SNOW CHAOS: Bournemouth residents wake up to blanket of snow

Bournemouth Echo: BLIZZARD: A walker in Christchurch BLIZZARD: A walker in Christchurch

DORSET woke up to heavy snow yesterday, which caused severe disruption for schools, roads and services.

Residents across the county encountered the first widespread snowfall of the winter, with up to five inches on the ground.

And it was soon followed by reports of traffic incidents and lengthy tailbacks, right in the middle of the morning rush-hour.

The snow also shut most schools and colleges across the area, forced bus and train companies to amend their timetables and led to bin collections being cancelled.

Although the snow was predicted and council gritters were out in force, it still caused chaos on the roads.

Two jack-knifed lorries closed a section of the A35 in Dorchester, blocked the A354 Blandford by-pass and there was a five car collision on the A31 at the Ringwood and Fordingbridge turn-off.

Wareham Road in Corfe Mullen was closed because of a bus across the road and a 40ft tree fell at Boundary Road in Ensbury Park, Bournemouth, blocking the footpath.

Herbert Avenue, Ringwood Road and Alder Road in Poole were all declared impassable by Dorset Police, as were many roads in Swanage.

A road accident at Harman’s Cross brought down power cables, leaving residents without power for four hours in the morning and Ulwell Road in Swanage and Wimborne Hill in Wimborne Minster were both closed due to heavy snow.

In Purbeck, a number of vehicles became stuck due to the wintry conditions. At 6.45am a blue transit van got stuck at the Swanage end of the road. Then, around 7.20am, several vehicles including a large van became stuck on a hill near Corfe Castle.

On many of the main roads that were open, motorists sat in lengthy tailbacks. Wimborne Road in Winton, Ashley Road in Parkstone and Talbot Avenue in Bournemouth were particularly slow.

Side roads around the area were treacherous.

Bus services were limited to main roads in Poole and services to Wimborne, Corfe Mullen and Merley were cancelled. The Sandbanks Ferry operated a reduced 30-minute service and South West Trains ran a revised timetable. Bournemouth, Poole and Purbeck councils suspended rubbish and recycling collections and the household recycling centres at Nuffield and Millhams were closed in the morning. Wareham Library was also closed.

Bournemouth council sent teams of workers out to hand-grit priority pedestrian areas, including GP surgeries and shopping precincts and Poole staff re-filled the 50-plus grit bins.

Herbert Avenue, where residents reported problems, was done in the morning and the gritters continued to work throughout the day, the council said.

In Poole’s Alder Road, where dozens of cars skidded out of control throughout the morning, one man was praised for helping stricken drivers.

Childminder Natalie O’Brien, whose home backs onto Alder Road, told the Daily Echo: “This guy was doing a fantastic job.

“He was running up and down the hill warning drivers and stopping traffic from getting into trouble. There were lots of cars spinning, some 360 degrees. If it wasn’t for this man there would have been even more problems.”

Comments (52)

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8:38am Sat 19 Jan 13

Baywolf says...

Laughable a few flakes of snow and its chaos and schools close their doors, Poland and Russia have temperatures minus 15 with feet of snow and everything runs including trains..oh well done to Wilts and Dorset for keeping services running but shame on the schools for yet another day off for the teachers.
Laughable a few flakes of snow and its chaos and schools close their doors, Poland and Russia have temperatures minus 15 with feet of snow and everything runs including trains..oh well done to Wilts and Dorset for keeping services running but shame on the schools for yet another day off for the teachers. Baywolf

8:52am Sat 19 Jan 13

Holes Bay Curve says...

In the 80s, and living in an isolated village in Norfolk, snow often meant the village being cut off for a whole week. Snow drifts ; well they were the things that littered the side of the road for 6 weeks after the initial snow had melted .The nearest Tesco being 18 miles away. My mother was a Nurse Midwife - yet she still walked to those cases she could reach on foot.
Its is indeed laughable at how people today deal with a miniscule amount of snow in the towns and surrounding areas.
In the 80s, and living in an isolated village in Norfolk, snow often meant the village being cut off for a whole week. Snow drifts ; well they were the things that littered the side of the road for 6 weeks after the initial snow had melted .The nearest Tesco being 18 miles away. My mother was a Nurse Midwife - yet she still walked to those cases she could reach on foot. Its is indeed laughable at how people today deal with a miniscule amount of snow in the towns and surrounding areas. Holes Bay Curve

8:53am Sat 19 Jan 13

spooki says...

The roads were slippery, I only drove a mile and turned round and came back. This was Castle Lane including by the hospital, surely a main route for vehicles including many bus services. Why were the roads SO bad?
Plus some idiot in a 4x4 was driving like a maniac, swapping lanes with no indications and straddling two lanes. I only have a normal little car and I had more control.
The roads were slippery, I only drove a mile and turned round and came back. This was Castle Lane including by the hospital, surely a main route for vehicles including many bus services. Why were the roads SO bad? Plus some idiot in a 4x4 was driving like a maniac, swapping lanes with no indications and straddling two lanes. I only have a normal little car and I had more control. spooki

9:11am Sat 19 Jan 13

Jetwasher says...

Baywolf wrote:
Laughable a few flakes of snow and its chaos and schools close their doors, Poland and Russia have temperatures minus 15 with feet of snow and everything runs including trains..oh well done to Wilts and Dorset for keeping services running but shame on the schools for yet another day off for the teachers.
It’s a shame some teachers look for any excuse to have time off if they were self employed im sure they would make more effort. No wonder they have little support from the public when they strike. Its only a little snow, get to work.
[quote][p][bold]Baywolf[/bold] wrote: Laughable a few flakes of snow and its chaos and schools close their doors, Poland and Russia have temperatures minus 15 with feet of snow and everything runs including trains..oh well done to Wilts and Dorset for keeping services running but shame on the schools for yet another day off for the teachers.[/p][/quote]It’s a shame some teachers look for any excuse to have time off if they were self employed im sure they would make more effort. No wonder they have little support from the public when they strike. Its only a little snow, get to work. Jetwasher

9:17am Sat 19 Jan 13

ben111 says...

SNOW CHAOS ,, Really
SNOW CHAOS ,, Really ben111

9:25am Sat 19 Jan 13

Teddy 1 says...

That's great reporting about yesterday but what's it like out today?
That's great reporting about yesterday but what's it like out today? Teddy 1

9:39am Sat 19 Jan 13

uvox44 says...

all those moaning about teachers get your facts right- it would be the headmaster /mistress that makes the decision to close a school not the teachers.
all those moaning about teachers get your facts right- it would be the headmaster /mistress that makes the decision to close a school not the teachers. uvox44

10:00am Sat 19 Jan 13

jadelou says...

I am a carer in the community and I worked from 7am til 10pm yesterday. Yes the roads were a bit slippery especially over in Merley but I needed to go to work as our clients need us but I'm glad to say everyone I saw yesterday on the roads drove safely and sensibly.
I am a carer in the community and I worked from 7am til 10pm yesterday. Yes the roads were a bit slippery especially over in Merley but I needed to go to work as our clients need us but I'm glad to say everyone I saw yesterday on the roads drove safely and sensibly. jadelou

10:16am Sat 19 Jan 13

magicman88 says...

Baywolf wrote:
Laughable a few flakes of snow and its chaos and schools close their doors, Poland and Russia have temperatures minus 15 with feet of snow and everything runs including trains..oh well done to Wilts and Dorset for keeping services running but shame on the schools for yet another day off for the teachers.
you say it is laughable but Russia and Poland have large amounts of snowfall every year and their country has no choice but to make provisions for it and therefore deal with it.Our country on the other hand, has limited or no snowfall so it would be a waste of money to make such provisions. Admittedly most people as the day went on could have got themselves to their work place but, for the sake of what will probably be one day of closed schools,is it worth the risk?
[quote][p][bold]Baywolf[/bold] wrote: Laughable a few flakes of snow and its chaos and schools close their doors, Poland and Russia have temperatures minus 15 with feet of snow and everything runs including trains..oh well done to Wilts and Dorset for keeping services running but shame on the schools for yet another day off for the teachers.[/p][/quote]you say it is laughable but Russia and Poland have large amounts of snowfall every year and their country has no choice but to make provisions for it and therefore deal with it.Our country on the other hand, has limited or no snowfall so it would be a waste of money to make such provisions. Admittedly most people as the day went on could have got themselves to their work place but, for the sake of what will probably be one day of closed schools,is it worth the risk? magicman88

10:18am Sat 19 Jan 13

sammmymac says...

Thank you uvox44 for making the point that teachers are merely employees who have to do what their bosses say. Local authorities, governors and heads make the decision to close schools. Teachers were working from home yesterday,(reorganis
ing disrupted lessons and redoing next week's timetable to incorporate missed lessons as well as marking , planning etc.) the true winners are all the support staff in schools who got a day 'off'. These people work incredibly hard so lets not begrudge them benefitting from what their bosses decide. Building snowmen and sledging are valuable lessons for our housebound children to learn anyway!
Thank you uvox44 for making the point that teachers are merely employees who have to do what their bosses say. Local authorities, governors and heads make the decision to close schools. Teachers were working from home yesterday,(reorganis ing disrupted lessons and redoing next week's timetable to incorporate missed lessons as well as marking , planning etc.) the true winners are all the support staff in schools who got a day 'off'. These people work incredibly hard so lets not begrudge them benefitting from what their bosses decide. Building snowmen and sledging are valuable lessons for our housebound children to learn anyway! sammmymac

10:48am Sat 19 Jan 13

alasdair1967 says...

uvox44 wrote:
all those moaning about teachers get your facts right- it would be the headmaster /mistress that makes the decision to close a school not the teachers.
And what reason did they use for closing the schools?
[quote][p][bold]uvox44[/bold] wrote: all those moaning about teachers get your facts right- it would be the headmaster /mistress that makes the decision to close a school not the teachers.[/p][/quote]And what reason did they use for closing the schools? alasdair1967

11:19am Sat 19 Jan 13

sammmymac says...

ratio of staff to pupils for safety perhaps as many teachers live a considerable commute from the school they work in. Most likely they decided its less disruptive for parents if they made the decision early and shut schools completely rather than opening, getting all the children bussed in ( assuming buses are running which many weren't ) ,then realising at some point in the day that they will all need to be collected early as the snow was falling and settling and then trying to contact parents and having children leave in dribs and drabs...or not at all if they are dependent on school bus services as many are. Remember when the decision was made at 6am yesterday, it was falling thick and fast as well as drifting and gusting.
ratio of staff to pupils for safety perhaps as many teachers live a considerable commute from the school they work in. Most likely they decided its less disruptive for parents if they made the decision early and shut schools completely rather than opening, getting all the children bussed in ( assuming buses are running which many weren't ) ,then realising at some point in the day that they will all need to be collected early as the snow was falling and settling and then trying to contact parents and having children leave in dribs and drabs...or not at all if they are dependent on school bus services as many are. Remember when the decision was made at 6am yesterday, it was falling thick and fast as well as drifting and gusting. sammmymac

11:24am Sat 19 Jan 13

Hessenford says...

uvox44 wrote:
all those moaning about teachers get your facts right- it would be the headmaster /mistress that makes the decision to close a school not the teachers.
I am really thankful that our NHS is not run by the same people who run the schools, what ever the weather the NHS never shuts, Ambulances blue lighting all over the place, doctors, nurses, porters and cleaners all battle their way through to provide this valuable service, first sign of sleet the education service shuts down, what a joke.
Couple of inches of snow and the whole country is plunged back into the dark ages, this country must be the laughing stock of the entire civilised world.
[quote][p][bold]uvox44[/bold] wrote: all those moaning about teachers get your facts right- it would be the headmaster /mistress that makes the decision to close a school not the teachers.[/p][/quote]I am really thankful that our NHS is not run by the same people who run the schools, what ever the weather the NHS never shuts, Ambulances blue lighting all over the place, doctors, nurses, porters and cleaners all battle their way through to provide this valuable service, first sign of sleet the education service shuts down, what a joke. Couple of inches of snow and the whole country is plunged back into the dark ages, this country must be the laughing stock of the entire civilised world. Hessenford

11:27am Sat 19 Jan 13

dinkie123 says...

alasdair1967 wrote:
uvox44 wrote:
all those moaning about teachers get your facts right- it would be the headmaster /mistress that makes the decision to close a school not the teachers.
And what reason did they use for closing the schools?
Mainly health and safety. The school i went to was on a hill.. so when it snowed, it was hard to get to. The headmaster lived 1hr away on a norm day, and the majority of teachers and students lived in the countryside amd up to 1hr away and relied on a total of 17 buses to ship 1000 students in. I lived 4miles away (one of the closest), but on another hill and the buses would never run. The schools site was also open, meaning none of the buildings were linked inside, so to get to class you had to go outside!!!
[quote][p][bold]alasdair1967[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]uvox44[/bold] wrote: all those moaning about teachers get your facts right- it would be the headmaster /mistress that makes the decision to close a school not the teachers.[/p][/quote]And what reason did they use for closing the schools?[/p][/quote]Mainly health and safety. The school i went to was on a hill.. so when it snowed, it was hard to get to. The headmaster lived 1hr away on a norm day, and the majority of teachers and students lived in the countryside amd up to 1hr away and relied on a total of 17 buses to ship 1000 students in. I lived 4miles away (one of the closest), but on another hill and the buses would never run. The schools site was also open, meaning none of the buildings were linked inside, so to get to class you had to go outside!!! dinkie123

11:27am Sat 19 Jan 13

alasdair1967 says...

sammmymac wrote:
ratio of staff to pupils for safety perhaps as many teachers live a considerable commute from the school they work in. Most likely they decided its less disruptive for parents if they made the decision early and shut schools completely rather than opening, getting all the children bussed in ( assuming buses are running which many weren't ) ,then realising at some point in the day that they will all need to be collected early as the snow was falling and settling and then trying to contact parents and having children leave in dribs and drabs...or not at all if they are dependent on school bus services as many are. Remember when the decision was made at 6am yesterday, it was falling thick and fast as well as drifting and gusting.
Many other employees in other sectors managed to make the commute to work my company had 100% attendance yesterday and these employees had to commute distance to do so
[quote][p][bold]sammmymac[/bold] wrote: ratio of staff to pupils for safety perhaps as many teachers live a considerable commute from the school they work in. Most likely they decided its less disruptive for parents if they made the decision early and shut schools completely rather than opening, getting all the children bussed in ( assuming buses are running which many weren't ) ,then realising at some point in the day that they will all need to be collected early as the snow was falling and settling and then trying to contact parents and having children leave in dribs and drabs...or not at all if they are dependent on school bus services as many are. Remember when the decision was made at 6am yesterday, it was falling thick and fast as well as drifting and gusting.[/p][/quote]Many other employees in other sectors managed to make the commute to work my company had 100% attendance yesterday and these employees had to commute distance to do so alasdair1967

11:30am Sat 19 Jan 13

Bournesouthmouth Downpokes says...

It's not as if it snows that often here in
Bmth. So what's wrong with letting the
children play, make snowmen, ride sleighs
etc. Their mind certainly won't be on
studying if in the classrom anyways.
Different case if it snowed often.

Besides there were a group on boys in
school uniform yesterday throwing
snowballs at cars passing by thinking it
was hilarious. Idiots!

What is wrong with some people??!
It's not as if it snows that often here in Bmth. So what's wrong with letting the children play, make snowmen, ride sleighs etc. Their mind certainly won't be on studying if in the classrom anyways. Different case if it snowed often. Besides there were a group on boys in school uniform yesterday throwing snowballs at cars passing by thinking it was hilarious. Idiots! What is wrong with some people??! Bournesouthmouth Downpokes

11:36am Sat 19 Jan 13

Hessenford says...

sammmymac wrote:
ratio of staff to pupils for safety perhaps as many teachers live a considerable commute from the school they work in. Most likely they decided its less disruptive for parents if they made the decision early and shut schools completely rather than opening, getting all the children bussed in ( assuming buses are running which many weren't ) ,then realising at some point in the day that they will all need to be collected early as the snow was falling and settling and then trying to contact parents and having children leave in dribs and drabs...or not at all if they are dependent on school bus services as many are. Remember when the decision was made at 6am yesterday, it was falling thick and fast as well as drifting and gusting.
And what about the disruption to parents who work while their kids are in school, what about the disruption to employers because these parents cant get to work as they have to look after their children, what about the disruption to parents income as some will not be paid for taking the day off unless they use annual leave, all this disruption because teachers are frightened of a little snow and schools health and safety bonkers.
[quote][p][bold]sammmymac[/bold] wrote: ratio of staff to pupils for safety perhaps as many teachers live a considerable commute from the school they work in. Most likely they decided its less disruptive for parents if they made the decision early and shut schools completely rather than opening, getting all the children bussed in ( assuming buses are running which many weren't ) ,then realising at some point in the day that they will all need to be collected early as the snow was falling and settling and then trying to contact parents and having children leave in dribs and drabs...or not at all if they are dependent on school bus services as many are. Remember when the decision was made at 6am yesterday, it was falling thick and fast as well as drifting and gusting.[/p][/quote]And what about the disruption to parents who work while their kids are in school, what about the disruption to employers because these parents cant get to work as they have to look after their children, what about the disruption to parents income as some will not be paid for taking the day off unless they use annual leave, all this disruption because teachers are frightened of a little snow and schools health and safety bonkers. Hessenford

11:43am Sat 19 Jan 13

Bournesouthmouth Downpokes says...

Hessenford wrote:
sammmymac wrote:
ratio of staff to pupils for safety perhaps as many teachers live a considerable commute from the school they work in. Most likely they decided its less disruptive for parents if they made the decision early and shut schools completely rather than opening, getting all the children bussed in ( assuming buses are running which many weren't ) ,then realising at some point in the day that they will all need to be collected early as the snow was falling and settling and then trying to contact parents and having children leave in dribs and drabs...or not at all if they are dependent on school bus services as many are. Remember when the decision was made at 6am yesterday, it was falling thick and fast as well as drifting and gusting.
And what about the disruption to parents who work while their kids are in school, what about the disruption to employers because these parents cant get to work as they have to look after their children, what about the disruption to parents income as some will not be paid for taking the day off unless they use annual leave, all this disruption because teachers are frightened of a little snow and schools health and safety bonkers.
And what about the disruption due to fact, a large percentage of children are sick right now. Do you have elementary school age children?

I can assure you there are a LOT of sicknesses going around right now.
[quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sammmymac[/bold] wrote: ratio of staff to pupils for safety perhaps as many teachers live a considerable commute from the school they work in. Most likely they decided its less disruptive for parents if they made the decision early and shut schools completely rather than opening, getting all the children bussed in ( assuming buses are running which many weren't ) ,then realising at some point in the day that they will all need to be collected early as the snow was falling and settling and then trying to contact parents and having children leave in dribs and drabs...or not at all if they are dependent on school bus services as many are. Remember when the decision was made at 6am yesterday, it was falling thick and fast as well as drifting and gusting.[/p][/quote]And what about the disruption to parents who work while their kids are in school, what about the disruption to employers because these parents cant get to work as they have to look after their children, what about the disruption to parents income as some will not be paid for taking the day off unless they use annual leave, all this disruption because teachers are frightened of a little snow and schools health and safety bonkers.[/p][/quote]And what about the disruption due to fact, a large percentage of children are sick right now. Do you have elementary school age children? I can assure you there are a LOT of sicknesses going around right now. Bournesouthmouth Downpokes

11:50am Sat 19 Jan 13

Hessenford says...

Bournesouthmouth Downpokes wrote:
Hessenford wrote:
sammmymac wrote:
ratio of staff to pupils for safety perhaps as many teachers live a considerable commute from the school they work in. Most likely they decided its less disruptive for parents if they made the decision early and shut schools completely rather than opening, getting all the children bussed in ( assuming buses are running which many weren't ) ,then realising at some point in the day that they will all need to be collected early as the snow was falling and settling and then trying to contact parents and having children leave in dribs and drabs...or not at all if they are dependent on school bus services as many are. Remember when the decision was made at 6am yesterday, it was falling thick and fast as well as drifting and gusting.
And what about the disruption to parents who work while their kids are in school, what about the disruption to employers because these parents cant get to work as they have to look after their children, what about the disruption to parents income as some will not be paid for taking the day off unless they use annual leave, all this disruption because teachers are frightened of a little snow and schools health and safety bonkers.
And what about the disruption due to fact, a large percentage of children are sick right now. Do you have elementary school age children?

I can assure you there are a LOT of sicknesses going around right now.
That's nothing to do with the snow is it. Everyone gets sick now and again but this isn't the reason the schools were shut, being sick and unable to go to school is different from a little snow flurry being used as an excuse to shut schools.
[quote][p][bold]Bournesouthmouth Downpokes[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]sammmymac[/bold] wrote: ratio of staff to pupils for safety perhaps as many teachers live a considerable commute from the school they work in. Most likely they decided its less disruptive for parents if they made the decision early and shut schools completely rather than opening, getting all the children bussed in ( assuming buses are running which many weren't ) ,then realising at some point in the day that they will all need to be collected early as the snow was falling and settling and then trying to contact parents and having children leave in dribs and drabs...or not at all if they are dependent on school bus services as many are. Remember when the decision was made at 6am yesterday, it was falling thick and fast as well as drifting and gusting.[/p][/quote]And what about the disruption to parents who work while their kids are in school, what about the disruption to employers because these parents cant get to work as they have to look after their children, what about the disruption to parents income as some will not be paid for taking the day off unless they use annual leave, all this disruption because teachers are frightened of a little snow and schools health and safety bonkers.[/p][/quote]And what about the disruption due to fact, a large percentage of children are sick right now. Do you have elementary school age children? I can assure you there are a LOT of sicknesses going around right now.[/p][/quote]That's nothing to do with the snow is it. Everyone gets sick now and again but this isn't the reason the schools were shut, being sick and unable to go to school is different from a little snow flurry being used as an excuse to shut schools. Hessenford

11:56am Sat 19 Jan 13

Bournesouthmouth Downpokes says...

I understand where you are coming from, but most of the children, and some adults might I add, had a joyous fun day yesterday you lot are spouting out such misery from the comfort on you cosy central heated homes.

Yesterday had a win chill factor of -13°C during what was a mini blizzard. Taking a young child out in that, was definitely not something some of us parents of young children were going to risk. Chill guys, enjoy the weekend. We are :)
I understand where you are coming from, but most of the children, and some adults might I add, had a joyous fun day yesterday you lot are spouting out such misery from the comfort on you cosy central heated homes. Yesterday had a win chill factor of -13°C during what was a mini blizzard. Taking a young child out in that, was definitely not something some of us parents of young children were going to risk. Chill guys, enjoy the weekend. We are :) Bournesouthmouth Downpokes

11:56am Sat 19 Jan 13

sammmymac says...

Hessenford: Can I just address a few remarks so that you are equipped with the facts before you say anything else. Teachers dont get teacher training days off! the clue is in the name: 'training' or 'inset days' are when children are not in school and teachers have to get to grips with new government initiatives. These come thick and fast and most are condensed into one day with about a week's worth of reading material to take away. Also since when has Primary teaching been the 'cushier number' ?! Larger classes, more dependent, needier children( and parents!) , same amount of planning and assesment, same hours, slighly less marking the younger you teach but 13 subjects to be responsible for....give it a try why don't you?
Hessenford: Can I just address a few remarks so that you are equipped with the facts before you say anything else. Teachers dont get teacher training days off! the clue is in the name: 'training' or 'inset days' are when children are not in school and teachers have to get to grips with new government initiatives. These come thick and fast and most are condensed into one day with about a week's worth of reading material to take away. Also since when has Primary teaching been the 'cushier number' ?! Larger classes, more dependent, needier children( and parents!) , same amount of planning and assesment, same hours, slighly less marking the younger you teach but 13 subjects to be responsible for....give it a try why don't you? sammmymac

11:58am Sat 19 Jan 13

Bournesouthmouth Downpokes says...

*while you lot are spouting out such
misery from the comfort of your cosy
central heated homes.
*while you lot are spouting out such misery from the comfort of your cosy central heated homes. Bournesouthmouth Downpokes

12:03pm Sat 19 Jan 13

Hessenford says...

sammmymac wrote:
Hessenford: Can I just address a few remarks so that you are equipped with the facts before you say anything else. Teachers dont get teacher training days off! the clue is in the name: 'training' or 'inset days' are when children are not in school and teachers have to get to grips with new government initiatives. These come thick and fast and most are condensed into one day with about a week's worth of reading material to take away. Also since when has Primary teaching been the 'cushier number' ?! Larger classes, more dependent, needier children( and parents!) , same amount of planning and assesment, same hours, slighly less marking the younger you teach but 13 subjects to be responsible for....give it a try why don't you?
Read posts properly before you respond, I never mentioned anything about teacher training days, I never mentioned anything about primary teaching being a cushier number.
I suggest you go back to school and learn to read properly.
[quote][p][bold]sammmymac[/bold] wrote: Hessenford: Can I just address a few remarks so that you are equipped with the facts before you say anything else. Teachers dont get teacher training days off! the clue is in the name: 'training' or 'inset days' are when children are not in school and teachers have to get to grips with new government initiatives. These come thick and fast and most are condensed into one day with about a week's worth of reading material to take away. Also since when has Primary teaching been the 'cushier number' ?! Larger classes, more dependent, needier children( and parents!) , same amount of planning and assesment, same hours, slighly less marking the younger you teach but 13 subjects to be responsible for....give it a try why don't you?[/p][/quote]Read posts properly before you respond, I never mentioned anything about teacher training days, I never mentioned anything about primary teaching being a cushier number. I suggest you go back to school and learn to read properly. Hessenford

12:21pm Sat 19 Jan 13

Bournesouthmouth Downpokes says...

Why can't we all just get along.

Why do we all have to disagree with each other and constantly argue with everyone. Especially on something as trvial as snow.

We as a community should embrace each other. Just saying.
Why can't we all just get along. Why do we all have to disagree with each other and constantly argue with everyone. Especially on something as trvial as snow. We as a community should embrace each other. Just saying. Bournesouthmouth Downpokes

12:21pm Sat 19 Jan 13

Isosceles says...

What is all this fuss about snow, where I live, on the outskirts of Weymuff, there must have been at least 2 mm. of snow which soon disappeared (:o)
What is all this fuss about snow, where I live, on the outskirts of Weymuff, there must have been at least 2 mm. of snow which soon disappeared (:o) Isosceles

12:27pm Sat 19 Jan 13

roguetrader666 says...

Primary school teachers are on exactly the same pay scales as secondary. The difference is that primary schools are inherently smaller so there is less chance of getting inhancements for head of department etc. Teachers get free periods during the day in which they can prepare lessons, mark homework etc. Planning lessons once you have worked as a teacher for more than a year is a non issue because as each new intake comes through you repeat the classes of the previous year. If, as a teacher, you set homework that takes a long time to mark, you are an idiot. Does it take long to mark the homework of a seven year old, given their level of intelligence? Of course not. It's amazing how many people swallow the stories they get spoonfed without questioning them. It's a bit like the politicians mantra of ' tell the electorate the same thing enough times and they end up believing it' Sheep!
Primary school teachers are on exactly the same pay scales as secondary. The difference is that primary schools are inherently smaller so there is less chance of getting inhancements for head of department etc. Teachers get free periods during the day in which they can prepare lessons, mark homework etc. Planning lessons once you have worked as a teacher for more than a year is a non issue because as each new intake comes through you repeat the classes of the previous year. If, as a teacher, you set homework that takes a long time to mark, you are an idiot. Does it take long to mark the homework of a seven year old, given their level of intelligence? Of course not. It's amazing how many people swallow the stories they get spoonfed without questioning them. It's a bit like the politicians mantra of ' tell the electorate the same thing enough times and they end up believing it' Sheep! roguetrader666

12:31pm Sat 19 Jan 13

Hessenford says...

Bournesouthmouth Downpokes wrote:
Why can't we all just get along.

Why do we all have to disagree with each other and constantly argue with everyone. Especially on something as trvial as snow.

We as a community should embrace each other. Just saying.
Probably because there are those of us that make an effort what ever the weather and there are those who use any excuse to take a day off citing health and safety issues, most people these days need to grow a pair and adjust and adapt their lives to the conditions on the day.
[quote][p][bold]Bournesouthmouth Downpokes[/bold] wrote: Why can't we all just get along. Why do we all have to disagree with each other and constantly argue with everyone. Especially on something as trvial as snow. We as a community should embrace each other. Just saying.[/p][/quote]Probably because there are those of us that make an effort what ever the weather and there are those who use any excuse to take a day off citing health and safety issues, most people these days need to grow a pair and adjust and adapt their lives to the conditions on the day. Hessenford

12:33pm Sat 19 Jan 13

burgerboy says...

alasdair1967 wrote:
uvox44 wrote:
all those moaning about teachers get your facts right- it would be the headmaster /mistress that makes the decision to close a school not the teachers.
And what reason did they use for closing the schools?
Its simple ,for every day lost when the school is closed due to adverse weather or sickness or failed heating or any other excuse make the school open at the end of that term to make up for the equivalent amount of days lost.
[quote][p][bold]alasdair1967[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]uvox44[/bold] wrote: all those moaning about teachers get your facts right- it would be the headmaster /mistress that makes the decision to close a school not the teachers.[/p][/quote]And what reason did they use for closing the schools?[/p][/quote]Its simple ,for every day lost when the school is closed due to adverse weather or sickness or failed heating or any other excuse make the school open at the end of that term to make up for the equivalent amount of days lost. burgerboy

12:35pm Sat 19 Jan 13

Bournesouthmouth Downpokes says...

"Does it take long to
mark the homework of a seven year old,
given their level of intelligence? Of
course not."


what would you know, and a lot of 7 year olds are probably more intelligent than many on here. my child figures out technical stuff on their laptop and ps3 that I never knew was possible. Unless you are an ACTIVE parent yourself be advise to think before you type.

rouguetrader666, what a lovely name by the way

related to football banning order yob by any chance?
"Does it take long to mark the homework of a seven year old, given their level of intelligence? Of course not." what would you know, and a lot of 7 year olds are probably more intelligent than many on here. my child figures out technical stuff on their laptop and ps3 that I never knew was possible. Unless you are an ACTIVE parent yourself be advise to think before you type. rouguetrader666, what a lovely name by the way related to football banning order yob by any chance? Bournesouthmouth Downpokes

12:55pm Sat 19 Jan 13

gundimore81 says...

the pavements and pedestrian area in boscombe had not been touched by any council workers or gritters. even for able-bodied people they were hazardous. i can only assume that health and safety prevents council workers from clearing them due to risk of them falling and sustaining injuries. if the snow and slush had frozen overnight the risk would have greatly increased especially adjacent to road crossing points.
the pavements and pedestrian area in boscombe had not been touched by any council workers or gritters. even for able-bodied people they were hazardous. i can only assume that health and safety prevents council workers from clearing them due to risk of them falling and sustaining injuries. if the snow and slush had frozen overnight the risk would have greatly increased especially adjacent to road crossing points. gundimore81

1:06pm Sat 19 Jan 13

BournemouthMum says...

roguetrader666 wrote:
Primary school teachers are on exactly the same pay scales as secondary. The difference is that primary schools are inherently smaller so there is less chance of getting inhancements for head of department etc. Teachers get free periods during the day in which they can prepare lessons, mark homework etc. Planning lessons once you have worked as a teacher for more than a year is a non issue because as each new intake comes through you repeat the classes of the previous year. If, as a teacher, you set homework that takes a long time to mark, you are an idiot. Does it take long to mark the homework of a seven year old, given their level of intelligence? Of course not. It's amazing how many people swallow the stories they get spoonfed without questioning them. It's a bit like the politicians mantra of ' tell the electorate the same thing enough times and they end up believing it' Sheep!
We'll have to agree to differ on that then won't we. I still think it is pretty poorly paid considering the responsibility it involves.
[quote][p][bold]roguetrader666[/bold] wrote: Primary school teachers are on exactly the same pay scales as secondary. The difference is that primary schools are inherently smaller so there is less chance of getting inhancements for head of department etc. Teachers get free periods during the day in which they can prepare lessons, mark homework etc. Planning lessons once you have worked as a teacher for more than a year is a non issue because as each new intake comes through you repeat the classes of the previous year. If, as a teacher, you set homework that takes a long time to mark, you are an idiot. Does it take long to mark the homework of a seven year old, given their level of intelligence? Of course not. It's amazing how many people swallow the stories they get spoonfed without questioning them. It's a bit like the politicians mantra of ' tell the electorate the same thing enough times and they end up believing it' Sheep![/p][/quote]We'll have to agree to differ on that then won't we. I still think it is pretty poorly paid considering the responsibility it involves. BournemouthMum

1:16pm Sat 19 Jan 13

Baywolf says...

uvox44 wrote:
all those moaning about teachers get your facts right- it would be the headmaster /mistress that makes the decision to close a school not the teachers.
Yes but only after half the staff phone in saying they can't make it in
[quote][p][bold]uvox44[/bold] wrote: all those moaning about teachers get your facts right- it would be the headmaster /mistress that makes the decision to close a school not the teachers.[/p][/quote]Yes but only after half the staff phone in saying they can't make it in Baywolf

1:22pm Sat 19 Jan 13

hamworthygirl says...

my daughter went to work to her dental surgery but was sent home early as most of her bosses and other staff didnt make it. She has to lose a the missing hours pay or take it as holiday even though her and another colleague bothered to go in, hardly seems fair really.
my daughter went to work to her dental surgery but was sent home early as most of her bosses and other staff didnt make it. She has to lose a the missing hours pay or take it as holiday even though her and another colleague bothered to go in, hardly seems fair really. hamworthygirl

2:10pm Sat 19 Jan 13

alasdair1967 says...

hamworthygirl wrote:
my daughter went to work to her dental surgery but was sent home early as most of her bosses and other staff didnt make it. She has to lose a the missing hours pay or take it as holiday even though her and another colleague bothered to go in, hardly seems fair really.
It is not fair at all her employers need to hang there head in shame at least your daughter made it to her place of work and was willing to work therefore why should she be financially penalised
[quote][p][bold]hamworthygirl[/bold] wrote: my daughter went to work to her dental surgery but was sent home early as most of her bosses and other staff didnt make it. She has to lose a the missing hours pay or take it as holiday even though her and another colleague bothered to go in, hardly seems fair really.[/p][/quote]It is not fair at all her employers need to hang there head in shame at least your daughter made it to her place of work and was willing to work therefore why should she be financially penalised alasdair1967

2:38pm Sat 19 Jan 13

sammmymac says...

just read in the paper copy of the echo that a local secondary school did actually open and guess what....only a quarter of the children bothered turning up anyway....most of them were gone by lunch time to meet their friends and have fun in the snow! What a waste of time and effort for all the staff then they couldn't teach the lessons they had planned because 75% of the children would miss them so.....may have well shut in the first place perhaps.
just read in the paper copy of the echo that a local secondary school did actually open and guess what....only a quarter of the children bothered turning up anyway....most of them were gone by lunch time to meet their friends and have fun in the snow! What a waste of time and effort for all the staff then they couldn't teach the lessons they had planned because 75% of the children would miss them so.....may have well shut in the first place perhaps. sammmymac

2:58pm Sat 19 Jan 13

Chiqqy says...

I cycled to work yesterday at about 11:30am. It was great, there was hardly anyone on the road, not like a normal Friday. My bike (a mountain bike) coped fine and so did I. Just wore lots of layers.

I don't remember if my school was closed in 1991 when we had bad snow, it might have been a weekend because I remember the school disco being cancelled. I expect the canadians etc are laughing at us and our inability to cope with a tiny bit of snow.
I cycled to work yesterday at about 11:30am. It was great, there was hardly anyone on the road, not like a normal Friday. My bike (a mountain bike) coped fine and so did I. Just wore lots of layers. I don't remember if my school was closed in 1991 when we had bad snow, it might have been a weekend because I remember the school disco being cancelled. I expect the canadians etc are laughing at us and our inability to cope with a tiny bit of snow. Chiqqy

3:42pm Sat 19 Jan 13

bevers67 says...

the guy helping every one on Alder hills was my brother in law David wilde ,he did a brilliant job ,his wife has the sandwich shop (wilde fillngs) on alder hills who supplied nice hot bacon rolls ..Well done you two ..
the guy helping every one on Alder hills was my brother in law David wilde ,he did a brilliant job ,his wife has the sandwich shop (wilde fillngs) on alder hills who supplied nice hot bacon rolls ..Well done you two .. bevers67

4:05pm Sat 19 Jan 13

alasdair1967 says...

sammmymac wrote:
just read in the paper copy of the echo that a local secondary school did actually open and guess what....only a quarter of the children bothered turning up anyway....most of them were gone by lunch time to meet their friends and have fun in the snow! What a waste of time and effort for all the staff then they couldn't teach the lessons they had planned because 75% of the children would miss them so.....may have well shut in the first place perhaps.
But at least they opened and well done to the headmaster teachers and governors for having the backbone not only to open but to make the journey to work
[quote][p][bold]sammmymac[/bold] wrote: just read in the paper copy of the echo that a local secondary school did actually open and guess what....only a quarter of the children bothered turning up anyway....most of them were gone by lunch time to meet their friends and have fun in the snow! What a waste of time and effort for all the staff then they couldn't teach the lessons they had planned because 75% of the children would miss them so.....may have well shut in the first place perhaps.[/p][/quote]But at least they opened and well done to the headmaster teachers and governors for having the backbone not only to open but to make the journey to work alasdair1967

4:13pm Sat 19 Jan 13

ben12341979 says...

BORING!!!!!!! This is yesterdays news being reported again?!!
BORING!!!!!!! This is yesterdays news being reported again?!! ben12341979

6:29pm Sat 19 Jan 13

Carolyn43 says...

burgerboy wrote:
alasdair1967 wrote:
uvox44 wrote:
all those moaning about teachers get your facts right- it would be the headmaster /mistress that makes the decision to close a school not the teachers.
And what reason did they use for closing the schools?
Its simple ,for every day lost when the school is closed due to adverse weather or sickness or failed heating or any other excuse make the school open at the end of that term to make up for the equivalent amount of days lost.
Are you saying you'd like schools to take children off the hands of parents for extra days at the end of term if they've had to shut during term time?
Most parents complain about schools being closed because it incoveniences them - why have children if they're going to be an inconvenience?
......
The NHS doesn't close because they're not likely to get sued if little Johnny breaks his arm in the snow, unlike if he does the same thing while at school. Parents blame teachers for everything; I was even blamed for one 14 year-old girl getting pregnant because I hadn't taught her enough about contraception. Nothing to do with her parents both working evenings and leaving her at home in the house alone with her boyfriend.
[quote][p][bold]burgerboy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]alasdair1967[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]uvox44[/bold] wrote: all those moaning about teachers get your facts right- it would be the headmaster /mistress that makes the decision to close a school not the teachers.[/p][/quote]And what reason did they use for closing the schools?[/p][/quote]Its simple ,for every day lost when the school is closed due to adverse weather or sickness or failed heating or any other excuse make the school open at the end of that term to make up for the equivalent amount of days lost.[/p][/quote]Are you saying you'd like schools to take children off the hands of parents for extra days at the end of term if they've had to shut during term time? Most parents complain about schools being closed because it incoveniences them - why have children if they're going to be an inconvenience? ...... The NHS doesn't close because they're not likely to get sued if little Johnny breaks his arm in the snow, unlike if he does the same thing while at school. Parents blame teachers for everything; I was even blamed for one 14 year-old girl getting pregnant because I hadn't taught her enough about contraception. Nothing to do with her parents both working evenings and leaving her at home in the house alone with her boyfriend. Carolyn43

8:31pm Sat 19 Jan 13

High Treason says...

It would appear the area is full of jealous whiners who haven't a clue about being a teacher.
The headmaster/mistress makes the decision to not open the school. Based on if the buses are running, if the staff who live a fair distance away are able to get to school, many use buses, dependant on the weather forecast and if it is safe for those that walk to school. The teachers I know did not sit at home watching TV, they marked papers,mock exams, course work and research for future changes to the curriculum. Maybe the jealous whiners should teach their children at home. Ooops, not possible due to lack of knowledge, no patience, afraid of hard work and would interfere with their TV schedule.
It would appear the area is full of jealous whiners who haven't a clue about being a teacher. The headmaster/mistress makes the decision to not open the school. Based on if the buses are running, if the staff who live a fair distance away are able to get to school, many use buses, dependant on the weather forecast and if it is safe for those that walk to school. The teachers I know did not sit at home watching TV, they marked papers,mock exams, course work and research for future changes to the curriculum. Maybe the jealous whiners should teach their children at home. Ooops, not possible due to lack of knowledge, no patience, afraid of hard work and would interfere with their TV schedule. High Treason

10:31pm Sat 19 Jan 13

Hessenford says...

High Treason wrote:
It would appear the area is full of jealous whiners who haven't a clue about being a teacher.
The headmaster/mistress makes the decision to not open the school. Based on if the buses are running, if the staff who live a fair distance away are able to get to school, many use buses, dependant on the weather forecast and if it is safe for those that walk to school. The teachers I know did not sit at home watching TV, they marked papers,mock exams, course work and research for future changes to the curriculum. Maybe the jealous whiners should teach their children at home. Ooops, not possible due to lack of knowledge, no patience, afraid of hard work and would interfere with their TV schedule.
Oh yea, teachers are so hard done by aren't they, schools were shut before a single snowflake had hit the ground, and then only one days worth, why is it always only schools that actually shut down when we get a little snow flurry.
[quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: It would appear the area is full of jealous whiners who haven't a clue about being a teacher. The headmaster/mistress makes the decision to not open the school. Based on if the buses are running, if the staff who live a fair distance away are able to get to school, many use buses, dependant on the weather forecast and if it is safe for those that walk to school. The teachers I know did not sit at home watching TV, they marked papers,mock exams, course work and research for future changes to the curriculum. Maybe the jealous whiners should teach their children at home. Ooops, not possible due to lack of knowledge, no patience, afraid of hard work and would interfere with their TV schedule.[/p][/quote]Oh yea, teachers are so hard done by aren't they, schools were shut before a single snowflake had hit the ground, and then only one days worth, why is it always only schools that actually shut down when we get a little snow flurry. Hessenford

6:45am Sun 20 Jan 13

luda says...

Once agian a little snow and everything stops. Years ago in Yorkshire if you could not make it to work because of the snow, then you reported to the council depot, where they issued you with a shovel and set you to work in teams to clear up the snow, now it`s a excuse for a day off work. Last winter I was in the Ukraine, -32c and the schools and roads are still open the only problem was fuel freezing.
Once agian a little snow and everything stops. Years ago in Yorkshire if you could not make it to work because of the snow, then you reported to the council depot, where they issued you with a shovel and set you to work in teams to clear up the snow, now it`s a excuse for a day off work. Last winter I was in the Ukraine, -32c and the schools and roads are still open the only problem was fuel freezing. luda

8:25am Sun 20 Jan 13

Carolyn43 says...

Hessenford wrote:
High Treason wrote:
It would appear the area is full of jealous whiners who haven't a clue about being a teacher.
The headmaster/mistress makes the decision to not open the school. Based on if the buses are running, if the staff who live a fair distance away are able to get to school, many use buses, dependant on the weather forecast and if it is safe for those that walk to school. The teachers I know did not sit at home watching TV, they marked papers,mock exams, course work and research for future changes to the curriculum. Maybe the jealous whiners should teach their children at home. Ooops, not possible due to lack of knowledge, no patience, afraid of hard work and would interfere with their TV schedule.
Oh yea, teachers are so hard done by aren't they, schools were shut before a single snowflake had hit the ground, and then only one days worth, why is it always only schools that actually shut down when we get a little snow flurry.
I've done various jobs - secretary, accounting clerk, lab technician, stable hand, cleaner and teacher. The hardest of those in terms of long hours (research, preparation, marking, reporting, meeting parents, attending meetings, attending courses, reading up on government legislation, surrogate parenting .......), dedication, concentration, frustration but mostly satisfaction, was teaching. I do wish those who criticise teachers would have the courage to spend four years at college and then try the job - you obviously think you can do it better and you'd have a nasty shock. I'm retired, and wouldn't do it nowadays - there are too many criticising when they know nothing about just what the job entails - all they see is the myth of working 9 am to 3.30 pm and long holidays. It's totally demoralising to know what people really think of teachers and what they do. That's apart from being expected to make sure that around 30 children are totally safe as soon as they enter the school gates, and do not get hurt in any way particularly when it snows - look out for the wrath of parents if they do.
[quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: It would appear the area is full of jealous whiners who haven't a clue about being a teacher. The headmaster/mistress makes the decision to not open the school. Based on if the buses are running, if the staff who live a fair distance away are able to get to school, many use buses, dependant on the weather forecast and if it is safe for those that walk to school. The teachers I know did not sit at home watching TV, they marked papers,mock exams, course work and research for future changes to the curriculum. Maybe the jealous whiners should teach their children at home. Ooops, not possible due to lack of knowledge, no patience, afraid of hard work and would interfere with their TV schedule.[/p][/quote]Oh yea, teachers are so hard done by aren't they, schools were shut before a single snowflake had hit the ground, and then only one days worth, why is it always only schools that actually shut down when we get a little snow flurry.[/p][/quote]I've done various jobs - secretary, accounting clerk, lab technician, stable hand, cleaner and teacher. The hardest of those in terms of long hours (research, preparation, marking, reporting, meeting parents, attending meetings, attending courses, reading up on government legislation, surrogate parenting .......), dedication, concentration, frustration but mostly satisfaction, was teaching. I do wish those who criticise teachers would have the courage to spend four years at college and then try the job - you obviously think you can do it better and you'd have a nasty shock. I'm retired, and wouldn't do it nowadays - there are too many criticising when they know nothing about just what the job entails - all they see is the myth of working 9 am to 3.30 pm and long holidays. It's totally demoralising to know what people really think of teachers and what they do. That's apart from being expected to make sure that around 30 children are totally safe as soon as they enter the school gates, and do not get hurt in any way particularly when it snows - look out for the wrath of parents if they do. Carolyn43

10:54am Sun 20 Jan 13

Hessenford says...

Carolyn43 wrote:
Hessenford wrote:
High Treason wrote:
It would appear the area is full of jealous whiners who haven't a clue about being a teacher.
The headmaster/mistress makes the decision to not open the school. Based on if the buses are running, if the staff who live a fair distance away are able to get to school, many use buses, dependant on the weather forecast and if it is safe for those that walk to school. The teachers I know did not sit at home watching TV, they marked papers,mock exams, course work and research for future changes to the curriculum. Maybe the jealous whiners should teach their children at home. Ooops, not possible due to lack of knowledge, no patience, afraid of hard work and would interfere with their TV schedule.
Oh yea, teachers are so hard done by aren't they, schools were shut before a single snowflake had hit the ground, and then only one days worth, why is it always only schools that actually shut down when we get a little snow flurry.
I've done various jobs - secretary, accounting clerk, lab technician, stable hand, cleaner and teacher. The hardest of those in terms of long hours (research, preparation, marking, reporting, meeting parents, attending meetings, attending courses, reading up on government legislation, surrogate parenting .......), dedication, concentration, frustration but mostly satisfaction, was teaching. I do wish those who criticise teachers would have the courage to spend four years at college and then try the job - you obviously think you can do it better and you'd have a nasty shock. I'm retired, and wouldn't do it nowadays - there are too many criticising when they know nothing about just what the job entails - all they see is the myth of working 9 am to 3.30 pm and long holidays. It's totally demoralising to know what people really think of teachers and what they do. That's apart from being expected to make sure that around 30 children are totally safe as soon as they enter the school gates, and do not get hurt in any way particularly when it snows - look out for the wrath of parents if they do.
As opposed to nursing staff who spend years as a student nurse on very low pay in order to qualify, who also attend numerous courses to keep up on new legislation, work 12 to 14 hour shifts, who deal with high levels of aggression from violent patients but are still extremely dedicated in the care of everybody, adults and children.
But of course they still urn up for work during bad weather, perhaps you should try nursing they have more reason to use the excuse of snow to take the day off.
[quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: It would appear the area is full of jealous whiners who haven't a clue about being a teacher. The headmaster/mistress makes the decision to not open the school. Based on if the buses are running, if the staff who live a fair distance away are able to get to school, many use buses, dependant on the weather forecast and if it is safe for those that walk to school. The teachers I know did not sit at home watching TV, they marked papers,mock exams, course work and research for future changes to the curriculum. Maybe the jealous whiners should teach their children at home. Ooops, not possible due to lack of knowledge, no patience, afraid of hard work and would interfere with their TV schedule.[/p][/quote]Oh yea, teachers are so hard done by aren't they, schools were shut before a single snowflake had hit the ground, and then only one days worth, why is it always only schools that actually shut down when we get a little snow flurry.[/p][/quote]I've done various jobs - secretary, accounting clerk, lab technician, stable hand, cleaner and teacher. The hardest of those in terms of long hours (research, preparation, marking, reporting, meeting parents, attending meetings, attending courses, reading up on government legislation, surrogate parenting .......), dedication, concentration, frustration but mostly satisfaction, was teaching. I do wish those who criticise teachers would have the courage to spend four years at college and then try the job - you obviously think you can do it better and you'd have a nasty shock. I'm retired, and wouldn't do it nowadays - there are too many criticising when they know nothing about just what the job entails - all they see is the myth of working 9 am to 3.30 pm and long holidays. It's totally demoralising to know what people really think of teachers and what they do. That's apart from being expected to make sure that around 30 children are totally safe as soon as they enter the school gates, and do not get hurt in any way particularly when it snows - look out for the wrath of parents if they do.[/p][/quote]As opposed to nursing staff who spend years as a student nurse on very low pay in order to qualify, who also attend numerous courses to keep up on new legislation, work 12 to 14 hour shifts, who deal with high levels of aggression from violent patients but are still extremely dedicated in the care of everybody, adults and children. But of course they still urn up for work during bad weather, perhaps you should try nursing they have more reason to use the excuse of snow to take the day off. Hessenford

1:11pm Sun 20 Jan 13

guisselle says...

I agree Nurses and Doctors surgeons
and vets probably, farmers as well.
I agree Nurses and Doctors surgeons and vets probably, farmers as well. guisselle

7:52pm Sun 20 Jan 13

Carolyn43 says...

I didn't say anything derogatory about nurses or any other profession. All medical staff are brilliant and I have nothing but admiration for them.
.......
I just said that those who think teachers have it easy should try it so they know what they are talking about. It isn't the easy job that most seem to think it is. Why anyone would want to do it nowadays in the face of such obvious contempt as is shown by many is beyond me.
......
And what many still don't seem to grasp is that is isn't the teachers who decide whether or not a school stays open in snow or on any other occasion.
I didn't say anything derogatory about nurses or any other profession. All medical staff are brilliant and I have nothing but admiration for them. ....... I just said that those who think teachers have it easy should try it so they know what they are talking about. It isn't the easy job that most seem to think it is. Why anyone would want to do it nowadays in the face of such obvious contempt as is shown by many is beyond me. ...... And what many still don't seem to grasp is that is isn't the teachers who decide whether or not a school stays open in snow or on any other occasion. Carolyn43

8:50pm Sun 20 Jan 13

Hessenford says...

Carolyn43 wrote:
I didn't say anything derogatory about nurses or any other profession. All medical staff are brilliant and I have nothing but admiration for them.
.......
I just said that those who think teachers have it easy should try it so they know what they are talking about. It isn't the easy job that most seem to think it is. Why anyone would want to do it nowadays in the face of such obvious contempt as is shown by many is beyond me.
......
And what many still don't seem to grasp is that is isn't the teachers who decide whether or not a school stays open in snow or on any other occasion.
The contempt is bought on by themselves, irrespective of who makes the decision to close schools, at the mention of inclement weather schools are the first and only progression which completely shuts down while others make the effort through bad conditions to get to work, teachers also still get paid for having the time off while others who live in the sticks and literally cant get into work lose a days pay.
[quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: I didn't say anything derogatory about nurses or any other profession. All medical staff are brilliant and I have nothing but admiration for them. ....... I just said that those who think teachers have it easy should try it so they know what they are talking about. It isn't the easy job that most seem to think it is. Why anyone would want to do it nowadays in the face of such obvious contempt as is shown by many is beyond me. ...... And what many still don't seem to grasp is that is isn't the teachers who decide whether or not a school stays open in snow or on any other occasion.[/p][/quote]The contempt is bought on by themselves, irrespective of who makes the decision to close schools, at the mention of inclement weather schools are the first and only progression which completely shuts down while others make the effort through bad conditions to get to work, teachers also still get paid for having the time off while others who live in the sticks and literally cant get into work lose a days pay. Hessenford

11:39pm Sun 20 Jan 13

s-pb2 says...

Bournesouthmouth Downpokes wrote:
Why can't we all just get along.

Why do we all have to disagree with each other and constantly argue with everyone. Especially on something as trvial as snow.

We as a community should embrace each other. Just saying.
Incredible irony in your comments after the Boscombe story earlier in the week where you heavily criticised anybody who dared say they lived normally in Boscombe with no problem, and walked through Boscombe unaccosted. You called them delusional and dumbfounded, and now all of a sudden you are talking about community!!! What a hypocrite!!
[quote][p][bold]Bournesouthmouth Downpokes[/bold] wrote: Why can't we all just get along. Why do we all have to disagree with each other and constantly argue with everyone. Especially on something as trvial as snow. We as a community should embrace each other. Just saying.[/p][/quote]Incredible irony in your comments after the Boscombe story earlier in the week where you heavily criticised anybody who dared say they lived normally in Boscombe with no problem, and walked through Boscombe unaccosted. You called them delusional and dumbfounded, and now all of a sudden you are talking about community!!! What a hypocrite!! s-pb2

8:06am Mon 21 Jan 13

Carolyn43 says...

Hessenford wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
I didn't say anything derogatory about nurses or any other profession. All medical staff are brilliant and I have nothing but admiration for them.
.......
I just said that those who think teachers have it easy should try it so they know what they are talking about. It isn't the easy job that most seem to think it is. Why anyone would want to do it nowadays in the face of such obvious contempt as is shown by many is beyond me.
......
And what many still don't seem to grasp is that is isn't the teachers who decide whether or not a school stays open in snow or on any other occasion.
The contempt is bought on by themselves, irrespective of who makes the decision to close schools, at the mention of inclement weather schools are the first and only progression which completely shuts down while others make the effort through bad conditions to get to work, teachers also still get paid for having the time off while others who live in the sticks and literally cant get into work lose a days pay.
And you still don't get it. Schools close for the safety of the pupils and for no other reason.
[quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: I didn't say anything derogatory about nurses or any other profession. All medical staff are brilliant and I have nothing but admiration for them. ....... I just said that those who think teachers have it easy should try it so they know what they are talking about. It isn't the easy job that most seem to think it is. Why anyone would want to do it nowadays in the face of such obvious contempt as is shown by many is beyond me. ...... And what many still don't seem to grasp is that is isn't the teachers who decide whether or not a school stays open in snow or on any other occasion.[/p][/quote]The contempt is bought on by themselves, irrespective of who makes the decision to close schools, at the mention of inclement weather schools are the first and only progression which completely shuts down while others make the effort through bad conditions to get to work, teachers also still get paid for having the time off while others who live in the sticks and literally cant get into work lose a days pay.[/p][/quote]And you still don't get it. Schools close for the safety of the pupils and for no other reason. Carolyn43

8:10am Mon 21 Jan 13

Carolyn43 says...

Forgot to add, presumably you heard on the local news that some schools in Hampshire are opening an hour late to allow time for the teachers and caretaking staff to clear ice and grit the playgrounds to make to make them safe for pupils.
Forgot to add, presumably you heard on the local news that some schools in Hampshire are opening an hour late to allow time for the teachers and caretaking staff to clear ice and grit the playgrounds to make to make them safe for pupils. Carolyn43

8:33am Mon 21 Jan 13

Hessenford says...

Carolyn43 wrote:
Hessenford wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
I didn't say anything derogatory about nurses or any other profession. All medical staff are brilliant and I have nothing but admiration for them.
.......
I just said that those who think teachers have it easy should try it so they know what they are talking about. It isn't the easy job that most seem to think it is. Why anyone would want to do it nowadays in the face of such obvious contempt as is shown by many is beyond me.
......
And what many still don't seem to grasp is that is isn't the teachers who decide whether or not a school stays open in snow or on any other occasion.
The contempt is bought on by themselves, irrespective of who makes the decision to close schools, at the mention of inclement weather schools are the first and only progression which completely shuts down while others make the effort through bad conditions to get to work, teachers also still get paid for having the time off while others who live in the sticks and literally cant get into work lose a days pay.
And you still don't get it. Schools close for the safety of the pupils and for no other reason.
Oh Yea, that old chestnut.
[quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: I didn't say anything derogatory about nurses or any other profession. All medical staff are brilliant and I have nothing but admiration for them. ....... I just said that those who think teachers have it easy should try it so they know what they are talking about. It isn't the easy job that most seem to think it is. Why anyone would want to do it nowadays in the face of such obvious contempt as is shown by many is beyond me. ...... And what many still don't seem to grasp is that is isn't the teachers who decide whether or not a school stays open in snow or on any other occasion.[/p][/quote]The contempt is bought on by themselves, irrespective of who makes the decision to close schools, at the mention of inclement weather schools are the first and only progression which completely shuts down while others make the effort through bad conditions to get to work, teachers also still get paid for having the time off while others who live in the sticks and literally cant get into work lose a days pay.[/p][/quote]And you still don't get it. Schools close for the safety of the pupils and for no other reason.[/p][/quote]Oh Yea, that old chestnut. Hessenford

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