£12m scheme to tackle congestion is launched - but is it "tinkering at the edges?"

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A £12m plan to help ease chronic congestion in the conurbation has been launched.

The Three Towns Travel partnership between Bournemouth, Poole and Christchurch, includes new cycle routes, better public transport and traffic management and more information for people to plan their journeys.

It focuses on the "3 Towns Corridor" - the A35 - and will mean better street lights, improved junction priority for buses, upgraded bus shelters, linked cycle routes and removal or clarification for signs for pedestrians and public transport.

See the plan in full here

But local council chiefs have denied the project is merely “tinkering at the edges” of the area's huge traffic problems.

Cllr Michael Filer, Bournemouth's cabinet member for transportation told the Daily Echo: “This is not a second best option.

“The conurbation will have more houses, more jobs and more people over the next few years and we need to address the traffic implication with this long term plan to offer a more integrated local transport system.

He added: “We need a local network that is fit for purpose.”

The government money will be spent along the key east - west route which features some of the worst gridlock blackspots like Christchurch bypass, Barrack Road, Castle Lane and Wallisdown.

Cllr Filer said there was no money and no appetite for the big, proposed infrastructure schemes of the past, such as the Branksome and Wallisdown relief roads, both dropped 20 years ago.”

“These proposals are not the whole thing, they are just the start.”

He said the prime aim of Three Towns Travel was to support the economy by minimising congestion.

Cllr Peter Finney, Dorset's highways cabinet member representing Christchurch, said: “We are trying to open up lots more options for people to travel to work.

“If we don't do something, places like Wallisdown Road may well be impassable in 13 years time. We need to free up the roads.”

The chairman of Dorset's Local Enterprise Partnership, Gordon Page, said the estimated cost of congestion to Dorset's economy was around £300m a year. He described the figure as “intolerable” and the traffic congestion was “an insidious block to our progress.”

More substantial projects would need to be considered as part of the bigger picture.

Comments (33)

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12:58pm Mon 11 Feb 13

jeebuscripes says...

What are the details of the plan?

What is the plan?

This article lacks any real information.
What are the details of the plan? What is the plan? This article lacks any real information. jeebuscripes
  • Score: 0

1:18pm Mon 11 Feb 13

RivermeadMike says...

More houses and more jobs equals the urgent need for better roads. Messing around with cycle lanes is pointless, most cyclists use the footpaths! As for improving public transport, a good idea in some ways but planners are living in cloud cuckoo land to think it would relieve traffic congestion. What people really want is to be able to go where they want, when they want and that means by car!
More houses and more jobs equals the urgent need for better roads. Messing around with cycle lanes is pointless, most cyclists use the footpaths! As for improving public transport, a good idea in some ways but planners are living in cloud cuckoo land to think it would relieve traffic congestion. What people really want is to be able to go where they want, when they want and that means by car! RivermeadMike
  • Score: 0

1:36pm Mon 11 Feb 13

Seabeam says...

What we need is more investment in alternatives to the car, gridlock is inevitable no matter how many roads are biilt.
More cycle lanes are probably the best long term remedy, or maybe a land train with a seperated lane so that people could plan a day out or get to work without having it ruined by the jams.
Cycle lanes surely are the only way to go, every cyclist is one less car poluting as it sits motionless or crawls at a snails pace.
No other alternative is available to all for little cost at this time.
What we need is more investment in alternatives to the car, gridlock is inevitable no matter how many roads are biilt. More cycle lanes are probably the best long term remedy, or maybe a land train with a seperated lane so that people could plan a day out or get to work without having it ruined by the jams. Cycle lanes surely are the only way to go, every cyclist is one less car poluting as it sits motionless or crawls at a snails pace. No other alternative is available to all for little cost at this time. Seabeam
  • Score: 0

1:53pm Mon 11 Feb 13

The Liberal says...

Put cycle lanes on all pavements. Or simply introduce a local bylaw making it perfectly legal to cycle on them. There is no reason cyclists and pedestrians can't share pavements safely, so long as they take care.
 
At the very least, it would stop the usual moaners on here complaining about illegal cycling on pavements! I expect that is what will follow here… yawn.
Put cycle lanes on all pavements. Or simply introduce a local bylaw making it perfectly legal to cycle on them. There is no reason cyclists and pedestrians can't share pavements safely, so long as they take care.   At the very least, it would stop the usual moaners on here complaining about illegal cycling on pavements! I expect that is what will follow here… yawn. The Liberal
  • Score: 0

2:01pm Mon 11 Feb 13

BmthNewshound says...

Yes it will just be tinkering at the edges. If there Councils are ruling out major infrastructure projects the options are very limited and the benefit questionable.
.
By the time the Councils have consulted the public, dealt with objections, paid consultants, I wonder how much of the £12m will actually be spent on the roads themselves.
.
Yes it will just be tinkering at the edges. If there Councils are ruling out major infrastructure projects the options are very limited and the benefit questionable. . By the time the Councils have consulted the public, dealt with objections, paid consultants, I wonder how much of the £12m will actually be spent on the roads themselves. . BmthNewshound
  • Score: 0

2:08pm Mon 11 Feb 13

BournemouthMatt says...

It sounds like we need a Monorail!!! It worked for Springfield...
It sounds like we need a Monorail!!! It worked for Springfield... BournemouthMatt
  • Score: 0

2:10pm Mon 11 Feb 13

Holes Bay Curve says...

'local council chiefs' simply do not have the long term vision.

In 30 years time we need to have walking and cycling to work not only acceptable , but the norm. The motor car should be seen as a luxury, and long distance freight traffic moved back onto the railways to allow cheaper passenger rail fares for all - oh, and plane off the asphalt road surfaces to reveal the old tramways that connected Poole to Bournemouth.
'local council chiefs' simply do not have the long term vision. In 30 years time we need to have walking and cycling to work not only acceptable , but the norm. The motor car should be seen as a luxury, and long distance freight traffic moved back onto the railways to allow cheaper passenger rail fares for all - oh, and plane off the asphalt road surfaces to reveal the old tramways that connected Poole to Bournemouth. Holes Bay Curve
  • Score: 0

2:13pm Mon 11 Feb 13

whataboutthat says...

Light rail sitting on some/most of the major pot-holed and overcrowded (and over subsidised) roads in and around the conurbation..dream dream dream...
Light rail sitting on some/most of the major pot-holed and overcrowded (and over subsidised) roads in and around the conurbation..dream dream dream... whataboutthat
  • Score: 0

2:23pm Mon 11 Feb 13

l'anglais says...

Tramway.
Tramway. l'anglais
  • Score: 0

3:01pm Mon 11 Feb 13

rayc says...

Holes Bay Curve wrote:
'local council chiefs' simply do not have the long term vision.

In 30 years time we need to have walking and cycling to work not only acceptable , but the norm. The motor car should be seen as a luxury, and long distance freight traffic moved back onto the railways to allow cheaper passenger rail fares for all - oh, and plane off the asphalt road surfaces to reveal the old tramways that connected Poole to Bournemouth.
In 30 years time people with work within a bus, bike or walking distance will be in the minority. Hospitals for example will become more and more remote from the population they serve.
Having worked in the rail industry and taking into account the 20 years to build HS2, I think your wish to expand freight traffic will remain merely a wish.
When the car is a luxury what taxes will pay for schools, hospitals etc?
[quote][p][bold]Holes Bay Curve[/bold] wrote: 'local council chiefs' simply do not have the long term vision. In 30 years time we need to have walking and cycling to work not only acceptable , but the norm. The motor car should be seen as a luxury, and long distance freight traffic moved back onto the railways to allow cheaper passenger rail fares for all - oh, and plane off the asphalt road surfaces to reveal the old tramways that connected Poole to Bournemouth.[/p][/quote]In 30 years time people with work within a bus, bike or walking distance will be in the minority. Hospitals for example will become more and more remote from the population they serve. Having worked in the rail industry and taking into account the 20 years to build HS2, I think your wish to expand freight traffic will remain merely a wish. When the car is a luxury what taxes will pay for schools, hospitals etc? rayc
  • Score: 0

4:17pm Mon 11 Feb 13

FNS-man says...

rayc wrote:
Holes Bay Curve wrote: 'local council chiefs' simply do not have the long term vision. In 30 years time we need to have walking and cycling to work not only acceptable , but the norm. The motor car should be seen as a luxury, and long distance freight traffic moved back onto the railways to allow cheaper passenger rail fares for all - oh, and plane off the asphalt road surfaces to reveal the old tramways that connected Poole to Bournemouth.
In 30 years time people with work within a bus, bike or walking distance will be in the minority. Hospitals for example will become more and more remote from the population they serve. Having worked in the rail industry and taking into account the 20 years to build HS2, I think your wish to expand freight traffic will remain merely a wish. When the car is a luxury what taxes will pay for schools, hospitals etc?
The government acknowledges that it subsidises motorists by billions of pounds per year once you factor in the cost of congestion, accidents, pollution etc. If the private motor car was phased out the country would be, fiscally speaking, a lot better off.
[quote][p][bold]rayc[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Holes Bay Curve[/bold] wrote: 'local council chiefs' simply do not have the long term vision. In 30 years time we need to have walking and cycling to work not only acceptable , but the norm. The motor car should be seen as a luxury, and long distance freight traffic moved back onto the railways to allow cheaper passenger rail fares for all - oh, and plane off the asphalt road surfaces to reveal the old tramways that connected Poole to Bournemouth.[/p][/quote]In 30 years time people with work within a bus, bike or walking distance will be in the minority. Hospitals for example will become more and more remote from the population they serve. Having worked in the rail industry and taking into account the 20 years to build HS2, I think your wish to expand freight traffic will remain merely a wish. When the car is a luxury what taxes will pay for schools, hospitals etc?[/p][/quote]The government acknowledges that it subsidises motorists by billions of pounds per year once you factor in the cost of congestion, accidents, pollution etc. If the private motor car was phased out the country would be, fiscally speaking, a lot better off. FNS-man
  • Score: 0

4:21pm Mon 11 Feb 13

muscliffman says...

BmthNewshound wrote:
Yes it will just be tinkering at the edges. If there Councils are ruling out major infrastructure projects the options are very limited and the benefit questionable.
.
By the time the Councils have consulted the public, dealt with objections, paid consultants, I wonder how much of the £12m will actually be spent on the roads themselves.
.
Regretably you are right. Little of this £12million will get past the queue of Council and Consultant fat-cats that will be licking their lips at the thought of having a share of this sum.
[quote][p][bold]BmthNewshound[/bold] wrote: Yes it will just be tinkering at the edges. If there Councils are ruling out major infrastructure projects the options are very limited and the benefit questionable. . By the time the Councils have consulted the public, dealt with objections, paid consultants, I wonder how much of the £12m will actually be spent on the roads themselves. .[/p][/quote]Regretably you are right. Little of this £12million will get past the queue of Council and Consultant fat-cats that will be licking their lips at the thought of having a share of this sum. muscliffman
  • Score: 0

4:37pm Mon 11 Feb 13

rayc says...

FNS-man wrote:
rayc wrote:
Holes Bay Curve wrote: 'local council chiefs' simply do not have the long term vision. In 30 years time we need to have walking and cycling to work not only acceptable , but the norm. The motor car should be seen as a luxury, and long distance freight traffic moved back onto the railways to allow cheaper passenger rail fares for all - oh, and plane off the asphalt road surfaces to reveal the old tramways that connected Poole to Bournemouth.
In 30 years time people with work within a bus, bike or walking distance will be in the minority. Hospitals for example will become more and more remote from the population they serve. Having worked in the rail industry and taking into account the 20 years to build HS2, I think your wish to expand freight traffic will remain merely a wish. When the car is a luxury what taxes will pay for schools, hospitals etc?
The government acknowledges that it subsidises motorists by billions of pounds per year once you factor in the cost of congestion, accidents, pollution etc. If the private motor car was phased out the country would be, fiscally speaking, a lot better off.
"The government acknowledges that it subsidises motorists by billions of pounds per year once you factor in the cost of congestion, accidents, pollution etc".

Some of that factoring is is tenuous in the extreme. There are such things as the cost of 'inactivity, how you turn that into real money to pay for public transport will no doubt tax politicians for decades.
[quote][p][bold]FNS-man[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]rayc[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Holes Bay Curve[/bold] wrote: 'local council chiefs' simply do not have the long term vision. In 30 years time we need to have walking and cycling to work not only acceptable , but the norm. The motor car should be seen as a luxury, and long distance freight traffic moved back onto the railways to allow cheaper passenger rail fares for all - oh, and plane off the asphalt road surfaces to reveal the old tramways that connected Poole to Bournemouth.[/p][/quote]In 30 years time people with work within a bus, bike or walking distance will be in the minority. Hospitals for example will become more and more remote from the population they serve. Having worked in the rail industry and taking into account the 20 years to build HS2, I think your wish to expand freight traffic will remain merely a wish. When the car is a luxury what taxes will pay for schools, hospitals etc?[/p][/quote]The government acknowledges that it subsidises motorists by billions of pounds per year once you factor in the cost of congestion, accidents, pollution etc. If the private motor car was phased out the country would be, fiscally speaking, a lot better off.[/p][/quote]"The government acknowledges that it subsidises motorists by billions of pounds per year once you factor in the cost of congestion, accidents, pollution etc". Some of that factoring is is tenuous in the extreme. There are such things as the cost of 'inactivity, how you turn that into real money to pay for public transport will no doubt tax politicians for decades. rayc
  • Score: 0

4:42pm Mon 11 Feb 13

loftusrod says...

jeebuscripes wrote:
What are the details of the plan? What is the plan? This article lacks any real information.
Simply click where it says 'See the plan in full here'.
[quote][p][bold]jeebuscripes[/bold] wrote: What are the details of the plan? What is the plan? This article lacks any real information.[/p][/quote]Simply click where it says 'See the plan in full here'. loftusrod
  • Score: 0

4:57pm Mon 11 Feb 13

Derf says...

If we move the freight onto railways, won't all the level crossings outside every shop and factory hold up the cyclists trying to get to work?
If we move the freight onto railways, won't all the level crossings outside every shop and factory hold up the cyclists trying to get to work? Derf
  • Score: 0

5:07pm Mon 11 Feb 13

bourne free says...

134 pages of tickering !!!
134 pages of tickering !!! bourne free
  • Score: 0

5:07pm Mon 11 Feb 13

Supergiz says...

They had the chance to sort out the Poole to Bournemouth bit 20? years ago with the Bourne Bottom relief road system but it all turned into a fiasco. No point tinkering at the edges, a proper road system is required and the opportunity has now gone. As a Poole resident the last place I would ever want to drive to is Christchurch. It takes forever Its quicker and easier to go to Southampton.
They had the chance to sort out the Poole to Bournemouth bit 20? years ago with the Bourne Bottom relief road system but it all turned into a fiasco. No point tinkering at the edges, a proper road system is required and the opportunity has now gone. As a Poole resident the last place I would ever want to drive to is Christchurch. It takes forever Its quicker and easier to go to Southampton. Supergiz
  • Score: 0

5:43pm Mon 11 Feb 13

GAHmusic says...

How about a course in being ready to move when lights change. The sheer amount of time wasted as one by one the drivers in the queue wake up when the car in front moves instead of being ready to move with it staggers me. It's not speeding, it's not wreckless just efficiant
How about a course in being ready to move when lights change. The sheer amount of time wasted as one by one the drivers in the queue wake up when the car in front moves instead of being ready to move with it staggers me. It's not speeding, it's not wreckless just efficiant GAHmusic
  • Score: 0

6:06pm Mon 11 Feb 13

bourne free says...

Supergiz wrote:
They had the chance to sort out the Poole to Bournemouth bit 20? years ago with the Bourne Bottom relief road system but it all turned into a fiasco. No point tinkering at the edges, a proper road system is required and the opportunity has now gone. As a Poole resident the last place I would ever want to drive to is Christchurch. It takes forever Its quicker and easier to go to Southampton.
put a road above the railway line ?
[quote][p][bold]Supergiz[/bold] wrote: They had the chance to sort out the Poole to Bournemouth bit 20? years ago with the Bourne Bottom relief road system but it all turned into a fiasco. No point tinkering at the edges, a proper road system is required and the opportunity has now gone. As a Poole resident the last place I would ever want to drive to is Christchurch. It takes forever Its quicker and easier to go to Southampton.[/p][/quote]put a road above the railway line ? bourne free
  • Score: 0

6:11pm Mon 11 Feb 13

corozin says...

Another stunning example on how to waste £12m of taxpayers money on gesture politics.

There's congestion in the town. Seriously, how is carving out more cycle lanes ever going to fix that? Where are the legions of cyclists pounding up and down Penn Hill Avenue every day proving that demand exists for this stuff? The rest of it sounds like more money to the hands of "consultants" and printers on "advice"

What a shocking bloody waste of money. Bereft of real solutions this is just window dressing on the taxpayer to fund jobs for the boys.
Another stunning example on how to waste £12m of taxpayers money on gesture politics. There's congestion in the town. Seriously, how is carving out more cycle lanes ever going to fix that? Where are the legions of cyclists pounding up and down Penn Hill Avenue every day proving that demand exists for this stuff? The rest of it sounds like more money to the hands of "consultants" and printers on "advice" What a shocking bloody waste of money. Bereft of real solutions this is just window dressing on the taxpayer to fund jobs for the boys. corozin
  • Score: 0

6:16pm Mon 11 Feb 13

Hessenford says...

Holes Bay Curve wrote:
'local council chiefs' simply do not have the long term vision.

In 30 years time we need to have walking and cycling to work not only acceptable , but the norm. The motor car should be seen as a luxury, and long distance freight traffic moved back onto the railways to allow cheaper passenger rail fares for all - oh, and plane off the asphalt road surfaces to reveal the old tramways that connected Poole to Bournemouth.
That would be nice but I think most of the tramways were ripped up years ago.
[quote][p][bold]Holes Bay Curve[/bold] wrote: 'local council chiefs' simply do not have the long term vision. In 30 years time we need to have walking and cycling to work not only acceptable , but the norm. The motor car should be seen as a luxury, and long distance freight traffic moved back onto the railways to allow cheaper passenger rail fares for all - oh, and plane off the asphalt road surfaces to reveal the old tramways that connected Poole to Bournemouth.[/p][/quote]That would be nice but I think most of the tramways were ripped up years ago. Hessenford
  • Score: 0

6:35pm Mon 11 Feb 13

BIGTONE says...

BournemouthMatt wrote:
It sounds like we need a Monorail!!! It worked for Springfield...
Agreed.
Straight down the centre of wessex way.
At the back of the Royal Bournemouth to Christchurch.
Frizzels through Penn Hill railway embankment
Intersection stations at Cooper Dean/Springbourne/As
da/Richmond hill/Cambridge road/Frizzels.
Thats 90% of it sorted.
[quote][p][bold]BournemouthMatt[/bold] wrote: It sounds like we need a Monorail!!! It worked for Springfield...[/p][/quote]Agreed. Straight down the centre of wessex way. At the back of the Royal Bournemouth to Christchurch. Frizzels through Penn Hill railway embankment Intersection stations at Cooper Dean/Springbourne/As da/Richmond hill/Cambridge road/Frizzels. Thats 90% of it sorted. BIGTONE
  • Score: 0

7:28pm Mon 11 Feb 13

rayc says...

If Ashley road is being turned into a 'through' route who will stop and use its shops? I went there by car today from Corfe Mullen. I wouldn't bother if it was a bus from Corfe Mullen to Poole and then Poole to Ashley road.
If Ashley road is being turned into a 'through' route who will stop and use its shops? I went there by car today from Corfe Mullen. I wouldn't bother if it was a bus from Corfe Mullen to Poole and then Poole to Ashley road. rayc
  • Score: 0

8:53pm Mon 11 Feb 13

bournenbred says...

If you read the plan, you will see its not about the car, but public transport, cycling, walking and low carbon / electric vehicles.

Private vehicles are going to be actively persecuted !
If you read the plan, you will see its not about the car, but public transport, cycling, walking and low carbon / electric vehicles. Private vehicles are going to be actively persecuted ! bournenbred
  • Score: 0

9:29pm Mon 11 Feb 13

gileto says...

Why does nobody remove their head from the sand here and consider the root cause of the problem. In the 60s and 70s, those that grew up in Bmth/Poole were quite happy with the roads. Then came planning policies that allowed the local population to expand to almost bursting point, wiping out large expanses of greenery around the conurbation. Now we have an unchecked EC invasion, coupled with another baby boom - and guess what? The roads which couldn't cope before are going to even more jam-packed with cars, unless those that can cycle or walk make some effort to do so (Amsterdam etc can do it, so why can't our 'city')..also a social conscience should be ringing in our heads if we're expecting to breed at the same rate and continue to enjoy what's left of our green and pleasant land....
Why does nobody remove their head from the sand here and consider the root cause of the problem. In the 60s and 70s, those that grew up in Bmth/Poole were quite happy with the roads. Then came planning policies that allowed the local population to expand to almost bursting point, wiping out large expanses of greenery around the conurbation. Now we have an unchecked EC invasion, coupled with another baby boom - and guess what? The roads which couldn't cope before are going to even more jam-packed with cars, unless those that can cycle or walk make some effort to do so (Amsterdam etc can do it, so why can't our 'city')..also a social conscience should be ringing in our heads if we're expecting to breed at the same rate and continue to enjoy what's left of our green and pleasant land.... gileto
  • Score: 0

9:50pm Mon 11 Feb 13

Hessenford says...

Always makes me laugh when the Christchurch bypass is mentioned, what bypass is that then.
This must be the only town bypass which leads all the traffic into the town, great planning.
Always makes me laugh when the Christchurch bypass is mentioned, what bypass is that then. This must be the only town bypass which leads all the traffic into the town, great planning. Hessenford
  • Score: 0

10:20pm Mon 11 Feb 13

Omni314 says...

bournenbred wrote:
If you read the plan, you will see its not about the car, but public transport, cycling, walking and low carbon / electric vehicles.

Private vehicles are going to be actively persecuted !
Not providing facilities for cars isn't persecution.
[quote][p][bold]bournenbred[/bold] wrote: If you read the plan, you will see its not about the car, but public transport, cycling, walking and low carbon / electric vehicles. Private vehicles are going to be actively persecuted ![/p][/quote]Not providing facilities for cars isn't persecution. Omni314
  • Score: 0

8:27am Tue 12 Feb 13

Lord Spring says...

Holes Bay Curve wrote:
'local council chiefs' simply do not have the long term vision.

In 30 years time we need to have walking and cycling to work not only acceptable , but the norm. The motor car should be seen as a luxury, and long distance freight traffic moved back onto the railways to allow cheaper passenger rail fares for all - oh, and plane off the asphalt road surfaces to reveal the old tramways that connected Poole to Bournemouth.
The tramways were all pulled up around 1947/8 I know as we were using the tarred wood blocks to keep warm.
[quote][p][bold]Holes Bay Curve[/bold] wrote: 'local council chiefs' simply do not have the long term vision. In 30 years time we need to have walking and cycling to work not only acceptable , but the norm. The motor car should be seen as a luxury, and long distance freight traffic moved back onto the railways to allow cheaper passenger rail fares for all - oh, and plane off the asphalt road surfaces to reveal the old tramways that connected Poole to Bournemouth.[/p][/quote]The tramways were all pulled up around 1947/8 I know as we were using the tarred wood blocks to keep warm. Lord Spring
  • Score: 0

8:38am Tue 12 Feb 13

Lord Spring says...

Come to think about it there may be some in places like Capstone Road. I can recall them having to be cut out when the Wessex Way was being constructed
Come to think about it there may be some in places like Capstone Road. I can recall them having to be cut out when the Wessex Way was being constructed Lord Spring
  • Score: 0

8:45am Tue 12 Feb 13

Lord Spring says...

Hessenford wrote:
Always makes me laugh when the Christchurch bypass is mentioned, what bypass is that then.
This must be the only town bypass which leads all the traffic into the town, great planning.
Constructed 1958, and what is your plan for 55 years ahead.
[quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: Always makes me laugh when the Christchurch bypass is mentioned, what bypass is that then. This must be the only town bypass which leads all the traffic into the town, great planning.[/p][/quote]Constructed 1958, and what is your plan for 55 years ahead. Lord Spring
  • Score: 0

11:00am Tue 12 Feb 13

muscliffman says...

Hessenford wrote:
Always makes me laugh when the Christchurch bypass is mentioned, what bypass is that then.
This must be the only town bypass which leads all the traffic into the town, great planning.
No, because in Bournemouth we also built a Town Centre 'Bypass', now it's called Wessex Way.

This one not only leads straight to the Town Centre (!) as well, but also caused the destruction of the equivilant of a whole suburb on one side of Holdenhurst Road - and then never made it across Poole as was essentially planned.

On the subject of tram track - it was mostly lifted here, as said above, in the mid-late forties, although some does remain, notably in the Square. However the concept of running fixed track light railways down today's congested Bournemouth streets does not bear thinking about!

But never mind, I see we appear to already have had a nice jolly 'Launch do' with Council photo opportunities at the BIC for this new transport funding, so the spending starts on the usual unproductive fripperies.
[quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: Always makes me laugh when the Christchurch bypass is mentioned, what bypass is that then. This must be the only town bypass which leads all the traffic into the town, great planning.[/p][/quote]No, because in Bournemouth we also built a Town Centre 'Bypass', now it's called Wessex Way. This one not only leads straight to the Town Centre (!) as well, but also caused the destruction of the equivilant of a whole suburb on one side of Holdenhurst Road - and then never made it across Poole as was essentially planned. On the subject of tram track - it was mostly lifted here, as said above, in the mid-late forties, although some does remain, notably in the Square. However the concept of running fixed track light railways down today's congested Bournemouth streets does not bear thinking about! But never mind, I see we appear to already have had a nice jolly 'Launch do' with Council photo opportunities at the BIC for this new transport funding, so the spending starts on the usual unproductive fripperies. muscliffman
  • Score: 0

2:04pm Tue 12 Feb 13

rayc says...

It is ironic that at the same time this was announced that Welsh councils are being asked to look again at pedestrian zones amid concern they are deterring shoppers. The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) says towns need to find new ways to attract people. They should make them easier to get to and easier for car drivers to navigate around, it says.
It is ironic that at the same time this was announced that Welsh councils are being asked to look again at pedestrian zones amid concern they are deterring shoppers. The Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors (RICS) says towns need to find new ways to attract people. They should make them easier to get to and easier for car drivers to navigate around, it says. rayc
  • Score: 0

3:25pm Tue 12 Feb 13

FNS-man says...

corozin wrote:
Another stunning example on how to waste £12m of taxpayers money on gesture politics. There's congestion in the town. Seriously, how is carving out more cycle lanes ever going to fix that? Where are the legions of cyclists pounding up and down Penn Hill Avenue every day proving that demand exists for this stuff? The rest of it sounds like more money to the hands of "consultants" and printers on "advice" What a shocking bloody waste of money. Bereft of real solutions this is just window dressing on the taxpayer to fund jobs for the boys.
The point is that it is not safe for people to cycle on the roads. If you want to look at thousands and thousands of would-be cyclists, then just go to the gates of a school during the school run. In Holland the average age for a kid to ride to school on their own is 8. If all 8-year-olds rode to school the roads would be a huge amount quieter. I imagine you notice the effect during the school hols.

But the current roads are simply not safe enough for a parent to consider letting their 8-year-old out on their own.
[quote][p][bold]corozin[/bold] wrote: Another stunning example on how to waste £12m of taxpayers money on gesture politics. There's congestion in the town. Seriously, how is carving out more cycle lanes ever going to fix that? Where are the legions of cyclists pounding up and down Penn Hill Avenue every day proving that demand exists for this stuff? The rest of it sounds like more money to the hands of "consultants" and printers on "advice" What a shocking bloody waste of money. Bereft of real solutions this is just window dressing on the taxpayer to fund jobs for the boys.[/p][/quote]The point is that it is not safe for people to cycle on the roads. If you want to look at thousands and thousands of would-be cyclists, then just go to the gates of a school during the school run. In Holland the average age for a kid to ride to school on their own is 8. If all 8-year-olds rode to school the roads would be a huge amount quieter. I imagine you notice the effect during the school hols. But the current roads are simply not safe enough for a parent to consider letting their 8-year-old out on their own. FNS-man
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