) Lower carbon emmisions and all of that! buzzie1
  • Score: 0

9:40pm Sun 2 Jun 13

retry69 says...

Thanks for that, i am seriously interested in this as i have been made aware of it via my daughter/grandaughte
rs and hadnt realised what a heated debate there can be over what appeared to me to be a harmless pastime,i am still of the opinion that there was no excuse for the lady to get stuck up the tree as if she was accompanied and was expecting to climb they should have been capable of ensuring her safety,however i expect it will not happen again
Thanks for that, i am seriously interested in this as i have been made aware of it via my daughter/grandaughte rs and hadnt realised what a heated debate there can be over what appeared to me to be a harmless pastime,i am still of the opinion that there was no excuse for the lady to get stuck up the tree as if she was accompanied and was expecting to climb they should have been capable of ensuring her safety,however i expect it will not happen again retry69
  • Score: 0

9:49pm Sun 2 Jun 13

buzzie1 says...

retry69 wrote:
Thanks for that, i am seriously interested in this as i have been made aware of it via my daughter/grandaughte

rs and hadnt realised what a heated debate there can be over what appeared to me to be a harmless pastime,i am still of the opinion that there was no excuse for the lady to get stuck up the tree as if she was accompanied and was expecting to climb they should have been capable of ensuring her safety,however i expect it will not happen again
Oh of course.

I just feel slightly aggrieved that we are being portrayed as these completely reckless people that are going round destroying nature reserves. That could not be further from the truth! I have a massive respect for the heathlands having grown up around here. However I would challenge anyone to find something in this day and age that can get a young child (aged between 5-10, will not give exact age out) out walking for on average 6-7 hours at a time. How can that possibly be wrong? Also he is learning some valuable skills. He has learned to follow a map, gained a sense of direction, is gaining skills in problem solving, working out distances in feet. Is also learning about nature and learning to have a love for his enviroment, plus is getting fit. How can any of that be a bad thing???
[quote][p][bold]retry69[/bold] wrote: Thanks for that, i am seriously interested in this as i have been made aware of it via my daughter/grandaughte rs and hadnt realised what a heated debate there can be over what appeared to me to be a harmless pastime,i am still of the opinion that there was no excuse for the lady to get stuck up the tree as if she was accompanied and was expecting to climb they should have been capable of ensuring her safety,however i expect it will not happen again[/p][/quote]Oh of course. I just feel slightly aggrieved that we are being portrayed as these completely reckless people that are going round destroying nature reserves. That could not be further from the truth! I have a massive respect for the heathlands having grown up around here. However I would challenge anyone to find something in this day and age that can get a young child (aged between 5-10, will not give exact age out) out walking for on average 6-7 hours at a time. How can that possibly be wrong? Also he is learning some valuable skills. He has learned to follow a map, gained a sense of direction, is gaining skills in problem solving, working out distances in feet. Is also learning about nature and learning to have a love for his enviroment, plus is getting fit. How can any of that be a bad thing??? buzzie1
  • Score: 0

10:02pm Sun 2 Jun 13

retry69 says...

buzzie1 wrote:
retry69 wrote:
Thanks for that, i am seriously interested in this as i have been made aware of it via my daughter/grandaughte


rs and hadnt realised what a heated debate there can be over what appeared to me to be a harmless pastime,i am still of the opinion that there was no excuse for the lady to get stuck up the tree as if she was accompanied and was expecting to climb they should have been capable of ensuring her safety,however i expect it will not happen again
Oh of course.

I just feel slightly aggrieved that we are being portrayed as these completely reckless people that are going round destroying nature reserves. That could not be further from the truth! I have a massive respect for the heathlands having grown up around here. However I would challenge anyone to find something in this day and age that can get a young child (aged between 5-10, will not give exact age out) out walking for on average 6-7 hours at a time. How can that possibly be wrong? Also he is learning some valuable skills. He has learned to follow a map, gained a sense of direction, is gaining skills in problem solving, working out distances in feet. Is also learning about nature and learning to have a love for his enviroment, plus is getting fit. How can any of that be a bad thing???
Of course you make some very valid points and I wouldnt feel aggrieved at all,if you were a regular follower of comments you would understand that there is a huge proportion of Echo readers who find pleasure in only exaggerating and seeing the negative aspects of things,us more stable humans realise you are far from destroying our countryside.Lets hope that some positives have come from this incident and it may encourage others to take part and will learn the truth for themselves and enjoy without involving any emergency services
[quote][p][bold]buzzie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]retry69[/bold] wrote: Thanks for that, i am seriously interested in this as i have been made aware of it via my daughter/grandaughte rs and hadnt realised what a heated debate there can be over what appeared to me to be a harmless pastime,i am still of the opinion that there was no excuse for the lady to get stuck up the tree as if she was accompanied and was expecting to climb they should have been capable of ensuring her safety,however i expect it will not happen again[/p][/quote]Oh of course. I just feel slightly aggrieved that we are being portrayed as these completely reckless people that are going round destroying nature reserves. That could not be further from the truth! I have a massive respect for the heathlands having grown up around here. However I would challenge anyone to find something in this day and age that can get a young child (aged between 5-10, will not give exact age out) out walking for on average 6-7 hours at a time. How can that possibly be wrong? Also he is learning some valuable skills. He has learned to follow a map, gained a sense of direction, is gaining skills in problem solving, working out distances in feet. Is also learning about nature and learning to have a love for his enviroment, plus is getting fit. How can any of that be a bad thing???[/p][/quote]Of course you make some very valid points and I wouldnt feel aggrieved at all,if you were a regular follower of comments you would understand that there is a huge proportion of Echo readers who find pleasure in only exaggerating and seeing the negative aspects of things,us more stable humans realise you are far from destroying our countryside.Lets hope that some positives have come from this incident and it may encourage others to take part and will learn the truth for themselves and enjoy without involving any emergency services retry69
  • Score: 0

12:34pm Mon 3 Jun 13

MartyBartfast says...

retry69 wrote:
Thanks for that, i am seriously interested in this as i have been made aware of it via my daughter/grandaughte

rs and hadnt realised what a heated debate there can be over what appeared to me to be a harmless pastime,i am still of the opinion that there was no excuse for the lady to get stuck up the tree as if she was accompanied and was expecting to climb they should have been capable of ensuring her safety,however i expect it will not happen again
Oh get real, the woman took reasonable precautions for the climb, but sometimes events occur outside of your expectations and catch you unprepared.

Have you ever been out on a boat? I expect you took your own inshore lifeboat with you and had your private air-sea rescue chopper hovering overhead.

Ever been out for a walk on the hills/moors? I expect you had a landrover following along with paramedics on board.

No you take reasonable precautions, but can't cater for every eventuality whatever you're doing.
[quote][p][bold]retry69[/bold] wrote: Thanks for that, i am seriously interested in this as i have been made aware of it via my daughter/grandaughte rs and hadnt realised what a heated debate there can be over what appeared to me to be a harmless pastime,i am still of the opinion that there was no excuse for the lady to get stuck up the tree as if she was accompanied and was expecting to climb they should have been capable of ensuring her safety,however i expect it will not happen again[/p][/quote]Oh get real, the woman took reasonable precautions for the climb, but sometimes events occur outside of your expectations and catch you unprepared. Have you ever been out on a boat? I expect you took your own inshore lifeboat with you and had your private air-sea rescue chopper hovering overhead. Ever been out for a walk on the hills/moors? I expect you had a landrover following along with paramedics on board. No you take reasonable precautions, but can't cater for every eventuality whatever you're doing. MartyBartfast
  • Score: 0

1:10pm Mon 3 Jun 13

Ventus says...

I read this and I see in short " I love the out doors and spending time with nature, but I'm more prepared to sit inside and moan over the internet"

Let it go and get on with life, if you found out what people do when they go green laneing, you'd throw a fit not doubt.

But this is the world we live in. And like the geo cachers, I suggest you make the most of the time you have on this planet, before you start to fertilise the ground your defending.

Peace out y'all
I read this and I see in short " I love the out doors and spending time with nature, but I'm more prepared to sit inside and moan over the internet" Let it go and get on with life, if you found out what people do when they go green laneing, you'd throw a fit not doubt. But this is the world we live in. And like the geo cachers, I suggest you make the most of the time you have on this planet, before you start to fertilise the ground your defending. Peace out y'all Ventus
  • Score: 0

1:29pm Mon 3 Jun 13

buzzie1 says...

Ventus wrote:
I read this and I see in short " I love the out doors and spending time with nature, but I'm more prepared to sit inside and moan over the internet"

Let it go and get on with life, if you found out what people do when they go green laneing, you'd throw a fit not doubt.

But this is the world we live in. And like the geo cachers, I suggest you make the most of the time you have on this planet, before you start to fertilise the ground your defending.

Peace out y'all
Im one of those naughty green laners and also have a dog!! Therefore I must be responsible for global warming :)

Everything we do, is because we LOVE being outside enjoying the great wide world. I think it would be preferable to some people on here if I plonked my son in front of the tv all the time so we didnt encroach on their space. Oh no, actually cos then they would be moaning about tv being the source of all evil and causing obesity...anyone else see the irony???
[quote][p][bold]Ventus[/bold] wrote: I read this and I see in short " I love the out doors and spending time with nature, but I'm more prepared to sit inside and moan over the internet" Let it go and get on with life, if you found out what people do when they go green laneing, you'd throw a fit not doubt. But this is the world we live in. And like the geo cachers, I suggest you make the most of the time you have on this planet, before you start to fertilise the ground your defending. Peace out y'all[/p][/quote]Im one of those naughty green laners and also have a dog!! Therefore I must be responsible for global warming :) Everything we do, is because we LOVE being outside enjoying the great wide world. I think it would be preferable to some people on here if I plonked my son in front of the tv all the time so we didnt encroach on their space. Oh no, actually cos then they would be moaning about tv being the source of all evil and causing obesity...anyone else see the irony??? buzzie1
  • Score: 0

1:43pm Mon 3 Jun 13

retry69 says...

MartyBartfast wrote:
retry69 wrote:
Thanks for that, i am seriously interested in this as i have been made aware of it via my daughter/grandaughte


rs and hadnt realised what a heated debate there can be over what appeared to me to be a harmless pastime,i am still of the opinion that there was no excuse for the lady to get stuck up the tree as if she was accompanied and was expecting to climb they should have been capable of ensuring her safety,however i expect it will not happen again
Oh get real, the woman took reasonable precautions for the climb, but sometimes events occur outside of your expectations and catch you unprepared.

Have you ever been out on a boat? I expect you took your own inshore lifeboat with you and had your private air-sea rescue chopper hovering overhead.

Ever been out for a walk on the hills/moors? I expect you had a landrover following along with paramedics on board.

No you take reasonable precautions, but can't cater for every eventuality whatever you're doing.
She got stuck up a tree! and couldnt get down even with the company she had not really taking reasonable precautions, a little bit different to your hysterical comparisons or was it you that phoned the fireservices because that would figure
[quote][p][bold]MartyBartfast[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]retry69[/bold] wrote: Thanks for that, i am seriously interested in this as i have been made aware of it via my daughter/grandaughte rs and hadnt realised what a heated debate there can be over what appeared to me to be a harmless pastime,i am still of the opinion that there was no excuse for the lady to get stuck up the tree as if she was accompanied and was expecting to climb they should have been capable of ensuring her safety,however i expect it will not happen again[/p][/quote]Oh get real, the woman took reasonable precautions for the climb, but sometimes events occur outside of your expectations and catch you unprepared. Have you ever been out on a boat? I expect you took your own inshore lifeboat with you and had your private air-sea rescue chopper hovering overhead. Ever been out for a walk on the hills/moors? I expect you had a landrover following along with paramedics on board. No you take reasonable precautions, but can't cater for every eventuality whatever you're doing.[/p][/quote]She got stuck up a tree! and couldnt get down even with the company she had not really taking reasonable precautions, a little bit different to your hysterical comparisons or was it you that phoned the fireservices because that would figure retry69
  • Score: 0

12:12pm Wed 5 Jun 13

Cache on Wheels says...

retry69 wrote:
MartyBartfast wrote:
retry69 wrote:
ranger_bob wrote:
oversixty wrote:
Idiot!
Yes you probably are. What the story doesn't tell you is that the young lady had the appropriate climbing equipment but that one of the ropes got stuck.

But then I suppose you've never had an accident or made a mistake in your life have you? What must it be like to be perfect?
Just a genuine serious question that will hopefully get an adult answer rather than the children that seem to be leaving comments here.Was the lady that had all the climbing equipment actually alone when this took place?
No she was not alone.
But nobody who accompanied her where capable of assisting her in getting down from a tree, although i have sympathy for the lady i find that a little irresponsible of all those that were with her and also to the person who placed the object in the tree
The person with her was fully qualified - it was just an unfortunate incident.
[quote][p][bold]retry69[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MartyBartfast[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]retry69[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ranger_bob[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: Idiot![/p][/quote]Yes you probably are. What the story doesn't tell you is that the young lady had the appropriate climbing equipment but that one of the ropes got stuck. But then I suppose you've never had an accident or made a mistake in your life have you? What must it be like to be perfect?[/p][/quote]Just a genuine serious question that will hopefully get an adult answer rather than the children that seem to be leaving comments here.Was the lady that had all the climbing equipment actually alone when this took place?[/p][/quote]No she was not alone.[/p][/quote]But nobody who accompanied her where capable of assisting her in getting down from a tree, although i have sympathy for the lady i find that a little irresponsible of all those that were with her and also to the person who placed the object in the tree[/p][/quote]The person with her was fully qualified - it was just an unfortunate incident. Cache on Wheels
  • Score: 0

12:26pm Wed 5 Jun 13

retry69 says...

Cache on Wheels wrote:
retry69 wrote:
MartyBartfast wrote:
retry69 wrote:
ranger_bob wrote:
oversixty wrote:
Idiot!
Yes you probably are. What the story doesn't tell you is that the young lady had the appropriate climbing equipment but that one of the ropes got stuck.

But then I suppose you've never had an accident or made a mistake in your life have you? What must it be like to be perfect?
Just a genuine serious question that will hopefully get an adult answer rather than the children that seem to be leaving comments here.Was the lady that had all the climbing equipment actually alone when this took place?
No she was not alone.
But nobody who accompanied her where capable of assisting her in getting down from a tree, although i have sympathy for the lady i find that a little irresponsible of all those that were with her and also to the person who placed the object in the tree
The person with her was fully qualified - it was just an unfortunate incident.
LOL ok stay safe
[quote][p][bold]Cache on Wheels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]retry69[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MartyBartfast[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]retry69[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ranger_bob[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: Idiot![/p][/quote]Yes you probably are. What the story doesn't tell you is that the young lady had the appropriate climbing equipment but that one of the ropes got stuck. But then I suppose you've never had an accident or made a mistake in your life have you? What must it be like to be perfect?[/p][/quote]Just a genuine serious question that will hopefully get an adult answer rather than the children that seem to be leaving comments here.Was the lady that had all the climbing equipment actually alone when this took place?[/p][/quote]No she was not alone.[/p][/quote]But nobody who accompanied her where capable of assisting her in getting down from a tree, although i have sympathy for the lady i find that a little irresponsible of all those that were with her and also to the person who placed the object in the tree[/p][/quote]The person with her was fully qualified - it was just an unfortunate incident.[/p][/quote]LOL ok stay safe retry69
  • Score: 0

12:35pm Wed 5 Jun 13

Cache on Wheels says...

portia6 wrote:
wezie100 wrote:
If you want to experience munzee before you set yourself against it I will be happy to show you it. I have qualifications in conservation and ecology and I love both geocaching and munzee. So please become informed before you make a decision.
Not heard of this geocaching before
so would be interested to find out more
especially as I have a student son who
would probably love it! Conservation
and ecology are very worthwhile in this
day and age!
I would be more than happy to talk to you further abut Geocaching.

You may be interested in Earth Caches too?

"An EarthCache is a special place that people can visit to learn about a unique geoscience feature of our Earth. EarthCache pages include a set of educational notes along with cache coordinates. Visitors to EarthCaches can see how our planet has been shaped by geological processes, how we manage its resources and how scientists gather evidence to learn about the Earth."

This is a quote from the page link below about Earthcaches. This page also shows a list of the different types of caches available.

I hope this helps
Mrs B

http://www.geocachin
g.com/about/cache_ty
pes.aspx
[quote][p][bold]portia6[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wezie100[/bold] wrote: If you want to experience munzee before you set yourself against it I will be happy to show you it. I have qualifications in conservation and ecology and I love both geocaching and munzee. So please become informed before you make a decision.[/p][/quote]Not heard of this geocaching before so would be interested to find out more especially as I have a student son who would probably love it! Conservation and ecology are very worthwhile in this day and age![/p][/quote]I would be more than happy to talk to you further abut Geocaching. You may be interested in Earth Caches too? "An EarthCache is a special place that people can visit to learn about a unique geoscience feature of our Earth. EarthCache pages include a set of educational notes along with cache coordinates. Visitors to EarthCaches can see how our planet has been shaped by geological processes, how we manage its resources and how scientists gather evidence to learn about the Earth." This is a quote from the page link below about Earthcaches. This page also shows a list of the different types of caches available. I hope this helps Mrs B http://www.geocachin g.com/about/cache_ty pes.aspx Cache on Wheels
  • Score: 0

1:05pm Wed 5 Jun 13

Cache on Wheels says...

oversixty wrote:
Cache on Wheels wrote:
PS Although Bournemouth Councl now have a blanket ban of all geocaches on their land, which is very unfortunate, there are far more councils and Trusts - Including the National Trust, who not only allow geocaches on their property, but they encourage it, The National Trust now even activiley promote it on their land and hide some caches themselved!! - i can't see them doing that if they felt that it would trash the countryside or have an adverse effect on the wildlife and the delicate plants etc.

I meant to say that it is very unfortunate that this young lady needed assistance from the emergency services - however far more people that are out walking their do or go walking in the same areas that geocaches are hidden, require assistance if they injure themselves. - The most imprtant message the above organiisations put across is that you only go within your limits, it's not adised that you do things like this young lady unless you are experienced and have other experiend people with you - as i mentioned above - all the caches placed are checked by a reviewer who has the exact coordinates of where all the caches are placed - thinkgs like birds nesting in the trees are also checked.

There are 20 caches that are hidden in one certain reserve where much of it is SSSI - they were all placed with the land owner and placed sympathetically within the surroundings.

Here is a link to the Land Owners agreement where you can view all the Trusts, Councils and Associations in a spreadsheet to see which areas have approved / denied caches to be placed on their land.

You will see that many areas such as The National Trust, The New Forest, and lots of councils around the country allow and welcome geocaches on their land. You can also view each agreement on the right of the place name.

May i suggest that those who are not fully aware of what Geoching is, how it works, what the strict rules are according to Groundspeak's Geocaching.com have a look at the links, before commenting - as you will then be able to comment from an informed point of view.

Just to emphasise - Munzees have nothing to do with Geocaching and are a totally sperate game, with not many specific guidlines or rules like Geocaching has.

I am more than happy to do an interview with the Echo are chat direcctly with anyone who may want to know more about Geocaching, or even have a go at it.

Yours Faithfully
Mrs B aka Cache on Wheels

http://gagb.co.uk/la


nd-agreements-databa


se/
Thanks Mrs B!
I welcome your input and as I am only aware of Bournemouth Council's guidelines on geo-caching cannot express any other views elsewhere.I am involved with an SSSI in Bournemouth and fully support their stance because I feel it will disturb the flora and fauna.
Surely it must disturb the habitat in some way?
Munzees are in some ways the same as geo caching as according to their website,they can be hidden in containers.The lady I saw was running around with smart phone in hand( in her work clothes!) amongst the undergrowth with two dogs out of control.As you will I am sure agree, this is very concerning when it's the time for birds nesting?
The Munzee tags are also plastic and not therefore environmentally friendly! As I have said before, no permission was asked for these Munzees! Permission was on the other hand asked for geo-caching but the response when it was refused was pretty nasty on the website!
Thank you for your lovely reply.
I believe there is never a reason to be nasty - and those who have responded in this way, are not helping to protect the good name of Geocaching or any other game either :(

As with all people who roam the country side, be it for Geocaching, Munzees or just walking, there will be people who act irresponsible unfortunatley.

With Geocaching, there are strict guidlines of how far apart the geocaches are allowed to be hidden - this is 0.1 Mile as the crow flies as a general rule, they are NEVER buried - there is a very strict No breaking ground rule.
You are not allowed to cause damage to any property, and certainly NOT allowed to hide a cache on a historic monument either.

I have found some Munzees that arein our village, and they were within a few feet of eachother - although these ones were respectfully hidden, some i have found have been staple to posts, and i was even guided to one that was at an ancient monument!!

Therre are some instances where i have heard of geocaches and Munzees being removed.

All geocaches that are hidden, should have an offical label on them or inside saying that this is a geocaching game piece, and it will have contact details on it so you can contact someone if there is a problem with it.

Many locals enjoy watching people finding them.

One of the 2 series in a SSSI area, were placed by a friend of ours with the Land Owners and all sympathetic to the area.

The rule is that all dogs must be kept on a lead, due to ground nesting birds etc.

The majority of people who roam the country side for what ever reason are very careful to protect our wonderful environment, and it's sad that some do not.

If you have concerns over someone's behaviour, do you tackle them and ask them to put their dogs on a lead?

Do you have signs up in your SSSI area that say if dogs are allowed or if they are to be kept on a lead?

I saw someones comment about Munzees do have rules about where they are placed and set distances apart.

If they are in containers hidden sympathetically, i have no problem with that, what i do object to, like you, is when they are stapled to wooden posts,or put out in sensitive areas, especially if the one who placed them is aware that Geocaches are not permitted there.- the majority of people who play either game whether hiding or seeking either, are fully aware that Bournemouth County Council have a blanket ban on al Geocaches beong paced on their property - i feel it is not helpful for people to then go and deply munzees in area where they know Geocaches are not allowed!! - It's certainly not helpful!

With regards to Munzees placed on your SSSI area:
It is easy to find out where they are by going on to the Munzee website.

If you have a problem with where they are placed, you can contact someone via the Munzee site.

Same goes for Geocaching. If someone has a problem with where a geocache is placed, they can go on to the Geocaching.com website and contact someone via a link on there too.

At the end of the day, if someone is acting in a way that could be harmful to the habitat no matter what reason they are there then it may be wise to tackle them, or have a member of staff to come and tackle them about their behaviour.

Like I said before, most Geocachers are very respectful about their environment and take great care -

The main idea when looking for a geocache is that you do it with stealth and so you do not stand out.

All geocaches are sent for review to ensure they meet all the guidlines and have the relevant permission where it is needed.

If you want to know more info from me, you can contact me via the Geocaching.com page or search for Cache on Wheels Geocaching and contact me via their website.

I would be more than happy to help where i can. :)

Thank you for an adult response :)

Mrs B
PS If people look at the link i provided for the Landowners Agreement on the GAGB website - you will see that it is not a free for all if councils or Trusts allow caches to be placed - some have strict guidlines as to where caches can be placed.

You may find it helpful to contact someone at the GAGB who could also give you further and more informed information - they are all very good :)
[quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Cache on Wheels[/bold] wrote: PS Although Bournemouth Councl now have a blanket ban of all geocaches on their land, which is very unfortunate, there are far more councils and Trusts - Including the National Trust, who not only allow geocaches on their property, but they encourage it, The National Trust now even activiley promote it on their land and hide some caches themselved!! - i can't see them doing that if they felt that it would trash the countryside or have an adverse effect on the wildlife and the delicate plants etc. I meant to say that it is very unfortunate that this young lady needed assistance from the emergency services - however far more people that are out walking their do or go walking in the same areas that geocaches are hidden, require assistance if they injure themselves. - The most imprtant message the above organiisations put across is that you only go within your limits, it's not adised that you do things like this young lady unless you are experienced and have other experiend people with you - as i mentioned above - all the caches placed are checked by a reviewer who has the exact coordinates of where all the caches are placed - thinkgs like birds nesting in the trees are also checked. There are 20 caches that are hidden in one certain reserve where much of it is SSSI - they were all placed with the land owner and placed sympathetically within the surroundings. Here is a link to the Land Owners agreement where you can view all the Trusts, Councils and Associations in a spreadsheet to see which areas have approved / denied caches to be placed on their land. You will see that many areas such as The National Trust, The New Forest, and lots of councils around the country allow and welcome geocaches on their land. You can also view each agreement on the right of the place name. May i suggest that those who are not fully aware of what Geoching is, how it works, what the strict rules are according to Groundspeak's Geocaching.com have a look at the links, before commenting - as you will then be able to comment from an informed point of view. Just to emphasise - Munzees have nothing to do with Geocaching and are a totally sperate game, with not many specific guidlines or rules like Geocaching has. I am more than happy to do an interview with the Echo are chat direcctly with anyone who may want to know more about Geocaching, or even have a go at it. Yours Faithfully Mrs B aka Cache on Wheels http://gagb.co.uk/la nd-agreements-databa se/[/p][/quote]Thanks Mrs B! I welcome your input and as I am only aware of Bournemouth Council's guidelines on geo-caching cannot express any other views elsewhere.I am involved with an SSSI in Bournemouth and fully support their stance because I feel it will disturb the flora and fauna. Surely it must disturb the habitat in some way? Munzees are in some ways the same as geo caching as according to their website,they can be hidden in containers.The lady I saw was running around with smart phone in hand( in her work clothes!) amongst the undergrowth with two dogs out of control.As you will I am sure agree, this is very concerning when it's the time for birds nesting? The Munzee tags are also plastic and not therefore environmentally friendly! As I have said before, no permission was asked for these Munzees! Permission was on the other hand asked for geo-caching but the response when it was refused was pretty nasty on the website![/p][/quote]Thank you for your lovely reply. I believe there is never a reason to be nasty - and those who have responded in this way, are not helping to protect the good name of Geocaching or any other game either :( As with all people who roam the country side, be it for Geocaching, Munzees or just walking, there will be people who act irresponsible unfortunatley. With Geocaching, there are strict guidlines of how far apart the geocaches are allowed to be hidden - this is 0.1 Mile as the crow flies as a general rule, they are NEVER buried - there is a very strict No breaking ground rule. You are not allowed to cause damage to any property, and certainly NOT allowed to hide a cache on a historic monument either. I have found some Munzees that arein our village, and they were within a few feet of eachother - although these ones were respectfully hidden, some i have found have been staple to posts, and i was even guided to one that was at an ancient monument!! Therre are some instances where i have heard of geocaches and Munzees being removed. All geocaches that are hidden, should have an offical label on them or inside saying that this is a geocaching game piece, and it will have contact details on it so you can contact someone if there is a problem with it. Many locals enjoy watching people finding them. One of the 2 series in a SSSI area, were placed by a friend of ours with the Land Owners and all sympathetic to the area. The rule is that all dogs must be kept on a lead, due to ground nesting birds etc. The majority of people who roam the country side for what ever reason are very careful to protect our wonderful environment, and it's sad that some do not. If you have concerns over someone's behaviour, do you tackle them and ask them to put their dogs on a lead? Do you have signs up in your SSSI area that say if dogs are allowed or if they are to be kept on a lead? I saw someones comment about Munzees do have rules about where they are placed and set distances apart. If they are in containers hidden sympathetically, i have no problem with that, what i do object to, like you, is when they are stapled to wooden posts,or put out in sensitive areas, especially if the one who placed them is aware that Geocaches are not permitted there.- the majority of people who play either game whether hiding or seeking either, are fully aware that Bournemouth County Council have a blanket ban on al Geocaches beong paced on their property - i feel it is not helpful for people to then go and deply munzees in area where they know Geocaches are not allowed!! - It's certainly not helpful! With regards to Munzees placed on your SSSI area: It is easy to find out where they are by going on to the Munzee website. If you have a problem with where they are placed, you can contact someone via the Munzee site. Same goes for Geocaching. If someone has a problem with where a geocache is placed, they can go on to the Geocaching.com website and contact someone via a link on there too. At the end of the day, if someone is acting in a way that could be harmful to the habitat no matter what reason they are there then it may be wise to tackle them, or have a member of staff to come and tackle them about their behaviour. Like I said before, most Geocachers are very respectful about their environment and take great care - The main idea when looking for a geocache is that you do it with stealth and so you do not stand out. All geocaches are sent for review to ensure they meet all the guidlines and have the relevant permission where it is needed. If you want to know more info from me, you can contact me via the Geocaching.com page or search for Cache on Wheels Geocaching and contact me via their website. I would be more than happy to help where i can. :) Thank you for an adult response :) Mrs B PS If people look at the link i provided for the Landowners Agreement on the GAGB website - you will see that it is not a free for all if councils or Trusts allow caches to be placed - some have strict guidlines as to where caches can be placed. You may find it helpful to contact someone at the GAGB who could also give you further and more informed information - they are all very good :) Cache on Wheels
  • Score: 0

1:15pm Wed 5 Jun 13

oversixty says...

Cache on Wheels wrote:
oversixty wrote:
Cache on Wheels wrote:
PS Although Bournemouth Councl now have a blanket ban of all geocaches on their land, which is very unfortunate, there are far more councils and Trusts - Including the National Trust, who not only allow geocaches on their property, but they encourage it, The National Trust now even activiley promote it on their land and hide some caches themselved!! - i can't see them doing that if they felt that it would trash the countryside or have an adverse effect on the wildlife and the delicate plants etc.

I meant to say that it is very unfortunate that this young lady needed assistance from the emergency services - however far more people that are out walking their do or go walking in the same areas that geocaches are hidden, require assistance if they injure themselves. - The most imprtant message the above organiisations put across is that you only go within your limits, it's not adised that you do things like this young lady unless you are experienced and have other experiend people with you - as i mentioned above - all the caches placed are checked by a reviewer who has the exact coordinates of where all the caches are placed - thinkgs like birds nesting in the trees are also checked.

There are 20 caches that are hidden in one certain reserve where much of it is SSSI - they were all placed with the land owner and placed sympathetically within the surroundings.

Here is a link to the Land Owners agreement where you can view all the Trusts, Councils and Associations in a spreadsheet to see which areas have approved / denied caches to be placed on their land.

You will see that many areas such as The National Trust, The New Forest, and lots of councils around the country allow and welcome geocaches on their land. You can also view each agreement on the right of the place name.

May i suggest that those who are not fully aware of what Geoching is, how it works, what the strict rules are according to Groundspeak's Geocaching.com have a look at the links, before commenting - as you will then be able to comment from an informed point of view.

Just to emphasise - Munzees have nothing to do with Geocaching and are a totally sperate game, with not many specific guidlines or rules like Geocaching has.

I am more than happy to do an interview with the Echo are chat direcctly with anyone who may want to know more about Geocaching, or even have a go at it.

Yours Faithfully
Mrs B aka Cache on Wheels

http://gagb.co.uk/la



nd-agreements-databa



se/
Thanks Mrs B!
I welcome your input and as I am only aware of Bournemouth Council's guidelines on geo-caching cannot express any other views elsewhere.I am involved with an SSSI in Bournemouth and fully support their stance because I feel it will disturb the flora and fauna.
Surely it must disturb the habitat in some way?
Munzees are in some ways the same as geo caching as according to their website,they can be hidden in containers.The lady I saw was running around with smart phone in hand( in her work clothes!) amongst the undergrowth with two dogs out of control.As you will I am sure agree, this is very concerning when it's the time for birds nesting?
The Munzee tags are also plastic and not therefore environmentally friendly! As I have said before, no permission was asked for these Munzees! Permission was on the other hand asked for geo-caching but the response when it was refused was pretty nasty on the website!
Thank you for your lovely reply.
I believe there is never a reason to be nasty - and those who have responded in this way, are not helping to protect the good name of Geocaching or any other game either :(

As with all people who roam the country side, be it for Geocaching, Munzees or just walking, there will be people who act irresponsible unfortunatley.

With Geocaching, there are strict guidlines of how far apart the geocaches are allowed to be hidden - this is 0.1 Mile as the crow flies as a general rule, they are NEVER buried - there is a very strict No breaking ground rule.
You are not allowed to cause damage to any property, and certainly NOT allowed to hide a cache on a historic monument either.

I have found some Munzees that arein our village, and they were within a few feet of eachother - although these ones were respectfully hidden, some i have found have been staple to posts, and i was even guided to one that was at an ancient monument!!

Therre are some instances where i have heard of geocaches and Munzees being removed.

All geocaches that are hidden, should have an offical label on them or inside saying that this is a geocaching game piece, and it will have contact details on it so you can contact someone if there is a problem with it.

Many locals enjoy watching people finding them.

One of the 2 series in a SSSI area, were placed by a friend of ours with the Land Owners and all sympathetic to the area.

The rule is that all dogs must be kept on a lead, due to ground nesting birds etc.

The majority of people who roam the country side for what ever reason are very careful to protect our wonderful environment, and it's sad that some do not.

If you have concerns over someone's behaviour, do you tackle them and ask them to put their dogs on a lead?

Do you have signs up in your SSSI area that say if dogs are allowed or if they are to be kept on a lead?

I saw someones comment about Munzees do have rules about where they are placed and set distances apart.

If they are in containers hidden sympathetically, i have no problem with that, what i do object to, like you, is when they are stapled to wooden posts,or put out in sensitive areas, especially if the one who placed them is aware that Geocaches are not permitted there.- the majority of people who play either game whether hiding or seeking either, are fully aware that Bournemouth County Council have a blanket ban on al Geocaches beong paced on their property - i feel it is not helpful for people to then go and deply munzees in area where they know Geocaches are not allowed!! - It's certainly not helpful!

With regards to Munzees placed on your SSSI area:
It is easy to find out where they are by going on to the Munzee website.

If you have a problem with where they are placed, you can contact someone via the Munzee site.

Same goes for Geocaching. If someone has a problem with where a geocache is placed, they can go on to the Geocaching.com website and contact someone via a link on there too.

At the end of the day, if someone is acting in a way that could be harmful to the habitat no matter what reason they are there then it may be wise to tackle them, or have a member of staff to come and tackle them about their behaviour.

Like I said before, most Geocachers are very respectful about their environment and take great care -

The main idea when looking for a geocache is that you do it with stealth and so you do not stand out.

All geocaches are sent for review to ensure they meet all the guidlines and have the relevant permission where it is needed.

If you want to know more info from me, you can contact me via the Geocaching.com page or search for Cache on Wheels Geocaching and contact me via their website.

I would be more than happy to help where i can. :)

Thank you for an adult response :)

Mrs B
PS If people look at the link i provided for the Landowners Agreement on the GAGB website - you will see that it is not a free for all if councils or Trusts allow caches to be placed - some have strict guidlines as to where caches can be placed.

You may find it helpful to contact someone at the GAGB who could also give you further and more informed information - they are all very good :)
I have actually contacted Natural England regarding geo-caching on S.S.S.I's and they say"Natural England have advised the authorities generally that geo-caching should not be permitted"
They were unaware of Munzees!
Our S.S.S.I also has by-laws posted on site covering all aspects which may harm our reserve.
Sadly that does not mean all users respect those laws:-(
[quote][p][bold]Cache on Wheels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Cache on Wheels[/bold] wrote: PS Although Bournemouth Councl now have a blanket ban of all geocaches on their land, which is very unfortunate, there are far more councils and Trusts - Including the National Trust, who not only allow geocaches on their property, but they encourage it, The National Trust now even activiley promote it on their land and hide some caches themselved!! - i can't see them doing that if they felt that it would trash the countryside or have an adverse effect on the wildlife and the delicate plants etc. I meant to say that it is very unfortunate that this young lady needed assistance from the emergency services - however far more people that are out walking their do or go walking in the same areas that geocaches are hidden, require assistance if they injure themselves. - The most imprtant message the above organiisations put across is that you only go within your limits, it's not adised that you do things like this young lady unless you are experienced and have other experiend people with you - as i mentioned above - all the caches placed are checked by a reviewer who has the exact coordinates of where all the caches are placed - thinkgs like birds nesting in the trees are also checked. There are 20 caches that are hidden in one certain reserve where much of it is SSSI - they were all placed with the land owner and placed sympathetically within the surroundings. Here is a link to the Land Owners agreement where you can view all the Trusts, Councils and Associations in a spreadsheet to see which areas have approved / denied caches to be placed on their land. You will see that many areas such as The National Trust, The New Forest, and lots of councils around the country allow and welcome geocaches on their land. You can also view each agreement on the right of the place name. May i suggest that those who are not fully aware of what Geoching is, how it works, what the strict rules are according to Groundspeak's Geocaching.com have a look at the links, before commenting - as you will then be able to comment from an informed point of view. Just to emphasise - Munzees have nothing to do with Geocaching and are a totally sperate game, with not many specific guidlines or rules like Geocaching has. I am more than happy to do an interview with the Echo are chat direcctly with anyone who may want to know more about Geocaching, or even have a go at it. Yours Faithfully Mrs B aka Cache on Wheels http://gagb.co.uk/la nd-agreements-databa se/[/p][/quote]Thanks Mrs B! I welcome your input and as I am only aware of Bournemouth Council's guidelines on geo-caching cannot express any other views elsewhere.I am involved with an SSSI in Bournemouth and fully support their stance because I feel it will disturb the flora and fauna. Surely it must disturb the habitat in some way? Munzees are in some ways the same as geo caching as according to their website,they can be hidden in containers.The lady I saw was running around with smart phone in hand( in her work clothes!) amongst the undergrowth with two dogs out of control.As you will I am sure agree, this is very concerning when it's the time for birds nesting? The Munzee tags are also plastic and not therefore environmentally friendly! As I have said before, no permission was asked for these Munzees! Permission was on the other hand asked for geo-caching but the response when it was refused was pretty nasty on the website![/p][/quote]Thank you for your lovely reply. I believe there is never a reason to be nasty - and those who have responded in this way, are not helping to protect the good name of Geocaching or any other game either :( As with all people who roam the country side, be it for Geocaching, Munzees or just walking, there will be people who act irresponsible unfortunatley. With Geocaching, there are strict guidlines of how far apart the geocaches are allowed to be hidden - this is 0.1 Mile as the crow flies as a general rule, they are NEVER buried - there is a very strict No breaking ground rule. You are not allowed to cause damage to any property, and certainly NOT allowed to hide a cache on a historic monument either. I have found some Munzees that arein our village, and they were within a few feet of eachother - although these ones were respectfully hidden, some i have found have been staple to posts, and i was even guided to one that was at an ancient monument!! Therre are some instances where i have heard of geocaches and Munzees being removed. All geocaches that are hidden, should have an offical label on them or inside saying that this is a geocaching game piece, and it will have contact details on it so you can contact someone if there is a problem with it. Many locals enjoy watching people finding them. One of the 2 series in a SSSI area, were placed by a friend of ours with the Land Owners and all sympathetic to the area. The rule is that all dogs must be kept on a lead, due to ground nesting birds etc. The majority of people who roam the country side for what ever reason are very careful to protect our wonderful environment, and it's sad that some do not. If you have concerns over someone's behaviour, do you tackle them and ask them to put their dogs on a lead? Do you have signs up in your SSSI area that say if dogs are allowed or if they are to be kept on a lead? I saw someones comment about Munzees do have rules about where they are placed and set distances apart. If they are in containers hidden sympathetically, i have no problem with that, what i do object to, like you, is when they are stapled to wooden posts,or put out in sensitive areas, especially if the one who placed them is aware that Geocaches are not permitted there.- the majority of people who play either game whether hiding or seeking either, are fully aware that Bournemouth County Council have a blanket ban on al Geocaches beong paced on their property - i feel it is not helpful for people to then go and deply munzees in area where they know Geocaches are not allowed!! - It's certainly not helpful! With regards to Munzees placed on your SSSI area: It is easy to find out where they are by going on to the Munzee website. If you have a problem with where they are placed, you can contact someone via the Munzee site. Same goes for Geocaching. If someone has a problem with where a geocache is placed, they can go on to the Geocaching.com website and contact someone via a link on there too. At the end of the day, if someone is acting in a way that could be harmful to the habitat no matter what reason they are there then it may be wise to tackle them, or have a member of staff to come and tackle them about their behaviour. Like I said before, most Geocachers are very respectful about their environment and take great care - The main idea when looking for a geocache is that you do it with stealth and so you do not stand out. All geocaches are sent for review to ensure they meet all the guidlines and have the relevant permission where it is needed. If you want to know more info from me, you can contact me via the Geocaching.com page or search for Cache on Wheels Geocaching and contact me via their website. I would be more than happy to help where i can. :) Thank you for an adult response :) Mrs B PS If people look at the link i provided for the Landowners Agreement on the GAGB website - you will see that it is not a free for all if councils or Trusts allow caches to be placed - some have strict guidlines as to where caches can be placed. You may find it helpful to contact someone at the GAGB who could also give you further and more informed information - they are all very good :)[/p][/quote]I have actually contacted Natural England regarding geo-caching on S.S.S.I's and they say"Natural England have advised the authorities generally that geo-caching should not be permitted" They were unaware of Munzees! Our S.S.S.I also has by-laws posted on site covering all aspects which may harm our reserve. Sadly that does not mean all users respect those laws:-( oversixty
  • Score: 0

1:21pm Wed 5 Jun 13

Cache on Wheels says...

oversixty wrote:
Cache on Wheels wrote:
PS Although Bournemouth Councl now have a blanket ban of all geocaches on their land, which is very unfortunate, there are far more councils and Trusts - Including the National Trust, who not only allow geocaches on their property, but they encourage it, The National Trust now even activiley promote it on their land and hide some caches themselved!! - i can't see them doing that if they felt that it would trash the countryside or have an adverse effect on the wildlife and the delicate plants etc.

I meant to say that it is very unfortunate that this young lady needed assistance from the emergency services - however far more people that are out walking their do or go walking in the same areas that geocaches are hidden, require assistance if they injure themselves. - The most imprtant message the above organiisations put across is that you only go within your limits, it's not adised that you do things like this young lady unless you are experienced and have other experiend people with you - as i mentioned above - all the caches placed are checked by a reviewer who has the exact coordinates of where all the caches are placed - thinkgs like birds nesting in the trees are also checked.

There are 20 caches that are hidden in one certain reserve where much of it is SSSI - they were all placed with the land owner and placed sympathetically within the surroundings.

Here is a link to the Land Owners agreement where you can view all the Trusts, Councils and Associations in a spreadsheet to see which areas have approved / denied caches to be placed on their land.

You will see that many areas such as The National Trust, The New Forest, and lots of councils around the country allow and welcome geocaches on their land. You can also view each agreement on the right of the place name.

May i suggest that those who are not fully aware of what Geoching is, how it works, what the strict rules are according to Groundspeak's Geocaching.com have a look at the links, before commenting - as you will then be able to comment from an informed point of view.

Just to emphasise - Munzees have nothing to do with Geocaching and are a totally sperate game, with not many specific guidlines or rules like Geocaching has.

I am more than happy to do an interview with the Echo are chat direcctly with anyone who may want to know more about Geocaching, or even have a go at it.

Yours Faithfully
Mrs B aka Cache on Wheels

http://gagb.co.uk/la


nd-agreements-databa


se/
Hello again Mrs B!

Am I correct in saying that most of the reserves you mention outside of Bournemouth are probably not in urban environments and not designated as Public Open Spaces?
The 10 Local Nature Reserves in Bournemouth are all urban and Public Open Spaces with those having heathland under particular stress for various reasons.There are plans to relieve the pressure on these sites which was probably one of the reasons that geo-caching was refused.
Munzees are even more worrying as they cover most of Bournemouth it seems!
A lot of the sites are open to the puclic and Urban - especially the New Forest, Holt Lee, where i held an event -

here are the details of the event we held there if anyone wants to look
http://www.geocachin
g.com/seek/cache_det
ails.aspx?guid=c1b96
670-ed51-4707-a46d-c
c1fe5d94507

- it would have been great for the Echo to cover this story in a positive light - We planted lots of native shrubs in a new wildlife garden demonstration area called Cachers Corner to encourage more wildlife - this came under the heading of a CITO.

Here is a quote from the person i prganised the event with: Our Geocaching guests made a start on creating a new wildlife gardening demonstration area. It was great to get an area of native shrubs planted before spring really set in. ‘Cachers' Corner’ comprises a rich mix of shrubs, such as hawthorn, blackthorn, hazel, dogwood, ash, willow, guelder rose and field maple. The idea is to create an area of scrub, a rare habitat at Holton Lee, good for birds, bees and a host of other wildlife. It was a great family effort ... thanks to all concerned.’

There are strict guidlines with Geocaching.com in these areas.

I must point out that there are other listing sites for geocaches, but Geocaching.com, owned by Groundspeak is the largest one.
[quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Cache on Wheels[/bold] wrote: PS Although Bournemouth Councl now have a blanket ban of all geocaches on their land, which is very unfortunate, there are far more councils and Trusts - Including the National Trust, who not only allow geocaches on their property, but they encourage it, The National Trust now even activiley promote it on their land and hide some caches themselved!! - i can't see them doing that if they felt that it would trash the countryside or have an adverse effect on the wildlife and the delicate plants etc. I meant to say that it is very unfortunate that this young lady needed assistance from the emergency services - however far more people that are out walking their do or go walking in the same areas that geocaches are hidden, require assistance if they injure themselves. - The most imprtant message the above organiisations put across is that you only go within your limits, it's not adised that you do things like this young lady unless you are experienced and have other experiend people with you - as i mentioned above - all the caches placed are checked by a reviewer who has the exact coordinates of where all the caches are placed - thinkgs like birds nesting in the trees are also checked. There are 20 caches that are hidden in one certain reserve where much of it is SSSI - they were all placed with the land owner and placed sympathetically within the surroundings. Here is a link to the Land Owners agreement where you can view all the Trusts, Councils and Associations in a spreadsheet to see which areas have approved / denied caches to be placed on their land. You will see that many areas such as The National Trust, The New Forest, and lots of councils around the country allow and welcome geocaches on their land. You can also view each agreement on the right of the place name. May i suggest that those who are not fully aware of what Geoching is, how it works, what the strict rules are according to Groundspeak's Geocaching.com have a look at the links, before commenting - as you will then be able to comment from an informed point of view. Just to emphasise - Munzees have nothing to do with Geocaching and are a totally sperate game, with not many specific guidlines or rules like Geocaching has. I am more than happy to do an interview with the Echo are chat direcctly with anyone who may want to know more about Geocaching, or even have a go at it. Yours Faithfully Mrs B aka Cache on Wheels http://gagb.co.uk/la nd-agreements-databa se/[/p][/quote]Hello again Mrs B! Am I correct in saying that most of the reserves you mention outside of Bournemouth are probably not in urban environments and not designated as Public Open Spaces? The 10 Local Nature Reserves in Bournemouth are all urban and Public Open Spaces with those having heathland under particular stress for various reasons.There are plans to relieve the pressure on these sites which was probably one of the reasons that geo-caching was refused. Munzees are even more worrying as they cover most of Bournemouth it seems![/p][/quote]A lot of the sites are open to the puclic and Urban - especially the New Forest, Holt Lee, where i held an event - here are the details of the event we held there if anyone wants to look http://www.geocachin g.com/seek/cache_det ails.aspx?guid=c1b96 670-ed51-4707-a46d-c c1fe5d94507 - it would have been great for the Echo to cover this story in a positive light - We planted lots of native shrubs in a new wildlife garden demonstration area called Cachers Corner to encourage more wildlife - this came under the heading of a CITO. Here is a quote from the person i prganised the event with: Our Geocaching guests made a start on creating a new wildlife gardening demonstration area. It was great to get an area of native shrubs planted before spring really set in. ‘Cachers' Corner’ comprises a rich mix of shrubs, such as hawthorn, blackthorn, hazel, dogwood, ash, willow, guelder rose and field maple. The idea is to create an area of scrub, a rare habitat at Holton Lee, good for birds, bees and a host of other wildlife. It was a great family effort ... thanks to all concerned.’ There are strict guidlines with Geocaching.com in these areas. I must point out that there are other listing sites for geocaches, but Geocaching.com, owned by Groundspeak is the largest one. Cache on Wheels
  • Score: 0

1:25pm Wed 5 Jun 13

buzzie1 says...

Okay. The whole issue around SSI's is so complicated. How can you have two councils NEXT to each other that are so different on their policies? We have already said that we work with the Urban Heath team that manage Canford Heath SSSI, who are happy to have them on there as long as they are kept to the main paths. What would be the problem having the same compromise with regards to Bournemouth? Munzee is completely different to Geocaching, there are not the same restrictions around where a zee can be deployed as there are with Geocaching. You will find globally zees are hidden where caches cannot be, it isnt just restricted to Bournemouth. We can deploy on fences, lamp posts etc, there is nothing in the rules of the game that says we cannot. This is from the help manual "There are limitless ways to hide a munzee barcode." The only real restricitions that we have is the distance ruling, which is now being dealt with to avoid spamming of certain objects and not deploying within 250ft of a playground or campus used by under 18's. I know it is a hard thing for cachers to understand, knowing the restrictions there are in placing a cache, but it is a completely separate game that is alot more free and unrestricted than geocaching
Okay. The whole issue around SSI's is so complicated. How can you have two councils NEXT to each other that are so different on their policies? We have already said that we work with the Urban Heath team that manage Canford Heath SSSI, who are happy to have them on there as long as they are kept to the main paths. What would be the problem having the same compromise with regards to Bournemouth? Munzee is completely different to Geocaching, there are not the same restrictions around where a zee can be deployed as there are with Geocaching. You will find globally zees are hidden where caches cannot be, it isnt just restricted to Bournemouth. We can deploy on fences, lamp posts etc, there is nothing in the rules of the game that says we cannot. This is from the help manual "There are limitless ways to hide a munzee barcode." The only real restricitions that we have is the distance ruling, which is now being dealt with to avoid spamming of certain objects and not deploying within 250ft of a playground or campus used by under 18's. I know it is a hard thing for cachers to understand, knowing the restrictions there are in placing a cache, but it is a completely separate game that is alot more free and unrestricted than geocaching buzzie1
  • Score: 0

1:29pm Wed 5 Jun 13

paragun says...

Sites of Special Scientific Interest: Encouraging positive partnerships
9
9
Preface
The Public Interest in SSSIs
English Nature will publicise notification of SSSIs in local newspapers. It should also
make
information readily available
in a variety of formats on the extent and
location of SSSIs, and the reasons why they are considered special. It should report
r
egularly to the Secretary of State on progress on improving the condition of SSSIs.
Where
r
ecreational activities
take place on SSSIs, English Nature should liaise with
managers to ensure that these can continue in ways that are compatible with the
conservation interest. It should agree Memoranda of Understanding with bodies
r
epresenting users. It should also acknowledge the value of sites to local
communities, increasing understanding and awareness of conservation importance,
and take account of the cultural/archaeologi
cal/industrial heritage on individual sites.
It should also liaise closely with English Heritage on the management of sites with
features of archaeological or historical importance
Sites of Special Scientific Interest: Encouraging positive partnerships 9 9 Preface The Public Interest in SSSIs English Nature will publicise notification of SSSIs in local newspapers. It should also make information readily available in a variety of formats on the extent and location of SSSIs, and the reasons why they are considered special. It should report r egularly to the Secretary of State on progress on improving the condition of SSSIs. Where r ecreational activities take place on SSSIs, English Nature should liaise with managers to ensure that these can continue in ways that are compatible with the conservation interest. It should agree Memoranda of Understanding with bodies r epresenting users. It should also acknowledge the value of sites to local communities, increasing understanding and awareness of conservation importance, and take account of the cultural/archaeologi cal/industrial heritage on individual sites. It should also liaise closely with English Heritage on the management of sites with features of archaeological or historical importance paragun
  • Score: 0

1:30pm Wed 5 Jun 13

Cache on Wheels says...

oversixty wrote:
wezie100 wrote:
If you want to experience munzee before you set yourself against it I will be happy to show you it. I have qualifications in conservation and ecology and I love both geocaching and munzee. So please become informed before you make a decision.
There are over 40 Munzee tags on our nature reserve which are there without permission!
The Council are in the process of getting them removed.
You have no idea on the impact of people scurrying about in protected areas on our wildlife!
You can find out where all Munzzees are placed by visitng their website - you may have to sign up for a free account.

You can contact someone via their website if you have concenrns, as you do with cache listed on the Geocaching.com wesite.

The Admins can trace who has placed and logged visits to each site, even if they delete their logs.

If you have a concern over anyones behaviour on your land, it is easier for the Admins of the site to trace them via geocaching or Munzee'ing website - if you have any concerns, simply email them with the date time and any information - it is always hoped that any dispputed or complaints are settled amicapably.

If you were to contact the site, they may be able to contact those who have placed them in your area and ask for them to be removed.

This was done via Geocaching once for all caches placed in a certain place to be removed as requested.

At the end of the day - we all want to encourage people to enjoy our wonderful countryside - but not to cause any damage at all :)
[quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wezie100[/bold] wrote: If you want to experience munzee before you set yourself against it I will be happy to show you it. I have qualifications in conservation and ecology and I love both geocaching and munzee. So please become informed before you make a decision.[/p][/quote]There are over 40 Munzee tags on our nature reserve which are there without permission! The Council are in the process of getting them removed. You have no idea on the impact of people scurrying about in protected areas on our wildlife![/p][/quote]You can find out where all Munzzees are placed by visitng their website - you may have to sign up for a free account. You can contact someone via their website if you have concenrns, as you do with cache listed on the Geocaching.com wesite. The Admins can trace who has placed and logged visits to each site, even if they delete their logs. If you have a concern over anyones behaviour on your land, it is easier for the Admins of the site to trace them via geocaching or Munzee'ing website - if you have any concerns, simply email them with the date time and any information - it is always hoped that any dispputed or complaints are settled amicapably. If you were to contact the site, they may be able to contact those who have placed them in your area and ask for them to be removed. This was done via Geocaching once for all caches placed in a certain place to be removed as requested. At the end of the day - we all want to encourage people to enjoy our wonderful countryside - but not to cause any damage at all :) Cache on Wheels
  • Score: 0

1:35pm Wed 5 Jun 13

paragun says...

This is the top level regulations above all others, they show that English Nature should be liaising with managers and agreeing memoranda of understanding with bodies representing users, now that clearly isn't happening all we are getting is dictated to, there is no discussion just draconian orders such as a dictator would make and those that fail to question are no better than the dictator itself! You are over sixty, remember the war? Remember Hitler? remember all the SS that said they were just following orders? What happened to them? They were held accountable were they not? The rot starts at the top!
This is the top level regulations above all others, they show that English Nature should be liaising with managers and agreeing memoranda of understanding with bodies representing users, now that clearly isn't happening all we are getting is dictated to, there is no discussion just draconian orders such as a dictator would make and those that fail to question are no better than the dictator itself! You are over sixty, remember the war? Remember Hitler? remember all the SS that said they were just following orders? What happened to them? They were held accountable were they not? The rot starts at the top! paragun
  • Score: 0

1:38pm Wed 5 Jun 13

paragun says...

Nice to hear about Holton Lee, an area I happen to like a great deal, I will have to bring the geocaching/munzee situation up with Lord Lee the next time I see him, I'll mention it to Bridget and Martin first!
Nice to hear about Holton Lee, an area I happen to like a great deal, I will have to bring the geocaching/munzee situation up with Lord Lee the next time I see him, I'll mention it to Bridget and Martin first! paragun
  • Score: 0

1:39pm Wed 5 Jun 13

Cache on Wheels says...

paragun wrote:
oversixty wrote:
paragun wrote:
oversixty wrote:
wezie100 wrote:
As for munzee causing damage I can assure you I make no more impact than yourself having worked on some internationaly important sites I would never be involed in something that had as much impact as you assume munzee does. Please tell me what your qualification are to make a environmental impact assement? I also educate the people i meet through the hobby in consevation and wildlife identification.
I get the info from those I work with who are highly qualified!
I wonder what Natural England would think of Munzees?
So you are happy that they are placed around a wetland of international importance then?

It appears they are placed on such sites at random and by more than one person.Where will that end?
So oversixty do you work for the council? Are these experts you work with the same ones that state that nothing can be placed in any of the public open spaces and sssi's? There seems to be a lot of overzealous officious individuals working to protect our flora and fauna these days instead of striking a happy medium which also takes into account the human element!
No but I work with them as a volunteer and we already have problems with irresponsible dog owners, litter and anti-social behavior!
These sites need protection and that is why these steps are being taken -
http://www.dorsetfor


you.com/387392
Now we get to it, so you are a volunteer for the council, but when you use the proverbial "WE" you are really saying "THEY", we all live in this area, sometimes when only one side of an argument is taken into account without any counter argument you will always end up with the result you want, don't you agree? Especially when experts are the ones making those aruguments! I am a dog owner, I am a responsible dog owner, I know that due to the late spring that birds are nesting about 6 weeks late on average but the layperson wouldn't, if there are signs warning people that they are in a certain area where they are then there is no excuse if they have the dogs off lead. Over officious use of notices means that putting a sign on an open space like a cricket ground will incite refusal to abide by it!

Now I also agree with you about litter and antisocial behavior so are you saying that geocaching and munzees are antisocial behavior? Has anyone carried out any form of research or analysis to establish the age profile or class category of those taken part in the above? I doubt it because if they did they would find that contrary to what has been assumed the results would show the majority to be middle to upper class, category A1 through B3! Remember I said the majority, these are not the type of people you would accuse of antisocial behavior especially when most of this country accepts and welcomes these outdoor pursuits and any form of outdoor pursuit taking part in ones hobby is much better than no exercise at all, do you agree?

I could go on but this is best served by education which should start by a meeting of both parties because only through dialogue is a fair result achieved, for the record, a munzee is on average 1.5 inches on a square not cubed, how much damage can something that size do? As for covering all of Bournemouth, if you actually knew how ridiculous that statement is you wouldn't have made it, as I said, education is the key and it works both ways!

Geocachers should know that there are rules and regulations for munzees and there are distance rules also so please get the correct facts before stating facts! Thank you, oh for the record, I am a bird lover and a animal lover, I love nature as a whole, so would not do anything to harm it but I do object to officials decimating heathland of trees to make it the way it was for the benefit of fauna! I loved the trees!
Please could you inform us what the guidlines say the minum distance is between Munzees please? :)

I have found many - although not scanned all of them, that have been 10-20 METERS apart.

With Geocaching.com listed geocaches, the minimum distance is ,01 MILES and that is as the crow flies.

Said in wanting to know the information way and not in bitterness.
[quote][p][bold]paragun[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]paragun[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wezie100[/bold] wrote: As for munzee causing damage I can assure you I make no more impact than yourself having worked on some internationaly important sites I would never be involed in something that had as much impact as you assume munzee does. Please tell me what your qualification are to make a environmental impact assement? I also educate the people i meet through the hobby in consevation and wildlife identification.[/p][/quote]I get the info from those I work with who are highly qualified! I wonder what Natural England would think of Munzees? So you are happy that they are placed around a wetland of international importance then? It appears they are placed on such sites at random and by more than one person.Where will that end?[/p][/quote]So oversixty do you work for the council? Are these experts you work with the same ones that state that nothing can be placed in any of the public open spaces and sssi's? There seems to be a lot of overzealous officious individuals working to protect our flora and fauna these days instead of striking a happy medium which also takes into account the human element![/p][/quote]No but I work with them as a volunteer and we already have problems with irresponsible dog owners, litter and anti-social behavior! These sites need protection and that is why these steps are being taken - http://www.dorsetfor you.com/387392[/p][/quote]Now we get to it, so you are a volunteer for the council, but when you use the proverbial "WE" you are really saying "THEY", we all live in this area, sometimes when only one side of an argument is taken into account without any counter argument you will always end up with the result you want, don't you agree? Especially when experts are the ones making those aruguments! I am a dog owner, I am a responsible dog owner, I know that due to the late spring that birds are nesting about 6 weeks late on average but the layperson wouldn't, if there are signs warning people that they are in a certain area where they are then there is no excuse if they have the dogs off lead. Over officious use of notices means that putting a sign on an open space like a cricket ground will incite refusal to abide by it! Now I also agree with you about litter and antisocial behavior so are you saying that geocaching and munzees are antisocial behavior? Has anyone carried out any form of research or analysis to establish the age profile or class category of those taken part in the above? I doubt it because if they did they would find that contrary to what has been assumed the results would show the majority to be middle to upper class, category A1 through B3! Remember I said the majority, these are not the type of people you would accuse of antisocial behavior especially when most of this country accepts and welcomes these outdoor pursuits and any form of outdoor pursuit taking part in ones hobby is much better than no exercise at all, do you agree? I could go on but this is best served by education which should start by a meeting of both parties because only through dialogue is a fair result achieved, for the record, a munzee is on average 1.5 inches on a square not cubed, how much damage can something that size do? As for covering all of Bournemouth, if you actually knew how ridiculous that statement is you wouldn't have made it, as I said, education is the key and it works both ways! Geocachers should know that there are rules and regulations for munzees and there are distance rules also so please get the correct facts before stating facts! Thank you, oh for the record, I am a bird lover and a animal lover, I love nature as a whole, so would not do anything to harm it but I do object to officials decimating heathland of trees to make it the way it was for the benefit of fauna! I loved the trees![/p][/quote]Please could you inform us what the guidlines say the minum distance is between Munzees please? :) I have found many - although not scanned all of them, that have been 10-20 METERS apart. With Geocaching.com listed geocaches, the minimum distance is ,01 MILES and that is as the crow flies. Said in wanting to know the information way and not in bitterness. Cache on Wheels
  • Score: 0

1:44pm Wed 5 Jun 13

paragun says...

Cache on Wheels wrote:
oversixty wrote:
wezie100 wrote:
If you want to experience munzee before you set yourself against it I will be happy to show you it. I have qualifications in conservation and ecology and I love both geocaching and munzee. So please become informed before you make a decision.
There are over 40 Munzee tags on our nature reserve which are there without permission!
The Council are in the process of getting them removed.
You have no idea on the impact of people scurrying about in protected areas on our wildlife!
You can find out where all Munzzees are placed by visitng their website - you may have to sign up for a free account.

You can contact someone via their website if you have concenrns, as you do with cache listed on the Geocaching.com wesite.

The Admins can trace who has placed and logged visits to each site, even if they delete their logs.

If you have a concern over anyones behaviour on your land, it is easier for the Admins of the site to trace them via geocaching or Munzee'ing website - if you have any concerns, simply email them with the date time and any information - it is always hoped that any dispputed or complaints are settled amicapably.

If you were to contact the site, they may be able to contact those who have placed them in your area and ask for them to be removed.

This was done via Geocaching once for all caches placed in a certain place to be removed as requested.

At the end of the day - we all want to encourage people to enjoy our wonderful countryside - but not to cause any damage at all :)
Caache on Wheels, do me a favour keep your comments to geocaching and leave munzees out of it, you clearly have no idea what munzeeing entails which is clear from your comments and a quick scan to get some info just doesn't cut it, do you see munzeers slagging off geocaching? I see them trying to explain to all and sundry that it is completely different to geocaching, how can you compare a QR code of around 40mm square with a dirty big ammo box!
[quote][p][bold]Cache on Wheels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wezie100[/bold] wrote: If you want to experience munzee before you set yourself against it I will be happy to show you it. I have qualifications in conservation and ecology and I love both geocaching and munzee. So please become informed before you make a decision.[/p][/quote]There are over 40 Munzee tags on our nature reserve which are there without permission! The Council are in the process of getting them removed. You have no idea on the impact of people scurrying about in protected areas on our wildlife![/p][/quote]You can find out where all Munzzees are placed by visitng their website - you may have to sign up for a free account. You can contact someone via their website if you have concenrns, as you do with cache listed on the Geocaching.com wesite. The Admins can trace who has placed and logged visits to each site, even if they delete their logs. If you have a concern over anyones behaviour on your land, it is easier for the Admins of the site to trace them via geocaching or Munzee'ing website - if you have any concerns, simply email them with the date time and any information - it is always hoped that any dispputed or complaints are settled amicapably. If you were to contact the site, they may be able to contact those who have placed them in your area and ask for them to be removed. This was done via Geocaching once for all caches placed in a certain place to be removed as requested. At the end of the day - we all want to encourage people to enjoy our wonderful countryside - but not to cause any damage at all :)[/p][/quote]Caache on Wheels, do me a favour keep your comments to geocaching and leave munzees out of it, you clearly have no idea what munzeeing entails which is clear from your comments and a quick scan to get some info just doesn't cut it, do you see munzeers slagging off geocaching? I see them trying to explain to all and sundry that it is completely different to geocaching, how can you compare a QR code of around 40mm square with a dirty big ammo box! paragun
  • Score: 0

1:47pm Wed 5 Jun 13

buzzie1 says...

This is in the process of being rectified to make the distance ruling more exact. If I deploy, I have to have 150ft between MY munzees, but another person can deploy 50ft from mine, so it is possible to have one every 50ft technically
This is in the process of being rectified to make the distance ruling more exact. If I deploy, I have to have 150ft between MY munzees, but another person can deploy 50ft from mine, so it is possible to have one every 50ft technically buzzie1
  • Score: 0

2:02pm Wed 5 Jun 13

Cache on Wheels says...

portia6 wrote:
wezie100 wrote:
I should have known better than to try to communicate in here. Full of nimby and trolls. My offer stands to anyone who cares to form opinions on fact and make informed decisions . I won't bother to be on here again.
I am interested to find out more about
this sport, got to be good exercise and
gets people off the lap top!
I would be more than happy to communicate with you to pass on more information about the game of Geocaching and the benefits :)

You can contact me via the geocaching.com website under my name :) - you can google it.
[quote][p][bold]portia6[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wezie100[/bold] wrote: I should have known better than to try to communicate in here. Full of nimby and trolls. My offer stands to anyone who cares to form opinions on fact and make informed decisions . I won't bother to be on here again.[/p][/quote]I am interested to find out more about this sport, got to be good exercise and gets people off the lap top![/p][/quote]I would be more than happy to communicate with you to pass on more information about the game of Geocaching and the benefits :) You can contact me via the geocaching.com website under my name :) - you can google it. Cache on Wheels
  • Score: 0

2:04pm Wed 5 Jun 13

Cache on Wheels says...

paragun wrote:
oversixty wrote:
paragun wrote:
oversixty wrote:
wezie100 wrote:
As for munzee causing damage I can assure you I make no more impact than yourself having worked on some internationaly important sites I would never be involed in something that had as much impact as you assume munzee does. Please tell me what your qualification are to make a environmental impact assement? I also educate the people i meet through the hobby in consevation and wildlife identification.
I get the info from those I work with who are highly qualified!
I wonder what Natural England would think of Munzees?
So you are happy that they are placed around a wetland of international importance then?

It appears they are placed on such sites at random and by more than one person.Where will that end?
So oversixty do you work for the council? Are these experts you work with the same ones that state that nothing can be placed in any of the public open spaces and sssi's? There seems to be a lot of overzealous officious individuals working to protect our flora and fauna these days instead of striking a happy medium which also takes into account the human element!
No but I work with them as a volunteer and we already have problems with irresponsible dog owners, litter and anti-social behavior!
These sites need protection and that is why these steps are being taken -
http://www.dorsetfor


you.com/387392
Now we get to it, so you are a volunteer for the council, but when you use the proverbial "WE" you are really saying "THEY", we all live in this area, sometimes when only one side of an argument is taken into account without any counter argument you will always end up with the result you want, don't you agree? Especially when experts are the ones making those aruguments! I am a dog owner, I am a responsible dog owner, I know that due to the late spring that birds are nesting about 6 weeks late on average but the layperson wouldn't, if there are signs warning people that they are in a certain area where they are then there is no excuse if they have the dogs off lead. Over officious use of notices means that putting a sign on an open space like a cricket ground will incite refusal to abide by it!

Now I also agree with you about litter and antisocial behavior so are you saying that geocaching and munzees are antisocial behavior? Has anyone carried out any form of research or analysis to establish the age profile or class category of those taken part in the above? I doubt it because if they did they would find that contrary to what has been assumed the results would show the majority to be middle to upper class, category A1 through B3! Remember I said the majority, these are not the type of people you would accuse of antisocial behavior especially when most of this country accepts and welcomes these outdoor pursuits and any form of outdoor pursuit taking part in ones hobby is much better than no exercise at all, do you agree?

I could go on but this is best served by education which should start by a meeting of both parties because only through dialogue is a fair result achieved, for the record, a munzee is on average 1.5 inches on a square not cubed, how much damage can something that size do? As for covering all of Bournemouth, if you actually knew how ridiculous that statement is you wouldn't have made it, as I said, education is the key and it works both ways!

Geocachers should know that there are rules and regulations for munzees and there are distance rules also so please get the correct facts before stating facts! Thank you, oh for the record, I am a bird lover and a animal lover, I love nature as a whole, so would not do anything to harm it but I do object to officials decimating heathland of trees to make it the way it was for the benefit of fauna! I loved the trees!
Please could you inform us what the guidlines say the minum distance is between Munzees please? :)

I have found many - although not scanned all of them, that have been 10-20 METERS apart.

With Geocaching.com listed geocaches, the minimum distance is ,01 MILES and that is as the crow flies.

Said in wanting to know the information way and not in bitterness.
[quote][p][bold]paragun[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]paragun[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wezie100[/bold] wrote: As for munzee causing damage I can assure you I make no more impact than yourself having worked on some internationaly important sites I would never be involed in something that had as much impact as you assume munzee does. Please tell me what your qualification are to make a environmental impact assement? I also educate the people i meet through the hobby in consevation and wildlife identification.[/p][/quote]I get the info from those I work with who are highly qualified! I wonder what Natural England would think of Munzees? So you are happy that they are placed around a wetland of international importance then? It appears they are placed on such sites at random and by more than one person.Where will that end?[/p][/quote]So oversixty do you work for the council? Are these experts you work with the same ones that state that nothing can be placed in any of the public open spaces and sssi's? There seems to be a lot of overzealous officious individuals working to protect our flora and fauna these days instead of striking a happy medium which also takes into account the human element![/p][/quote]No but I work with them as a volunteer and we already have problems with irresponsible dog owners, litter and anti-social behavior! These sites need protection and that is why these steps are being taken - http://www.dorsetfor you.com/387392[/p][/quote]Now we get to it, so you are a volunteer for the council, but when you use the proverbial "WE" you are really saying "THEY", we all live in this area, sometimes when only one side of an argument is taken into account without any counter argument you will always end up with the result you want, don't you agree? Especially when experts are the ones making those aruguments! I am a dog owner, I am a responsible dog owner, I know that due to the late spring that birds are nesting about 6 weeks late on average but the layperson wouldn't, if there are signs warning people that they are in a certain area where they are then there is no excuse if they have the dogs off lead. Over officious use of notices means that putting a sign on an open space like a cricket ground will incite refusal to abide by it! Now I also agree with you about litter and antisocial behavior so are you saying that geocaching and munzees are antisocial behavior? Has anyone carried out any form of research or analysis to establish the age profile or class category of those taken part in the above? I doubt it because if they did they would find that contrary to what has been assumed the results would show the majority to be middle to upper class, category A1 through B3! Remember I said the majority, these are not the type of people you would accuse of antisocial behavior especially when most of this country accepts and welcomes these outdoor pursuits and any form of outdoor pursuit taking part in ones hobby is much better than no exercise at all, do you agree? I could go on but this is best served by education which should start by a meeting of both parties because only through dialogue is a fair result achieved, for the record, a munzee is on average 1.5 inches on a square not cubed, how much damage can something that size do? As for covering all of Bournemouth, if you actually knew how ridiculous that statement is you wouldn't have made it, as I said, education is the key and it works both ways! Geocachers should know that there are rules and regulations for munzees and there are distance rules also so please get the correct facts before stating facts! Thank you, oh for the record, I am a bird lover and a animal lover, I love nature as a whole, so would not do anything to harm it but I do object to officials decimating heathland of trees to make it the way it was for the benefit of fauna! I loved the trees![/p][/quote]Please could you inform us what the guidlines say the minum distance is between Munzees please? :) I have found many - although not scanned all of them, that have been 10-20 METERS apart. With Geocaching.com listed geocaches, the minimum distance is ,01 MILES and that is as the crow flies. Said in wanting to know the information way and not in bitterness. Cache on Wheels
  • Score: 0

2:10pm Wed 5 Jun 13

buzzie1 says...

Added this above. You can deploy 150ft apart from your own, but someone can deploy 50ft from yours. So you can end up with them every 50ft
Added this above. You can deploy 150ft apart from your own, but someone can deploy 50ft from yours. So you can end up with them every 50ft buzzie1
  • Score: 0

2:14pm Wed 5 Jun 13

Cache on Wheels says...

buzzie1 wrote:
Okay. The whole issue around SSI's is so complicated. How can you have two councils NEXT to each other that are so different on their policies? We have already said that we work with the Urban Heath team that manage Canford Heath SSSI, who are happy to have them on there as long as they are kept to the main paths. What would be the problem having the same compromise with regards to Bournemouth? Munzee is completely different to Geocaching, there are not the same restrictions around where a zee can be deployed as there are with Geocaching. You will find globally zees are hidden where caches cannot be, it isnt just restricted to Bournemouth. We can deploy on fences, lamp posts etc, there is nothing in the rules of the game that says we cannot. This is from the help manual "There are limitless ways to hide a munzee barcode." The only real restricitions that we have is the distance ruling, which is now being dealt with to avoid spamming of certain objects and not deploying within 250ft of a playground or campus used by under 18's. I know it is a hard thing for cachers to understand, knowing the restrictions there are in placing a cache, but it is a completely separate game that is alot more free and unrestricted than geocaching
Thank you for your pleasant and informative comment - as a geocacher i respect the distance ruling of geocaches must not be placed colser that 0.1 MILES of another physical point as the crow flies.

It would be great if Poole and B'mouth councils could talk to easch other - as i mentioned in another comment, a lot of councils / trusts allow caches to be placed on their land and do put restrictions in that the qualified reviewers have all the information on, including maps of areas that do not allow caches to be placed, and will NOT publish a cache that does not follow the guidlines.

It is a real shame that Munzee authorities do not put more restrictions in place - i have even found one at an ancient protected monumnet, that was hidden under a stone right on the footings. I did not seek it or remove the stone, but saw it.

The problem with this, is people may disturb stones and cause damage whilst looking for it. - With Geocaching.com it is NOT permitted to hide a cache in or on a dry stone wall or ancient monuments.

There is a law in place saying that no one should remove stones from dry stone walls and such like that applies to everyone, including geocachers and munzee searchers.
[quote][p][bold]buzzie1[/bold] wrote: Okay. The whole issue around SSI's is so complicated. How can you have two councils NEXT to each other that are so different on their policies? We have already said that we work with the Urban Heath team that manage Canford Heath SSSI, who are happy to have them on there as long as they are kept to the main paths. What would be the problem having the same compromise with regards to Bournemouth? Munzee is completely different to Geocaching, there are not the same restrictions around where a zee can be deployed as there are with Geocaching. You will find globally zees are hidden where caches cannot be, it isnt just restricted to Bournemouth. We can deploy on fences, lamp posts etc, there is nothing in the rules of the game that says we cannot. This is from the help manual "There are limitless ways to hide a munzee barcode." The only real restricitions that we have is the distance ruling, which is now being dealt with to avoid spamming of certain objects and not deploying within 250ft of a playground or campus used by under 18's. I know it is a hard thing for cachers to understand, knowing the restrictions there are in placing a cache, but it is a completely separate game that is alot more free and unrestricted than geocaching[/p][/quote]Thank you for your pleasant and informative comment - as a geocacher i respect the distance ruling of geocaches must not be placed colser that 0.1 MILES of another physical point as the crow flies. It would be great if Poole and B'mouth councils could talk to easch other - as i mentioned in another comment, a lot of councils / trusts allow caches to be placed on their land and do put restrictions in that the qualified reviewers have all the information on, including maps of areas that do not allow caches to be placed, and will NOT publish a cache that does not follow the guidlines. It is a real shame that Munzee authorities do not put more restrictions in place - i have even found one at an ancient protected monumnet, that was hidden under a stone right on the footings. I did not seek it or remove the stone, but saw it. The problem with this, is people may disturb stones and cause damage whilst looking for it. - With Geocaching.com it is NOT permitted to hide a cache in or on a dry stone wall or ancient monuments. There is a law in place saying that no one should remove stones from dry stone walls and such like that applies to everyone, including geocachers and munzee searchers. Cache on Wheels
  • Score: 0

2:23pm Wed 5 Jun 13

Cache on Wheels says...

buzzie1 wrote:
Added this above. You can deploy 150ft apart from your own, but someone can deploy 50ft from yours. So you can end up with them every 50ft
Whereas with Geocaching.com the limit is 0.1 MILES as the crow flies of a physical stage of a geocache, with No 7 highlighting the distance rule of:

7.Physical elements of different geocaches should be at least 0.10 miles (528 ft or 161 m) apart.

That creates less caches placed in any area.

In the New Forest it is 1 MILE apart and comes with it's own restrictions as do many other Councils / Trusts
Here is a link to the Fundamental Guidlines on Geocaching.com, with the following titles having expandable links for more detaild iinformation:

http://www.geocachin
g.com/about/guidelin
es.aspx

Fundamental Placement Guidelines

1.All local laws and documented land management policies apply.

2.You assure us that you have the landowner's and/or land manager's permission before you hide any geocache, whether placed on private or public property.

3.Geocaches are never buried, neither partially nor completely.

4.Geocache placements do not damage, deface or destroy public or private property.

5.Wildlife and the natural environment are not harmed in the pursuit of geocaching.


6.Geocaches are not placed in restricted, prohibited or otherwise inappropriate locations.

7.Physical elements of different geocaches should be at least 0.10 miles (528 ft or 161 m) apart.
[quote][p][bold]buzzie1[/bold] wrote: Added this above. You can deploy 150ft apart from your own, but someone can deploy 50ft from yours. So you can end up with them every 50ft[/p][/quote]Whereas with Geocaching.com the limit is 0.1 MILES as the crow flies of a physical stage of a geocache, with No 7 highlighting the distance rule of: 7.Physical elements of different geocaches should be at least 0.10 miles (528 ft or 161 m) apart. That creates less caches placed in any area. In the New Forest it is 1 MILE apart and comes with it's own restrictions as do many other Councils / Trusts Here is a link to the Fundamental Guidlines on Geocaching.com, with the following titles having expandable links for more detaild iinformation: http://www.geocachin g.com/about/guidelin es.aspx Fundamental Placement Guidelines 1.All local laws and documented land management policies apply. 2.You assure us that you have the landowner's and/or land manager's permission before you hide any geocache, whether placed on private or public property. 3.Geocaches are never buried, neither partially nor completely. 4.Geocache placements do not damage, deface or destroy public or private property. 5.Wildlife and the natural environment are not harmed in the pursuit of geocaching. 6.Geocaches are not placed in restricted, prohibited or otherwise inappropriate locations. 7.Physical elements of different geocaches should be at least 0.10 miles (528 ft or 161 m) apart. Cache on Wheels
  • Score: 0

2:30pm Wed 5 Jun 13

buzzie1 says...

Cache on Wheels wrote:
buzzie1 wrote:
Okay. The whole issue around SSI's is so complicated. How can you have two councils NEXT to each other that are so different on their policies? We have already said that we work with the Urban Heath team that manage Canford Heath SSSI, who are happy to have them on there as long as they are kept to the main paths. What would be the problem having the same compromise with regards to Bournemouth? Munzee is completely different to Geocaching, there are not the same restrictions around where a zee can be deployed as there are with Geocaching. You will find globally zees are hidden where caches cannot be, it isnt just restricted to Bournemouth. We can deploy on fences, lamp posts etc, there is nothing in the rules of the game that says we cannot. This is from the help manual "There are limitless ways to hide a munzee barcode." The only real restricitions that we have is the distance ruling, which is now being dealt with to avoid spamming of certain objects and not deploying within 250ft of a playground or campus used by under 18's. I know it is a hard thing for cachers to understand, knowing the restrictions there are in placing a cache, but it is a completely separate game that is alot more free and unrestricted than geocaching
Thank you for your pleasant and informative comment - as a geocacher i respect the distance ruling of geocaches must not be placed colser that 0.1 MILES of another physical point as the crow flies.

It would be great if Poole and B'mouth councils could talk to easch other - as i mentioned in another comment, a lot of councils / trusts allow caches to be placed on their land and do put restrictions in that the qualified reviewers have all the information on, including maps of areas that do not allow caches to be placed, and will NOT publish a cache that does not follow the guidlines.

It is a real shame that Munzee authorities do not put more restrictions in place - i have even found one at an ancient protected monumnet, that was hidden under a stone right on the footings. I did not seek it or remove the stone, but saw it.

The problem with this, is people may disturb stones and cause damage whilst looking for it. - With Geocaching.com it is NOT permitted to hide a cache in or on a dry stone wall or ancient monuments.

There is a law in place saying that no one should remove stones from dry stone walls and such like that applies to everyone, including geocachers and munzee searchers.
Oh I completely agree with your concerns around ancient monuments. That is not unreasonable at all. The thing is, we are not unreasonable either. I truly believe that there is a way where both geocachers and Munzeers can play the game in bournemouth in a way that bournemouth council can be happy with. We would quite happily work within any limits or restrictions that were asked of us, I just think a blanket ban on both caches and zee's is unreasonable. There is a middle ground to be had here.
[quote][p][bold]Cache on Wheels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]buzzie1[/bold] wrote: Okay. The whole issue around SSI's is so complicated. How can you have two councils NEXT to each other that are so different on their policies? We have already said that we work with the Urban Heath team that manage Canford Heath SSSI, who are happy to have them on there as long as they are kept to the main paths. What would be the problem having the same compromise with regards to Bournemouth? Munzee is completely different to Geocaching, there are not the same restrictions around where a zee can be deployed as there are with Geocaching. You will find globally zees are hidden where caches cannot be, it isnt just restricted to Bournemouth. We can deploy on fences, lamp posts etc, there is nothing in the rules of the game that says we cannot. This is from the help manual "There are limitless ways to hide a munzee barcode." The only real restricitions that we have is the distance ruling, which is now being dealt with to avoid spamming of certain objects and not deploying within 250ft of a playground or campus used by under 18's. I know it is a hard thing for cachers to understand, knowing the restrictions there are in placing a cache, but it is a completely separate game that is alot more free and unrestricted than geocaching[/p][/quote]Thank you for your pleasant and informative comment - as a geocacher i respect the distance ruling of geocaches must not be placed colser that 0.1 MILES of another physical point as the crow flies. It would be great if Poole and B'mouth councils could talk to easch other - as i mentioned in another comment, a lot of councils / trusts allow caches to be placed on their land and do put restrictions in that the qualified reviewers have all the information on, including maps of areas that do not allow caches to be placed, and will NOT publish a cache that does not follow the guidlines. It is a real shame that Munzee authorities do not put more restrictions in place - i have even found one at an ancient protected monumnet, that was hidden under a stone right on the footings. I did not seek it or remove the stone, but saw it. The problem with this, is people may disturb stones and cause damage whilst looking for it. - With Geocaching.com it is NOT permitted to hide a cache in or on a dry stone wall or ancient monuments. There is a law in place saying that no one should remove stones from dry stone walls and such like that applies to everyone, including geocachers and munzee searchers.[/p][/quote]Oh I completely agree with your concerns around ancient monuments. That is not unreasonable at all. The thing is, we are not unreasonable either. I truly believe that there is a way where both geocachers and Munzeers can play the game in bournemouth in a way that bournemouth council can be happy with. We would quite happily work within any limits or restrictions that were asked of us, I just think a blanket ban on both caches and zee's is unreasonable. There is a middle ground to be had here. buzzie1
  • Score: 0

2:54pm Wed 5 Jun 13

oversixty says...

buzzie1 wrote:
Okay. The whole issue around SSI's is so complicated. How can you have two councils NEXT to each other that are so different on their policies? We have already said that we work with the Urban Heath team that manage Canford Heath SSSI, who are happy to have them on there as long as they are kept to the main paths. What would be the problem having the same compromise with regards to Bournemouth? Munzee is completely different to Geocaching, there are not the same restrictions around where a zee can be deployed as there are with Geocaching. You will find globally zees are hidden where caches cannot be, it isnt just restricted to Bournemouth. We can deploy on fences, lamp posts etc, there is nothing in the rules of the game that says we cannot. This is from the help manual "There are limitless ways to hide a munzee barcode." The only real restricitions that we have is the distance ruling, which is now being dealt with to avoid spamming of certain objects and not deploying within 250ft of a playground or campus used by under 18's. I know it is a hard thing for cachers to understand, knowing the restrictions there are in placing a cache, but it is a completely separate game that is alot more free and unrestricted than geocaching
Urban Heaths Partnership do not manage Canford Heath or any other site.They patrol heathland and educate the public on it's importance, working in partnership with the relevant authority.
All owners/managers of S.S.S.I's are responsible to Natural England for it's upkeep.If they do not do so, it could mean that it will lose it's status as such.
[quote][p][bold]buzzie1[/bold] wrote: Okay. The whole issue around SSI's is so complicated. How can you have two councils NEXT to each other that are so different on their policies? We have already said that we work with the Urban Heath team that manage Canford Heath SSSI, who are happy to have them on there as long as they are kept to the main paths. What would be the problem having the same compromise with regards to Bournemouth? Munzee is completely different to Geocaching, there are not the same restrictions around where a zee can be deployed as there are with Geocaching. You will find globally zees are hidden where caches cannot be, it isnt just restricted to Bournemouth. We can deploy on fences, lamp posts etc, there is nothing in the rules of the game that says we cannot. This is from the help manual "There are limitless ways to hide a munzee barcode." The only real restricitions that we have is the distance ruling, which is now being dealt with to avoid spamming of certain objects and not deploying within 250ft of a playground or campus used by under 18's. I know it is a hard thing for cachers to understand, knowing the restrictions there are in placing a cache, but it is a completely separate game that is alot more free and unrestricted than geocaching[/p][/quote]Urban Heaths Partnership do not manage Canford Heath or any other site.They patrol heathland and educate the public on it's importance, working in partnership with the relevant authority. All owners/managers of S.S.S.I's are responsible to Natural England for it's upkeep.If they do not do so, it could mean that it will lose it's status as such. oversixty
  • Score: 0

4:53pm Wed 5 Jun 13

buzzie1 says...

oversixty wrote:
buzzie1 wrote:
Okay. The whole issue around SSI's is so complicated. How can you have two councils NEXT to each other that are so different on their policies? We have already said that we work with the Urban Heath team that manage Canford Heath SSSI, who are happy to have them on there as long as they are kept to the main paths. What would be the problem having the same compromise with regards to Bournemouth? Munzee is completely different to Geocaching, there are not the same restrictions around where a zee can be deployed as there are with Geocaching. You will find globally zees are hidden where caches cannot be, it isnt just restricted to Bournemouth. We can deploy on fences, lamp posts etc, there is nothing in the rules of the game that says we cannot. This is from the help manual "There are limitless ways to hide a munzee barcode." The only real restricitions that we have is the distance ruling, which is now being dealt with to avoid spamming of certain objects and not deploying within 250ft of a playground or campus used by under 18's. I know it is a hard thing for cachers to understand, knowing the restrictions there are in placing a cache, but it is a completely separate game that is alot more free and unrestricted than geocaching
Urban Heaths Partnership do not manage Canford Heath or any other site.They patrol heathland and educate the public on it's importance, working in partnership with the relevant authority.
All owners/managers of S.S.S.I's are responsible to Natural England for it's upkeep.If they do not do so, it could mean that it will lose it's status as such.
Wow talk about completely bypassing the point I made. The point is, we have permission to deploy on an SSSI from Poole council/urban heath PROVIDING we stay within their limits, which is to not stray off the main paths. If POOLE council are happy for us to do it on an SSSI, why can Bournemouth not take a similar stance?? It seems odd that two neighbouring councils work so differently. The same as Poole will allow caches on a SSSI...but I am sure you will still argue this point as how dare anyone have fun on YOUR nature reserve
[quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]buzzie1[/bold] wrote: Okay. The whole issue around SSI's is so complicated. How can you have two councils NEXT to each other that are so different on their policies? We have already said that we work with the Urban Heath team that manage Canford Heath SSSI, who are happy to have them on there as long as they are kept to the main paths. What would be the problem having the same compromise with regards to Bournemouth? Munzee is completely different to Geocaching, there are not the same restrictions around where a zee can be deployed as there are with Geocaching. You will find globally zees are hidden where caches cannot be, it isnt just restricted to Bournemouth. We can deploy on fences, lamp posts etc, there is nothing in the rules of the game that says we cannot. This is from the help manual "There are limitless ways to hide a munzee barcode." The only real restricitions that we have is the distance ruling, which is now being dealt with to avoid spamming of certain objects and not deploying within 250ft of a playground or campus used by under 18's. I know it is a hard thing for cachers to understand, knowing the restrictions there are in placing a cache, but it is a completely separate game that is alot more free and unrestricted than geocaching[/p][/quote]Urban Heaths Partnership do not manage Canford Heath or any other site.They patrol heathland and educate the public on it's importance, working in partnership with the relevant authority. All owners/managers of S.S.S.I's are responsible to Natural England for it's upkeep.If they do not do so, it could mean that it will lose it's status as such.[/p][/quote]Wow talk about completely bypassing the point I made. The point is, we have permission to deploy on an SSSI from Poole council/urban heath PROVIDING we stay within their limits, which is to not stray off the main paths. If POOLE council are happy for us to do it on an SSSI, why can Bournemouth not take a similar stance?? It seems odd that two neighbouring councils work so differently. The same as Poole will allow caches on a SSSI...but I am sure you will still argue this point as how dare anyone have fun on YOUR nature reserve buzzie1
  • Score: 0

5:31pm Wed 5 Jun 13

oversixty says...

buzzie1 wrote:
oversixty wrote:
buzzie1 wrote:
Okay. The whole issue around SSI's is so complicated. How can you have two councils NEXT to each other that are so different on their policies? We have already said that we work with the Urban Heath team that manage Canford Heath SSSI, who are happy to have them on there as long as they are kept to the main paths. What would be the problem having the same compromise with regards to Bournemouth? Munzee is completely different to Geocaching, there are not the same restrictions around where a zee can be deployed as there are with Geocaching. You will find globally zees are hidden where caches cannot be, it isnt just restricted to Bournemouth. We can deploy on fences, lamp posts etc, there is nothing in the rules of the game that says we cannot. This is from the help manual "There are limitless ways to hide a munzee barcode." The only real restricitions that we have is the distance ruling, which is now being dealt with to avoid spamming of certain objects and not deploying within 250ft of a playground or campus used by under 18's. I know it is a hard thing for cachers to understand, knowing the restrictions there are in placing a cache, but it is a completely separate game that is alot more free and unrestricted than geocaching
Urban Heaths Partnership do not manage Canford Heath or any other site.They patrol heathland and educate the public on it's importance, working in partnership with the relevant authority.
All owners/managers of S.S.S.I's are responsible to Natural England for it's upkeep.If they do not do so, it could mean that it will lose it's status as such.
Wow talk about completely bypassing the point I made. The point is, we have permission to deploy on an SSSI from Poole council/urban heath PROVIDING we stay within their limits, which is to not stray off the main paths. If POOLE council are happy for us to do it on an SSSI, why can Bournemouth not take a similar stance?? It seems odd that two neighbouring councils work so differently. The same as Poole will allow caches on a SSSI...but I am sure you will still argue this point as how dare anyone have fun on YOUR nature reserve
I'm not bypassing anything!
If you read my earlier post you will see that English Nature are the ones who make the decisions on SSSI's not Poole or Bournemouth Councils!!
They have decided that geo-caching is NOT acceptable!
If Poole Council have given permission within the SSSI, I can't imagine Natural England being very happy!
[quote][p][bold]buzzie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]buzzie1[/bold] wrote: Okay. The whole issue around SSI's is so complicated. How can you have two councils NEXT to each other that are so different on their policies? We have already said that we work with the Urban Heath team that manage Canford Heath SSSI, who are happy to have them on there as long as they are kept to the main paths. What would be the problem having the same compromise with regards to Bournemouth? Munzee is completely different to Geocaching, there are not the same restrictions around where a zee can be deployed as there are with Geocaching. You will find globally zees are hidden where caches cannot be, it isnt just restricted to Bournemouth. We can deploy on fences, lamp posts etc, there is nothing in the rules of the game that says we cannot. This is from the help manual "There are limitless ways to hide a munzee barcode." The only real restricitions that we have is the distance ruling, which is now being dealt with to avoid spamming of certain objects and not deploying within 250ft of a playground or campus used by under 18's. I know it is a hard thing for cachers to understand, knowing the restrictions there are in placing a cache, but it is a completely separate game that is alot more free and unrestricted than geocaching[/p][/quote]Urban Heaths Partnership do not manage Canford Heath or any other site.They patrol heathland and educate the public on it's importance, working in partnership with the relevant authority. All owners/managers of S.S.S.I's are responsible to Natural England for it's upkeep.If they do not do so, it could mean that it will lose it's status as such.[/p][/quote]Wow talk about completely bypassing the point I made. The point is, we have permission to deploy on an SSSI from Poole council/urban heath PROVIDING we stay within their limits, which is to not stray off the main paths. If POOLE council are happy for us to do it on an SSSI, why can Bournemouth not take a similar stance?? It seems odd that two neighbouring councils work so differently. The same as Poole will allow caches on a SSSI...but I am sure you will still argue this point as how dare anyone have fun on YOUR nature reserve[/p][/quote]I'm not bypassing anything! If you read my earlier post you will see that English Nature are the ones who make the decisions on SSSI's not Poole or Bournemouth Councils!! They have decided that geo-caching is NOT acceptable! If Poole Council have given permission within the SSSI, I can't imagine Natural England being very happy! oversixty
  • Score: 0

5:35pm Wed 5 Jun 13

DavePVR says...

oversixty wrote:
Cache on Wheels wrote:
oversixty wrote:
Cache on Wheels wrote:
PS Although Bournemouth Councl now have a blanket ban of all geocaches on their land, which is very unfortunate, there are far more councils and Trusts - Including the National Trust, who not only allow geocaches on their property, but they encourage it, The National Trust now even activiley promote it on their land and hide some caches themselved!! - i can't see them doing that if they felt that it would trash the countryside or have an adverse effect on the wildlife and the delicate plants etc.

I meant to say that it is very unfortunate that this young lady needed assistance from the emergency services - however far more people that are out walking their do or go walking in the same areas that geocaches are hidden, require assistance if they injure themselves. - The most imprtant message the above organiisations put across is that you only go within your limits, it's not adised that you do things like this young lady unless you are experienced and have other experiend people with you - as i mentioned above - all the caches placed are checked by a reviewer who has the exact coordinates of where all the caches are placed - thinkgs like birds nesting in the trees are also checked.

There are 20 caches that are hidden in one certain reserve where much of it is SSSI - they were all placed with the land owner and placed sympathetically within the surroundings.

Here is a link to the Land Owners agreement where you can view all the Trusts, Councils and Associations in a spreadsheet to see which areas have approved / denied caches to be placed on their land.

You will see that many areas such as The National Trust, The New Forest, and lots of councils around the country allow and welcome geocaches on their land. You can also view each agreement on the right of the place name.

May i suggest that those who are not fully aware of what Geoching is, how it works, what the strict rules are according to Groundspeak's Geocaching.com have a look at the links, before commenting - as you will then be able to comment from an informed point of view.

Just to emphasise - Munzees have nothing to do with Geocaching and are a totally sperate game, with not many specific guidlines or rules like Geocaching has.

I am more than happy to do an interview with the Echo are chat direcctly with anyone who may want to know more about Geocaching, or even have a go at it.

Yours Faithfully
Mrs B aka Cache on Wheels

http://gagb.co.uk/la




nd-agreements-databa




se/
Thanks Mrs B!
I welcome your input and as I am only aware of Bournemouth Council's guidelines on geo-caching cannot express any other views elsewhere.I am involved with an SSSI in Bournemouth and fully support their stance because I feel it will disturb the flora and fauna.
Surely it must disturb the habitat in some way?
Munzees are in some ways the same as geo caching as according to their website,they can be hidden in containers.The lady I saw was running around with smart phone in hand( in her work clothes!) amongst the undergrowth with two dogs out of control.As you will I am sure agree, this is very concerning when it's the time for birds nesting?
The Munzee tags are also plastic and not therefore environmentally friendly! As I have said before, no permission was asked for these Munzees! Permission was on the other hand asked for geo-caching but the response when it was refused was pretty nasty on the website!
Thank you for your lovely reply.
I believe there is never a reason to be nasty - and those who have responded in this way, are not helping to protect the good name of Geocaching or any other game either :(

As with all people who roam the country side, be it for Geocaching, Munzees or just walking, there will be people who act irresponsible unfortunatley.

With Geocaching, there are strict guidlines of how far apart the geocaches are allowed to be hidden - this is 0.1 Mile as the crow flies as a general rule, they are NEVER buried - there is a very strict No breaking ground rule.
You are not allowed to cause damage to any property, and certainly NOT allowed to hide a cache on a historic monument either.

I have found some Munzees that arein our village, and they were within a few feet of eachother - although these ones were respectfully hidden, some i have found have been staple to posts, and i was even guided to one that was at an ancient monument!!

Therre are some instances where i have heard of geocaches and Munzees being removed.

All geocaches that are hidden, should have an offical label on them or inside saying that this is a geocaching game piece, and it will have contact details on it so you can contact someone if there is a problem with it.

Many locals enjoy watching people finding them.

One of the 2 series in a SSSI area, were placed by a friend of ours with the Land Owners and all sympathetic to the area.

The rule is that all dogs must be kept on a lead, due to ground nesting birds etc.

The majority of people who roam the country side for what ever reason are very careful to protect our wonderful environment, and it's sad that some do not.

If you have concerns over someone's behaviour, do you tackle them and ask them to put their dogs on a lead?

Do you have signs up in your SSSI area that say if dogs are allowed or if they are to be kept on a lead?

I saw someones comment about Munzees do have rules about where they are placed and set distances apart.

If they are in containers hidden sympathetically, i have no problem with that, what i do object to, like you, is when they are stapled to wooden posts,or put out in sensitive areas, especially if the one who placed them is aware that Geocaches are not permitted there.- the majority of people who play either game whether hiding or seeking either, are fully aware that Bournemouth County Council have a blanket ban on al Geocaches beong paced on their property - i feel it is not helpful for people to then go and deply munzees in area where they know Geocaches are not allowed!! - It's certainly not helpful!

With regards to Munzees placed on your SSSI area:
It is easy to find out where they are by going on to the Munzee website.

If you have a problem with where they are placed, you can contact someone via the Munzee site.

Same goes for Geocaching. If someone has a problem with where a geocache is placed, they can go on to the Geocaching.com website and contact someone via a link on there too.

At the end of the day, if someone is acting in a way that could be harmful to the habitat no matter what reason they are there then it may be wise to tackle them, or have a member of staff to come and tackle them about their behaviour.

Like I said before, most Geocachers are very respectful about their environment and take great care -

The main idea when looking for a geocache is that you do it with stealth and so you do not stand out.

All geocaches are sent for review to ensure they meet all the guidlines and have the relevant permission where it is needed.

If you want to know more info from me, you can contact me via the Geocaching.com page or search for Cache on Wheels Geocaching and contact me via their website.

I would be more than happy to help where i can. :)

Thank you for an adult response :)

Mrs B
PS If people look at the link i provided for the Landowners Agreement on the GAGB website - you will see that it is not a free for all if councils or Trusts allow caches to be placed - some have strict guidlines as to where caches can be placed.

You may find it helpful to contact someone at the GAGB who could also give you further and more informed information - they are all very good :)
I have actually contacted Natural England regarding geo-caching on S.S.S.I's and they say"Natural England have advised the authorities generally that geo-caching should not be permitted"
They were unaware of Munzees!
Our S.S.S.I also has by-laws posted on site covering all aspects which may harm our reserve.
Sadly that does not mean all users respect those laws:-(
Sorry I would dispute the comments attributed to Natural England. I personally worked with the Countryside Council for Wales, which is the Designating Authority re Nature for Wales, way back in 2004. Since 2006, as a Volunteer Geocache Reviewer, I have worked with all the Designating Authorities in the UK, Natural England, English Heritage, Scottish Natural Heritage, Historic Scotland, Countryside Council Council for Wales. CADW.

All have over the last 7 years either given Permission if they owned the Location, or Approval if just the Designating Authority, for Geocaches to be placed in LNR's, NNR's, SSSI's, SM. On numerous occasions. in fact CCW who own Snowdon Mountain on behalf of the Welsh Assembly, have only ever refused permission for one cache there, despite the whole mountain being a Designated SSSI. I have after having Proof of Permission and if needed Approval off the Designating Authority, have published a large number of Geocaches located in LNR's, NNR's, SSSI's, SM'S.

The Designating Authorities for all 3 Governments, have happily and continue to support Geocaching.

The Volunteer UK Geocache Reviewers, in fact use specialised tools provided by DEFRA, who have welcomed feed back, re those tools, from a group of very experienced users.

DaveP
[quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Cache on Wheels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Cache on Wheels[/bold] wrote: PS Although Bournemouth Councl now have a blanket ban of all geocaches on their land, which is very unfortunate, there are far more councils and Trusts - Including the National Trust, who not only allow geocaches on their property, but they encourage it, The National Trust now even activiley promote it on their land and hide some caches themselved!! - i can't see them doing that if they felt that it would trash the countryside or have an adverse effect on the wildlife and the delicate plants etc. I meant to say that it is very unfortunate that this young lady needed assistance from the emergency services - however far more people that are out walking their do or go walking in the same areas that geocaches are hidden, require assistance if they injure themselves. - The most imprtant message the above organiisations put across is that you only go within your limits, it's not adised that you do things like this young lady unless you are experienced and have other experiend people with you - as i mentioned above - all the caches placed are checked by a reviewer who has the exact coordinates of where all the caches are placed - thinkgs like birds nesting in the trees are also checked. There are 20 caches that are hidden in one certain reserve where much of it is SSSI - they were all placed with the land owner and placed sympathetically within the surroundings. Here is a link to the Land Owners agreement where you can view all the Trusts, Councils and Associations in a spreadsheet to see which areas have approved / denied caches to be placed on their land. You will see that many areas such as The National Trust, The New Forest, and lots of councils around the country allow and welcome geocaches on their land. You can also view each agreement on the right of the place name. May i suggest that those who are not fully aware of what Geoching is, how it works, what the strict rules are according to Groundspeak's Geocaching.com have a look at the links, before commenting - as you will then be able to comment from an informed point of view. Just to emphasise - Munzees have nothing to do with Geocaching and are a totally sperate game, with not many specific guidlines or rules like Geocaching has. I am more than happy to do an interview with the Echo are chat direcctly with anyone who may want to know more about Geocaching, or even have a go at it. Yours Faithfully Mrs B aka Cache on Wheels http://gagb.co.uk/la nd-agreements-databa se/[/p][/quote]Thanks Mrs B! I welcome your input and as I am only aware of Bournemouth Council's guidelines on geo-caching cannot express any other views elsewhere.I am involved with an SSSI in Bournemouth and fully support their stance because I feel it will disturb the flora and fauna. Surely it must disturb the habitat in some way? Munzees are in some ways the same as geo caching as according to their website,they can be hidden in containers.The lady I saw was running around with smart phone in hand( in her work clothes!) amongst the undergrowth with two dogs out of control.As you will I am sure agree, this is very concerning when it's the time for birds nesting? The Munzee tags are also plastic and not therefore environmentally friendly! As I have said before, no permission was asked for these Munzees! Permission was on the other hand asked for geo-caching but the response when it was refused was pretty nasty on the website![/p][/quote]Thank you for your lovely reply. I believe there is never a reason to be nasty - and those who have responded in this way, are not helping to protect the good name of Geocaching or any other game either :( As with all people who roam the country side, be it for Geocaching, Munzees or just walking, there will be people who act irresponsible unfortunatley. With Geocaching, there are strict guidlines of how far apart the geocaches are allowed to be hidden - this is 0.1 Mile as the crow flies as a general rule, they are NEVER buried - there is a very strict No breaking ground rule. You are not allowed to cause damage to any property, and certainly NOT allowed to hide a cache on a historic monument either. I have found some Munzees that arein our village, and they were within a few feet of eachother - although these ones were respectfully hidden, some i have found have been staple to posts, and i was even guided to one that was at an ancient monument!! Therre are some instances where i have heard of geocaches and Munzees being removed. All geocaches that are hidden, should have an offical label on them or inside saying that this is a geocaching game piece, and it will have contact details on it so you can contact someone if there is a problem with it. Many locals enjoy watching people finding them. One of the 2 series in a SSSI area, were placed by a friend of ours with the Land Owners and all sympathetic to the area. The rule is that all dogs must be kept on a lead, due to ground nesting birds etc. The majority of people who roam the country side for what ever reason are very careful to protect our wonderful environment, and it's sad that some do not. If you have concerns over someone's behaviour, do you tackle them and ask them to put their dogs on a lead? Do you have signs up in your SSSI area that say if dogs are allowed or if they are to be kept on a lead? I saw someones comment about Munzees do have rules about where they are placed and set distances apart. If they are in containers hidden sympathetically, i have no problem with that, what i do object to, like you, is when they are stapled to wooden posts,or put out in sensitive areas, especially if the one who placed them is aware that Geocaches are not permitted there.- the majority of people who play either game whether hiding or seeking either, are fully aware that Bournemouth County Council have a blanket ban on al Geocaches beong paced on their property - i feel it is not helpful for people to then go and deply munzees in area where they know Geocaches are not allowed!! - It's certainly not helpful! With regards to Munzees placed on your SSSI area: It is easy to find out where they are by going on to the Munzee website. If you have a problem with where they are placed, you can contact someone via the Munzee site. Same goes for Geocaching. If someone has a problem with where a geocache is placed, they can go on to the Geocaching.com website and contact someone via a link on there too. At the end of the day, if someone is acting in a way that could be harmful to the habitat no matter what reason they are there then it may be wise to tackle them, or have a member of staff to come and tackle them about their behaviour. Like I said before, most Geocachers are very respectful about their environment and take great care - The main idea when looking for a geocache is that you do it with stealth and so you do not stand out. All geocaches are sent for review to ensure they meet all the guidlines and have the relevant permission where it is needed. If you want to know more info from me, you can contact me via the Geocaching.com page or search for Cache on Wheels Geocaching and contact me via their website. I would be more than happy to help where i can. :) Thank you for an adult response :) Mrs B PS If people look at the link i provided for the Landowners Agreement on the GAGB website - you will see that it is not a free for all if councils or Trusts allow caches to be placed - some have strict guidlines as to where caches can be placed. You may find it helpful to contact someone at the GAGB who could also give you further and more informed information - they are all very good :)[/p][/quote]I have actually contacted Natural England regarding geo-caching on S.S.S.I's and they say"Natural England have advised the authorities generally that geo-caching should not be permitted" They were unaware of Munzees! Our S.S.S.I also has by-laws posted on site covering all aspects which may harm our reserve. Sadly that does not mean all users respect those laws:-([/p][/quote]Sorry I would dispute the comments attributed to Natural England. I personally worked with the Countryside Council for Wales, which is the Designating Authority re Nature for Wales, way back in 2004. Since 2006, as a Volunteer Geocache Reviewer, I have worked with all the Designating Authorities in the UK, Natural England, English Heritage, Scottish Natural Heritage, Historic Scotland, Countryside Council Council for Wales. CADW. All have over the last 7 years either given Permission if they owned the Location, or Approval if just the Designating Authority, for Geocaches to be placed in LNR's, NNR's, SSSI's, SM. On numerous occasions. in fact CCW who own Snowdon Mountain on behalf of the Welsh Assembly, have only ever refused permission for one cache there, despite the whole mountain being a Designated SSSI. I have after having Proof of Permission and if needed Approval off the Designating Authority, have published a large number of Geocaches located in LNR's, NNR's, SSSI's, SM'S. The Designating Authorities for all 3 Governments, have happily and continue to support Geocaching. The Volunteer UK Geocache Reviewers, in fact use specialised tools provided by DEFRA, who have welcomed feed back, re those tools, from a group of very experienced users. DaveP DavePVR
  • Score: 0

5:50pm Wed 5 Jun 13

buzzie1 says...

oversixty wrote:
buzzie1 wrote:
oversixty wrote:
buzzie1 wrote:
Okay. The whole issue around SSI's is so complicated. How can you have two councils NEXT to each other that are so different on their policies? We have already said that we work with the Urban Heath team that manage Canford Heath SSSI, who are happy to have them on there as long as they are kept to the main paths. What would be the problem having the same compromise with regards to Bournemouth? Munzee is completely different to Geocaching, there are not the same restrictions around where a zee can be deployed as there are with Geocaching. You will find globally zees are hidden where caches cannot be, it isnt just restricted to Bournemouth. We can deploy on fences, lamp posts etc, there is nothing in the rules of the game that says we cannot. This is from the help manual "There are limitless ways to hide a munzee barcode." The only real restricitions that we have is the distance ruling, which is now being dealt with to avoid spamming of certain objects and not deploying within 250ft of a playground or campus used by under 18's. I know it is a hard thing for cachers to understand, knowing the restrictions there are in placing a cache, but it is a completely separate game that is alot more free and unrestricted than geocaching
Urban Heaths Partnership do not manage Canford Heath or any other site.They patrol heathland and educate the public on it's importance, working in partnership with the relevant authority.
All owners/managers of S.S.S.I's are responsible to Natural England for it's upkeep.If they do not do so, it could mean that it will lose it's status as such.
Wow talk about completely bypassing the point I made. The point is, we have permission to deploy on an SSSI from Poole council/urban heath PROVIDING we stay within their limits, which is to not stray off the main paths. If POOLE council are happy for us to do it on an SSSI, why can Bournemouth not take a similar stance?? It seems odd that two neighbouring councils work so differently. The same as Poole will allow caches on a SSSI...but I am sure you will still argue this point as how dare anyone have fun on YOUR nature reserve
I'm not bypassing anything!
If you read my earlier post you will see that English Nature are the ones who make the decisions on SSSI's not Poole or Bournemouth Councils!!
They have decided that geo-caching is NOT acceptable!
If Poole Council have given permission within the SSSI, I can't imagine Natural England being very happy!
I am NOT talking about Geocaching!! (where is a wall when you need one). Poole Council and Urban Heath have given permission for MUNZEE providing we do not stray off of the main paths! They are two different things, two different concepts. If Poole Coucil/Urban Heath are happy with Munzee on the heath, then where is the issue with Bournemouth??? The point is, there are only two councils in the WHOLE of the country that have an outright ban on Munzee, Bournemouth being one of them. This is a massive opportunity to bring more tourists into Bournemouth on a GLOBAL level, apart from the other benefits that have been mentioned. There has to be room for compromise. It is entirely un democratic to have a ban without discussion first.

This is my last comment on this now, as it is fairly obvious that some people are closed minded with regards to this and do not want people having fun. Times are changing. Modern technology means that hobbies and outdoor pursuits are changing and there has to be room for people to enjoy these, even if it is within limits.

On that note, I bid you all Adieu
[quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]buzzie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]buzzie1[/bold] wrote: Okay. The whole issue around SSI's is so complicated. How can you have two councils NEXT to each other that are so different on their policies? We have already said that we work with the Urban Heath team that manage Canford Heath SSSI, who are happy to have them on there as long as they are kept to the main paths. What would be the problem having the same compromise with regards to Bournemouth? Munzee is completely different to Geocaching, there are not the same restrictions around where a zee can be deployed as there are with Geocaching. You will find globally zees are hidden where caches cannot be, it isnt just restricted to Bournemouth. We can deploy on fences, lamp posts etc, there is nothing in the rules of the game that says we cannot. This is from the help manual "There are limitless ways to hide a munzee barcode." The only real restricitions that we have is the distance ruling, which is now being dealt with to avoid spamming of certain objects and not deploying within 250ft of a playground or campus used by under 18's. I know it is a hard thing for cachers to understand, knowing the restrictions there are in placing a cache, but it is a completely separate game that is alot more free and unrestricted than geocaching[/p][/quote]Urban Heaths Partnership do not manage Canford Heath or any other site.They patrol heathland and educate the public on it's importance, working in partnership with the relevant authority. All owners/managers of S.S.S.I's are responsible to Natural England for it's upkeep.If they do not do so, it could mean that it will lose it's status as such.[/p][/quote]Wow talk about completely bypassing the point I made. The point is, we have permission to deploy on an SSSI from Poole council/urban heath PROVIDING we stay within their limits, which is to not stray off the main paths. If POOLE council are happy for us to do it on an SSSI, why can Bournemouth not take a similar stance?? It seems odd that two neighbouring councils work so differently. The same as Poole will allow caches on a SSSI...but I am sure you will still argue this point as how dare anyone have fun on YOUR nature reserve[/p][/quote]I'm not bypassing anything! If you read my earlier post you will see that English Nature are the ones who make the decisions on SSSI's not Poole or Bournemouth Councils!! They have decided that geo-caching is NOT acceptable! If Poole Council have given permission within the SSSI, I can't imagine Natural England being very happy![/p][/quote]I am NOT talking about Geocaching!! (where is a wall when you need one). Poole Council and Urban Heath have given permission for MUNZEE providing we do not stray off of the main paths! They are two different things, two different concepts. If Poole Coucil/Urban Heath are happy with Munzee on the heath, then where is the issue with Bournemouth??? The point is, there are only two councils in the WHOLE of the country that have an outright ban on Munzee, Bournemouth being one of them. This is a massive opportunity to bring more tourists into Bournemouth on a GLOBAL level, apart from the other benefits that have been mentioned. There has to be room for compromise. It is entirely un democratic to have a ban without discussion first. This is my last comment on this now, as it is fairly obvious that some people are closed minded with regards to this and do not want people having fun. Times are changing. Modern technology means that hobbies and outdoor pursuits are changing and there has to be room for people to enjoy these, even if it is within limits. On that note, I bid you all Adieu buzzie1
  • Score: 0

7:23pm Wed 5 Jun 13

oversixty says...

buzzie1 wrote:
oversixty wrote:
buzzie1 wrote:
oversixty wrote:
buzzie1 wrote:
Okay. The whole issue around SSI's is so complicated. How can you have two councils NEXT to each other that are so different on their policies? We have already said that we work with the Urban Heath team that manage Canford Heath SSSI, who are happy to have them on there as long as they are kept to the main paths. What would be the problem having the same compromise with regards to Bournemouth? Munzee is completely different to Geocaching, there are not the same restrictions around where a zee can be deployed as there are with Geocaching. You will find globally zees are hidden where caches cannot be, it isnt just restricted to Bournemouth. We can deploy on fences, lamp posts etc, there is nothing in the rules of the game that says we cannot. This is from the help manual "There are limitless ways to hide a munzee barcode." The only real restricitions that we have is the distance ruling, which is now being dealt with to avoid spamming of certain objects and not deploying within 250ft of a playground or campus used by under 18's. I know it is a hard thing for cachers to understand, knowing the restrictions there are in placing a cache, but it is a completely separate game that is alot more free and unrestricted than geocaching
Urban Heaths Partnership do not manage Canford Heath or any other site.They patrol heathland and educate the public on it's importance, working in partnership with the relevant authority.
All owners/managers of S.S.S.I's are responsible to Natural England for it's upkeep.If they do not do so, it could mean that it will lose it's status as such.
Wow talk about completely bypassing the point I made. The point is, we have permission to deploy on an SSSI from Poole council/urban heath PROVIDING we stay within their limits, which is to not stray off the main paths. If POOLE council are happy for us to do it on an SSSI, why can Bournemouth not take a similar stance?? It seems odd that two neighbouring councils work so differently. The same as Poole will allow caches on a SSSI...but I am sure you will still argue this point as how dare anyone have fun on YOUR nature reserve
I'm not bypassing anything!
If you read my earlier post you will see that English Nature are the ones who make the decisions on SSSI's not Poole or Bournemouth Councils!!
They have decided that geo-caching is NOT acceptable!
If Poole Council have given permission within the SSSI, I can't imagine Natural England being very happy!
I am NOT talking about Geocaching!! (where is a wall when you need one). Poole Council and Urban Heath have given permission for MUNZEE providing we do not stray off of the main paths! They are two different things, two different concepts. If Poole Coucil/Urban Heath are happy with Munzee on the heath, then where is the issue with Bournemouth??? The point is, there are only two councils in the WHOLE of the country that have an outright ban on Munzee, Bournemouth being one of them. This is a massive opportunity to bring more tourists into Bournemouth on a GLOBAL level, apart from the other benefits that have been mentioned. There has to be room for compromise. It is entirely un democratic to have a ban without discussion first.

This is my last comment on this now, as it is fairly obvious that some people are closed minded with regards to this and do not want people having fun. Times are changing. Modern technology means that hobbies and outdoor pursuits are changing and there has to be room for people to enjoy these, even if it is within limits.

On that note, I bid you all Adieu
Sorry for the misunderstanding but the story relates to geo-caching!
If Bournemouth has a ban on Munzees then why are there so many in town?
As far as I am aware, no one had heard of them in my area until I saw the lady on our nature reserve!!
[quote][p][bold]buzzie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]buzzie1[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]buzzie1[/bold] wrote: Okay. The whole issue around SSI's is so complicated. How can you have two councils NEXT to each other that are so different on their policies? We have already said that we work with the Urban Heath team that manage Canford Heath SSSI, who are happy to have them on there as long as they are kept to the main paths. What would be the problem having the same compromise with regards to Bournemouth? Munzee is completely different to Geocaching, there are not the same restrictions around where a zee can be deployed as there are with Geocaching. You will find globally zees are hidden where caches cannot be, it isnt just restricted to Bournemouth. We can deploy on fences, lamp posts etc, there is nothing in the rules of the game that says we cannot. This is from the help manual "There are limitless ways to hide a munzee barcode." The only real restricitions that we have is the distance ruling, which is now being dealt with to avoid spamming of certain objects and not deploying within 250ft of a playground or campus used by under 18's. I know it is a hard thing for cachers to understand, knowing the restrictions there are in placing a cache, but it is a completely separate game that is alot more free and unrestricted than geocaching[/p][/quote]Urban Heaths Partnership do not manage Canford Heath or any other site.They patrol heathland and educate the public on it's importance, working in partnership with the relevant authority. All owners/managers of S.S.S.I's are responsible to Natural England for it's upkeep.If they do not do so, it could mean that it will lose it's status as such.[/p][/quote]Wow talk about completely bypassing the point I made. The point is, we have permission to deploy on an SSSI from Poole council/urban heath PROVIDING we stay within their limits, which is to not stray off the main paths. If POOLE council are happy for us to do it on an SSSI, why can Bournemouth not take a similar stance?? It seems odd that two neighbouring councils work so differently. The same as Poole will allow caches on a SSSI...but I am sure you will still argue this point as how dare anyone have fun on YOUR nature reserve[/p][/quote]I'm not bypassing anything! If you read my earlier post you will see that English Nature are the ones who make the decisions on SSSI's not Poole or Bournemouth Councils!! They have decided that geo-caching is NOT acceptable! If Poole Council have given permission within the SSSI, I can't imagine Natural England being very happy![/p][/quote]I am NOT talking about Geocaching!! (where is a wall when you need one). Poole Council and Urban Heath have given permission for MUNZEE providing we do not stray off of the main paths! They are two different things, two different concepts. If Poole Coucil/Urban Heath are happy with Munzee on the heath, then where is the issue with Bournemouth??? The point is, there are only two councils in the WHOLE of the country that have an outright ban on Munzee, Bournemouth being one of them. This is a massive opportunity to bring more tourists into Bournemouth on a GLOBAL level, apart from the other benefits that have been mentioned. There has to be room for compromise. It is entirely un democratic to have a ban without discussion first. This is my last comment on this now, as it is fairly obvious that some people are closed minded with regards to this and do not want people having fun. Times are changing. Modern technology means that hobbies and outdoor pursuits are changing and there has to be room for people to enjoy these, even if it is within limits. On that note, I bid you all Adieu[/p][/quote]Sorry for the misunderstanding but the story relates to geo-caching! If Bournemouth has a ban on Munzees then why are there so many in town? As far as I am aware, no one had heard of them in my area until I saw the lady on our nature reserve!! oversixty
  • Score: 0

7:25pm Wed 5 Jun 13

oversixty says...

DavePVR wrote:
oversixty wrote:
Cache on Wheels wrote:
oversixty wrote:
Cache on Wheels wrote:
PS Although Bournemouth Councl now have a blanket ban of all geocaches on their land, which is very unfortunate, there are far more councils and Trusts - Including the National Trust, who not only allow geocaches on their property, but they encourage it, The National Trust now even activiley promote it on their land and hide some caches themselved!! - i can't see them doing that if they felt that it would trash the countryside or have an adverse effect on the wildlife and the delicate plants etc.

I meant to say that it is very unfortunate that this young lady needed assistance from the emergency services - however far more people that are out walking their do or go walking in the same areas that geocaches are hidden, require assistance if they injure themselves. - The most imprtant message the above organiisations put across is that you only go within your limits, it's not adised that you do things like this young lady unless you are experienced and have other experiend people with you - as i mentioned above - all the caches placed are checked by a reviewer who has the exact coordinates of where all the caches are placed - thinkgs like birds nesting in the trees are also checked.

There are 20 caches that are hidden in one certain reserve where much of it is SSSI - they were all placed with the land owner and placed sympathetically within the surroundings.

Here is a link to the Land Owners agreement where you can view all the Trusts, Councils and Associations in a spreadsheet to see which areas have approved / denied caches to be placed on their land.

You will see that many areas such as The National Trust, The New Forest, and lots of councils around the country allow and welcome geocaches on their land. You can also view each agreement on the right of the place name.

May i suggest that those who are not fully aware of what Geoching is, how it works, what the strict rules are according to Groundspeak's Geocaching.com have a look at the links, before commenting - as you will then be able to comment from an informed point of view.

Just to emphasise - Munzees have nothing to do with Geocaching and are a totally sperate game, with not many specific guidlines or rules like Geocaching has.

I am more than happy to do an interview with the Echo are chat direcctly with anyone who may want to know more about Geocaching, or even have a go at it.

Yours Faithfully
Mrs B aka Cache on Wheels

http://gagb.co.uk/la





nd-agreements-databa





se/
Thanks Mrs B!
I welcome your input and as I am only aware of Bournemouth Council's guidelines on geo-caching cannot express any other views elsewhere.I am involved with an SSSI in Bournemouth and fully support their stance because I feel it will disturb the flora and fauna.
Surely it must disturb the habitat in some way?
Munzees are in some ways the same as geo caching as according to their website,they can be hidden in containers.The lady I saw was running around with smart phone in hand( in her work clothes!) amongst the undergrowth with two dogs out of control.As you will I am sure agree, this is very concerning when it's the time for birds nesting?
The Munzee tags are also plastic and not therefore environmentally friendly! As I have said before, no permission was asked for these Munzees! Permission was on the other hand asked for geo-caching but the response when it was refused was pretty nasty on the website!
Thank you for your lovely reply.
I believe there is never a reason to be nasty - and those who have responded in this way, are not helping to protect the good name of Geocaching or any other game either :(

As with all people who roam the country side, be it for Geocaching, Munzees or just walking, there will be people who act irresponsible unfortunatley.

With Geocaching, there are strict guidlines of how far apart the geocaches are allowed to be hidden - this is 0.1 Mile as the crow flies as a general rule, they are NEVER buried - there is a very strict No breaking ground rule.
You are not allowed to cause damage to any property, and certainly NOT allowed to hide a cache on a historic monument either.

I have found some Munzees that arein our village, and they were within a few feet of eachother - although these ones were respectfully hidden, some i have found have been staple to posts, and i was even guided to one that was at an ancient monument!!

Therre are some instances where i have heard of geocaches and Munzees being removed.

All geocaches that are hidden, should have an offical label on them or inside saying that this is a geocaching game piece, and it will have contact details on it so you can contact someone if there is a problem with it.

Many locals enjoy watching people finding them.

One of the 2 series in a SSSI area, were placed by a friend of ours with the Land Owners and all sympathetic to the area.

The rule is that all dogs must be kept on a lead, due to ground nesting birds etc.

The majority of people who roam the country side for what ever reason are very careful to protect our wonderful environment, and it's sad that some do not.

If you have concerns over someone's behaviour, do you tackle them and ask them to put their dogs on a lead?

Do you have signs up in your SSSI area that say if dogs are allowed or if they are to be kept on a lead?

I saw someones comment about Munzees do have rules about where they are placed and set distances apart.

If they are in containers hidden sympathetically, i have no problem with that, what i do object to, like you, is when they are stapled to wooden posts,or put out in sensitive areas, especially if the one who placed them is aware that Geocaches are not permitted there.- the majority of people who play either game whether hiding or seeking either, are fully aware that Bournemouth County Council have a blanket ban on al Geocaches beong paced on their property - i feel it is not helpful for people to then go and deply munzees in area where they know Geocaches are not allowed!! - It's certainly not helpful!

With regards to Munzees placed on your SSSI area:
It is easy to find out where they are by going on to the Munzee website.

If you have a problem with where they are placed, you can contact someone via the Munzee site.

Same goes for Geocaching. If someone has a problem with where a geocache is placed, they can go on to the Geocaching.com website and contact someone via a link on there too.

At the end of the day, if someone is acting in a way that could be harmful to the habitat no matter what reason they are there then it may be wise to tackle them, or have a member of staff to come and tackle them about their behaviour.

Like I said before, most Geocachers are very respectful about their environment and take great care -

The main idea when looking for a geocache is that you do it with stealth and so you do not stand out.

All geocaches are sent for review to ensure they meet all the guidlines and have the relevant permission where it is needed.

If you want to know more info from me, you can contact me via the Geocaching.com page or search for Cache on Wheels Geocaching and contact me via their website.

I would be more than happy to help where i can. :)

Thank you for an adult response :)

Mrs B
PS If people look at the link i provided for the Landowners Agreement on the GAGB website - you will see that it is not a free for all if councils or Trusts allow caches to be placed - some have strict guidlines as to where caches can be placed.

You may find it helpful to contact someone at the GAGB who could also give you further and more informed information - they are all very good :)
I have actually contacted Natural England regarding geo-caching on S.S.S.I's and they say"Natural England have advised the authorities generally that geo-caching should not be permitted"
They were unaware of Munzees!
Our S.S.S.I also has by-laws posted on site covering all aspects which may harm our reserve.
Sadly that does not mean all users respect those laws:-(
Sorry I would dispute the comments attributed to Natural England. I personally worked with the Countryside Council for Wales, which is the Designating Authority re Nature for Wales, way back in 2004. Since 2006, as a Volunteer Geocache Reviewer, I have worked with all the Designating Authorities in the UK, Natural England, English Heritage, Scottish Natural Heritage, Historic Scotland, Countryside Council Council for Wales. CADW.

All have over the last 7 years either given Permission if they owned the Location, or Approval if just the Designating Authority, for Geocaches to be placed in LNR's, NNR's, SSSI's, SM. On numerous occasions. in fact CCW who own Snowdon Mountain on behalf of the Welsh Assembly, have only ever refused permission for one cache there, despite the whole mountain being a Designated SSSI. I have after having Proof of Permission and if needed Approval off the Designating Authority, have published a large number of Geocaches located in LNR's, NNR's, SSSI's, SM'S.

The Designating Authorities for all 3 Governments, have happily and continue to support Geocaching.

The Volunteer UK Geocache Reviewers, in fact use specialised tools provided by DEFRA, who have welcomed feed back, re those tools, from a group of very experienced users.

DaveP
Sorry Dave but my information comes from a Natural England rep in Dorset.
[quote][p][bold]DavePVR[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Cache on Wheels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Cache on Wheels[/bold] wrote: PS Although Bournemouth Councl now have a blanket ban of all geocaches on their land, which is very unfortunate, there are far more councils and Trusts - Including the National Trust, who not only allow geocaches on their property, but they encourage it, The National Trust now even activiley promote it on their land and hide some caches themselved!! - i can't see them doing that if they felt that it would trash the countryside or have an adverse effect on the wildlife and the delicate plants etc. I meant to say that it is very unfortunate that this young lady needed assistance from the emergency services - however far more people that are out walking their do or go walking in the same areas that geocaches are hidden, require assistance if they injure themselves. - The most imprtant message the above organiisations put across is that you only go within your limits, it's not adised that you do things like this young lady unless you are experienced and have other experiend people with you - as i mentioned above - all the caches placed are checked by a reviewer who has the exact coordinates of where all the caches are placed - thinkgs like birds nesting in the trees are also checked. There are 20 caches that are hidden in one certain reserve where much of it is SSSI - they were all placed with the land owner and placed sympathetically within the surroundings. Here is a link to the Land Owners agreement where you can view all the Trusts, Councils and Associations in a spreadsheet to see which areas have approved / denied caches to be placed on their land. You will see that many areas such as The National Trust, The New Forest, and lots of councils around the country allow and welcome geocaches on their land. You can also view each agreement on the right of the place name. May i suggest that those who are not fully aware of what Geoching is, how it works, what the strict rules are according to Groundspeak's Geocaching.com have a look at the links, before commenting - as you will then be able to comment from an informed point of view. Just to emphasise - Munzees have nothing to do with Geocaching and are a totally sperate game, with not many specific guidlines or rules like Geocaching has. I am more than happy to do an interview with the Echo are chat direcctly with anyone who may want to know more about Geocaching, or even have a go at it. Yours Faithfully Mrs B aka Cache on Wheels http://gagb.co.uk/la nd-agreements-databa se/[/p][/quote]Thanks Mrs B! I welcome your input and as I am only aware of Bournemouth Council's guidelines on geo-caching cannot express any other views elsewhere.I am involved with an SSSI in Bournemouth and fully support their stance because I feel it will disturb the flora and fauna. Surely it must disturb the habitat in some way? Munzees are in some ways the same as geo caching as according to their website,they can be hidden in containers.The lady I saw was running around with smart phone in hand( in her work clothes!) amongst the undergrowth with two dogs out of control.As you will I am sure agree, this is very concerning when it's the time for birds nesting? The Munzee tags are also plastic and not therefore environmentally friendly! As I have said before, no permission was asked for these Munzees! Permission was on the other hand asked for geo-caching but the response when it was refused was pretty nasty on the website![/p][/quote]Thank you for your lovely reply. I believe there is never a reason to be nasty - and those who have responded in this way, are not helping to protect the good name of Geocaching or any other game either :( As with all people who roam the country side, be it for Geocaching, Munzees or just walking, there will be people who act irresponsible unfortunatley. With Geocaching, there are strict guidlines of how far apart the geocaches are allowed to be hidden - this is 0.1 Mile as the crow flies as a general rule, they are NEVER buried - there is a very strict No breaking ground rule. You are not allowed to cause damage to any property, and certainly NOT allowed to hide a cache on a historic monument either. I have found some Munzees that arein our village, and they were within a few feet of eachother - although these ones were respectfully hidden, some i have found have been staple to posts, and i was even guided to one that was at an ancient monument!! Therre are some instances where i have heard of geocaches and Munzees being removed. All geocaches that are hidden, should have an offical label on them or inside saying that this is a geocaching game piece, and it will have contact details on it so you can contact someone if there is a problem with it. Many locals enjoy watching people finding them. One of the 2 series in a SSSI area, were placed by a friend of ours with the Land Owners and all sympathetic to the area. The rule is that all dogs must be kept on a lead, due to ground nesting birds etc. The majority of people who roam the country side for what ever reason are very careful to protect our wonderful environment, and it's sad that some do not. If you have concerns over someone's behaviour, do you tackle them and ask them to put their dogs on a lead? Do you have signs up in your SSSI area that say if dogs are allowed or if they are to be kept on a lead? I saw someones comment about Munzees do have rules about where they are placed and set distances apart. If they are in containers hidden sympathetically, i have no problem with that, what i do object to, like you, is when they are stapled to wooden posts,or put out in sensitive areas, especially if the one who placed them is aware that Geocaches are not permitted there.- the majority of people who play either game whether hiding or seeking either, are fully aware that Bournemouth County Council have a blanket ban on al Geocaches beong paced on their property - i feel it is not helpful for people to then go and deply munzees in area where they know Geocaches are not allowed!! - It's certainly not helpful! With regards to Munzees placed on your SSSI area: It is easy to find out where they are by going on to the Munzee website. If you have a problem with where they are placed, you can contact someone via the Munzee site. Same goes for Geocaching. If someone has a problem with where a geocache is placed, they can go on to the Geocaching.com website and contact someone via a link on there too. At the end of the day, if someone is acting in a way that could be harmful to the habitat no matter what reason they are there then it may be wise to tackle them, or have a member of staff to come and tackle them about their behaviour. Like I said before, most Geocachers are very respectful about their environment and take great care - The main idea when looking for a geocache is that you do it with stealth and so you do not stand out. All geocaches are sent for review to ensure they meet all the guidlines and have the relevant permission where it is needed. If you want to know more info from me, you can contact me via the Geocaching.com page or search for Cache on Wheels Geocaching and contact me via their website. I would be more than happy to help where i can. :) Thank you for an adult response :) Mrs B PS If people look at the link i provided for the Landowners Agreement on the GAGB website - you will see that it is not a free for all if councils or Trusts allow caches to be placed - some have strict guidlines as to where caches can be placed. You may find it helpful to contact someone at the GAGB who could also give you further and more informed information - they are all very good :)[/p][/quote]I have actually contacted Natural England regarding geo-caching on S.S.S.I's and they say"Natural England have advised the authorities generally that geo-caching should not be permitted" They were unaware of Munzees! Our S.S.S.I also has by-laws posted on site covering all aspects which may harm our reserve. Sadly that does not mean all users respect those laws:-([/p][/quote]Sorry I would dispute the comments attributed to Natural England. I personally worked with the Countryside Council for Wales, which is the Designating Authority re Nature for Wales, way back in 2004. Since 2006, as a Volunteer Geocache Reviewer, I have worked with all the Designating Authorities in the UK, Natural England, English Heritage, Scottish Natural Heritage, Historic Scotland, Countryside Council Council for Wales. CADW. All have over the last 7 years either given Permission if they owned the Location, or Approval if just the Designating Authority, for Geocaches to be placed in LNR's, NNR's, SSSI's, SM. On numerous occasions. in fact CCW who own Snowdon Mountain on behalf of the Welsh Assembly, have only ever refused permission for one cache there, despite the whole mountain being a Designated SSSI. I have after having Proof of Permission and if needed Approval off the Designating Authority, have published a large number of Geocaches located in LNR's, NNR's, SSSI's, SM'S. The Designating Authorities for all 3 Governments, have happily and continue to support Geocaching. The Volunteer UK Geocache Reviewers, in fact use specialised tools provided by DEFRA, who have welcomed feed back, re those tools, from a group of very experienced users. DaveP[/p][/quote]Sorry Dave but my information comes from a Natural England rep in Dorset. oversixty
  • Score: 0

10:47pm Wed 5 Jun 13

portia6 says...

Cache on Wheels wrote:
portia6 wrote:
wezie100 wrote:
I should have known better than to try to communicate in here. Full of nimby and trolls. My offer stands to anyone who cares to form opinions on fact and make informed decisions . I won't bother to be on here again.
I am interested to find out more about
this sport, got to be good exercise and
gets people off the lap top!
I would be more than happy to communicate with you to pass on more information about the game of Geocaching and the benefits :)

You can contact me via the geocaching.com website under my name :) - you can google it.
Thanks Wezie100
[quote][p][bold]Cache on Wheels[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]portia6[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]wezie100[/bold] wrote: I should have known better than to try to communicate in here. Full of nimby and trolls. My offer stands to anyone who cares to form opinions on fact and make informed decisions . I won't bother to be on here again.[/p][/quote]I am interested to find out more about this sport, got to be good exercise and gets people off the lap top![/p][/quote]I would be more than happy to communicate with you to pass on more information about the game of Geocaching and the benefits :) You can contact me via the geocaching.com website under my name :) - you can google it.[/p][/quote]Thanks Wezie100 portia6
  • Score: 0

10:53am Thu 6 Jun 13

Mamma Troll says...

ridiculous idiots
ridiculous idiots Mamma Troll
  • Score: 0

10:40am Fri 7 Jun 13

colbel says...

ranger_bob wrote:
oversixty wrote:
Idiot!
Yes you probably are. What the story doesn't tell you is that the young lady had the appropriate climbing equipment but that one of the ropes got stuck.

But then I suppose you've never had an accident or made a mistake in your life have you? What must it be like to be perfect?
Wonderful.
[quote][p][bold]ranger_bob[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]oversixty[/bold] wrote: Idiot![/p][/quote]Yes you probably are. What the story doesn't tell you is that the young lady had the appropriate climbing equipment but that one of the ropes got stuck. But then I suppose you've never had an accident or made a mistake in your life have you? What must it be like to be perfect?[/p][/quote]Wonderful. colbel
  • Score: 0

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