Now Ringwood School bans girl from lessons for having red hair

Bournemouth Echo: Alisha Kay-Tyler, who was banned from lessons at Ringwood School because of her dyed red hair Alisha Kay-Tyler, who was banned from lessons at Ringwood School because of her dyed red hair

A SECOND mum has criticised a Hampshire school after her daughter was placed in isolation – for having her hair dyed dark red.

Alisha Kay-Tyler was taken out of classes at Ringwood School today after turning up with her new haircut.

The 13-year-old’s furious mum, Sarah Kay, accused the school of “over-reacting” because her daughter had been told the “unnatural” hair colour would distract other pupils.

It comes just days after the Daily Echo reported how Year 8 pupil Billie Halford was taken out of the same school temporarily by her mum after she was placed in isolation because of hair pink dip dye hairstyle.

Bosses at the Parsonage Barn Lane school say there are strict policies in place over youngsters’ appearance, which all parents sign up to when they send their children there.

Sarah, from Poulner, said she had only allowed Alisha to have her hair dyed once she was satisfied it would not be an outlandish colour.

She told the Daily Echo: “If it was up to Alisha I can guarantee that her hair would be dip-died pink too, but I know that’s unacceptable.

“It’s not really an unnatural colour. It’s quite dark and it’s quite nice. Her natural colour has a lot of red in it anyway.

“If it was bright pink or blue or orange then that’s fair enough, but it’s in no means offensive – I think that’s the word they used.

“They’ve just taken it way too far.”

Sarah said she has now had to take Alisha, a Year 9 pupil, back to the salon where her hair had been dyed to have it coloured again, this time a dark brown, costing £40.

She said: “I don’t agree that she should have it done again, especially within 24 hours because that’s not good for her hair, but I’m doing it because she will miss school.

“She was going to be in isolation until it’s gone and I think that’s disgusting. That’s for children who have been naughty.

“I would have made a stand against this but the whole time she would be missing out on school. But I’m going to be writing to the school and speaking to the head teacher.”

Ringwood’s head, Chris Edwards was not immediately available for comment this afternoon.

But in response to the earlier row over Billie’s hair, she said: “At Ringwood School we have very clear rules with regard to appearance and uniform which parents agree to when they send their child to the school.

“Our rules state that hair should be traditionally styled – extremes of fashion such as shaved hair, beads, braids, unnatural tints, dyes and highlights are not acceptable.

“If a student arrives at school with inappropriate uniform or appearance arrangements are made to continue with learning in isolation while contact is made with parents to arrange to resolve the problem.”

Comments (31)

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5:47pm Thu 17 Jan 13

BournemouthMum says...

Good grief where do these morons come from?
Good grief where do these morons come from? BournemouthMum

6:02pm Thu 17 Jan 13

speedy231278 says...

Another one wanting their five minutes of fame. Move along, nothing to see. Mind the snow.
Another one wanting their five minutes of fame. Move along, nothing to see. Mind the snow. speedy231278

6:02pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Old Colonial says...

Please Echo, stop giving publicity to these people. Leave them do their own bleating on Facebook etc.
Please Echo, stop giving publicity to these people. Leave them do their own bleating on Facebook etc. Old Colonial

6:09pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Pablo23 says...

Its looks like a fairly natural unoffensive colour to me.

What next, ban gingers?
Its looks like a fairly natural unoffensive colour to me. What next, ban gingers? Pablo23

6:30pm Thu 17 Jan 13

ragj195 says...

Why do 13 year olds need to dye their ***** hair?

School isn't a fashion show and when you're old enough to leave, you'll have all the time in the world to do what you want.
Why do 13 year olds need to dye their ***** hair? School isn't a fashion show and when you're old enough to leave, you'll have all the time in the world to do what you want. ragj195

6:35pm Thu 17 Jan 13

ragj195 says...

Add to that the school has no choice but to be objective. They can't have a subjective view on each child with their hair dyed as everyone would have different views on whether the dye was over the top. They'd need to delegate someone to deal with all the moaning from parents demanding that their child should be the exception. What a total nightmare parents can be. Who'd want to be a teacher.
Add to that the school has no choice but to be objective. They can't have a subjective view on each child with their hair dyed as everyone would have different views on whether the dye was over the top. They'd need to delegate someone to deal with all the moaning from parents demanding that their child should be the exception. What a total nightmare parents can be. Who'd want to be a teacher. ragj195

6:42pm Thu 17 Jan 13

s-pb2 says...

This isnt unusual. Schools will wash their hands of anyone they dont want to teach. All they are interested in are there Ofsted reports and exam marks. So all learning in isolation is doing is costing the taxpayer more and teaching children its not right to be an individual, no wonder this country's young are so apathetic when it comes to politics. The school should grow up and stop whinging and do what they are supposed to be doing and stop wasting everybodys time and money.
This isnt unusual. Schools will wash their hands of anyone they dont want to teach. All they are interested in are there Ofsted reports and exam marks. So all learning in isolation is doing is costing the taxpayer more and teaching children its not right to be an individual, no wonder this country's young are so apathetic when it comes to politics. The school should grow up and stop whinging and do what they are supposed to be doing and stop wasting everybodys time and money. s-pb2

6:59pm Thu 17 Jan 13

BournemouthMum says...

If I was head of that school (or any school) and someone broke the rules I'd exclude them - end of. Far too much leniency is shown to those who can't abide by even the simplist rules. If these parents think the rules don't apply to their little darlings then let them educate their own children.
If I was head of that school (or any school) and someone broke the rules I'd exclude them - end of. Far too much leniency is shown to those who can't abide by even the simplist rules. If these parents think the rules don't apply to their little darlings then let them educate their own children. BournemouthMum

7:01pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Carolyn43 says...

If they want to do things adults do and not be the children they are, then let them leave school at 14 and do a full day's work like they used to do.
If they want to do things adults do and not be the children they are, then let them leave school at 14 and do a full day's work like they used to do. Carolyn43

7:21pm Thu 17 Jan 13

sea poole says...

s-pb2 -So what rules do you think schools should adopt...if any? Bit sweeping some of your comments. Been reading too much Daily Mail?
s-pb2 -So what rules do you think schools should adopt...if any? Bit sweeping some of your comments. Been reading too much Daily Mail? sea poole

7:33pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Bob49 says...

"and teaching children its not right to be an individual, no wonder this country's young are so apathetic when it comes to politics."

Stop being ridiculous. It is not being 'individual' it is daft parents indulging children, An indulgence that is far more likely to have them ever feel they have to take responsibility for their lives or recognise the world doesn't revolve solely around them.

If a parent is happy to spend £80 plus in dyeing her child's hair then I doubt either will be much bothered by politics.

As to the logical conclusion to your absurd claim, then interest in politics was more prevelant in times past because schools were NOT so strict !

ye gods, it beggars belief
"and teaching children its not right to be an individual, no wonder this country's young are so apathetic when it comes to politics." Stop being ridiculous. It is not being 'individual' it is daft parents indulging children, An indulgence that is far more likely to have them ever feel they have to take responsibility for their lives or recognise the world doesn't revolve solely around them. If a parent is happy to spend £80 plus in dyeing her child's hair then I doubt either will be much bothered by politics. As to the logical conclusion to your absurd claim, then interest in politics was more prevelant in times past because schools were NOT so strict ! ye gods, it beggars belief Bob49

7:42pm Thu 17 Jan 13

uvox44 says...

hmmm i thought schools were places of education but it seems they are moral gaurdians of fashion too- maybe they should stick to banning children who are disruptive or poorly behaved rather than policing what colour hair is or is not acceptable! The girls hair is hardly bright red anyway , it's a very natural looking red, but even if it was bright green and pink why should the school judge her UNLESS it affects her or others learning- the narrow-minded comments above don't surprise me as people round here seem to be incredibly blinkered.
hmmm i thought schools were places of education but it seems they are moral gaurdians of fashion too- maybe they should stick to banning children who are disruptive or poorly behaved rather than policing what colour hair is or is not acceptable! The girls hair is hardly bright red anyway , it's a very natural looking red, but even if it was bright green and pink why should the school judge her UNLESS it affects her or others learning- the narrow-minded comments above don't surprise me as people round here seem to be incredibly blinkered. uvox44

8:06pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Carolyn43 says...

leah6153 wrote:
Her hair looks lovely..Shame on Ringwood school yet again...Overpaid Bullies
Do the teachers know you have no respect for them at all, even when teaching your daughter? They do now. You must be referring to the teachers because they don't set the rules - the governors do and they don't get paid - teachers just have to enforce what the governors decide just the same as your boss enforces what the company owners decide.
.....
Fortunately teachers are professional and won't treat your daughter any differently to other pupils just because you've created such a fuss over wanting to break the school rules, which you must have agreed to when you accepted a place for your daughter - "Hair - natural colour only" is clearly stated in the school prospectus which presumably you read before accepting the place.
[quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: Her hair looks lovely..Shame on Ringwood school yet again...Overpaid Bullies[/p][/quote]Do the teachers know you have no respect for them at all, even when teaching your daughter? They do now. You must be referring to the teachers because they don't set the rules - the governors do and they don't get paid - teachers just have to enforce what the governors decide just the same as your boss enforces what the company owners decide. ..... Fortunately teachers are professional and won't treat your daughter any differently to other pupils just because you've created such a fuss over wanting to break the school rules, which you must have agreed to when you accepted a place for your daughter - "Hair - natural colour only" is clearly stated in the school prospectus which presumably you read before accepting the place. Carolyn43

8:21pm Thu 17 Jan 13

scrumpyjack says...

s-pb2 wrote:
This isnt unusual. Schools will wash their hands of anyone they dont want to teach. All they are interested in are there Ofsted reports and exam marks. So all learning in isolation is doing is costing the taxpayer more and teaching children its not right to be an individual, no wonder this country's young are so apathetic when it comes to politics. The school should grow up and stop whinging and do what they are supposed to be doing and stop wasting everybodys time and money.
I haven't heard the school 'whinging'.

This is a real 'tin foil hat' comment.
[quote][p][bold]s-pb2[/bold] wrote: This isnt unusual. Schools will wash their hands of anyone they dont want to teach. All they are interested in are there Ofsted reports and exam marks. So all learning in isolation is doing is costing the taxpayer more and teaching children its not right to be an individual, no wonder this country's young are so apathetic when it comes to politics. The school should grow up and stop whinging and do what they are supposed to be doing and stop wasting everybodys time and money.[/p][/quote]I haven't heard the school 'whinging'. This is a real 'tin foil hat' comment. scrumpyjack

9:09pm Thu 17 Jan 13

muscliffman says...

Bravo school, we have to adhere to and uphold standards, there must be lines drawn in life that you do not cross however trivial they may seem.

Rules and laws are there to hold society together and should be respected (or properly questioned - not simply defied). The poor teachers, what a nightmare dealing with kids of all ages.
Bravo school, we have to adhere to and uphold standards, there must be lines drawn in life that you do not cross however trivial they may seem. Rules and laws are there to hold society together and should be respected (or properly questioned - not simply defied). The poor teachers, what a nightmare dealing with kids of all ages. muscliffman

10:07pm Thu 17 Jan 13

l'anglais says...

Forget the hair, there should be a law against those curtains
Forget the hair, there should be a law against those curtains l'anglais

10:09pm Thu 17 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

Carolyn43 wrote:
leah6153 wrote:
Her hair looks lovely..Shame on Ringwood school yet again...Overpaid Bullies
Do the teachers know you have no respect for them at all, even when teaching your daughter? They do now. You must be referring to the teachers because they don't set the rules - the governors do and they don't get paid - teachers just have to enforce what the governors decide just the same as your boss enforces what the company owners decide.
.....
Fortunately teachers are professional and won't treat your daughter any differently to other pupils just because you've created such a fuss over wanting to break the school rules, which you must have agreed to when you accepted a place for your daughter - "Hair - natural colour only" is clearly stated in the school prospectus which presumably you read before accepting the place.
You are all missing the point here.. I believe in rules.. However rules defining hair are simply pathetic and they are made by the head teacher then approved by the board of governors. The up roar is how the school treats its pupils and parents. Respect is a two way street, I do not believe for one second that the colour of your hair affects your ability to learn. This is a school, they are paid to teach, not dictate.
[quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: Her hair looks lovely..Shame on Ringwood school yet again...Overpaid Bullies[/p][/quote]Do the teachers know you have no respect for them at all, even when teaching your daughter? They do now. You must be referring to the teachers because they don't set the rules - the governors do and they don't get paid - teachers just have to enforce what the governors decide just the same as your boss enforces what the company owners decide. ..... Fortunately teachers are professional and won't treat your daughter any differently to other pupils just because you've created such a fuss over wanting to break the school rules, which you must have agreed to when you accepted a place for your daughter - "Hair - natural colour only" is clearly stated in the school prospectus which presumably you read before accepting the place.[/p][/quote]You are all missing the point here.. I believe in rules.. However rules defining hair are simply pathetic and they are made by the head teacher then approved by the board of governors. The up roar is how the school treats its pupils and parents. Respect is a two way street, I do not believe for one second that the colour of your hair affects your ability to learn. This is a school, they are paid to teach, not dictate. leah6153

11:11pm Thu 17 Jan 13

s-pb2 says...

sea poole wrote:
s-pb2 -So what rules do you think schools should adopt...if any? Bit sweeping some of your comments. Been reading too much Daily Mail?
Well what do you think happens to children that are excluded from schools? Usually nothing, no school will take them, and they end up messing around on the streets when everyone else is at school. Like I said, all schools are ever interested in are Ofsted reports and exam marks. Heads are no longer head teachers but more like chief executives. Daily Mail? No, just personal experience helping families with such children and know how frustrating it is that you cant get the said child back into the education system
[quote][p][bold]sea poole[/bold] wrote: s-pb2 -So what rules do you think schools should adopt...if any? Bit sweeping some of your comments. Been reading too much Daily Mail?[/p][/quote]Well what do you think happens to children that are excluded from schools? Usually nothing, no school will take them, and they end up messing around on the streets when everyone else is at school. Like I said, all schools are ever interested in are Ofsted reports and exam marks. Heads are no longer head teachers but more like chief executives. Daily Mail? No, just personal experience helping families with such children and know how frustrating it is that you cant get the said child back into the education system s-pb2

12:07am Fri 18 Jan 13

Bob49 says...

"The up roar is how the school treats its pupils and parents"

uproar ?

what uproar ?

There is nothing, other than your childish petulance.

Where are the other hundreds and hundreds of parents, supposedly we must assume who will be making up this uproar ?

Maybe they have a more realistic view on such matters, and probably feel that supporting the school is of far more importance than indulging the whim of someone who is after all a child.
"The up roar is how the school treats its pupils and parents" uproar ? what uproar ? There is nothing, other than your childish petulance. Where are the other hundreds and hundreds of parents, supposedly we must assume who will be making up this uproar ? Maybe they have a more realistic view on such matters, and probably feel that supporting the school is of far more importance than indulging the whim of someone who is after all a child. Bob49

12:27am Fri 18 Jan 13

AdelaidePete says...

Carolyn, you're right. Teachers do not set the rules. Teachers are employees who have to do what their employers, and in this case perhaps the governors, tell them. When "the school" makes a ruling don't think for one minute that it's the teachers.
I bet London to a brick that most teachers would just see this girl as another student.
Carolyn, you're right. Teachers do not set the rules. Teachers are employees who have to do what their employers, and in this case perhaps the governors, tell them. When "the school" makes a ruling don't think for one minute that it's the teachers. I bet London to a brick that most teachers would just see this girl as another student. AdelaidePete

12:27am Fri 18 Jan 13

AdelaidePete says...

Carolyn, you're right. Teachers do not set the rules. Teachers are employees who have to do what their employers, and in this case perhaps the governors, tell them. When "the school" makes a ruling don't think for one minute that it's the teachers.
I bet London to a brick that most teachers would just see this girl as another student.
Carolyn, you're right. Teachers do not set the rules. Teachers are employees who have to do what their employers, and in this case perhaps the governors, tell them. When "the school" makes a ruling don't think for one minute that it's the teachers. I bet London to a brick that most teachers would just see this girl as another student. AdelaidePete

8:14am Fri 18 Jan 13

Carolyn43 says...

leah6153 wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
leah6153 wrote:
Her hair looks lovely..Shame on Ringwood school yet again...Overpaid Bullies
Do the teachers know you have no respect for them at all, even when teaching your daughter? They do now. You must be referring to the teachers because they don't set the rules - the governors do and they don't get paid - teachers just have to enforce what the governors decide just the same as your boss enforces what the company owners decide.
.....
Fortunately teachers are professional and won't treat your daughter any differently to other pupils just because you've created such a fuss over wanting to break the school rules, which you must have agreed to when you accepted a place for your daughter - "Hair - natural colour only" is clearly stated in the school prospectus which presumably you read before accepting the place.
You are all missing the point here.. I believe in rules.. However rules defining hair are simply pathetic and they are made by the head teacher then approved by the board of governors. The up roar is how the school treats its pupils and parents. Respect is a two way street, I do not believe for one second that the colour of your hair affects your ability to learn. This is a school, they are paid to teach, not dictate.
No, you are missing the point. The rule about hair colour is in the school prospectus, the contents of which you agreed to when you accepted the place for your child. If you didn't read the prospectus from cover to cover, why not? If you did read it, then you are choosing to do the opposite to what you agreed to when you accepted the place.
.......
And do you really think the headteacher has nothing better to do than sit and think up rules to annoy parents? No, it's the board of governors who meet and decide these things - and not to annoy parents, but to ensure a smooth running, efficient place of learning with as few distractions as possible. Try working in a school and see how it works. You might take a different view.
[quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: Her hair looks lovely..Shame on Ringwood school yet again...Overpaid Bullies[/p][/quote]Do the teachers know you have no respect for them at all, even when teaching your daughter? They do now. You must be referring to the teachers because they don't set the rules - the governors do and they don't get paid - teachers just have to enforce what the governors decide just the same as your boss enforces what the company owners decide. ..... Fortunately teachers are professional and won't treat your daughter any differently to other pupils just because you've created such a fuss over wanting to break the school rules, which you must have agreed to when you accepted a place for your daughter - "Hair - natural colour only" is clearly stated in the school prospectus which presumably you read before accepting the place.[/p][/quote]You are all missing the point here.. I believe in rules.. However rules defining hair are simply pathetic and they are made by the head teacher then approved by the board of governors. The up roar is how the school treats its pupils and parents. Respect is a two way street, I do not believe for one second that the colour of your hair affects your ability to learn. This is a school, they are paid to teach, not dictate.[/p][/quote]No, you are missing the point. The rule about hair colour is in the school prospectus, the contents of which you agreed to when you accepted the place for your child. If you didn't read the prospectus from cover to cover, why not? If you did read it, then you are choosing to do the opposite to what you agreed to when you accepted the place. ....... And do you really think the headteacher has nothing better to do than sit and think up rules to annoy parents? No, it's the board of governors who meet and decide these things - and not to annoy parents, but to ensure a smooth running, efficient place of learning with as few distractions as possible. Try working in a school and see how it works. You might take a different view. Carolyn43

8:20am Fri 18 Jan 13

ragj195 says...

leah6153 wrote:
Carolyn43 wrote:
leah6153 wrote:
Her hair looks lovely..Shame on Ringwood school yet again...Overpaid Bullies
Do the teachers know you have no respect for them at all, even when teaching your daughter? They do now. You must be referring to the teachers because they don't set the rules - the governors do and they don't get paid - teachers just have to enforce what the governors decide just the same as your boss enforces what the company owners decide.
.....
Fortunately teachers are professional and won't treat your daughter any differently to other pupils just because you've created such a fuss over wanting to break the school rules, which you must have agreed to when you accepted a place for your daughter - "Hair - natural colour only" is clearly stated in the school prospectus which presumably you read before accepting the place.
You are all missing the point here.. I believe in rules.. However rules defining hair are simply pathetic and they are made by the head teacher then approved by the board of governors. The up roar is how the school treats its pupils and parents. Respect is a two way street, I do not believe for one second that the colour of your hair affects your ability to learn. This is a school, they are paid to teach, not dictate.
Do you think it would be acceptable for a boy to go to school with a pink mohican 10 inches high?
[quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: Her hair looks lovely..Shame on Ringwood school yet again...Overpaid Bullies[/p][/quote]Do the teachers know you have no respect for them at all, even when teaching your daughter? They do now. You must be referring to the teachers because they don't set the rules - the governors do and they don't get paid - teachers just have to enforce what the governors decide just the same as your boss enforces what the company owners decide. ..... Fortunately teachers are professional and won't treat your daughter any differently to other pupils just because you've created such a fuss over wanting to break the school rules, which you must have agreed to when you accepted a place for your daughter - "Hair - natural colour only" is clearly stated in the school prospectus which presumably you read before accepting the place.[/p][/quote]You are all missing the point here.. I believe in rules.. However rules defining hair are simply pathetic and they are made by the head teacher then approved by the board of governors. The up roar is how the school treats its pupils and parents. Respect is a two way street, I do not believe for one second that the colour of your hair affects your ability to learn. This is a school, they are paid to teach, not dictate.[/p][/quote]Do you think it would be acceptable for a boy to go to school with a pink mohican 10 inches high? ragj195

8:29am Fri 18 Jan 13

The Renegade Master says...

Another bimbo after her five minutes of fame. Although this one's hair isn't as ridiculous as that girl's the other day, it still contravenes the school's dress and presentation policy and she has rightly been punished. Don't like it? Don't dye you hair. Simple.
Well done to the school for setting high standards and sticking to them, but please Echo, stop giving these idiots publicity.
Another bimbo after her five minutes of fame. Although this one's hair isn't as ridiculous as that girl's the other day, it still contravenes the school's dress and presentation policy and she has rightly been punished. Don't like it? Don't dye you hair. Simple. Well done to the school for setting high standards and sticking to them, but please Echo, stop giving these idiots publicity. The Renegade Master

9:48am Fri 18 Jan 13

LordLilliput says...

You'd think that after the previous story on the same subject either The Echo or 'Complainee Number 2' would have realised they are simply embarrassing themselves with such a pathetic story - neither it seems.
You'd think that after the previous story on the same subject either The Echo or 'Complainee Number 2' would have realised they are simply embarrassing themselves with such a pathetic story - neither it seems. LordLilliput

10:14am Fri 18 Jan 13

The Liberal says...

The school prospectus does indeed say 'natural hair colour only'. However, some of those girls in the prospectus pictures don't look like natural blondes to me! Nor does it say anything about shaved hair, braids, highlights etc. Perhaps the school should clarify the rule in the next edition of its prospectus?
The school prospectus does indeed say 'natural hair colour only'. However, some of those girls in the prospectus pictures don't look like natural blondes to me! Nor does it say anything about shaved hair, braids, highlights etc. Perhaps the school should clarify the rule in the next edition of its prospectus? The Liberal

10:59am Fri 18 Jan 13

spooki says...

Yes there are rules and they should be stuck to. This is hardly 'in your face" red is it? I don't agree that the colour is distracting at all. I do however disagree that a 13yr old needs to dye her hair. I also disagree with the fact that a school will willingly take a child out of education because they've dyed their hair! Extreme hair styles or colours yes (bright pink for example) but this is not what i would call 'distracting'!
If around 30 children will sit for an hours lesson just staring at a girls hair then there is a problem with the teaching methods.
Yes there are rules and they should be stuck to. This is hardly 'in your face" red is it? I don't agree that the colour is distracting at all. I do however disagree that a 13yr old needs to dye her hair. I also disagree with the fact that a school will willingly take a child out of education because they've dyed their hair! Extreme hair styles or colours yes (bright pink for example) but this is not what i would call 'distracting'! If around 30 children will sit for an hours lesson just staring at a girls hair then there is a problem with the teaching methods. spooki

3:24pm Fri 18 Jan 13

EGHH says...

Looks like the Head of that school is trying it on. This girl's hair looks a natural colour to me. Stupid decision.
Looks like the Head of that school is trying it on. This girl's hair looks a natural colour to me. Stupid decision. EGHH

3:30pm Fri 18 Jan 13

ragj195 says...

EGHH wrote:
Looks like the Head of that school is trying it on. This girl's hair looks a natural colour to me. Stupid decision.
The rules do say the hair needs to "look" a natural hair colour. It needs to be a the natural hair colour. How simple can it be.

It might not be an "in your face" red but are the school seriously going to have to have some sort of grading system to judge what's in your face and what isn't? Of course not and I'd rather teachers were teaching rather than having to explain to one parent why their kids hair is too dyed compared to another childs who's isn't.

They can't do it on a case by case basis because parents wouldn't accept the decisions so they've done the best thing for everyone which is a blanked no dye rule.
[quote][p][bold]EGHH[/bold] wrote: Looks like the Head of that school is trying it on. This girl's hair looks a natural colour to me. Stupid decision.[/p][/quote]The rules do say the hair needs to "look" a natural hair colour. It needs to be a the natural hair colour. How simple can it be. It might not be an "in your face" red but are the school seriously going to have to have some sort of grading system to judge what's in your face and what isn't? Of course not and I'd rather teachers were teaching rather than having to explain to one parent why their kids hair is too dyed compared to another childs who's isn't. They can't do it on a case by case basis because parents wouldn't accept the decisions so they've done the best thing for everyone which is a blanked no dye rule. ragj195

3:32pm Fri 18 Jan 13

ragj195 says...

ragj195 wrote:
EGHH wrote:
Looks like the Head of that school is trying it on. This girl's hair looks a natural colour to me. Stupid decision.
The rules do say the hair needs to "look" a natural hair colour. It needs to be a the natural hair colour. How simple can it be.

It might not be an "in your face" red but are the school seriously going to have to have some sort of grading system to judge what's in your face and what isn't? Of course not and I'd rather teachers were teaching rather than having to explain to one parent why their kids hair is too dyed compared to another childs who's isn't.

They can't do it on a case by case basis because parents wouldn't accept the decisions so they've done the best thing for everyone which is a blanked no dye rule.
This is meant to say "don't say"
[quote][p][bold]ragj195[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]EGHH[/bold] wrote: Looks like the Head of that school is trying it on. This girl's hair looks a natural colour to me. Stupid decision.[/p][/quote]The rules do say the hair needs to "look" a natural hair colour. It needs to be a the natural hair colour. How simple can it be. It might not be an "in your face" red but are the school seriously going to have to have some sort of grading system to judge what's in your face and what isn't? Of course not and I'd rather teachers were teaching rather than having to explain to one parent why their kids hair is too dyed compared to another childs who's isn't. They can't do it on a case by case basis because parents wouldn't accept the decisions so they've done the best thing for everyone which is a blanked no dye rule.[/p][/quote]This is meant to say "don't say" ragj195

7:00pm Fri 18 Jan 13

Carolyn43 says...

spooki wrote:
Yes there are rules and they should be stuck to. This is hardly 'in your face" red is it? I don't agree that the colour is distracting at all. I do however disagree that a 13yr old needs to dye her hair. I also disagree with the fact that a school will willingly take a child out of education because they've dyed their hair! Extreme hair styles or colours yes (bright pink for example) but this is not what i would call 'distracting'!
If around 30 children will sit for an hours lesson just staring at a girls hair then there is a problem with the teaching methods.
The child wasn't taken "out of education". She was put in a separate room and given work to do equivalent to that being done by those in the classroom they've been removed from who haven't dyed their hair.
[quote][p][bold]spooki[/bold] wrote: Yes there are rules and they should be stuck to. This is hardly 'in your face" red is it? I don't agree that the colour is distracting at all. I do however disagree that a 13yr old needs to dye her hair. I also disagree with the fact that a school will willingly take a child out of education because they've dyed their hair! Extreme hair styles or colours yes (bright pink for example) but this is not what i would call 'distracting'! If around 30 children will sit for an hours lesson just staring at a girls hair then there is a problem with the teaching methods.[/p][/quote]The child wasn't taken "out of education". She was put in a separate room and given work to do equivalent to that being done by those in the classroom they've been removed from who haven't dyed their hair. Carolyn43

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