Mum takes teenager out of school over punishment for having pink hair

Bournemouth Echo: Leah Halford and her daughter Billie Leah Halford and her daughter Billie

AN infuriated parent has slammed a school for punishing her daughter over the colour of her hair.

Leah Halford from Poulner has temporarily removed her daughter Billie from Ringwood School after discovering the 13-year-old had been put in “isolation” because she dyed the ends of her hair pink.

The Year 8 pupil was pulled out of class on Friday morning by her Head of Year as a result of her new dip dye hair style.

Leah said: “I’ve made the decision to pull her out of the school until it’s gone.

“It’s not affecting her learning having pink hair but they’ve told me her absence will now be put down as unauthorised.

“I think it’s bullying – they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality.

“The dye is one of those wash out ones, so we are of course going to keep washing it, but it will take a few weeks.”

Isolation consists of the pupil being put in a room alone, restricting them from mixing with any other pupils.

“For me, isolation would be a punishment for naughty children, not for something as minimal as this”, Leah added.

“She is a model pupil aside from this – there have been no problems with behaviour or learning.

“Other girls go in with a full face of make-up or their skirts hitched up to their thighs.

“They’re allowed to have mobile phones on them. I just don’t understand why this is such an offence.

“Other people have told me it’s ridiculous as well.

“She’s always had a cutting edge hair cut but never been in trouble for it before.

“I just don’t see how this could possibly affect her learning, or anyone else’s.

“She’s lucky this isn’t a particularly important year, otherwise implementing this kind of punishment for something so menial would have far greater consequences.

“I’m going to get a private tutor so she can keep up with her lessons.”

In RESPONSE to Leah Halford’s comments, headteacher Chris Edwards said: “At Ringwood School we have very clear rules with regard to appearance and uniform which parents agree to when they send their child to the school.

“Our rules state that - “Hair should be traditionally styled – extremes of fashion eg shaved hair, beads, braids, unnatural tints, dyes and highlights are not acceptable in school.”

“If a student arrives at school with inappropriate uniform or appearance arrangements are made to continue with learning in isolation whie contact is made with parents to arrange to resolve the problem. 

“I am very grateful to the vast majority of our parents who are very supportive of the high standards we expect from all of our young people.”

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Comments (196)

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9:35am Tue 15 Jan 13

TinyLegacy says...

What is it with parents like this? Rules are RULES. How do you expect your child to have any sort of respect for people when they're older?
What is it with parents like this? Rules are RULES. How do you expect your child to have any sort of respect for people when they're older? TinyLegacy
  • Score: -2

9:37am Tue 15 Jan 13

geoffro says...

totally agree with the school not good for school moral she has only done it for attention the schools have to put up with enough werdos as it is
totally agree with the school not good for school moral she has only done it for attention the schools have to put up with enough werdos as it is geoffro
  • Score: -2

9:39am Tue 15 Jan 13

Professor Zaroff says...

In my day we didn't have classes for having pink hair.
In my day we didn't have classes for having pink hair. Professor Zaroff
  • Score: 0

9:40am Tue 15 Jan 13

speedy231278 says...

"they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality"

Correct. Hence the term school UNIFORM. All kids are supposed to wear the same clothes and aren't supposed to have excessive makeup, much if anything in the way of jewellry, and not have outlandish hairstyles. I would say bright pink tips counts as outlandish, and is going to be a breach of the school rules.

It looks like the mother dyes her hair too, so she's probably just trying to make some sort of silly point about being allowed to be different.
"they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality" Correct. Hence the term school UNIFORM. All kids are supposed to wear the same clothes and aren't supposed to have excessive makeup, much if anything in the way of jewellry, and not have outlandish hairstyles. I would say bright pink tips counts as outlandish, and is going to be a breach of the school rules. It looks like the mother dyes her hair too, so she's probably just trying to make some sort of silly point about being allowed to be different. speedy231278
  • Score: 0

9:45am Tue 15 Jan 13

ukdragon says...

Totally behind the school. They knew the rules regarding uniform & agreed to it.

They are there to LEARN, not to show off the latest hair style
Totally behind the school. They knew the rules regarding uniform & agreed to it. They are there to LEARN, not to show off the latest hair style ukdragon
  • Score: -2

9:46am Tue 15 Jan 13

Yawwwn! says...

Leah Halford, you sent your daughter to this school because you thought it was a good school, when you opt for that, you have to respect the rules and code of conduct that the school upholds!

Learn some respect, the school is upholding the dress code rules so that all the kids will grow up in life with a sense of conduct and respect for laws and rules that are out there in life.

The school are right! You are wrong! accept this and move on for the good of your daughter. If the school have made the dress code clear for all the kids, then you have only yourself to blame for her exclusion!
Leah Halford, you sent your daughter to this school because you thought it was a good school, when you opt for that, you have to respect the rules and code of conduct that the school upholds! Learn some respect, the school is upholding the dress code rules so that all the kids will grow up in life with a sense of conduct and respect for laws and rules that are out there in life. The school are right! You are wrong! accept this and move on for the good of your daughter. If the school have made the dress code clear for all the kids, then you have only yourself to blame for her exclusion! Yawwwn!
  • Score: -2

9:48am Tue 15 Jan 13

Yawwwn! says...

Leah Halford, you sent your daughter to this school because you thought it was a good school, when you opt for that, you have to respect the rules and code of conduct that the school upholds!

Learn some respect, the school is upholding the dress code rules so that all the kids will grow up in life with a sense of conduct and respect for laws and rules that are out there in life.

The school are right! You are wrong! accept this and move on for the good of your daughter. If the school have made the dress code clear for all the kids, then you have only yourself to blame for her exclusion!
Leah Halford, you sent your daughter to this school because you thought it was a good school, when you opt for that, you have to respect the rules and code of conduct that the school upholds! Learn some respect, the school is upholding the dress code rules so that all the kids will grow up in life with a sense of conduct and respect for laws and rules that are out there in life. The school are right! You are wrong! accept this and move on for the good of your daughter. If the school have made the dress code clear for all the kids, then you have only yourself to blame for her exclusion! Yawwwn!
  • Score: -1

9:50am Tue 15 Jan 13

Ayles 10 says...

I agree with the school's decision, but having seen many of the Ringwood female pupils, especially the older ones, walking around town, at least 25% of them should also be barred for not complying to uniform regulations - many looking like painted dolls in mini skirts. It should be one rule for all, its all part of the discipline which seems to be disapprearing in a lot of schools.
I agree with the school's decision, but having seen many of the Ringwood female pupils, especially the older ones, walking around town, at least 25% of them should also be barred for not complying to uniform regulations - many looking like painted dolls in mini skirts. It should be one rule for all, its all part of the discipline which seems to be disapprearing in a lot of schools. Ayles 10
  • Score: 1

9:57am Tue 15 Jan 13

jeebuscripes says...

This is a clear case of someone agreeing to a contract and then not following it.

The parent agreed that the child wouldn't be sent to school with dyed hair. Then they sent them anyway.

The school is completely in the right.

Parents such as this woman are what is making this country a disgrace. Rules mean nothing to her. Then she plays the victim.

She is a victim. A victim of her own stupidity.
This is a clear case of someone agreeing to a contract and then not following it. The parent agreed that the child wouldn't be sent to school with dyed hair. Then they sent them anyway. The school is completely in the right. Parents such as this woman are what is making this country a disgrace. Rules mean nothing to her. Then she plays the victim. She is a victim. A victim of her own stupidity. jeebuscripes
  • Score: -1

9:58am Tue 15 Jan 13

Linguist says...

The school is correct. Also, why wait two weeks for it to wash out? If she wants her daughter back in school ... cut her hair!
The school is correct. Also, why wait two weeks for it to wash out? If she wants her daughter back in school ... cut her hair! Linguist
  • Score: -2

9:59am Tue 15 Jan 13

scattymum78 says...

Finally a school with a backbone!!!
Finally a school with a backbone!!! scattymum78
  • Score: -2

9:59am Tue 15 Jan 13

scrumpyjack says...

Oh dear not much support for stroppy mummy.

What do you think you are teaching your daughter by having a sulk and withdrawing her from school just because you have decided you do not want to adhere to the same rules as every one else?

The key to this, for me, is this:

"we have very clear rules with regard to appearance and uniform which parents agree to when they send their child to the school.

“Our rules state that - “Hair should be traditionally styled – extremes of fashion eg shaved hair, beads, braids, unnatural tints, dyes and highlights are not acceptable".

It's black and white (not pink).
Oh dear not much support for stroppy mummy. What do you think you are teaching your daughter by having a sulk and withdrawing her from school just because you have decided you do not want to adhere to the same rules as every one else? The key to this, for me, is this: "we have very clear rules with regard to appearance and uniform which parents agree to when they send their child to the school. “Our rules state that - “Hair should be traditionally styled – extremes of fashion eg shaved hair, beads, braids, unnatural tints, dyes and highlights are not acceptable". It's black and white (not pink). scrumpyjack
  • Score: 0

10:02am Tue 15 Jan 13

chicken_madras says...

The fact that this is even a story is what is wrong with todays society. The child will grow up to be a spoilt brat if she has to go crying to mummy whenever she hears something she doesn't like, and then mummy has to go crying to the local press.
The fact that this is even a story is what is wrong with todays society. The child will grow up to be a spoilt brat if she has to go crying to mummy whenever she hears something she doesn't like, and then mummy has to go crying to the local press. chicken_madras
  • Score: -1

10:06am Tue 15 Jan 13

Hickery says...

Another example of school playing role of parent, while parent sides with child. Ms Halford - I hope you've seen from all of these comments that society agrees with the school's stance at that, on this occasion, you've got it wrong. Stop being your daughter's 'friend' and start being a responsible parent. Send her back to school to continue the necessary learning that they are providing. And hopefully you've both learned something from this!?
Another example of school playing role of parent, while parent sides with child. Ms Halford - I hope you've seen from all of these comments that society agrees with the school's stance at that, on this occasion, you've got it wrong. Stop being your daughter's 'friend' and start being a responsible parent. Send her back to school to continue the necessary learning that they are providing. And hopefully you've both learned something from this!? Hickery
  • Score: -1

10:06am Tue 15 Jan 13

BarrHumbug says...

Cut off the pink ends and send her back to school, problem solved?
Cut off the pink ends and send her back to school, problem solved? BarrHumbug
  • Score: -1

10:09am Tue 15 Jan 13

Old Colonial says...

But at least she's got her moment of fame with her photo in the paper. Both of then I mean! The Echo should stop pandering to these selfish types.
But at least she's got her moment of fame with her photo in the paper. Both of then I mean! The Echo should stop pandering to these selfish types. Old Colonial
  • Score: -1

10:15am Tue 15 Jan 13

retry69 says...

Obviously agree with the school, if anything it does show the complete stupidity of some parents in their attitude towards their childrens upbringing
Obviously agree with the school, if anything it does show the complete stupidity of some parents in their attitude towards their childrens upbringing retry69
  • Score: -1

10:17am Tue 15 Jan 13

BENNY7 says...

Schools do not teach you how to learn they only teach the past facts... Teachers get paid to teach pupils how to pass tests... to be honest your daughter is best off in isolation. The comments on here are from the 95% brigade who's egos don't allow anything different into their lives.

Steve Jobs
Duncan Bannatyne
Benjamin Franklin
Richard Branson
Jay-Z
Michelle Mone
Aretha Franklin

Be creative & do not listen to others opinions just watch what successful people do & incorporate that into your own style...

The journey is the reward.

Good luck & Well done!
Schools do not teach you how to learn they only teach the past facts... Teachers get paid to teach pupils how to pass tests... to be honest your daughter is best off in isolation. The comments on here are from the 95% brigade who's egos don't allow anything different into their lives. Steve Jobs Duncan Bannatyne Benjamin Franklin Richard Branson Jay-Z Michelle Mone Aretha Franklin Be creative & do not listen to others opinions just watch what successful people do & incorporate that into your own style... The journey is the reward. Good luck & Well done! BENNY7
  • Score: 1

10:22am Tue 15 Jan 13

jeebuscripes says...

BENNY7 wrote:
Schools do not teach you how to learn they only teach the past facts... Teachers get paid to teach pupils how to pass tests... to be honest your daughter is best off in isolation. The comments on here are from the 95% brigade who's egos don't allow anything different into their lives.

Steve Jobs
Duncan Bannatyne
Benjamin Franklin
Richard Branson
Jay-Z
Michelle Mone
Aretha Franklin

Be creative & do not listen to others opinions just watch what successful people do & incorporate that into your own style...

The journey is the reward.

Good luck & Well done!
Good trolling.
[quote][p][bold]BENNY7[/bold] wrote: Schools do not teach you how to learn they only teach the past facts... Teachers get paid to teach pupils how to pass tests... to be honest your daughter is best off in isolation. The comments on here are from the 95% brigade who's egos don't allow anything different into their lives. Steve Jobs Duncan Bannatyne Benjamin Franklin Richard Branson Jay-Z Michelle Mone Aretha Franklin Be creative & do not listen to others opinions just watch what successful people do & incorporate that into your own style... The journey is the reward. Good luck & Well done![/p][/quote]Good trolling. jeebuscripes
  • Score: -1

10:24am Tue 15 Jan 13

phonehome says...

In my day, kids were put into isolation with purple heads!

Anyone remember that?
In my day, kids were put into isolation with purple heads! Anyone remember that? phonehome
  • Score: 0

10:26am Tue 15 Jan 13

InkZ says...

Well done Mum for allowing your daughter to have no respect for the school.
Well done Mum for allowing your daughter to have no respect for the school. InkZ
  • Score: -2

10:28am Tue 15 Jan 13

stevobath says...

speedy231278 wrote:
"they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality"

Correct. Hence the term school UNIFORM. All kids are supposed to wear the same clothes and aren't supposed to have excessive makeup, much if anything in the way of jewellry, and not have outlandish hairstyles. I would say bright pink tips counts as outlandish, and is going to be a breach of the school rules.

It looks like the mother dyes her hair too, so she's probably just trying to make some sort of silly point about being allowed to be different.
Schools want kids to be robots.Individuality is seen as some kind of sickness.

I was labelled an 'individualist' at school, because I was different.IE I had a 'Flat Top' & later got into the 'Goth' scene.I equate it to bullying by teachers.
I was an above average pupil,in the top grade for ALL subjects & I died my hair on regular occasions.I was also one of the best all round sportspersons at my school & went on to represent my school & town at athletics, this IN SPITE of being one of those awful INDIVIDUALIST..Why shouldnt a young person experiment & express themselves?...So what if a kid comes to school & proclaims, 'Im Gay'? That being 'Different' to some narrow minded types...Do you exclude them? Individuality should be encouraged, not stifled, as long as its not affecting school work.
[quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: "they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality" Correct. Hence the term school UNIFORM. All kids are supposed to wear the same clothes and aren't supposed to have excessive makeup, much if anything in the way of jewellry, and not have outlandish hairstyles. I would say bright pink tips counts as outlandish, and is going to be a breach of the school rules. It looks like the mother dyes her hair too, so she's probably just trying to make some sort of silly point about being allowed to be different.[/p][/quote]Schools want kids to be robots.Individuality is seen as some kind of sickness. I was labelled an 'individualist' at school, because I was different.IE I had a 'Flat Top' & later got into the 'Goth' scene.I equate it to bullying by teachers. I was an above average pupil,in the top grade for ALL subjects & I died my hair on regular occasions.I was also one of the best all round sportspersons at my school & went on to represent my school & town at athletics, this IN SPITE of being one of those awful INDIVIDUALIST..Why shouldnt a young person experiment & express themselves?...So what if a kid comes to school & proclaims, 'Im Gay'? That being 'Different' to some narrow minded types...Do you exclude them? Individuality should be encouraged, not stifled, as long as its not affecting school work. stevobath
  • Score: 1

10:33am Tue 15 Jan 13

Ayles 10 says...

stevobath wrote:
speedy231278 wrote:
"they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality"

Correct. Hence the term school UNIFORM. All kids are supposed to wear the same clothes and aren't supposed to have excessive makeup, much if anything in the way of jewellry, and not have outlandish hairstyles. I would say bright pink tips counts as outlandish, and is going to be a breach of the school rules.

It looks like the mother dyes her hair too, so she's probably just trying to make some sort of silly point about being allowed to be different.
Schools want kids to be robots.Individuality is seen as some kind of sickness.

I was labelled an 'individualist' at school, because I was different.IE I had a 'Flat Top' & later got into the 'Goth' scene.I equate it to bullying by teachers.
I was an above average pupil,in the top grade for ALL subjects & I died my hair on regular occasions.I was also one of the best all round sportspersons at my school & went on to represent my school & town at athletics, this IN SPITE of being one of those awful INDIVIDUALIST..Why shouldnt a young person experiment & express themselves?...So what if a kid comes to school & proclaims, 'Im Gay'? That being 'Different' to some narrow minded types...Do you exclude them? Individuality should be encouraged, not stifled, as long as its not affecting school work.
“She’s lucky this isn’t a particularly important year, otherwise implementing this kind of punishment for something so menial would have far greater consequences."

Nuff said...
[quote][p][bold]stevobath[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: "they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality" Correct. Hence the term school UNIFORM. All kids are supposed to wear the same clothes and aren't supposed to have excessive makeup, much if anything in the way of jewellry, and not have outlandish hairstyles. I would say bright pink tips counts as outlandish, and is going to be a breach of the school rules. It looks like the mother dyes her hair too, so she's probably just trying to make some sort of silly point about being allowed to be different.[/p][/quote]Schools want kids to be robots.Individuality is seen as some kind of sickness. I was labelled an 'individualist' at school, because I was different.IE I had a 'Flat Top' & later got into the 'Goth' scene.I equate it to bullying by teachers. I was an above average pupil,in the top grade for ALL subjects & I died my hair on regular occasions.I was also one of the best all round sportspersons at my school & went on to represent my school & town at athletics, this IN SPITE of being one of those awful INDIVIDUALIST..Why shouldnt a young person experiment & express themselves?...So what if a kid comes to school & proclaims, 'Im Gay'? That being 'Different' to some narrow minded types...Do you exclude them? Individuality should be encouraged, not stifled, as long as its not affecting school work.[/p][/quote]“She’s lucky this isn’t a particularly important year, otherwise implementing this kind of punishment for something so menial would have far greater consequences." Nuff said... Ayles 10
  • Score: 0

10:33am Tue 15 Jan 13

Desperado says...

Oh dear, not the kind of response she was hoping for.
No respect for the rules .
Oh dear, not the kind of response she was hoping for. No respect for the rules . Desperado
  • Score: -1

10:34am Tue 15 Jan 13

manana says...

Aother so called parent dragging the next generation up to have no respect for rules, regulations and authority. Cut the ends off, send her back and grow up!
Aother so called parent dragging the next generation up to have no respect for rules, regulations and authority. Cut the ends off, send her back and grow up! manana
  • Score: -1

10:34am Tue 15 Jan 13

stevobath says...

Hickery wrote:
Another example of school playing role of parent, while parent sides with child. Ms Halford - I hope you've seen from all of these comments that society agrees with the school's stance at that, on this occasion, you've got it wrong. Stop being your daughter's 'friend' and start being a responsible parent. Send her back to school to continue the necessary learning that they are providing. And hopefully you've both learned something from this!?
So cause society deems something right it is? Society bullies anyone who dares to be different.

Id be interested to see how many teachers at this school dye.highlight their hair? I bet there are a fair few?
[quote][p][bold]Hickery[/bold] wrote: Another example of school playing role of parent, while parent sides with child. Ms Halford - I hope you've seen from all of these comments that society agrees with the school's stance at that, on this occasion, you've got it wrong. Stop being your daughter's 'friend' and start being a responsible parent. Send her back to school to continue the necessary learning that they are providing. And hopefully you've both learned something from this!?[/p][/quote]So cause society deems something right it is? Society bullies anyone who dares to be different. Id be interested to see how many teachers at this school dye.highlight their hair? I bet there are a fair few? stevobath
  • Score: 0

10:35am Tue 15 Jan 13

Ayles 10 says...

Stevobath, I didn't mean to quote you on my last post - no idea how that happpened! Soz
Stevobath, I didn't mean to quote you on my last post - no idea how that happpened! Soz Ayles 10
  • Score: 0

10:37am Tue 15 Jan 13

nikkip71 says...

Having dyed hair will not affect her learning, I agree, but withdrawing her from school almost certainly will. As long as the school are consistent and treat all such incidences with students the same, I see no issue. You can't have a set of rules and then moan when they don't suit your own end.
Having dyed hair will not affect her learning, I agree, but withdrawing her from school almost certainly will. As long as the school are consistent and treat all such incidences with students the same, I see no issue. You can't have a set of rules and then moan when they don't suit your own end. nikkip71
  • Score: 0

10:39am Tue 15 Jan 13

stevobath says...

Ayles 10 wrote:
stevobath wrote:
speedy231278 wrote:
"they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality"

Correct. Hence the term school UNIFORM. All kids are supposed to wear the same clothes and aren't supposed to have excessive makeup, much if anything in the way of jewellry, and not have outlandish hairstyles. I would say bright pink tips counts as outlandish, and is going to be a breach of the school rules.

It looks like the mother dyes her hair too, so she's probably just trying to make some sort of silly point about being allowed to be different.
Schools want kids to be robots.Individuality is seen as some kind of sickness.

I was labelled an 'individualist' at school, because I was different.IE I had a 'Flat Top' & later got into the 'Goth' scene.I equate it to bullying by teachers.
I was an above average pupil,in the top grade for ALL subjects & I died my hair on regular occasions.I was also one of the best all round sportspersons at my school & went on to represent my school & town at athletics, this IN SPITE of being one of those awful INDIVIDUALIST..Why shouldnt a young person experiment & express themselves?...So what if a kid comes to school & proclaims, 'Im Gay'? That being 'Different' to some narrow minded types...Do you exclude them? Individuality should be encouraged, not stifled, as long as its not affecting school work.
“She’s lucky this isn’t a particularly important year, otherwise implementing this kind of punishment for something so menial would have far greater consequences."

Nuff said...
'I'm going to get a private tutor, so she can keep up with lessons....'

Left that bit out didn't you?

Nuff said...
[quote][p][bold]Ayles 10[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]stevobath[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: "they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality" Correct. Hence the term school UNIFORM. All kids are supposed to wear the same clothes and aren't supposed to have excessive makeup, much if anything in the way of jewellry, and not have outlandish hairstyles. I would say bright pink tips counts as outlandish, and is going to be a breach of the school rules. It looks like the mother dyes her hair too, so she's probably just trying to make some sort of silly point about being allowed to be different.[/p][/quote]Schools want kids to be robots.Individuality is seen as some kind of sickness. I was labelled an 'individualist' at school, because I was different.IE I had a 'Flat Top' & later got into the 'Goth' scene.I equate it to bullying by teachers. I was an above average pupil,in the top grade for ALL subjects & I died my hair on regular occasions.I was also one of the best all round sportspersons at my school & went on to represent my school & town at athletics, this IN SPITE of being one of those awful INDIVIDUALIST..Why shouldnt a young person experiment & express themselves?...So what if a kid comes to school & proclaims, 'Im Gay'? That being 'Different' to some narrow minded types...Do you exclude them? Individuality should be encouraged, not stifled, as long as its not affecting school work.[/p][/quote]“She’s lucky this isn’t a particularly important year, otherwise implementing this kind of punishment for something so menial would have far greater consequences." Nuff said...[/p][/quote]'I'm going to get a private tutor, so she can keep up with lessons....' Left that bit out didn't you? Nuff said... stevobath
  • Score: 0

10:39am Tue 15 Jan 13

boscombe78 says...

School rules. You break them, you are sent home. Simple. You want an education, follow the rules. Hardly rocket science.

Well done to the school I say.
School rules. You break them, you are sent home. Simple. You want an education, follow the rules. Hardly rocket science. Well done to the school I say. boscombe78
  • Score: -1

10:40am Tue 15 Jan 13

jeebuscripes says...

stevobath wrote:
speedy231278 wrote:
"they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality"

Correct. Hence the term school UNIFORM. All kids are supposed to wear the same clothes and aren't supposed to have excessive makeup, much if anything in the way of jewellry, and not have outlandish hairstyles. I would say bright pink tips counts as outlandish, and is going to be a breach of the school rules.

It looks like the mother dyes her hair too, so she's probably just trying to make some sort of silly point about being allowed to be different.
Schools want kids to be robots.Individuality is seen as some kind of sickness.

I was labelled an 'individualist' at school, because I was different.IE I had a 'Flat Top' & later got into the 'Goth' scene.I equate it to bullying by teachers.
I was an above average pupil,in the top grade for ALL subjects & I died my hair on regular occasions.I was also one of the best all round sportspersons at my school & went on to represent my school & town at athletics, this IN SPITE of being one of those awful INDIVIDUALIST..Why shouldnt a young person experiment & express themselves?...So what if a kid comes to school & proclaims, 'Im Gay'? That being 'Different' to some narrow minded types...Do you exclude them? Individuality should be encouraged, not stifled, as long as its not affecting school work.
Individuality is not the issue here.

Being different is not the issue.

What is the issue, is that the school has rules. The parent signed an agreement, promising to follow those rules. Then the parent went back on that agreement.

That is the issue.
[quote][p][bold]stevobath[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: "they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality" Correct. Hence the term school UNIFORM. All kids are supposed to wear the same clothes and aren't supposed to have excessive makeup, much if anything in the way of jewellry, and not have outlandish hairstyles. I would say bright pink tips counts as outlandish, and is going to be a breach of the school rules. It looks like the mother dyes her hair too, so she's probably just trying to make some sort of silly point about being allowed to be different.[/p][/quote]Schools want kids to be robots.Individuality is seen as some kind of sickness. I was labelled an 'individualist' at school, because I was different.IE I had a 'Flat Top' & later got into the 'Goth' scene.I equate it to bullying by teachers. I was an above average pupil,in the top grade for ALL subjects & I died my hair on regular occasions.I was also one of the best all round sportspersons at my school & went on to represent my school & town at athletics, this IN SPITE of being one of those awful INDIVIDUALIST..Why shouldnt a young person experiment & express themselves?...So what if a kid comes to school & proclaims, 'Im Gay'? That being 'Different' to some narrow minded types...Do you exclude them? Individuality should be encouraged, not stifled, as long as its not affecting school work.[/p][/quote]Individuality is not the issue here. Being different is not the issue. What is the issue, is that the school has rules. The parent signed an agreement, promising to follow those rules. Then the parent went back on that agreement. That is the issue. jeebuscripes
  • Score: -1

10:43am Tue 15 Jan 13

really?? seriously?? says...

stevobath wrote:
speedy231278 wrote: "they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality" Correct. Hence the term school UNIFORM. All kids are supposed to wear the same clothes and aren't supposed to have excessive makeup, much if anything in the way of jewellry, and not have outlandish hairstyles. I would say bright pink tips counts as outlandish, and is going to be a breach of the school rules. It looks like the mother dyes her hair too, so she's probably just trying to make some sort of silly point about being allowed to be different.
Schools want kids to be robots.Individuality is seen as some kind of sickness. I was labelled an 'individualist' at school, because I was different.IE I had a 'Flat Top' & later got into the 'Goth' scene.I equate it to bullying by teachers. I was an above average pupil,in the top grade for ALL subjects & I died my hair on regular occasions.I was also one of the best all round sportspersons at my school & went on to represent my school & town at athletics, this IN SPITE of being one of those awful INDIVIDUALIST..Why shouldnt a young person experiment & express themselves?...So what if a kid comes to school & proclaims, 'Im Gay'? That being 'Different' to some narrow minded types...Do you exclude them? Individuality should be encouraged, not stifled, as long as its not affecting school work.
Above average pupil ??? Died your hair??? (dyed i think)
[quote][p][bold]stevobath[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: "they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality" Correct. Hence the term school UNIFORM. All kids are supposed to wear the same clothes and aren't supposed to have excessive makeup, much if anything in the way of jewellry, and not have outlandish hairstyles. I would say bright pink tips counts as outlandish, and is going to be a breach of the school rules. It looks like the mother dyes her hair too, so she's probably just trying to make some sort of silly point about being allowed to be different.[/p][/quote]Schools want kids to be robots.Individuality is seen as some kind of sickness. I was labelled an 'individualist' at school, because I was different.IE I had a 'Flat Top' & later got into the 'Goth' scene.I equate it to bullying by teachers. I was an above average pupil,in the top grade for ALL subjects & I died my hair on regular occasions.I was also one of the best all round sportspersons at my school & went on to represent my school & town at athletics, this IN SPITE of being one of those awful INDIVIDUALIST..Why shouldnt a young person experiment & express themselves?...So what if a kid comes to school & proclaims, 'Im Gay'? That being 'Different' to some narrow minded types...Do you exclude them? Individuality should be encouraged, not stifled, as long as its not affecting school work.[/p][/quote]Above average pupil ??? Died your hair??? (dyed i think) really?? seriously??
  • Score: -1

10:47am Tue 15 Jan 13

speedy231278 says...

Some people fail to understand the concept of school rules. They aren't there to decide how society runs. They are there to decide how the school runs. The school isn't saying it is wrong to have your own identity. The school is simply saying that while at school, the pupils should dress in a certain manner so they do not attract attention to themselves nor distract other pupils, risk being bullied for being 'different'.

This girl and her peroxide mother may dress exactly how they please while in their own company and that of anyone else, save when the child is at school, when there's this little thing called uniform, which has been around many hundreds of years.

Any why exactly does a 13 year old girl need pink hair? Clearly, the mother is an attention seeker,and sadly the local press love attention seekers.

Now, the story about the lad who shaved his head for charity with the blessing of his school who then banned him for it being too short, that's a little different....!
Some people fail to understand the concept of school rules. They aren't there to decide how society runs. They are there to decide how the school runs. The school isn't saying it is wrong to have your own identity. The school is simply saying that while at school, the pupils should dress in a certain manner so they do not attract attention to themselves nor distract other pupils, risk being bullied for being 'different'. This girl and her peroxide mother may dress exactly how they please while in their own company and that of anyone else, save when the child is at school, when there's this little thing called uniform, which has been around many hundreds of years. Any why exactly does a 13 year old girl need pink hair? Clearly, the mother is an attention seeker,and sadly the local press love attention seekers. Now, the story about the lad who shaved his head for charity with the blessing of his school who then banned him for it being too short, that's a little different....! speedy231278
  • Score: -1

10:57am Tue 15 Jan 13

bobsworthforever says...

Schools need to stand up for their rules and children need to learn in live and work place they will always be subjected to rules and school is the place to start. Many years ago when I was at school skirts had to be below the knee, no makeup and hair if long tired back. Girls today would not last 5mins with those rules and the parents would have them home all year.
Schools need to stand up for their rules and children need to learn in live and work place they will always be subjected to rules and school is the place to start. Many years ago when I was at school skirts had to be below the knee, no makeup and hair if long tired back. Girls today would not last 5mins with those rules and the parents would have them home all year. bobsworthforever
  • Score: -1

11:07am Tue 15 Jan 13

Tjones:) says...

cut the pink out then she can go back to school :)
cut the pink out then she can go back to school :) Tjones:)
  • Score: -1

11:08am Tue 15 Jan 13

PooleParky says...

stevobath wrote:
speedy231278 wrote:
"they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality"

Correct. Hence the term school UNIFORM. All kids are supposed to wear the same clothes and aren't supposed to have excessive makeup, much if anything in the way of jewellry, and not have outlandish hairstyles. I would say bright pink tips counts as outlandish, and is going to be a breach of the school rules.

It looks like the mother dyes her hair too, so she's probably just trying to make some sort of silly point about being allowed to be different.
Schools want kids to be robots.Individuality is seen as some kind of sickness.

I was labelled an 'individualist' at school, because I was different.IE I had a 'Flat Top' & later got into the 'Goth' scene.I equate it to bullying by teachers.
I was an above average pupil,in the top grade for ALL subjects & I died my hair on regular occasions.I was also one of the best all round sportspersons at my school & went on to represent my school & town at athletics, this IN SPITE of being one of those awful INDIVIDUALIST..Why shouldnt a young person experiment & express themselves?...So what if a kid comes to school & proclaims, 'Im Gay'? That being 'Different' to some narrow minded types...Do you exclude them? Individuality should be encouraged, not stifled, as long as its not affecting school work.
"So what if a kid comes to school & proclaims, 'Im Gay'? That being 'Different' to some narrow minded types...Do you exclude them?"

That such a a fatuous and ignorant statement. Being gay is not 'individualist choice', and bringing up the issue of teenagers struggling with their sexulity in a discussion in about someone stupidly floating a school rule about hair is frankly insulting.
[quote][p][bold]stevobath[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: "they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality" Correct. Hence the term school UNIFORM. All kids are supposed to wear the same clothes and aren't supposed to have excessive makeup, much if anything in the way of jewellry, and not have outlandish hairstyles. I would say bright pink tips counts as outlandish, and is going to be a breach of the school rules. It looks like the mother dyes her hair too, so she's probably just trying to make some sort of silly point about being allowed to be different.[/p][/quote]Schools want kids to be robots.Individuality is seen as some kind of sickness. I was labelled an 'individualist' at school, because I was different.IE I had a 'Flat Top' & later got into the 'Goth' scene.I equate it to bullying by teachers. I was an above average pupil,in the top grade for ALL subjects & I died my hair on regular occasions.I was also one of the best all round sportspersons at my school & went on to represent my school & town at athletics, this IN SPITE of being one of those awful INDIVIDUALIST..Why shouldnt a young person experiment & express themselves?...So what if a kid comes to school & proclaims, 'Im Gay'? That being 'Different' to some narrow minded types...Do you exclude them? Individuality should be encouraged, not stifled, as long as its not affecting school work.[/p][/quote]"So what if a kid comes to school & proclaims, 'Im Gay'? That being 'Different' to some narrow minded types...Do you exclude them?" That such a a fatuous and ignorant statement. Being gay is not 'individualist choice', and bringing up the issue of teenagers struggling with their sexulity in a discussion in about someone stupidly floating a school rule about hair is frankly insulting. PooleParky
  • Score: -1

11:14am Tue 15 Jan 13

large_cheese says...

“The dye is one of those wash out ones, so we are of course going to keep washing it, but it will take a few weeks.”

Cut it! Be an individual outside of school!

I do like the Sad Face\Shocked Face combo photo!
“The dye is one of those wash out ones, so we are of course going to keep washing it, but it will take a few weeks.” Cut it! Be an individual outside of school! I do like the Sad Face\Shocked Face combo photo! large_cheese
  • Score: 0

11:19am Tue 15 Jan 13

Ivan Opinion says...

Simple --- Dont dye your hair pink and go to school...Really its as simple as that .
Simple --- Dont dye your hair pink and go to school...Really its as simple as that . Ivan Opinion
  • Score: 0

11:28am Tue 15 Jan 13

MPK83i says...

Wow. That's a lot of comments, what a stupid woman. It's not affecting her learning having link hair.. No it's not, pulling her out of school is. Idiot! Fine the mum and teach them both how to live by the rules.
Wow. That's a lot of comments, what a stupid woman. It's not affecting her learning having link hair.. No it's not, pulling her out of school is. Idiot! Fine the mum and teach them both how to live by the rules. MPK83i
  • Score: 0

11:28am Tue 15 Jan 13

Dilligaf08 says...

How pathetic!

What happens when this girl leaves school and gets a job, dyes her hair an inappropriate colour and gets the sack?? Will she go running to mummy who in turn goes running to the local paper?? Of course not because the RULES will have stated that what she did wasn't in keeping with the company! It's no different to school is it??

Cut your hair and get back to school where you've got it easy!!
How pathetic! What happens when this girl leaves school and gets a job, dyes her hair an inappropriate colour and gets the sack?? Will she go running to mummy who in turn goes running to the local paper?? Of course not because the RULES will have stated that what she did wasn't in keeping with the company! It's no different to school is it?? Cut your hair and get back to school where you've got it easy!! Dilligaf08
  • Score: 0

11:29am Tue 15 Jan 13

TigerTim says...

I was a pupil at Ringwood School from 1986-1991, the same rules applied then as they do now! All parents and pupils know the rules and pink hair is not acceptable in school. Easy solution: cut hair and go back to school.
I was a pupil at Ringwood School from 1986-1991, the same rules applied then as they do now! All parents and pupils know the rules and pink hair is not acceptable in school. Easy solution: cut hair and go back to school. TigerTim
  • Score: 0

11:32am Tue 15 Jan 13

PooleParky says...

Dilligaf08 wrote:
How pathetic!

What happens when this girl leaves school and gets a job, dyes her hair an inappropriate colour and gets the sack?? Will she go running to mummy who in turn goes running to the local paper?? Of course not because the RULES will have stated that what she did wasn't in keeping with the company! It's no different to school is it??

Cut your hair and get back to school where you've got it easy!!
And let’s hope the employers don't google her name and find this article. In this day and age when jobs are so sparse you need to think very carefully about running to the press. Sadly for the girl this article's presence could harm her prospects in the future.
[quote][p][bold]Dilligaf08[/bold] wrote: How pathetic! What happens when this girl leaves school and gets a job, dyes her hair an inappropriate colour and gets the sack?? Will she go running to mummy who in turn goes running to the local paper?? Of course not because the RULES will have stated that what she did wasn't in keeping with the company! It's no different to school is it?? Cut your hair and get back to school where you've got it easy!![/p][/quote]And let’s hope the employers don't google her name and find this article. In this day and age when jobs are so sparse you need to think very carefully about running to the press. Sadly for the girl this article's presence could harm her prospects in the future. PooleParky
  • Score: 0

11:41am Tue 15 Jan 13

The Liberal says...

I can't believe so many people are against her having dyed hair. What a bunch of squares!
 
Also, I believe the school rules may even contravene the Human Rights Act, particularly with the banning of such things as braids – which may be of cultural or even religious importance to some people.
I can't believe so many people are against her having dyed hair. What a bunch of squares!   Also, I believe the school rules may even contravene the Human Rights Act, particularly with the banning of such things as braids – which may be of cultural or even religious importance to some people. The Liberal
  • Score: 0

11:41am Tue 15 Jan 13

spooki says...

She shouldn't have dyed her hair pink! If it's a wash out one, why will it take 'weeks' to come out? Use medicated shampoo (Head & Shoulders for eg) that'll help strip it and do it again in the summer holds if you must. I might point out that that's a very unusual coloured 'natural' blonde...
She shouldn't have dyed her hair pink! If it's a wash out one, why will it take 'weeks' to come out? Use medicated shampoo (Head & Shoulders for eg) that'll help strip it and do it again in the summer holds if you must. I might point out that that's a very unusual coloured 'natural' blonde... spooki
  • Score: 0

11:59am Tue 15 Jan 13

mumble says...

it's a sad reflection on society that the only way teenagers can have 'individuality' is to dye their hair - whatever happened to personality?
it's a sad reflection on society that the only way teenagers can have 'individuality' is to dye their hair - whatever happened to personality? mumble
  • Score: 0

12:10pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Justin666 says...

stevobath wrote:
speedy231278 wrote:
"they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality"

Correct. Hence the term school UNIFORM. All kids are supposed to wear the same clothes and aren't supposed to have excessive makeup, much if anything in the way of jewellry, and not have outlandish hairstyles. I would say bright pink tips counts as outlandish, and is going to be a breach of the school rules.

It looks like the mother dyes her hair too, so she's probably just trying to make some sort of silly point about being allowed to be different.
Schools want kids to be robots.Individuality is seen as some kind of sickness.

I was labelled an 'individualist' at school, because I was different.IE I had a 'Flat Top' & later got into the 'Goth' scene.I equate it to bullying by teachers.
I was an above average pupil,in the top grade for ALL subjects & I died my hair on regular occasions.I was also one of the best all round sportspersons at my school & went on to represent my school & town at athletics, this IN SPITE of being one of those awful INDIVIDUALIST..Why shouldnt a young person experiment & express themselves?...So what if a kid comes to school & proclaims, 'Im Gay'? That being 'Different' to some narrow minded types...Do you exclude them? Individuality should be encouraged, not stifled, as long as its not affecting school work.
After blowing your trumpet so strenuosly I presume that today you are leading our country out of its' current mess? Clearly you were at the right type of school to be in the upper echelons of present society.
[quote][p][bold]stevobath[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: "they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality" Correct. Hence the term school UNIFORM. All kids are supposed to wear the same clothes and aren't supposed to have excessive makeup, much if anything in the way of jewellry, and not have outlandish hairstyles. I would say bright pink tips counts as outlandish, and is going to be a breach of the school rules. It looks like the mother dyes her hair too, so she's probably just trying to make some sort of silly point about being allowed to be different.[/p][/quote]Schools want kids to be robots.Individuality is seen as some kind of sickness. I was labelled an 'individualist' at school, because I was different.IE I had a 'Flat Top' & later got into the 'Goth' scene.I equate it to bullying by teachers. I was an above average pupil,in the top grade for ALL subjects & I died my hair on regular occasions.I was also one of the best all round sportspersons at my school & went on to represent my school & town at athletics, this IN SPITE of being one of those awful INDIVIDUALIST..Why shouldnt a young person experiment & express themselves?...So what if a kid comes to school & proclaims, 'Im Gay'? That being 'Different' to some narrow minded types...Do you exclude them? Individuality should be encouraged, not stifled, as long as its not affecting school work.[/p][/quote]After blowing your trumpet so strenuosly I presume that today you are leading our country out of its' current mess? Clearly you were at the right type of school to be in the upper echelons of present society. Justin666
  • Score: 0

12:12pm Tue 15 Jan 13

The Liberal says...

A Harrow school's policy of banning braids, without any exceptions, was ruled unlawful by the High Court in 2011: http://bit.ly/jUal9g

 
The ruling stated that while the school policy was perfectly permissible and lawful, exceptions had to be made on ethnic and cultural grounds – such as "a genuine family tradition based on cultural and social reasons".
 
Not sure if that's quite the case here, unless it's a family tradition to dye their hair ends pink. ;)
A Harrow school's policy of banning braids, without any exceptions, was ruled unlawful by the High Court in 2011: http://bit.ly/jUal9g   The ruling stated that while the school policy was perfectly permissible and lawful, exceptions had to be made on ethnic and cultural grounds – such as "a genuine family tradition based on cultural and social reasons".   Not sure if that's quite the case here, unless it's a family tradition to dye their hair ends pink. ;) The Liberal
  • Score: 0

12:22pm Tue 15 Jan 13

JackJohnson says...

Rules within reason.

There is nothing to stop a pensioner from having a pink rinse, so why should any schoolgirl (or boy, even) be put in solitary confinement for having a pink dip-dye?

One function of schools is to promote an inclusive society. Teaching 'normal' kids that it is acceptable to persecute a human being for such a minor thing as this is an unethical way for any school to behave. The headmaster and board of governors should be ashamed of themselves.
Rules within reason. There is nothing to stop a pensioner from having a pink rinse, so why should any schoolgirl (or boy, even) be put in solitary confinement for having a pink dip-dye? One function of schools is to promote an inclusive society. Teaching 'normal' kids that it is acceptable to persecute a human being for such a minor thing as this is an unethical way for any school to behave. The headmaster and board of governors should be ashamed of themselves. JackJohnson
  • Score: 0

12:23pm Tue 15 Jan 13

AFCB_112 says...

Same thing happened to me when I was at school , I had my head shaved very short and I was also sent to isolation so I kicked up a fuss and my teacher showed me the rules , I apologised and in those 2 weeks of isolation I got more work done because It was just me and no interruptions.
Same thing happened to me when I was at school , I had my head shaved very short and I was also sent to isolation so I kicked up a fuss and my teacher showed me the rules , I apologised and in those 2 weeks of isolation I got more work done because It was just me and no interruptions. AFCB_112
  • Score: 0

12:24pm Tue 15 Jan 13

WOC says...

Cut it off, send her back to school and stop being so stupid! The end.
Cut it off, send her back to school and stop being so stupid! The end. WOC
  • Score: 0

12:28pm Tue 15 Jan 13

The Renegade Master says...

The mother should have known the school's dress code and presentation rules and not have allowed her daughter to dye her hair a stupid colour in the first place, let alone allow her to toddle off to school looking ridiculous. (No doubt wearing make up and a short skirt too.)
Learn your lesson Ms. Halford, cut the ends of your daughter's hair off, apologise to the Head for being so foolish and send your daughter back to school this afternoon with a promise it will never happen again. If your daughter wants to express her individuality she's got the rest of her life to do that.
The mother should have known the school's dress code and presentation rules and not have allowed her daughter to dye her hair a stupid colour in the first place, let alone allow her to toddle off to school looking ridiculous. (No doubt wearing make up and a short skirt too.) Learn your lesson Ms. Halford, cut the ends of your daughter's hair off, apologise to the Head for being so foolish and send your daughter back to school this afternoon with a promise it will never happen again. If your daughter wants to express her individuality she's got the rest of her life to do that. The Renegade Master
  • Score: 0

12:49pm Tue 15 Jan 13

HartleyH says...

I can remember being sent home for wearing white socks instead if regulation black (it was the 80's). Good for the school for standing by their rules. No sympathy here I'm afraid.
I can remember being sent home for wearing white socks instead if regulation black (it was the 80's). Good for the school for standing by their rules. No sympathy here I'm afraid. HartleyH
  • Score: 0

12:49pm Tue 15 Jan 13

nicolecashell29 says...

The thing I find funny is when i went to this school i had red hair, purple hair, orange hair and once green, yet did i get put in 'isolation' - like a disease? No. Do the girls with blonde highlights get put it isolation then Ringwood School? what about the boys with coloured tips? By having pink hair is it going to impact classmates knowledge and learning? I think this is ridiculous, you spend 5 years at that school with them telling you to be individual, don't give in to peer pressure. who wants brunette hair? blonde hair. As a TEENAGER they go through stages of wanting vans shoes, beaded bracelets, faces caked in foundation and coloured hair, so are you going to pick a child out for every phase that makes them different? Because i'm pretty sure you don't have enough isolation rooms to do that? I think Ringwood school have escalated this. And as for Chris Edwards thanking parents who have 'kept to the rules of uniform' how patronizing do you get? If this pupil is the only one in the school with colour in her hair thats ever been put in isolation, I will eat my own hand. Carry on with what you're doing Leah - promoting individuality!
The thing I find funny is when i went to this school i had red hair, purple hair, orange hair and once green, yet did i get put in 'isolation' - like a disease? No. Do the girls with blonde highlights get put it isolation then Ringwood School? what about the boys with coloured tips? By having pink hair is it going to impact classmates knowledge and learning? I think this is ridiculous, you spend 5 years at that school with them telling you to be individual, don't give in to peer pressure. who wants brunette hair? blonde hair. As a TEENAGER they go through stages of wanting vans shoes, beaded bracelets, faces caked in foundation and coloured hair, so are you going to pick a child out for every phase that makes them different? Because i'm pretty sure you don't have enough isolation rooms to do that? I think Ringwood school have escalated this. And as for Chris Edwards thanking parents who have 'kept to the rules of uniform' how patronizing do you get? If this pupil is the only one in the school with colour in her hair thats ever been put in isolation, I will eat my own hand. Carry on with what you're doing Leah - promoting individuality! nicolecashell29
  • Score: 0

12:56pm Tue 15 Jan 13

sea poole says...

So what was the point of running to the Echo? Wonder if 'Mum' reads the comments above...
So what was the point of running to the Echo? Wonder if 'Mum' reads the comments above... sea poole
  • Score: 0

1:03pm Tue 15 Jan 13

joncon says...

Next time one of these parents comes whining to you, echo, can you just tell them to go away? Thanks
Next time one of these parents comes whining to you, echo, can you just tell them to go away? Thanks joncon
  • Score: 0

1:23pm Tue 15 Jan 13

speedy231278 says...

nicolecashell29 wrote:
The thing I find funny is when i went to this school i had red hair, purple hair, orange hair and once green, yet did i get put in 'isolation' - like a disease? No. Do the girls with blonde highlights get put it isolation then Ringwood School? what about the boys with coloured tips? By having pink hair is it going to impact classmates knowledge and learning? I think this is ridiculous, you spend 5 years at that school with them telling you to be individual, don't give in to peer pressure. who wants brunette hair? blonde hair. As a TEENAGER they go through stages of wanting vans shoes, beaded bracelets, faces caked in foundation and coloured hair, so are you going to pick a child out for every phase that makes them different? Because i'm pretty sure you don't have enough isolation rooms to do that? I think Ringwood school have escalated this. And as for Chris Edwards thanking parents who have 'kept to the rules of uniform' how patronizing do you get? If this pupil is the only one in the school with colour in her hair thats ever been put in isolation, I will eat my own hand. Carry on with what you're doing Leah - promoting individuality!
Or, promoting a blatant disregard for authority.
[quote][p][bold]nicolecashell29[/bold] wrote: The thing I find funny is when i went to this school i had red hair, purple hair, orange hair and once green, yet did i get put in 'isolation' - like a disease? No. Do the girls with blonde highlights get put it isolation then Ringwood School? what about the boys with coloured tips? By having pink hair is it going to impact classmates knowledge and learning? I think this is ridiculous, you spend 5 years at that school with them telling you to be individual, don't give in to peer pressure. who wants brunette hair? blonde hair. As a TEENAGER they go through stages of wanting vans shoes, beaded bracelets, faces caked in foundation and coloured hair, so are you going to pick a child out for every phase that makes them different? Because i'm pretty sure you don't have enough isolation rooms to do that? I think Ringwood school have escalated this. And as for Chris Edwards thanking parents who have 'kept to the rules of uniform' how patronizing do you get? If this pupil is the only one in the school with colour in her hair thats ever been put in isolation, I will eat my own hand. Carry on with what you're doing Leah - promoting individuality![/p][/quote]Or, promoting a blatant disregard for authority. speedy231278
  • Score: 0

1:31pm Tue 15 Jan 13

The Liberal says...

Is this all part of Michael Gove's to get education back to the Fifties? Which is what most of these commenters still seem to be living in, the conservative old fuddy-duddies… did punk rock never happen or something?
Is this all part of Michael Gove's to get education back to the Fifties? Which is what most of these commenters still seem to be living in, the conservative old fuddy-duddies… did punk rock never happen or something? The Liberal
  • Score: 0

2:08pm Tue 15 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

Hi everyone, Thankyou for your lovely comments!! Just to clear up a few things here...The 'school rules' which are no where to be found on the schools website but there is a small paragraph in the back of my daughters homework diary that states 'no coloured hair' I read this today..My daughter does not have her roots dyed dark!! She has bleached blonde hair and has done for the past year, but NO isolation from that. I like to lead a quiet life, the reason i 'ran' to the newspaper is because the schools are a law unto themselves..The local authorities cant do anything as the school can basically exclude anyone they choose to. My anger from all of this is the way the teachers handled the situation and were not even willing to discuss 'the rules' with me. None of you actually know me and i apologise to people who are offended because i dye my hair!! I have a grown up daughter of 20 whom is currently training to be an accountant...I raised her to also have individuality..She is not a brat!! The picture was posed as requested by the Echo themselves, anyone that understands the media would know this! Many of you seem to jump on the bandwagon and follow the crowd..good luck with your journey on that! I think i have covered most comments. My daughter is a top student and well behaved polite young girl...People should learn not to just a book by its cover. I have never broken the law myself nor been in trouble with the law, Most girls at this school go to school with skirts hitched up around their wastes and full makeup on, yet the teachers say NOTHING. The kids their are allowed to spend all day on their phones, fb etc as the school ruled that its their human rights to do so..I myself am confused at them singling out my daughter..whom in their own words last month they said and i quote.. 'shes a superstar' thankyou for reading
Hi everyone, Thankyou for your lovely comments!! Just to clear up a few things here...The 'school rules' which are no where to be found on the schools website but there is a small paragraph in the back of my daughters homework diary that states 'no coloured hair' I read this today..My daughter does not have her roots dyed dark!! She has bleached blonde hair and has done for the past year, but NO isolation from that. I like to lead a quiet life, the reason i 'ran' to the newspaper is because the schools are a law unto themselves..The local authorities cant do anything as the school can basically exclude anyone they choose to. My anger from all of this is the way the teachers handled the situation and were not even willing to discuss 'the rules' with me. None of you actually know me and i apologise to people who are offended because i dye my hair!! I have a grown up daughter of 20 whom is currently training to be an accountant...I raised her to also have individuality..She is not a brat!! The picture was posed as requested by the Echo themselves, anyone that understands the media would know this! Many of you seem to jump on the bandwagon and follow the crowd..good luck with your journey on that! I think i have covered most comments. My daughter is a top student and well behaved polite young girl...People should learn not to just a book by its cover. I have never broken the law myself nor been in trouble with the law, Most girls at this school go to school with skirts hitched up around their wastes and full makeup on, yet the teachers say NOTHING. The kids their are allowed to spend all day on their phones, fb etc as the school ruled that its their human rights to do so..I myself am confused at them singling out my daughter..whom in their own words last month they said and i quote.. 'shes a superstar' thankyou for reading leah6153
  • Score: 0

2:13pm Tue 15 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

nicolecashell29 wrote:
The thing I find funny is when i went to this school i had red hair, purple hair, orange hair and once green, yet did i get put in 'isolation' - like a disease? No. Do the girls with blonde highlights get put it isolation then Ringwood School? what about the boys with coloured tips? By having pink hair is it going to impact classmates knowledge and learning? I think this is ridiculous, you spend 5 years at that school with them telling you to be individual, don't give in to peer pressure. who wants brunette hair? blonde hair. As a TEENAGER they go through stages of wanting vans shoes, beaded bracelets, faces caked in foundation and coloured hair, so are you going to pick a child out for every phase that makes them different? Because i'm pretty sure you don't have enough isolation rooms to do that? I think Ringwood school have escalated this. And as for Chris Edwards thanking parents who have 'kept to the rules of uniform' how patronizing do you get? If this pupil is the only one in the school with colour in her hair thats ever been put in isolation, I will eat my own hand. Carry on with what you're doing Leah - promoting individuality!
Thankyou :) xx
[quote][p][bold]nicolecashell29[/bold] wrote: The thing I find funny is when i went to this school i had red hair, purple hair, orange hair and once green, yet did i get put in 'isolation' - like a disease? No. Do the girls with blonde highlights get put it isolation then Ringwood School? what about the boys with coloured tips? By having pink hair is it going to impact classmates knowledge and learning? I think this is ridiculous, you spend 5 years at that school with them telling you to be individual, don't give in to peer pressure. who wants brunette hair? blonde hair. As a TEENAGER they go through stages of wanting vans shoes, beaded bracelets, faces caked in foundation and coloured hair, so are you going to pick a child out for every phase that makes them different? Because i'm pretty sure you don't have enough isolation rooms to do that? I think Ringwood school have escalated this. And as for Chris Edwards thanking parents who have 'kept to the rules of uniform' how patronizing do you get? If this pupil is the only one in the school with colour in her hair thats ever been put in isolation, I will eat my own hand. Carry on with what you're doing Leah - promoting individuality![/p][/quote]Thankyou :) xx leah6153
  • Score: 0

2:31pm Tue 15 Jan 13

scrumpyjack says...

leah6153 wrote:
Hi everyone, Thankyou for your lovely comments!! Just to clear up a few things here...The 'school rules' which are no where to be found on the schools website but there is a small paragraph in the back of my daughters homework diary that states 'no coloured hair' I read this today..My daughter does not have her roots dyed dark!! She has bleached blonde hair and has done for the past year, but NO isolation from that. I like to lead a quiet life, the reason i 'ran' to the newspaper is because the schools are a law unto themselves..The local authorities cant do anything as the school can basically exclude anyone they choose to. My anger from all of this is the way the teachers handled the situation and were not even willing to discuss 'the rules' with me. None of you actually know me and i apologise to people who are offended because i dye my hair!! I have a grown up daughter of 20 whom is currently training to be an accountant...I raised her to also have individuality..She is not a brat!! The picture was posed as requested by the Echo themselves, anyone that understands the media would know this! Many of you seem to jump on the bandwagon and follow the crowd..good luck with your journey on that! I think i have covered most comments. My daughter is a top student and well behaved polite young girl...People should learn not to just a book by its cover. I have never broken the law myself nor been in trouble with the law, Most girls at this school go to school with skirts hitched up around their wastes and full makeup on, yet the teachers say NOTHING. The kids their are allowed to spend all day on their phones, fb etc as the school ruled that its their human rights to do so..I myself am confused at them singling out my daughter..whom in their own words last month they said and i quote.. 'shes a superstar' thankyou for reading
"My daughter does not have her roots dyed dark!! She has bleached blonde hair".

Not too good at spotting sarcasm then?

"as the school can basically exclude anyone they choose to"

That's right it's their right to run the school as they see fit and you have been happy enough so far...

"because the schools are a law unto themselves"

That's right, that way they can set the rules by which all pupils must adhere not pick and choose the ones that suit them.

You are clearly on a losing wicket here, the weight of response disagreeing with your response shows that.

Maybe a time out and think am I and the old tit of a hippy right and everyone else is wrong or have I have over reacted?
[quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: Hi everyone, Thankyou for your lovely comments!! Just to clear up a few things here...The 'school rules' which are no where to be found on the schools website but there is a small paragraph in the back of my daughters homework diary that states 'no coloured hair' I read this today..My daughter does not have her roots dyed dark!! She has bleached blonde hair and has done for the past year, but NO isolation from that. I like to lead a quiet life, the reason i 'ran' to the newspaper is because the schools are a law unto themselves..The local authorities cant do anything as the school can basically exclude anyone they choose to. My anger from all of this is the way the teachers handled the situation and were not even willing to discuss 'the rules' with me. None of you actually know me and i apologise to people who are offended because i dye my hair!! I have a grown up daughter of 20 whom is currently training to be an accountant...I raised her to also have individuality..She is not a brat!! The picture was posed as requested by the Echo themselves, anyone that understands the media would know this! Many of you seem to jump on the bandwagon and follow the crowd..good luck with your journey on that! I think i have covered most comments. My daughter is a top student and well behaved polite young girl...People should learn not to just a book by its cover. I have never broken the law myself nor been in trouble with the law, Most girls at this school go to school with skirts hitched up around their wastes and full makeup on, yet the teachers say NOTHING. The kids their are allowed to spend all day on their phones, fb etc as the school ruled that its their human rights to do so..I myself am confused at them singling out my daughter..whom in their own words last month they said and i quote.. 'shes a superstar' thankyou for reading[/p][/quote]"My daughter does not have her roots dyed dark!! She has bleached blonde hair". Not too good at spotting sarcasm then? "as the school can basically exclude anyone they choose to" That's right it's their right to run the school as they see fit and you have been happy enough so far... "because the schools are a law unto themselves" That's right, that way they can set the rules by which all pupils must adhere not pick and choose the ones that suit them. You are clearly on a losing wicket here, the weight of response disagreeing with your response shows that. Maybe a time out and think am I and the old tit of a hippy right and everyone else is wrong or have I have over reacted? scrumpyjack
  • Score: 0

2:33pm Tue 15 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

I always 'conform' to rules etc...There are NO clear rules set by the school for all to see..They make up the rules as they see fit!! But thank you for your educated insight!!!
I always 'conform' to rules etc...There are NO clear rules set by the school for all to see..They make up the rules as they see fit!! But thank you for your educated insight!!! leah6153
  • Score: -1

3:04pm Tue 15 Jan 13

speedy231278 says...

Another parent who thinks rules are for other people. Great!
Another parent who thinks rules are for other people. Great! speedy231278
  • Score: 0

3:15pm Tue 15 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

speedy231278 wrote:
Some people fail to understand the concept of school rules. They aren't there to decide how society runs. They are there to decide how the school runs. The school isn't saying it is wrong to have your own identity. The school is simply saying that while at school, the pupils should dress in a certain manner so they do not attract attention to themselves nor distract other pupils, risk being bullied for being 'different'.

This girl and her peroxide mother may dress exactly how they please while in their own company and that of anyone else, save when the child is at school, when there's this little thing called uniform, which has been around many hundreds of years.

Any why exactly does a 13 year old girl need pink hair? Clearly, the mother is an attention seeker,and sadly the local press love attention seekers.

Now, the story about the lad who shaved his head for charity with the blessing of his school who then banned him for it being too short, that's a little different....!
Well speedy..This school did exactly the same to a girl that shaved her hair for raising money for cancer research....I apologise if my 'peroxide' hair offends you!! Over half the population have peroxide in their hair!! You must be one pretty offended individual :) Im glad my story has given you something to do for the day!
[quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: Some people fail to understand the concept of school rules. They aren't there to decide how society runs. They are there to decide how the school runs. The school isn't saying it is wrong to have your own identity. The school is simply saying that while at school, the pupils should dress in a certain manner so they do not attract attention to themselves nor distract other pupils, risk being bullied for being 'different'. This girl and her peroxide mother may dress exactly how they please while in their own company and that of anyone else, save when the child is at school, when there's this little thing called uniform, which has been around many hundreds of years. Any why exactly does a 13 year old girl need pink hair? Clearly, the mother is an attention seeker,and sadly the local press love attention seekers. Now, the story about the lad who shaved his head for charity with the blessing of his school who then banned him for it being too short, that's a little different....![/p][/quote]Well speedy..This school did exactly the same to a girl that shaved her hair for raising money for cancer research....I apologise if my 'peroxide' hair offends you!! Over half the population have peroxide in their hair!! You must be one pretty offended individual :) Im glad my story has given you something to do for the day! leah6153
  • Score: 0

3:27pm Tue 15 Jan 13

stevobath says...

leah6153 wrote:
Hi everyone, Thankyou for your lovely comments!! Just to clear up a few things here...The 'school rules' which are no where to be found on the schools website but there is a small paragraph in the back of my daughters homework diary that states 'no coloured hair' I read this today..My daughter does not have her roots dyed dark!! She has bleached blonde hair and has done for the past year, but NO isolation from that. I like to lead a quiet life, the reason i 'ran' to the newspaper is because the schools are a law unto themselves..The local authorities cant do anything as the school can basically exclude anyone they choose to. My anger from all of this is the way the teachers handled the situation and were not even willing to discuss 'the rules' with me. None of you actually know me and i apologise to people who are offended because i dye my hair!! I have a grown up daughter of 20 whom is currently training to be an accountant...I raised her to also have individuality..She is not a brat!! The picture was posed as requested by the Echo themselves, anyone that understands the media would know this! Many of you seem to jump on the bandwagon and follow the crowd..good luck with your journey on that! I think i have covered most comments. My daughter is a top student and well behaved polite young girl...People should learn not to just a book by its cover. I have never broken the law myself nor been in trouble with the law, Most girls at this school go to school with skirts hitched up around their wastes and full makeup on, yet the teachers say NOTHING. The kids their are allowed to spend all day on their phones, fb etc as the school ruled that its their human rights to do so..I myself am confused at them singling out my daughter..whom in their own words last month they said and i quote.. 'shes a superstar' thankyou for reading
I'm one of the few who see no problem with your daughter expressing her individuality.

Attacking people personally is typical of most regular commentators on here.

Personally isolating your' daughter is a total overreaction.I'd love to know if all the teachers are subject to this same rule? How many have their hair coloured etc?Surely its someones human right to colour their hair?
[quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: Hi everyone, Thankyou for your lovely comments!! Just to clear up a few things here...The 'school rules' which are no where to be found on the schools website but there is a small paragraph in the back of my daughters homework diary that states 'no coloured hair' I read this today..My daughter does not have her roots dyed dark!! She has bleached blonde hair and has done for the past year, but NO isolation from that. I like to lead a quiet life, the reason i 'ran' to the newspaper is because the schools are a law unto themselves..The local authorities cant do anything as the school can basically exclude anyone they choose to. My anger from all of this is the way the teachers handled the situation and were not even willing to discuss 'the rules' with me. None of you actually know me and i apologise to people who are offended because i dye my hair!! I have a grown up daughter of 20 whom is currently training to be an accountant...I raised her to also have individuality..She is not a brat!! The picture was posed as requested by the Echo themselves, anyone that understands the media would know this! Many of you seem to jump on the bandwagon and follow the crowd..good luck with your journey on that! I think i have covered most comments. My daughter is a top student and well behaved polite young girl...People should learn not to just a book by its cover. I have never broken the law myself nor been in trouble with the law, Most girls at this school go to school with skirts hitched up around their wastes and full makeup on, yet the teachers say NOTHING. The kids their are allowed to spend all day on their phones, fb etc as the school ruled that its their human rights to do so..I myself am confused at them singling out my daughter..whom in their own words last month they said and i quote.. 'shes a superstar' thankyou for reading[/p][/quote]I'm one of the few who see no problem with your daughter expressing her individuality. Attacking people personally is typical of most regular commentators on here. Personally isolating your' daughter is a total overreaction.I'd love to know if all the teachers are subject to this same rule? How many have their hair coloured etc?Surely its someones human right to colour their hair? stevobath
  • Score: 0

3:32pm Tue 15 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

To be fair I have made my point...Many back me up where it matters!!..Quite frankly it would be a very boring world we live in if everyone played the same tune..Just please dont insult a 13yr old girl.
To be fair I have made my point...Many back me up where it matters!!..Quite frankly it would be a very boring world we live in if everyone played the same tune..Just please dont insult a 13yr old girl. leah6153
  • Score: 0

3:34pm Tue 15 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

stevobath wrote:
leah6153 wrote:
Hi everyone, Thankyou for your lovely comments!! Just to clear up a few things here...The 'school rules' which are no where to be found on the schools website but there is a small paragraph in the back of my daughters homework diary that states 'no coloured hair' I read this today..My daughter does not have her roots dyed dark!! She has bleached blonde hair and has done for the past year, but NO isolation from that. I like to lead a quiet life, the reason i 'ran' to the newspaper is because the schools are a law unto themselves..The local authorities cant do anything as the school can basically exclude anyone they choose to. My anger from all of this is the way the teachers handled the situation and were not even willing to discuss 'the rules' with me. None of you actually know me and i apologise to people who are offended because i dye my hair!! I have a grown up daughter of 20 whom is currently training to be an accountant...I raised her to also have individuality..She is not a brat!! The picture was posed as requested by the Echo themselves, anyone that understands the media would know this! Many of you seem to jump on the bandwagon and follow the crowd..good luck with your journey on that! I think i have covered most comments. My daughter is a top student and well behaved polite young girl...People should learn not to just a book by its cover. I have never broken the law myself nor been in trouble with the law, Most girls at this school go to school with skirts hitched up around their wastes and full makeup on, yet the teachers say NOTHING. The kids their are allowed to spend all day on their phones, fb etc as the school ruled that its their human rights to do so..I myself am confused at them singling out my daughter..whom in their own words last month they said and i quote.. 'shes a superstar' thankyou for reading
I'm one of the few who see no problem with your daughter expressing her individuality.

Attacking people personally is typical of most regular commentators on here.

Personally isolating your' daughter is a total overreaction.I'd love to know if all the teachers are subject to this same rule? How many have their hair coloured etc?Surely its someones human right to colour their hair?
Thankyou :)
[quote][p][bold]stevobath[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: Hi everyone, Thankyou for your lovely comments!! Just to clear up a few things here...The 'school rules' which are no where to be found on the schools website but there is a small paragraph in the back of my daughters homework diary that states 'no coloured hair' I read this today..My daughter does not have her roots dyed dark!! She has bleached blonde hair and has done for the past year, but NO isolation from that. I like to lead a quiet life, the reason i 'ran' to the newspaper is because the schools are a law unto themselves..The local authorities cant do anything as the school can basically exclude anyone they choose to. My anger from all of this is the way the teachers handled the situation and were not even willing to discuss 'the rules' with me. None of you actually know me and i apologise to people who are offended because i dye my hair!! I have a grown up daughter of 20 whom is currently training to be an accountant...I raised her to also have individuality..She is not a brat!! The picture was posed as requested by the Echo themselves, anyone that understands the media would know this! Many of you seem to jump on the bandwagon and follow the crowd..good luck with your journey on that! I think i have covered most comments. My daughter is a top student and well behaved polite young girl...People should learn not to just a book by its cover. I have never broken the law myself nor been in trouble with the law, Most girls at this school go to school with skirts hitched up around their wastes and full makeup on, yet the teachers say NOTHING. The kids their are allowed to spend all day on their phones, fb etc as the school ruled that its their human rights to do so..I myself am confused at them singling out my daughter..whom in their own words last month they said and i quote.. 'shes a superstar' thankyou for reading[/p][/quote]I'm one of the few who see no problem with your daughter expressing her individuality. Attacking people personally is typical of most regular commentators on here. Personally isolating your' daughter is a total overreaction.I'd love to know if all the teachers are subject to this same rule? How many have their hair coloured etc?Surely its someones human right to colour their hair?[/p][/quote]Thankyou :) leah6153
  • Score: 0

3:40pm Tue 15 Jan 13

speedy231278 says...

leah6153 wrote:
speedy231278 wrote:
Some people fail to understand the concept of school rules. They aren't there to decide how society runs. They are there to decide how the school runs. The school isn't saying it is wrong to have your own identity. The school is simply saying that while at school, the pupils should dress in a certain manner so they do not attract attention to themselves nor distract other pupils, risk being bullied for being 'different'.

This girl and her peroxide mother may dress exactly how they please while in their own company and that of anyone else, save when the child is at school, when there's this little thing called uniform, which has been around many hundreds of years.

Any why exactly does a 13 year old girl need pink hair? Clearly, the mother is an attention seeker,and sadly the local press love attention seekers.

Now, the story about the lad who shaved his head for charity with the blessing of his school who then banned him for it being too short, that's a little different....!
Well speedy..This school did exactly the same to a girl that shaved her hair for raising money for cancer research....I apologise if my 'peroxide' hair offends you!! Over half the population have peroxide in their hair!! You must be one pretty offended individual :) Im glad my story has given you something to do for the day!
Peroxide in hair does not offend me. I fail to understand how you think people are offended by it. The school is not offended by it. The teachers are not offended by it. In fact, I doubt anyone here is offended by it.

What has offended the school is the fact that you have chosen to ignore a very simple and basic rule that your daughter should not have dyed pink hair, because you seem to think that a simple rule on appearance does not apply to your daughter on grounds that it prevents freedom of expression. I cannot imagine that school rules aren't freely available to all prospective parents, and wonder what other school rules and civil laws you choose to ignore on the grounds that they don't suit you? Your daughter has the summer holidays, and many years of her life ahead of her outside of school where she can express her individuality to her heart's content. She could dye the whole lot pink, blue, green or any other colour for all anyone would care. There's nothing wrong with wanting to be different, but there is a time and place for everything, and school isn't one of them!
[quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: Some people fail to understand the concept of school rules. They aren't there to decide how society runs. They are there to decide how the school runs. The school isn't saying it is wrong to have your own identity. The school is simply saying that while at school, the pupils should dress in a certain manner so they do not attract attention to themselves nor distract other pupils, risk being bullied for being 'different'. This girl and her peroxide mother may dress exactly how they please while in their own company and that of anyone else, save when the child is at school, when there's this little thing called uniform, which has been around many hundreds of years. Any why exactly does a 13 year old girl need pink hair? Clearly, the mother is an attention seeker,and sadly the local press love attention seekers. Now, the story about the lad who shaved his head for charity with the blessing of his school who then banned him for it being too short, that's a little different....![/p][/quote]Well speedy..This school did exactly the same to a girl that shaved her hair for raising money for cancer research....I apologise if my 'peroxide' hair offends you!! Over half the population have peroxide in their hair!! You must be one pretty offended individual :) Im glad my story has given you something to do for the day![/p][/quote]Peroxide in hair does not offend me. I fail to understand how you think people are offended by it. The school is not offended by it. The teachers are not offended by it. In fact, I doubt anyone here is offended by it. What has offended the school is the fact that you have chosen to ignore a very simple and basic rule that your daughter should not have dyed pink hair, because you seem to think that a simple rule on appearance does not apply to your daughter on grounds that it prevents freedom of expression. I cannot imagine that school rules aren't freely available to all prospective parents, and wonder what other school rules and civil laws you choose to ignore on the grounds that they don't suit you? Your daughter has the summer holidays, and many years of her life ahead of her outside of school where she can express her individuality to her heart's content. She could dye the whole lot pink, blue, green or any other colour for all anyone would care. There's nothing wrong with wanting to be different, but there is a time and place for everything, and school isn't one of them! speedy231278
  • Score: 0

4:06pm Tue 15 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

speedy231278 wrote:
leah6153 wrote:
speedy231278 wrote:
Some people fail to understand the concept of school rules. They aren't there to decide how society runs. They are there to decide how the school runs. The school isn't saying it is wrong to have your own identity. The school is simply saying that while at school, the pupils should dress in a certain manner so they do not attract attention to themselves nor distract other pupils, risk being bullied for being 'different'.

This girl and her peroxide mother may dress exactly how they please while in their own company and that of anyone else, save when the child is at school, when there's this little thing called uniform, which has been around many hundreds of years.

Any why exactly does a 13 year old girl need pink hair? Clearly, the mother is an attention seeker,and sadly the local press love attention seekers.

Now, the story about the lad who shaved his head for charity with the blessing of his school who then banned him for it being too short, that's a little different....!
Well speedy..This school did exactly the same to a girl that shaved her hair for raising money for cancer research....I apologise if my 'peroxide' hair offends you!! Over half the population have peroxide in their hair!! You must be one pretty offended individual :) Im glad my story has given you something to do for the day!
Peroxide in hair does not offend me. I fail to understand how you think people are offended by it. The school is not offended by it. The teachers are not offended by it. In fact, I doubt anyone here is offended by it.

What has offended the school is the fact that you have chosen to ignore a very simple and basic rule that your daughter should not have dyed pink hair, because you seem to think that a simple rule on appearance does not apply to your daughter on grounds that it prevents freedom of expression. I cannot imagine that school rules aren't freely available to all prospective parents, and wonder what other school rules and civil laws you choose to ignore on the grounds that they don't suit you? Your daughter has the summer holidays, and many years of her life ahead of her outside of school where she can express her individuality to her heart's content. She could dye the whole lot pink, blue, green or any other colour for all anyone would care. There's nothing wrong with wanting to be different, but there is a time and place for everything, and school isn't one of them!
I totally agree, But you are ALL missing the point. The 'rules' are not freely available and the school raises confusion. I would never of intentionally sent my child to school knowing she would be excluded. If the school had phoned me and given me a slap on the wrist and asked me to rectify the problem then i would of done in a heartbeat. Instead they humiliated her and waited 2 hours to contact me and told me that any other colour was acceptable..just not 'pink' as he did not like the colour pink!! then proceeded to inform me that i could send my child to another school. I would also like to add that children spend 6hrs out of 24hrs at school weekdays. They are there to learn which my daughter does, she is a good student..Hair dying should not be the issue here. Many thanks
[quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: Some people fail to understand the concept of school rules. They aren't there to decide how society runs. They are there to decide how the school runs. The school isn't saying it is wrong to have your own identity. The school is simply saying that while at school, the pupils should dress in a certain manner so they do not attract attention to themselves nor distract other pupils, risk being bullied for being 'different'. This girl and her peroxide mother may dress exactly how they please while in their own company and that of anyone else, save when the child is at school, when there's this little thing called uniform, which has been around many hundreds of years. Any why exactly does a 13 year old girl need pink hair? Clearly, the mother is an attention seeker,and sadly the local press love attention seekers. Now, the story about the lad who shaved his head for charity with the blessing of his school who then banned him for it being too short, that's a little different....![/p][/quote]Well speedy..This school did exactly the same to a girl that shaved her hair for raising money for cancer research....I apologise if my 'peroxide' hair offends you!! Over half the population have peroxide in their hair!! You must be one pretty offended individual :) Im glad my story has given you something to do for the day![/p][/quote]Peroxide in hair does not offend me. I fail to understand how you think people are offended by it. The school is not offended by it. The teachers are not offended by it. In fact, I doubt anyone here is offended by it. What has offended the school is the fact that you have chosen to ignore a very simple and basic rule that your daughter should not have dyed pink hair, because you seem to think that a simple rule on appearance does not apply to your daughter on grounds that it prevents freedom of expression. I cannot imagine that school rules aren't freely available to all prospective parents, and wonder what other school rules and civil laws you choose to ignore on the grounds that they don't suit you? Your daughter has the summer holidays, and many years of her life ahead of her outside of school where she can express her individuality to her heart's content. She could dye the whole lot pink, blue, green or any other colour for all anyone would care. There's nothing wrong with wanting to be different, but there is a time and place for everything, and school isn't one of them![/p][/quote]I totally agree, But you are ALL missing the point. The 'rules' are not freely available and the school raises confusion. I would never of intentionally sent my child to school knowing she would be excluded. If the school had phoned me and given me a slap on the wrist and asked me to rectify the problem then i would of done in a heartbeat. Instead they humiliated her and waited 2 hours to contact me and told me that any other colour was acceptable..just not 'pink' as he did not like the colour pink!! then proceeded to inform me that i could send my child to another school. I would also like to add that children spend 6hrs out of 24hrs at school weekdays. They are there to learn which my daughter does, she is a good student..Hair dying should not be the issue here. Many thanks leah6153
  • Score: 0

4:13pm Tue 15 Jan 13

mysticalshoelace says...

Ridiculous if you ask me, schools should stop treating children like sheep, let them have some individuality, let them be kids and start teaching them useful stuff that they might actually need in later life.
Ridiculous if you ask me, schools should stop treating children like sheep, let them have some individuality, let them be kids and start teaching them useful stuff that they might actually need in later life. mysticalshoelace
  • Score: 0

4:17pm Tue 15 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

mysticalshoelace wrote:
Ridiculous if you ask me, schools should stop treating children like sheep, let them have some individuality, let them be kids and start teaching them useful stuff that they might actually need in later life.
Thankyou :) All they have done is taught my daughter that she is not allowed to express herself and that working hard and being a good student counts for nothing!! There are always going to be different views on life..thats what makes us INDIVIDUALS!!!!!! xx
[quote][p][bold]mysticalshoelace[/bold] wrote: Ridiculous if you ask me, schools should stop treating children like sheep, let them have some individuality, let them be kids and start teaching them useful stuff that they might actually need in later life.[/p][/quote]Thankyou :) All they have done is taught my daughter that she is not allowed to express herself and that working hard and being a good student counts for nothing!! There are always going to be different views on life..thats what makes us INDIVIDUALS!!!!!! xx leah6153
  • Score: 0

4:20pm Tue 15 Jan 13

The Liberal says...

If mobile phone use in class is prevalent, as alleged, you'd think the school would be more concerned about that than the colour of a pupil's hair.
If mobile phone use in class is prevalent, as alleged, you'd think the school would be more concerned about that than the colour of a pupil's hair. The Liberal
  • Score: 0

4:22pm Tue 15 Jan 13

scrumpyjack says...

Has not learned a thing.
Has not learned a thing. scrumpyjack
  • Score: 0

4:23pm Tue 15 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

The Liberal wrote:
If mobile phone use in class is prevalent, as alleged, you'd think the school would be more concerned about that than the colour of a pupil's hair.
Thats my thoughts exactly..Its there 'human right' to use there phones during school hours, Personally i think learning is far more important. Expressing your personality through hair is seemed far more damaging according to this particular school!!
[quote][p][bold]The Liberal[/bold] wrote: If mobile phone use in class is prevalent, as alleged, you'd think the school would be more concerned about that than the colour of a pupil's hair.[/p][/quote]Thats my thoughts exactly..Its there 'human right' to use there phones during school hours, Personally i think learning is far more important. Expressing your personality through hair is seemed far more damaging according to this particular school!! leah6153
  • Score: 0

4:31pm Tue 15 Jan 13

WOC says...

I was excluded from school 20+ years ago for having green hair and wasn't allowed to return until it was back to it's normal colour. Thankfully I went back to school and learnt the difference between there, their and they're.
I was excluded from school 20+ years ago for having green hair and wasn't allowed to return until it was back to it's normal colour. Thankfully I went back to school and learnt the difference between there, their and they're. WOC
  • Score: 0

4:42pm Tue 15 Jan 13

EGHH says...

Over reaction. I was in the sixth form at my local boy's school in 1968 and my hair was shoulder length. My friend had his in the King Charles II style. Nothing was said. This girl's hair looks nice. It's not as if it was a pink Mohawk! I suspect the school system is now about turning out office and factory fodder not adults with individual styles and thoughts.
Over reaction. I was in the sixth form at my local boy's school in 1968 and my hair was shoulder length. My friend had his in the King Charles II style. Nothing was said. This girl's hair looks nice. It's not as if it was a pink Mohawk! I suspect the school system is now about turning out office and factory fodder not adults with individual styles and thoughts. EGHH
  • Score: 0

4:48pm Tue 15 Jan 13

BournemouthMum says...

Bob49 wrote:
"The picture was posed as requested by the Echo themselves"


which, strangely, you were happy to comply with

no demands for you to be allowed to 'express your individuality' in that case

as you appear quite happy to conform to requirements when it suits

yes Leah, when it suits
Brilliant! So true.
[quote][p][bold]Bob49[/bold] wrote: "The picture was posed as requested by the Echo themselves" which, strangely, you were happy to comply with no demands for you to be allowed to 'express your individuality' in that case as you appear quite happy to conform to requirements when it suits yes Leah, when it suits[/p][/quote]Brilliant! So true. BournemouthMum
  • Score: 0

4:59pm Tue 15 Jan 13

scrumpyjack says...

WOC wrote:
I was excluded from school 20+ years ago for having green hair and wasn't allowed to return until it was back to it's normal colour. Thankfully I went back to school and learnt the difference between there, their and they're.
Class. I doff my cap.
[quote][p][bold]WOC[/bold] wrote: I was excluded from school 20+ years ago for having green hair and wasn't allowed to return until it was back to it's normal colour. Thankfully I went back to school and learnt the difference between there, their and they're.[/p][/quote]Class. I doff my cap. scrumpyjack
  • Score: 0

5:20pm Tue 15 Jan 13

mysticalshoelace says...

WOC wrote:
I was excluded from school 20+ years ago for having green hair and wasn't allowed to return until it was back to it's normal colour. Thankfully I went back to school and learnt the difference between there, their and they're.
But not the difference between its and it's ...lol
[quote][p][bold]WOC[/bold] wrote: I was excluded from school 20+ years ago for having green hair and wasn't allowed to return until it was back to it's normal colour. Thankfully I went back to school and learnt the difference between there, their and they're.[/p][/quote]But not the difference between its and it's ...lol mysticalshoelace
  • Score: 0

5:27pm Tue 15 Jan 13

boscombewizard says...

Schools love to tell people what to do. Of course there must be rules and of course parents agree to them, otherwise their children wouldn't have a school. But this is a classic example of a school over reacting and responding in an unreasonable way. The pink in the hair is not a problem at all.

Many of the comments are classic echo comments, uninformed, ignorant and abusive. Good luck to you.

Compliance never changed anything. In the words of Joe Strummer 'always challenge authority'. I brought my kids up to do this and they have turned out just fine. Polite, courteous, always worked, never in any bother with school or Police. BUT they will challenge anything that they feel needs challenging.

i remember a lad I worked with once who shaved his head and was told he could only come to school if he wore a hat. He wore a trilby and stood out more with the hat than with a shaved head.

If school uniform is so vital why not make staff wear it too? Seems fair.
Schools love to tell people what to do. Of course there must be rules and of course parents agree to them, otherwise their children wouldn't have a school. But this is a classic example of a school over reacting and responding in an unreasonable way. The pink in the hair is not a problem at all. Many of the comments are classic echo comments, uninformed, ignorant and abusive. Good luck to you. Compliance never changed anything. In the words of Joe Strummer 'always challenge authority'. I brought my kids up to do this and they have turned out just fine. Polite, courteous, always worked, never in any bother with school or Police. BUT they will challenge anything that they feel needs challenging. i remember a lad I worked with once who shaved his head and was told he could only come to school if he wore a hat. He wore a trilby and stood out more with the hat than with a shaved head. If school uniform is so vital why not make staff wear it too? Seems fair. boscombewizard
  • Score: 0

5:28pm Tue 15 Jan 13

BournemouthMum says...

Letcommonsenseprevai
l
wrote:
I can sense almost immediately from the non-conformist spelling of the Christian names, that what we basically have here is a family that thinks all the usual rules don't apply to them, because they are special. This pair of attention seekers need to be reminded that children need to be governed at school and taught to comply with rules (even if they might SEEM non-sensical) so that when they GROW UP, they are used to complying with the social structure that the rest of us live within.........
I agree. There are always people who think that rules don't apply to them. Some of the rules and laws we have to follow in our daily lives are ridiculous, but we follow them nonetheless.

I'm sure this mother has her daughter's best interests at heart and genuinely cares about her, but to encourage a child to break rules is not reponsible parenting in my opinion and is setting the child up for future problems.
[quote][p][bold]Letcommonsenseprevai l[/bold] wrote: I can sense almost immediately from the non-conformist spelling of the Christian names, that what we basically have here is a family that thinks all the usual rules don't apply to them, because they are special. This pair of attention seekers need to be reminded that children need to be governed at school and taught to comply with rules (even if they might SEEM non-sensical) so that when they GROW UP, they are used to complying with the social structure that the rest of us live within.........[/p][/quote]I agree. There are always people who think that rules don't apply to them. Some of the rules and laws we have to follow in our daily lives are ridiculous, but we follow them nonetheless. I'm sure this mother has her daughter's best interests at heart and genuinely cares about her, but to encourage a child to break rules is not reponsible parenting in my opinion and is setting the child up for future problems. BournemouthMum
  • Score: 0

5:30pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Vicvic says...

Leah dont take this the wrong way but did you not think that people would be unkind and take the mickey when you asked the local paper to report a story about your daughters hair. Its not exactly newsworthy is it? I'm not going to be rude about it but I do think ( as do most people it would seem ) That the school has made the right judgement in this matter.
Leah dont take this the wrong way but did you not think that people would be unkind and take the mickey when you asked the local paper to report a story about your daughters hair. Its not exactly newsworthy is it? I'm not going to be rude about it but I do think ( as do most people it would seem ) That the school has made the right judgement in this matter. Vicvic
  • Score: 0

5:51pm Tue 15 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

Vicvic wrote:
Leah dont take this the wrong way but did you not think that people would be unkind and take the mickey when you asked the local paper to report a story about your daughters hair. Its not exactly newsworthy is it? I'm not going to be rude about it but I do think ( as do most people it would seem ) That the school has made the right judgement in this matter.
We live in a society where no one stands up for what they believe in, in case they are in a minority. No one complains in this country ie restaurants etc.. as we dont like to make a fuss. I believe the school handled this situation totally wrong and im not scared to make a stand. It saddens me that the people on here all copy each other with repetitive thoughts.. A few individuals have spoken up on here and not followed the herd!! Personal remarks however are totally uncalled for but as they hide behind their keyboard i will happily take it on the chin :) Constructive critisisim is always welcome in my life, but vulgarity isnt.
[quote][p][bold]Vicvic[/bold] wrote: Leah dont take this the wrong way but did you not think that people would be unkind and take the mickey when you asked the local paper to report a story about your daughters hair. Its not exactly newsworthy is it? I'm not going to be rude about it but I do think ( as do most people it would seem ) That the school has made the right judgement in this matter.[/p][/quote]We live in a society where no one stands up for what they believe in, in case they are in a minority. No one complains in this country ie restaurants etc.. as we dont like to make a fuss. I believe the school handled this situation totally wrong and im not scared to make a stand. It saddens me that the people on here all copy each other with repetitive thoughts.. A few individuals have spoken up on here and not followed the herd!! Personal remarks however are totally uncalled for but as they hide behind their keyboard i will happily take it on the chin :) Constructive critisisim is always welcome in my life, but vulgarity isnt. leah6153
  • Score: 0

5:53pm Tue 15 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

mysticalshoelace wrote:
WOC wrote:
I was excluded from school 20+ years ago for having green hair and wasn't allowed to return until it was back to it's normal colour. Thankfully I went back to school and learnt the difference between there, their and they're.
But not the difference between its and it's ...lol
haha!! Brilliant!!
[quote][p][bold]mysticalshoelace[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]WOC[/bold] wrote: I was excluded from school 20+ years ago for having green hair and wasn't allowed to return until it was back to it's normal colour. Thankfully I went back to school and learnt the difference between there, their and they're.[/p][/quote]But not the difference between its and it's ...lol[/p][/quote]haha!! Brilliant!! leah6153
  • Score: 0

6:01pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Vicvic says...

I take your point Leah and i hope you dont think I am being rude as that was not my intention and I certainly wasnt vulgar. Just an honest opinion, which people are going to offer if you put yourself in the news, it is human nature. I think you saying that NO ONE in society stands up for what they believe in is puerile nonsense though. I must go now though as I have to prepare classes for tomorrow and mark the homework of the pupils I both teach and care about.
I take your point Leah and i hope you dont think I am being rude as that was not my intention and I certainly wasnt vulgar. Just an honest opinion, which people are going to offer if you put yourself in the news, it is human nature. I think you saying that NO ONE in society stands up for what they believe in is puerile nonsense though. I must go now though as I have to prepare classes for tomorrow and mark the homework of the pupils I both teach and care about. Vicvic
  • Score: 0

6:17pm Tue 15 Jan 13

jinglebell says...

People with pink hair have a clear inability to learn to do things like everyone else - as do people who do not wear what everyone else is wearing. On alighting from bed in the morning ensure that you think the same as everyone else; people who do not, are in serious danger of inventing things, changing political thinking, in fact the world.
If it wasn't for those who starting weaving clothes, we could all snuggle up in our furs, use our clubs to kill our food, and generally feel really smug about our ability to be carbon copies of each other.
People with pink hair have a clear inability to learn to do things like everyone else - as do people who do not wear what everyone else is wearing. On alighting from bed in the morning ensure that you think the same as everyone else; people who do not, are in serious danger of inventing things, changing political thinking, in fact the world. If it wasn't for those who starting weaving clothes, we could all snuggle up in our furs, use our clubs to kill our food, and generally feel really smug about our ability to be carbon copies of each other. jinglebell
  • Score: 0

6:17pm Tue 15 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

Vicvic wrote:
I take your point Leah and i hope you dont think I am being rude as that was not my intention and I certainly wasnt vulgar. Just an honest opinion, which people are going to offer if you put yourself in the news, it is human nature. I think you saying that NO ONE in society stands up for what they believe in is puerile nonsense though. I must go now though as I have to prepare classes for tomorrow and mark the homework of the pupils I both teach and care about.
Im glad to hear you care about your pupils as many teachers only care about their end of year figures!! I wasnt saying that you had offended me as your comments where well put accross.Maybe you could teach a few of the 'adults' on here some people skills :) I just hope that they dont get shot down for something they believe in later on
[quote][p][bold]Vicvic[/bold] wrote: I take your point Leah and i hope you dont think I am being rude as that was not my intention and I certainly wasnt vulgar. Just an honest opinion, which people are going to offer if you put yourself in the news, it is human nature. I think you saying that NO ONE in society stands up for what they believe in is puerile nonsense though. I must go now though as I have to prepare classes for tomorrow and mark the homework of the pupils I both teach and care about.[/p][/quote]Im glad to hear you care about your pupils as many teachers only care about their end of year figures!! I wasnt saying that you had offended me as your comments where well put accross.Maybe you could teach a few of the 'adults' on here some people skills :) I just hope that they dont get shot down for something they believe in later on leah6153
  • Score: 0

6:21pm Tue 15 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

Vicvic wrote:
I think you are confusing me with someone else has written as I did not write your daughter was cheap or that you were a hippy. Not my style.
I was and for that i apologise , Sorry x
[quote][p][bold]Vicvic[/bold] wrote: I think you are confusing me with someone else has written as I did not write your daughter was cheap or that you were a hippy. Not my style.[/p][/quote]I was and for that i apologise , Sorry x leah6153
  • Score: 0

6:28pm Tue 15 Jan 13

spooki says...

Leah I think the school were being too extreme in isolating your daughter, it's a bit much for what is basically an inch of pink hair! If she had shaved it off and then dyed the first inch pink I would see their point. I see girls going to school in mini skirts, make up and coloured hair and I know the teachers at my school (ye olde Summerbee Senior) would have gone nuts!
If there is a rule it shouldn't come as a shock when they uphold it, but it should go for EVERY student, in which case half of them would probably be sent home! If the school uphold their decision then all students should be considered too.
I personally don't agree with 13yr olds bleaching their hair but that's just my opinion.
Leah I think the school were being too extreme in isolating your daughter, it's a bit much for what is basically an inch of pink hair! If she had shaved it off and then dyed the first inch pink I would see their point. I see girls going to school in mini skirts, make up and coloured hair and I know the teachers at my school (ye olde Summerbee Senior) would have gone nuts! If there is a rule it shouldn't come as a shock when they uphold it, but it should go for EVERY student, in which case half of them would probably be sent home! If the school uphold their decision then all students should be considered too. I personally don't agree with 13yr olds bleaching their hair but that's just my opinion. spooki
  • Score: 0

6:48pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Carolyn43 says...

Mum admits her daughter has bleached blonde hair, and in the photo her roots are dark. So do her roots and bleach out the pink ends at the same time - problem solved immediately.
.......
As for standing up for things that an individual believe are wrong, some think that speed limits are wrong; so let's all break speed limits. Some think that being arrested for peddling drugs is wrong; so let's all peddle drugs. In fact let's all break the laws and rules we don't like. Rules are there to make all our lives as pleasant as possible, and you can't pick and choose which ones you will obey unless
you are totally selfish and anti-social.
Mum admits her daughter has bleached blonde hair, and in the photo her roots are dark. So do her roots and bleach out the pink ends at the same time - problem solved immediately. ....... As for standing up for things that an individual believe are wrong, some think that speed limits are wrong; so let's all break speed limits. Some think that being arrested for peddling drugs is wrong; so let's all peddle drugs. In fact let's all break the laws and rules we don't like. Rules are there to make all our lives as pleasant as possible, and you can't pick and choose which ones you will obey unless you are totally selfish and anti-social. Carolyn43
  • Score: 0

7:03pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Carolyn43 says...

For 25 years I taught "difficult" 15 and 16-year-old girls and successfully helped the majority to leave school with skills and attitudes they could use when they left school. As a result of that experience, I'm of the opinion that a 13 year-old child shouldn't be dying her hair, because that is what she is - a child. Children are allowed to be mini-adults without the ability to cope with everything being an adult entails.
For 25 years I taught "difficult" 15 and 16-year-old girls and successfully helped the majority to leave school with skills and attitudes they could use when they left school. As a result of that experience, I'm of the opinion that a 13 year-old child shouldn't be dying her hair, because that is what she is - a child. Children are allowed to be mini-adults without the ability to cope with everything being an adult entails. Carolyn43
  • Score: 0

7:22pm Tue 15 Jan 13

mungobean says...

leah6153 wrote:
Hi everyone, Thankyou for your lovely comments!! Just to clear up a few things here...The 'school rules' which are no where to be found on the schools website but there is a small paragraph in the back of my daughters homework diary that states 'no coloured hair' I read this today..My daughter does not have her roots dyed dark!! She has bleached blonde hair and has done for the past year, but NO isolation from that. I like to lead a quiet life, the reason i 'ran' to the newspaper is because the schools are a law unto themselves..The local authorities cant do anything as the school can basically exclude anyone they choose to. My anger from all of this is the way the teachers handled the situation and were not even willing to discuss 'the rules' with me. None of you actually know me and i apologise to people who are offended because i dye my hair!! I have a grown up daughter of 20 whom is currently training to be an accountant...I raised her to also have individuality..She is not a brat!! The picture was posed as requested by the Echo themselves, anyone that understands the media would know this! Many of you seem to jump on the bandwagon and follow the crowd..good luck with your journey on that! I think i have covered most comments. My daughter is a top student and well behaved polite young girl...People should learn not to just a book by its cover. I have never broken the law myself nor been in trouble with the law, Most girls at this school go to school with skirts hitched up around their wastes and full makeup on, yet the teachers say NOTHING. The kids their are allowed to spend all day on their phones, fb etc as the school ruled that its their human rights to do so..I myself am confused at them singling out my daughter..whom in their own words last month they said and i quote.. 'shes a superstar' thankyou for reading
It's 'judge' a book by its cover not 'just' as you typed and it's 'waists' not 'wastes', and of course it would be helpful if you could differentiate between there, their and they're. Maybe when your daughter returns to school you could join her, you might learn some respect and learn to spell properly.
[quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: Hi everyone, Thankyou for your lovely comments!! Just to clear up a few things here...The 'school rules' which are no where to be found on the schools website but there is a small paragraph in the back of my daughters homework diary that states 'no coloured hair' I read this today..My daughter does not have her roots dyed dark!! She has bleached blonde hair and has done for the past year, but NO isolation from that. I like to lead a quiet life, the reason i 'ran' to the newspaper is because the schools are a law unto themselves..The local authorities cant do anything as the school can basically exclude anyone they choose to. My anger from all of this is the way the teachers handled the situation and were not even willing to discuss 'the rules' with me. None of you actually know me and i apologise to people who are offended because i dye my hair!! I have a grown up daughter of 20 whom is currently training to be an accountant...I raised her to also have individuality..She is not a brat!! The picture was posed as requested by the Echo themselves, anyone that understands the media would know this! Many of you seem to jump on the bandwagon and follow the crowd..good luck with your journey on that! I think i have covered most comments. My daughter is a top student and well behaved polite young girl...People should learn not to just a book by its cover. I have never broken the law myself nor been in trouble with the law, Most girls at this school go to school with skirts hitched up around their wastes and full makeup on, yet the teachers say NOTHING. The kids their are allowed to spend all day on their phones, fb etc as the school ruled that its their human rights to do so..I myself am confused at them singling out my daughter..whom in their own words last month they said and i quote.. 'shes a superstar' thankyou for reading[/p][/quote]It's 'judge' a book by its cover not 'just' as you typed and it's 'waists' not 'wastes', and of course it would be helpful if you could differentiate between there, their and they're. Maybe when your daughter returns to school you could join her, you might learn some respect and learn to spell properly. mungobean
  • Score: 0

7:24pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Plymouth says...

Carolyn43 wrote:
Mum admits her daughter has bleached blonde hair, and in the photo her roots are dark. So do her roots and bleach out the pink ends at the same time - problem solved immediately.
.......
As for standing up for things that an individual believe are wrong, some think that speed limits are wrong; so let's all break speed limits. Some think that being arrested for peddling drugs is wrong; so let's all peddle drugs. In fact let's all break the laws and rules we don't like. Rules are there to make all our lives as pleasant as possible, and you can't pick and choose which ones you will obey unless
you are totally selfish and anti-social.
At one point the law stated that women weren't allowed to vote. How childish and spoilt women must have been for going against "the rules".
[quote][p][bold]Carolyn43[/bold] wrote: Mum admits her daughter has bleached blonde hair, and in the photo her roots are dark. So do her roots and bleach out the pink ends at the same time - problem solved immediately. ....... As for standing up for things that an individual believe are wrong, some think that speed limits are wrong; so let's all break speed limits. Some think that being arrested for peddling drugs is wrong; so let's all peddle drugs. In fact let's all break the laws and rules we don't like. Rules are there to make all our lives as pleasant as possible, and you can't pick and choose which ones you will obey unless you are totally selfish and anti-social.[/p][/quote]At one point the law stated that women weren't allowed to vote. How childish and spoilt women must have been for going against "the rules". Plymouth
  • Score: 0

7:26pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Vikki27 says...

I'm stunned at the amount of vitriol everyone is spitting in this mum's direction!

First of all, I'm pretty sure nobody here is a perfect parent, so I'm curious where the authority on what is right and wrong comes from. There's no right or wrong for anyone outside this situation - only opinion, so let's just get that straight right now.

Secondly, yes, there is a uniform and yes, there are rules. But I also think a certain degree of reason and flexibility HAS to be applied because you're dealing with people, not robots. And I agree with Leah completely on the point that you can't allow girls to go to school with their skirts rolled right up and faces plastered in make up but then exclude a girl who has the very tips of her hair dyed but is otherwise a model student. Put a mark against her name or something but excluding her is taking this to the extreme and I've no doubt that the school is going to this extreme to 'make an example' of her.

I went to a school where uniformity was also paramount, but we were still not penalised for dying our hair because insisting on uniformity in a way that affects you outside of school is taking it too far. From experience, teenage girls NEED the outlet to express their personality and who are we, as adults, to define for them how they should do it, beyond whether it's likely to cause mental or physical harm? Teaching teenage girls they have to look the same as everyone else will harm their sense of self in the long run and teaching them that being an individual creates social exclusion? A very poor lesson for a school to teach.

I realise I'm barking up the wrong tree as it were, but the ability to comment on stories like this appears to make the public feel they have free license to spout opinion as though it were fact, and in an aggressive manner as well. Many of you have lost the ability to view a story objectively and consider it before reacting with an emotional outburst. From the comments I could stand to read, some of the authors need a lesson in glass houses.
I'm stunned at the amount of vitriol everyone is spitting in this mum's direction! First of all, I'm pretty sure nobody here is a perfect parent, so I'm curious where the authority on what is right and wrong comes from. There's no right or wrong for anyone outside this situation - only opinion, so let's just get that straight right now. Secondly, yes, there is a uniform and yes, there are rules. But I also think a certain degree of reason and flexibility HAS to be applied because you're dealing with people, not robots. And I agree with Leah completely on the point that you can't allow girls to go to school with their skirts rolled right up and faces plastered in make up but then exclude a girl who has the very tips of her hair dyed but is otherwise a model student. Put a mark against her name or something but excluding her is taking this to the extreme and I've no doubt that the school is going to this extreme to 'make an example' of her. I went to a school where uniformity was also paramount, but we were still not penalised for dying our hair because insisting on uniformity in a way that affects you outside of school is taking it too far. From experience, teenage girls NEED the outlet to express their personality and who are we, as adults, to define for them how they should do it, beyond whether it's likely to cause mental or physical harm? Teaching teenage girls they have to look the same as everyone else will harm their sense of self in the long run and teaching them that being an individual creates social exclusion? A very poor lesson for a school to teach. I realise I'm barking up the wrong tree as it were, but the ability to comment on stories like this appears to make the public feel they have free license to spout opinion as though it were fact, and in an aggressive manner as well. Many of you have lost the ability to view a story objectively and consider it before reacting with an emotional outburst. From the comments I could stand to read, some of the authors need a lesson in glass houses. Vikki27
  • Score: 0

7:28pm Tue 15 Jan 13

bmouthmummyoftwo says...

I think it's amazing how stories like this make it into the paper! As far as I'm concerned, a child's hairstyle has always been classed as part of their 'uniform'. The rules were the same when I was at school. This is just a case of the Americanized state that we live in now, where people can moan or sue about anything. They should not be given publicity while doing so.
I think it's amazing how stories like this make it into the paper! As far as I'm concerned, a child's hairstyle has always been classed as part of their 'uniform'. The rules were the same when I was at school. This is just a case of the Americanized state that we live in now, where people can moan or sue about anything. They should not be given publicity while doing so. bmouthmummyoftwo
  • Score: 0

7:33pm Tue 15 Jan 13

LordLilliput says...

Leah, you sound like a very principled person although personally, I think you are completely wrong on choosing to remove your child from school rather than do what the school has asked of you so that she can continue her education. Especially as it is something as trivial as a haircut.

Where I think you have got this very wrong is in using a minor ie your child as a channel for your principals. In life some things do not work out as we would personally like but to put your 13 year old daughter into a newspaper for what you consider to be an injustice based upon A HAIRCUT is I feel, an ill judged decision.
Leah, you sound like a very principled person although personally, I think you are completely wrong on choosing to remove your child from school rather than do what the school has asked of you so that she can continue her education. Especially as it is something as trivial as a haircut. Where I think you have got this very wrong is in using a minor ie your child as a channel for your principals. In life some things do not work out as we would personally like but to put your 13 year old daughter into a newspaper for what you consider to be an injustice based upon A HAIRCUT is I feel, an ill judged decision. LordLilliput
  • Score: 0

7:35pm Tue 15 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

Her hair has been re/bleached and stripped...Back to school tomorrow and they CANT isolate her for having bleached hair as many others have coloured hair! One rule for one and totally different rules for the others as their 'face fits' !! My daughters education is my first priority and i will be writing to the board of governers to make the school rules accessible and very CLEAR so that there are no misunderstandings in the future. Hopefully this article will jolt them into reviewing the way the school deals with ALL parents regarding expectations and rules as i can assure you all, I am not the only parent with issues with this particular school. Its a real shame that we cant express ourselves in 2013 whilst doing no harm to others.
Her hair has been re/bleached and stripped...Back to school tomorrow and they CANT isolate her for having bleached hair as many others have coloured hair! One rule for one and totally different rules for the others as their 'face fits' !! My daughters education is my first priority and i will be writing to the board of governers to make the school rules accessible and very CLEAR so that there are no misunderstandings in the future. Hopefully this article will jolt them into reviewing the way the school deals with ALL parents regarding expectations and rules as i can assure you all, I am not the only parent with issues with this particular school. Its a real shame that we cant express ourselves in 2013 whilst doing no harm to others. leah6153
  • Score: 0

7:42pm Tue 15 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

LordLilliput wrote:
Leah, you sound like a very principled person although personally, I think you are completely wrong on choosing to remove your child from school rather than do what the school has asked of you so that she can continue her education. Especially as it is something as trivial as a haircut.

Where I think you have got this very wrong is in using a minor ie your child as a channel for your principals. In life some things do not work out as we would personally like but to put your 13 year old daughter into a newspaper for what you consider to be an injustice based upon A HAIRCUT is I feel, an ill judged decision.
Possibly right, However i acted out of passion and fury over how my daughter and I were treated by the school. If i can get them to change their approach to how they deal with parents and children and make their rules clear and available for ALL to read...then i have acheived my goal. It saddens me how people are quick to judge a story on face value without knowing the people/circumstances involved. We live and learn!
[quote][p][bold]LordLilliput[/bold] wrote: Leah, you sound like a very principled person although personally, I think you are completely wrong on choosing to remove your child from school rather than do what the school has asked of you so that she can continue her education. Especially as it is something as trivial as a haircut. Where I think you have got this very wrong is in using a minor ie your child as a channel for your principals. In life some things do not work out as we would personally like but to put your 13 year old daughter into a newspaper for what you consider to be an injustice based upon A HAIRCUT is I feel, an ill judged decision.[/p][/quote]Possibly right, However i acted out of passion and fury over how my daughter and I were treated by the school. If i can get them to change their approach to how they deal with parents and children and make their rules clear and available for ALL to read...then i have acheived my goal. It saddens me how people are quick to judge a story on face value without knowing the people/circumstances involved. We live and learn! leah6153
  • Score: 0

7:47pm Tue 15 Jan 13

charlie2004 says...

Leah, to allow your daughter to 'express herself' as you put it would mean all pupils should be allowed to express themselves in whichever way them choose. This simply will not work in a secondary school or any other place where rules are in force. There is a reason for pupils to where uniform and to conform and one of those reasons are that no individual stands out from the rest, whether in a good way or a bad way. Send your daughter back to school and if need be let her express herself away from this environment if that is what you wish.
Leah, to allow your daughter to 'express herself' as you put it would mean all pupils should be allowed to express themselves in whichever way them choose. This simply will not work in a secondary school or any other place where rules are in force. There is a reason for pupils to where uniform and to conform and one of those reasons are that no individual stands out from the rest, whether in a good way or a bad way. Send your daughter back to school and if need be let her express herself away from this environment if that is what you wish. charlie2004
  • Score: 0

7:48pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Dixi says...

Well said Carolyn. If Leah feels that it's unreasonable that her daughter gets 'singled out' for punishment when so many others are not adhering to the rules, why does she feel it's acceptable to let her own daughter go to school like that? Why isn't she giving her daughter some intelligent, parental advice that it is NOT acceptable to break rules in society, let alone school. She is not preparing her daughter for the outside world.

It would be more helpful to her daughter if she explained that when she goes for her first job interviews, first impressions will count. Any rebellious attitude in behaviour or the way she presents herself, will not fill any future employer with confidence.

As a mother, I brought up my daughter to accept and respect authority and that there are times when one has to conform to rules.

There are always other times when one can express individuality far more effectively and imaginatively on a communicative level, for instance.

But to think one is being 'individualistic' by wearing outfits or a hairstyle that are not school uniform, is just not acceptable.

School is not the place for demonstrating fashions or trends in dress and a girl of 13 should be concentrating on the importance of her education, not on her hairstyle - and her mother has failed in her duty as a parent by not impressing that fact on her.
Well said Carolyn. If Leah feels that it's unreasonable that her daughter gets 'singled out' for punishment when so many others are not adhering to the rules, why does she feel it's acceptable to let her own daughter go to school like that? Why isn't she giving her daughter some intelligent, parental advice that it is NOT acceptable to break rules in society, let alone school. She is not preparing her daughter for the outside world. It would be more helpful to her daughter if she explained that when she goes for her first job interviews, first impressions will count. Any rebellious attitude in behaviour or the way she presents herself, will not fill any future employer with confidence. As a mother, I brought up my daughter to accept and respect authority and that there are times when one has to conform to rules. There are always other times when one can express individuality far more effectively and imaginatively on a communicative level, for instance. But to think one is being 'individualistic' by wearing outfits or a hairstyle that are not school uniform, is just not acceptable. School is not the place for demonstrating fashions or trends in dress and a girl of 13 should be concentrating on the importance of her education, not on her hairstyle - and her mother has failed in her duty as a parent by not impressing that fact on her. Dixi
  • Score: 0

7:52pm Tue 15 Jan 13

mysticalshoelace says...

Judging by most of the comments on here the majority of Echo readers still reside in the Dark Ages!
Judging by most of the comments on here the majority of Echo readers still reside in the Dark Ages! mysticalshoelace
  • Score: 0

8:07pm Tue 15 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

Dixi wrote:
Well said Carolyn. If Leah feels that it's unreasonable that her daughter gets 'singled out' for punishment when so many others are not adhering to the rules, why does she feel it's acceptable to let her own daughter go to school like that? Why isn't she giving her daughter some intelligent, parental advice that it is NOT acceptable to break rules in society, let alone school. She is not preparing her daughter for the outside world.

It would be more helpful to her daughter if she explained that when she goes for her first job interviews, first impressions will count. Any rebellious attitude in behaviour or the way she presents herself, will not fill any future employer with confidence.

As a mother, I brought up my daughter to accept and respect authority and that there are times when one has to conform to rules.

There are always other times when one can express individuality far more effectively and imaginatively on a communicative level, for instance.

But to think one is being 'individualistic' by wearing outfits or a hairstyle that are not school uniform, is just not acceptable.

School is not the place for demonstrating fashions or trends in dress and a girl of 13 should be concentrating on the importance of her education, not on her hairstyle - and her mother has failed in her duty as a parent by not impressing that fact on her.
I appreciate your comment but i am also the mother to a 20yr old whom i raised in the exact same way as my 13yr old.. She has upmost respect for her peers and obides by the rules and is currently training in an accountacy firm to become an accountant.. Please lets not lose sight of the issue here..an inch of pink hair dye!!
[quote][p][bold]Dixi[/bold] wrote: Well said Carolyn. If Leah feels that it's unreasonable that her daughter gets 'singled out' for punishment when so many others are not adhering to the rules, why does she feel it's acceptable to let her own daughter go to school like that? Why isn't she giving her daughter some intelligent, parental advice that it is NOT acceptable to break rules in society, let alone school. She is not preparing her daughter for the outside world. It would be more helpful to her daughter if she explained that when she goes for her first job interviews, first impressions will count. Any rebellious attitude in behaviour or the way she presents herself, will not fill any future employer with confidence. As a mother, I brought up my daughter to accept and respect authority and that there are times when one has to conform to rules. There are always other times when one can express individuality far more effectively and imaginatively on a communicative level, for instance. But to think one is being 'individualistic' by wearing outfits or a hairstyle that are not school uniform, is just not acceptable. School is not the place for demonstrating fashions or trends in dress and a girl of 13 should be concentrating on the importance of her education, not on her hairstyle - and her mother has failed in her duty as a parent by not impressing that fact on her.[/p][/quote]I appreciate your comment but i am also the mother to a 20yr old whom i raised in the exact same way as my 13yr old.. She has upmost respect for her peers and obides by the rules and is currently training in an accountacy firm to become an accountant.. Please lets not lose sight of the issue here..an inch of pink hair dye!! leah6153
  • Score: 0

8:13pm Tue 15 Jan 13

LordLilliput says...

leah6153 wrote:
Dixi wrote:
Well said Carolyn. If Leah feels that it's unreasonable that her daughter gets 'singled out' for punishment when so many others are not adhering to the rules, why does she feel it's acceptable to let her own daughter go to school like that? Why isn't she giving her daughter some intelligent, parental advice that it is NOT acceptable to break rules in society, let alone school. She is not preparing her daughter for the outside world.

It would be more helpful to her daughter if she explained that when she goes for her first job interviews, first impressions will count. Any rebellious attitude in behaviour or the way she presents herself, will not fill any future employer with confidence.

As a mother, I brought up my daughter to accept and respect authority and that there are times when one has to conform to rules.

There are always other times when one can express individuality far more effectively and imaginatively on a communicative level, for instance.

But to think one is being 'individualistic' by wearing outfits or a hairstyle that are not school uniform, is just not acceptable.

School is not the place for demonstrating fashions or trends in dress and a girl of 13 should be concentrating on the importance of her education, not on her hairstyle - and her mother has failed in her duty as a parent by not impressing that fact on her.
I appreciate your comment but i am also the mother to a 20yr old whom i raised in the exact same way as my 13yr old.. She has upmost respect for her peers and obides by the rules and is currently training in an accountacy firm to become an accountant.. Please lets not lose sight of the issue here..an inch of pink hair dye!!
Can you not see the irony of your last sentence!?
[quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dixi[/bold] wrote: Well said Carolyn. If Leah feels that it's unreasonable that her daughter gets 'singled out' for punishment when so many others are not adhering to the rules, why does she feel it's acceptable to let her own daughter go to school like that? Why isn't she giving her daughter some intelligent, parental advice that it is NOT acceptable to break rules in society, let alone school. She is not preparing her daughter for the outside world. It would be more helpful to her daughter if she explained that when she goes for her first job interviews, first impressions will count. Any rebellious attitude in behaviour or the way she presents herself, will not fill any future employer with confidence. As a mother, I brought up my daughter to accept and respect authority and that there are times when one has to conform to rules. There are always other times when one can express individuality far more effectively and imaginatively on a communicative level, for instance. But to think one is being 'individualistic' by wearing outfits or a hairstyle that are not school uniform, is just not acceptable. School is not the place for demonstrating fashions or trends in dress and a girl of 13 should be concentrating on the importance of her education, not on her hairstyle - and her mother has failed in her duty as a parent by not impressing that fact on her.[/p][/quote]I appreciate your comment but i am also the mother to a 20yr old whom i raised in the exact same way as my 13yr old.. She has upmost respect for her peers and obides by the rules and is currently training in an accountacy firm to become an accountant.. Please lets not lose sight of the issue here..an inch of pink hair dye!![/p][/quote]Can you not see the irony of your last sentence!? LordLilliput
  • Score: 0

8:19pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Dixi says...

LordLilliput wrote:
leah6153 wrote:
Dixi wrote:
Well said Carolyn. If Leah feels that it's unreasonable that her daughter gets 'singled out' for punishment when so many others are not adhering to the rules, why does she feel it's acceptable to let her own daughter go to school like that? Why isn't she giving her daughter some intelligent, parental advice that it is NOT acceptable to break rules in society, let alone school. She is not preparing her daughter for the outside world.

It would be more helpful to her daughter if she explained that when she goes for her first job interviews, first impressions will count. Any rebellious attitude in behaviour or the way she presents herself, will not fill any future employer with confidence.

As a mother, I brought up my daughter to accept and respect authority and that there are times when one has to conform to rules.

There are always other times when one can express individuality far more effectively and imaginatively on a communicative level, for instance.

But to think one is being 'individualistic' by wearing outfits or a hairstyle that are not school uniform, is just not acceptable.

School is not the place for demonstrating fashions or trends in dress and a girl of 13 should be concentrating on the importance of her education, not on her hairstyle - and her mother has failed in her duty as a parent by not impressing that fact on her.
I appreciate your comment but i am also the mother to a 20yr old whom i raised in the exact same way as my 13yr old.. She has upmost respect for her peers and obides by the rules and is currently training in an accountacy firm to become an accountant.. Please lets not lose sight of the issue here..an inch of pink hair dye!!
Can you not see the irony of your last sentence!?
No, Leah, the issue here, is allowing her to go to school like that.
[quote][p][bold]LordLilliput[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dixi[/bold] wrote: Well said Carolyn. If Leah feels that it's unreasonable that her daughter gets 'singled out' for punishment when so many others are not adhering to the rules, why does she feel it's acceptable to let her own daughter go to school like that? Why isn't she giving her daughter some intelligent, parental advice that it is NOT acceptable to break rules in society, let alone school. She is not preparing her daughter for the outside world. It would be more helpful to her daughter if she explained that when she goes for her first job interviews, first impressions will count. Any rebellious attitude in behaviour or the way she presents herself, will not fill any future employer with confidence. As a mother, I brought up my daughter to accept and respect authority and that there are times when one has to conform to rules. There are always other times when one can express individuality far more effectively and imaginatively on a communicative level, for instance. But to think one is being 'individualistic' by wearing outfits or a hairstyle that are not school uniform, is just not acceptable. School is not the place for demonstrating fashions or trends in dress and a girl of 13 should be concentrating on the importance of her education, not on her hairstyle - and her mother has failed in her duty as a parent by not impressing that fact on her.[/p][/quote]I appreciate your comment but i am also the mother to a 20yr old whom i raised in the exact same way as my 13yr old.. She has upmost respect for her peers and obides by the rules and is currently training in an accountacy firm to become an accountant.. Please lets not lose sight of the issue here..an inch of pink hair dye!![/p][/quote]Can you not see the irony of your last sentence!?[/p][/quote]No, Leah, the issue here, is allowing her to go to school like that. Dixi
  • Score: 0

8:19pm Tue 15 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

LordLilliput wrote:
leah6153 wrote:
Dixi wrote:
Well said Carolyn. If Leah feels that it's unreasonable that her daughter gets 'singled out' for punishment when so many others are not adhering to the rules, why does she feel it's acceptable to let her own daughter go to school like that? Why isn't she giving her daughter some intelligent, parental advice that it is NOT acceptable to break rules in society, let alone school. She is not preparing her daughter for the outside world.

It would be more helpful to her daughter if she explained that when she goes for her first job interviews, first impressions will count. Any rebellious attitude in behaviour or the way she presents herself, will not fill any future employer with confidence.

As a mother, I brought up my daughter to accept and respect authority and that there are times when one has to conform to rules.

There are always other times when one can express individuality far more effectively and imaginatively on a communicative level, for instance.

But to think one is being 'individualistic' by wearing outfits or a hairstyle that are not school uniform, is just not acceptable.

School is not the place for demonstrating fashions or trends in dress and a girl of 13 should be concentrating on the importance of her education, not on her hairstyle - and her mother has failed in her duty as a parent by not impressing that fact on her.
I appreciate your comment but i am also the mother to a 20yr old whom i raised in the exact same way as my 13yr old.. She has upmost respect for her peers and obides by the rules and is currently training in an accountacy firm to become an accountant.. Please lets not lose sight of the issue here..an inch of pink hair dye!!
Can you not see the irony of your last sentence!?
Im tired, its been a long day!! Being attacked from all angles is exhausting!! Its 4 yrs since my mother passed today..this is all bad timing so im logging out to spend time with my family :)
[quote][p][bold]LordLilliput[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dixi[/bold] wrote: Well said Carolyn. If Leah feels that it's unreasonable that her daughter gets 'singled out' for punishment when so many others are not adhering to the rules, why does she feel it's acceptable to let her own daughter go to school like that? Why isn't she giving her daughter some intelligent, parental advice that it is NOT acceptable to break rules in society, let alone school. She is not preparing her daughter for the outside world. It would be more helpful to her daughter if she explained that when she goes for her first job interviews, first impressions will count. Any rebellious attitude in behaviour or the way she presents herself, will not fill any future employer with confidence. As a mother, I brought up my daughter to accept and respect authority and that there are times when one has to conform to rules. There are always other times when one can express individuality far more effectively and imaginatively on a communicative level, for instance. But to think one is being 'individualistic' by wearing outfits or a hairstyle that are not school uniform, is just not acceptable. School is not the place for demonstrating fashions or trends in dress and a girl of 13 should be concentrating on the importance of her education, not on her hairstyle - and her mother has failed in her duty as a parent by not impressing that fact on her.[/p][/quote]I appreciate your comment but i am also the mother to a 20yr old whom i raised in the exact same way as my 13yr old.. She has upmost respect for her peers and obides by the rules and is currently training in an accountacy firm to become an accountant.. Please lets not lose sight of the issue here..an inch of pink hair dye!![/p][/quote]Can you not see the irony of your last sentence!?[/p][/quote]Im tired, its been a long day!! Being attacked from all angles is exhausting!! Its 4 yrs since my mother passed today..this is all bad timing so im logging out to spend time with my family :) leah6153
  • Score: 0

8:25pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Ex-pat, thankfully says...

I think you'll find most people aren't 'copying eachother' or 'following the herd' but that most people genuinely can see how ridiculous you've been. Teaching your kid that they don't need to have any respect for rules or authority is pure bad parenting. End of. Grow up, cut the end of her hair, and stop making a fuss over nothing!
I think you'll find most people aren't 'copying eachother' or 'following the herd' but that most people genuinely can see how ridiculous you've been. Teaching your kid that they don't need to have any respect for rules or authority is pure bad parenting. End of. Grow up, cut the end of her hair, and stop making a fuss over nothing! Ex-pat, thankfully
  • Score: 0

8:26pm Tue 15 Jan 13

LordLilliput says...

leah6153 wrote:
LordLilliput wrote:
leah6153 wrote:
Dixi wrote:
Well said Carolyn. If Leah feels that it's unreasonable that her daughter gets 'singled out' for punishment when so many others are not adhering to the rules, why does she feel it's acceptable to let her own daughter go to school like that? Why isn't she giving her daughter some intelligent, parental advice that it is NOT acceptable to break rules in society, let alone school. She is not preparing her daughter for the outside world.

It would be more helpful to her daughter if she explained that when she goes for her first job interviews, first impressions will count. Any rebellious attitude in behaviour or the way she presents herself, will not fill any future employer with confidence.

As a mother, I brought up my daughter to accept and respect authority and that there are times when one has to conform to rules.

There are always other times when one can express individuality far more effectively and imaginatively on a communicative level, for instance.

But to think one is being 'individualistic' by wearing outfits or a hairstyle that are not school uniform, is just not acceptable.

School is not the place for demonstrating fashions or trends in dress and a girl of 13 should be concentrating on the importance of her education, not on her hairstyle - and her mother has failed in her duty as a parent by not impressing that fact on her.
I appreciate your comment but i am also the mother to a 20yr old whom i raised in the exact same way as my 13yr old.. She has upmost respect for her peers and obides by the rules and is currently training in an accountacy firm to become an accountant.. Please lets not lose sight of the issue here..an inch of pink hair dye!!
Can you not see the irony of your last sentence!?
Im tired, its been a long day!! Being attacked from all angles is exhausting!! Its 4 yrs since my mother passed today..this is all bad timing so im logging out to spend time with my family :)
I certainly wasn't and haven't attacked you. All I'm saying is that you've made a standpoint about, as you rightly say, an inch of pink hair - it really isnt worth it.

Rules are rules and some are unfair but without them there would be a thousand more injustices.

You are right spend time with your family don't spend it fighting all this, it's not worth it.
[quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LordLilliput[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dixi[/bold] wrote: Well said Carolyn. If Leah feels that it's unreasonable that her daughter gets 'singled out' for punishment when so many others are not adhering to the rules, why does she feel it's acceptable to let her own daughter go to school like that? Why isn't she giving her daughter some intelligent, parental advice that it is NOT acceptable to break rules in society, let alone school. She is not preparing her daughter for the outside world. It would be more helpful to her daughter if she explained that when she goes for her first job interviews, first impressions will count. Any rebellious attitude in behaviour or the way she presents herself, will not fill any future employer with confidence. As a mother, I brought up my daughter to accept and respect authority and that there are times when one has to conform to rules. There are always other times when one can express individuality far more effectively and imaginatively on a communicative level, for instance. But to think one is being 'individualistic' by wearing outfits or a hairstyle that are not school uniform, is just not acceptable. School is not the place for demonstrating fashions or trends in dress and a girl of 13 should be concentrating on the importance of her education, not on her hairstyle - and her mother has failed in her duty as a parent by not impressing that fact on her.[/p][/quote]I appreciate your comment but i am also the mother to a 20yr old whom i raised in the exact same way as my 13yr old.. She has upmost respect for her peers and obides by the rules and is currently training in an accountacy firm to become an accountant.. Please lets not lose sight of the issue here..an inch of pink hair dye!![/p][/quote]Can you not see the irony of your last sentence!?[/p][/quote]Im tired, its been a long day!! Being attacked from all angles is exhausting!! Its 4 yrs since my mother passed today..this is all bad timing so im logging out to spend time with my family :)[/p][/quote]I certainly wasn't and haven't attacked you. All I'm saying is that you've made a standpoint about, as you rightly say, an inch of pink hair - it really isnt worth it. Rules are rules and some are unfair but without them there would be a thousand more injustices. You are right spend time with your family don't spend it fighting all this, it's not worth it. LordLilliput
  • Score: 0

8:28pm Tue 15 Jan 13

nobbjockie says...

Its actually and more simply about mutual respect, something an increasing number lack nowadays. The lack of compliance with rules is a lack of mutual respect and both should be ashamed.
Its actually and more simply about mutual respect, something an increasing number lack nowadays. The lack of compliance with rules is a lack of mutual respect and both should be ashamed. nobbjockie
  • Score: 0

8:36pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Dixi says...

mysticalshoelace wrote:
Judging by most of the comments on here the majority of Echo readers still reside in the Dark Ages!
Hahaha...punishment for breaking rules in the Dark Ages would probably have amounted to execution! All we aim for is a society that works well for the good of everyone and one which can sustain/improve the gift of an education system which surpasses many of those throughout the world. I think you'll find that even Good King Alfred advocated these things! ;o)
[quote][p][bold]mysticalshoelace[/bold] wrote: Judging by most of the comments on here the majority of Echo readers still reside in the Dark Ages![/p][/quote]Hahaha...punishment for breaking rules in the Dark Ages would probably have amounted to execution! All we aim for is a society that works well for the good of everyone and one which can sustain/improve the gift of an education system which surpasses many of those throughout the world. I think you'll find that even Good King Alfred advocated these things! ;o) Dixi
  • Score: 0

8:36pm Tue 15 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

LordLilliput wrote:
leah6153 wrote:
LordLilliput wrote:
leah6153 wrote:
Dixi wrote:
Well said Carolyn. If Leah feels that it's unreasonable that her daughter gets 'singled out' for punishment when so many others are not adhering to the rules, why does she feel it's acceptable to let her own daughter go to school like that? Why isn't she giving her daughter some intelligent, parental advice that it is NOT acceptable to break rules in society, let alone school. She is not preparing her daughter for the outside world.

It would be more helpful to her daughter if she explained that when she goes for her first job interviews, first impressions will count. Any rebellious attitude in behaviour or the way she presents herself, will not fill any future employer with confidence.

As a mother, I brought up my daughter to accept and respect authority and that there are times when one has to conform to rules.

There are always other times when one can express individuality far more effectively and imaginatively on a communicative level, for instance.

But to think one is being 'individualistic' by wearing outfits or a hairstyle that are not school uniform, is just not acceptable.

School is not the place for demonstrating fashions or trends in dress and a girl of 13 should be concentrating on the importance of her education, not on her hairstyle - and her mother has failed in her duty as a parent by not impressing that fact on her.
I appreciate your comment but i am also the mother to a 20yr old whom i raised in the exact same way as my 13yr old.. She has upmost respect for her peers and obides by the rules and is currently training in an accountacy firm to become an accountant.. Please lets not lose sight of the issue here..an inch of pink hair dye!!
Can you not see the irony of your last sentence!?
Im tired, its been a long day!! Being attacked from all angles is exhausting!! Its 4 yrs since my mother passed today..this is all bad timing so im logging out to spend time with my family :)
I certainly wasn't and haven't attacked you. All I'm saying is that you've made a standpoint about, as you rightly say, an inch of pink hair - it really isnt worth it.

Rules are rules and some are unfair but without them there would be a thousand more injustices.

You are right spend time with your family don't spend it fighting all this, it's not worth it.
I agree with you and wrote earlier on here that my daughters hair has been bleached back to 'normal'! School for her tomorrow but im writing to the board of governers to make the school rules are available for all to see and to make them clear so that there are no future misunderstandings! If i can do this from the article then i have acheived something. I am going now! Thankyou, Its nice to hear from someone with intelligence and an open mind.
[quote][p][bold]LordLilliput[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LordLilliput[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dixi[/bold] wrote: Well said Carolyn. If Leah feels that it's unreasonable that her daughter gets 'singled out' for punishment when so many others are not adhering to the rules, why does she feel it's acceptable to let her own daughter go to school like that? Why isn't she giving her daughter some intelligent, parental advice that it is NOT acceptable to break rules in society, let alone school. She is not preparing her daughter for the outside world. It would be more helpful to her daughter if she explained that when she goes for her first job interviews, first impressions will count. Any rebellious attitude in behaviour or the way she presents herself, will not fill any future employer with confidence. As a mother, I brought up my daughter to accept and respect authority and that there are times when one has to conform to rules. There are always other times when one can express individuality far more effectively and imaginatively on a communicative level, for instance. But to think one is being 'individualistic' by wearing outfits or a hairstyle that are not school uniform, is just not acceptable. School is not the place for demonstrating fashions or trends in dress and a girl of 13 should be concentrating on the importance of her education, not on her hairstyle - and her mother has failed in her duty as a parent by not impressing that fact on her.[/p][/quote]I appreciate your comment but i am also the mother to a 20yr old whom i raised in the exact same way as my 13yr old.. She has upmost respect for her peers and obides by the rules and is currently training in an accountacy firm to become an accountant.. Please lets not lose sight of the issue here..an inch of pink hair dye!![/p][/quote]Can you not see the irony of your last sentence!?[/p][/quote]Im tired, its been a long day!! Being attacked from all angles is exhausting!! Its 4 yrs since my mother passed today..this is all bad timing so im logging out to spend time with my family :)[/p][/quote]I certainly wasn't and haven't attacked you. All I'm saying is that you've made a standpoint about, as you rightly say, an inch of pink hair - it really isnt worth it. Rules are rules and some are unfair but without them there would be a thousand more injustices. You are right spend time with your family don't spend it fighting all this, it's not worth it.[/p][/quote]I agree with you and wrote earlier on here that my daughters hair has been bleached back to 'normal'! School for her tomorrow but im writing to the board of governers to make the school rules are available for all to see and to make them clear so that there are no future misunderstandings! If i can do this from the article then i have acheived something. I am going now! Thankyou, Its nice to hear from someone with intelligence and an open mind. leah6153
  • Score: 0

8:45pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Rustyfootballer says...

i thought parents signed a home school contract these days so my guess is the mum signed a binding agreement.
i think the mother is emotionally immature.
i thought parents signed a home school contract these days so my guess is the mum signed a binding agreement. i think the mother is emotionally immature. Rustyfootballer
  • Score: 0

8:46pm Tue 15 Jan 13

LordLilliput says...

leah6153 wrote:
LordLilliput wrote:
leah6153 wrote:
LordLilliput wrote:
leah6153 wrote:
Dixi wrote:
Well said Carolyn. If Leah feels that it's unreasonable that her daughter gets 'singled out' for punishment when so many others are not adhering to the rules, why does she feel it's acceptable to let her own daughter go to school like that? Why isn't she giving her daughter some intelligent, parental advice that it is NOT acceptable to break rules in society, let alone school. She is not preparing her daughter for the outside world.

It would be more helpful to her daughter if she explained that when she goes for her first job interviews, first impressions will count. Any rebellious attitude in behaviour or the way she presents herself, will not fill any future employer with confidence.

As a mother, I brought up my daughter to accept and respect authority and that there are times when one has to conform to rules.

There are always other times when one can express individuality far more effectively and imaginatively on a communicative level, for instance.

But to think one is being 'individualistic' by wearing outfits or a hairstyle that are not school uniform, is just not acceptable.

School is not the place for demonstrating fashions or trends in dress and a girl of 13 should be concentrating on the importance of her education, not on her hairstyle - and her mother has failed in her duty as a parent by not impressing that fact on her.
I appreciate your comment but i am also the mother to a 20yr old whom i raised in the exact same way as my 13yr old.. She has upmost respect for her peers and obides by the rules and is currently training in an accountacy firm to become an accountant.. Please lets not lose sight of the issue here..an inch of pink hair dye!!
Can you not see the irony of your last sentence!?
Im tired, its been a long day!! Being attacked from all angles is exhausting!! Its 4 yrs since my mother passed today..this is all bad timing so im logging out to spend time with my family :)
I certainly wasn't and haven't attacked you. All I'm saying is that you've made a standpoint about, as you rightly say, an inch of pink hair - it really isnt worth it.

Rules are rules and some are unfair but without them there would be a thousand more injustices.

You are right spend time with your family don't spend it fighting all this, it's not worth it.
I agree with you and wrote earlier on here that my daughters hair has been bleached back to 'normal'! School for her tomorrow but im writing to the board of governers to make the school rules are available for all to see and to make them clear so that there are no future misunderstandings! If i can do this from the article then i have acheived something. I am going now! Thankyou, Its nice to hear from someone with intelligence and an open mind.
Thank you.

All the best..
[quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LordLilliput[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LordLilliput[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dixi[/bold] wrote: Well said Carolyn. If Leah feels that it's unreasonable that her daughter gets 'singled out' for punishment when so many others are not adhering to the rules, why does she feel it's acceptable to let her own daughter go to school like that? Why isn't she giving her daughter some intelligent, parental advice that it is NOT acceptable to break rules in society, let alone school. She is not preparing her daughter for the outside world. It would be more helpful to her daughter if she explained that when she goes for her first job interviews, first impressions will count. Any rebellious attitude in behaviour or the way she presents herself, will not fill any future employer with confidence. As a mother, I brought up my daughter to accept and respect authority and that there are times when one has to conform to rules. There are always other times when one can express individuality far more effectively and imaginatively on a communicative level, for instance. But to think one is being 'individualistic' by wearing outfits or a hairstyle that are not school uniform, is just not acceptable. School is not the place for demonstrating fashions or trends in dress and a girl of 13 should be concentrating on the importance of her education, not on her hairstyle - and her mother has failed in her duty as a parent by not impressing that fact on her.[/p][/quote]I appreciate your comment but i am also the mother to a 20yr old whom i raised in the exact same way as my 13yr old.. She has upmost respect for her peers and obides by the rules and is currently training in an accountacy firm to become an accountant.. Please lets not lose sight of the issue here..an inch of pink hair dye!![/p][/quote]Can you not see the irony of your last sentence!?[/p][/quote]Im tired, its been a long day!! Being attacked from all angles is exhausting!! Its 4 yrs since my mother passed today..this is all bad timing so im logging out to spend time with my family :)[/p][/quote]I certainly wasn't and haven't attacked you. All I'm saying is that you've made a standpoint about, as you rightly say, an inch of pink hair - it really isnt worth it. Rules are rules and some are unfair but without them there would be a thousand more injustices. You are right spend time with your family don't spend it fighting all this, it's not worth it.[/p][/quote]I agree with you and wrote earlier on here that my daughters hair has been bleached back to 'normal'! School for her tomorrow but im writing to the board of governers to make the school rules are available for all to see and to make them clear so that there are no future misunderstandings! If i can do this from the article then i have acheived something. I am going now! Thankyou, Its nice to hear from someone with intelligence and an open mind.[/p][/quote]Thank you. All the best.. LordLilliput
  • Score: 0

8:53pm Tue 15 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

Dixi wrote:
Vikki27 wrote:
I'm stunned at the amount of vitriol everyone is spitting in this mum's direction!

First of all, I'm pretty sure nobody here is a perfect parent, so I'm curious where the authority on what is right and wrong comes from. There's no right or wrong for anyone outside this situation - only opinion, so let's just get that straight right now.

Secondly, yes, there is a uniform and yes, there are rules. But I also think a certain degree of reason and flexibility HAS to be applied because you're dealing with people, not robots. And I agree with Leah completely on the point that you can't allow girls to go to school with their skirts rolled right up and faces plastered in make up but then exclude a girl who has the very tips of her hair dyed but is otherwise a model student. Put a mark against her name or something but excluding her is taking this to the extreme and I've no doubt that the school is going to this extreme to 'make an example' of her.

I went to a school where uniformity was also paramount, but we were still not penalised for dying our hair because insisting on uniformity in a way that affects you outside of school is taking it too far. From experience, teenage girls NEED the outlet to express their personality and who are we, as adults, to define for them how they should do it, beyond whether it's likely to cause mental or physical harm? Teaching teenage girls they have to look the same as everyone else will harm their sense of self in the long run and teaching them that being an individual creates social exclusion? A very poor lesson for a school to teach.

I realise I'm barking up the wrong tree as it were, but the ability to comment on stories like this appears to make the public feel they have free license to spout opinion as though it were fact, and in an aggressive manner as well. Many of you have lost the ability to view a story objectively and consider it before reacting with an emotional outburst. From the comments I could stand to read, some of the authors need a lesson in glass houses.
full of contradictions!
Thankyou Vikki, Someone that sees sense!!xx
[quote][p][bold]Dixi[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Vikki27[/bold] wrote: I'm stunned at the amount of vitriol everyone is spitting in this mum's direction! First of all, I'm pretty sure nobody here is a perfect parent, so I'm curious where the authority on what is right and wrong comes from. There's no right or wrong for anyone outside this situation - only opinion, so let's just get that straight right now. Secondly, yes, there is a uniform and yes, there are rules. But I also think a certain degree of reason and flexibility HAS to be applied because you're dealing with people, not robots. And I agree with Leah completely on the point that you can't allow girls to go to school with their skirts rolled right up and faces plastered in make up but then exclude a girl who has the very tips of her hair dyed but is otherwise a model student. Put a mark against her name or something but excluding her is taking this to the extreme and I've no doubt that the school is going to this extreme to 'make an example' of her. I went to a school where uniformity was also paramount, but we were still not penalised for dying our hair because insisting on uniformity in a way that affects you outside of school is taking it too far. From experience, teenage girls NEED the outlet to express their personality and who are we, as adults, to define for them how they should do it, beyond whether it's likely to cause mental or physical harm? Teaching teenage girls they have to look the same as everyone else will harm their sense of self in the long run and teaching them that being an individual creates social exclusion? A very poor lesson for a school to teach. I realise I'm barking up the wrong tree as it were, but the ability to comment on stories like this appears to make the public feel they have free license to spout opinion as though it were fact, and in an aggressive manner as well. Many of you have lost the ability to view a story objectively and consider it before reacting with an emotional outburst. From the comments I could stand to read, some of the authors need a lesson in glass houses.[/p][/quote]full of contradictions![/p][/quote]Thankyou Vikki, Someone that sees sense!!xx leah6153
  • Score: 0

9:05pm Tue 15 Jan 13

BournemouthMum says...

Rustyfootballer wrote:
i thought parents signed a home school contract these days so my guess is the mum signed a binding agreement.
i think the mother is emotionally immature.
I agree, and I can't see what the objective would have been to go to the press with this story. The general consensus - both on this site and the Daily Mail where it has also been reported - is similar in that most people feel that the school were in the right. My son's school (Bournemouth School) has a strict dress code and he was recently asked to remove a jumper because it was 'too casual'. I didn't agree that it was, but I respect the rules and told my son he must do the same.

Rules are rules - whether we agree with them or not.
[quote][p][bold]Rustyfootballer[/bold] wrote: i thought parents signed a home school contract these days so my guess is the mum signed a binding agreement. i think the mother is emotionally immature.[/p][/quote]I agree, and I can't see what the objective would have been to go to the press with this story. The general consensus - both on this site and the Daily Mail where it has also been reported - is similar in that most people feel that the school were in the right. My son's school (Bournemouth School) has a strict dress code and he was recently asked to remove a jumper because it was 'too casual'. I didn't agree that it was, but I respect the rules and told my son he must do the same. Rules are rules - whether we agree with them or not. BournemouthMum
  • Score: 0

9:12pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Bob49 says...

" so I'm curious where the authority on what is right and wrong comes from.



what absolute drivel as your next sentence demonstrates


"Secondly, yes, there is a uniform and yes, there are rules"

Yes, rules. Rules drawn up by the school this child willing attends.

This is not a case of freedom of expression or a struggle to be equated with votes for woman It is not only rediculous to claim it is but an insult to those who did struggle.

Those like Emily Davison the suffragette who lost he life fighting, Linda Brown a black child involved in the fight for non segregated schools in the US and and Malala Yousufzai aged 15, shot by the Taliban for believing that girls should have the right to education.

Elsewhere girls walk miles to and from school to gain an education, mostly in the most primitive of conditions - both at home and school.

This story is non of that. It merely ebcapsulate so much that is wrong in our society today. A 'me me' society where all sense of proportion has all too often gone out of the window and replaced with a 'celebrity' driven culture has led so many to think that if everything in their world is not as they see in the media then they are victims - their 'entitlement' has somehow been unjustly denied to them.


The girl maybe a child, but it is the mother who needs to do an awful lot of growing up and get a bit of perspective on things and maybe look a bit beyond her own Elizabeth Bott mentality in regard to this case.
" so I'm curious where the authority on what is right and wrong comes from. what absolute drivel as your next sentence demonstrates "Secondly, yes, there is a uniform and yes, there are rules" Yes, rules. Rules drawn up by the school this child willing attends. This is not a case of freedom of expression or a struggle to be equated with votes for woman It is not only rediculous to claim it is but an insult to those who did struggle. Those like Emily Davison the suffragette who lost he life fighting, Linda Brown a black child involved in the fight for non segregated schools in the US and and Malala Yousufzai aged 15, shot by the Taliban for believing that girls should have the right to education. Elsewhere girls walk miles to and from school to gain an education, mostly in the most primitive of conditions - both at home and school. This story is non of that. It merely ebcapsulate so much that is wrong in our society today. A 'me me' society where all sense of proportion has all too often gone out of the window and replaced with a 'celebrity' driven culture has led so many to think that if everything in their world is not as they see in the media then they are victims - their 'entitlement' has somehow been unjustly denied to them. The girl maybe a child, but it is the mother who needs to do an awful lot of growing up and get a bit of perspective on things and maybe look a bit beyond her own Elizabeth Bott mentality in regard to this case. Bob49
  • Score: 0

10:03pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Vicvic says...

I think Leah is probably sick and tired of reading all this by now. I believe everyone has an opinion on this and people will always fight their corner on an emotive subject but some of this stuff has been very rude I reckon, why so?
I think Leah is probably sick and tired of reading all this by now. I believe everyone has an opinion on this and people will always fight their corner on an emotive subject but some of this stuff has been very rude I reckon, why so? Vicvic
  • Score: 0

10:23pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Event123 says...

What is so sad about this is that the young lady is getting competely the wrong support from her mother. You're not helping your daughter by excluding her. Help her to get her hair cut so she can return to school normailty.

Mum clearly attempting to pass on her own disrespect for authority to her daughter. Then decides to tell the world by calling the local paper! Well you've had your 15 minutes of fame but it's such a negative for you, what a shame - not!
What is so sad about this is that the young lady is getting competely the wrong support from her mother. You're not helping your daughter by excluding her. Help her to get her hair cut so she can return to school normailty. Mum clearly attempting to pass on her own disrespect for authority to her daughter. Then decides to tell the world by calling the local paper! Well you've had your 15 minutes of fame but it's such a negative for you, what a shame - not! Event123
  • Score: 0

11:08pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Hessenford says...

When this young girl leaves school I doubt very much whether any employer will worry about her hair having the tips dyed pink as long as she can do the job she was employed to do.
When this young girl leaves school I doubt very much whether any employer will worry about her hair having the tips dyed pink as long as she can do the job she was employed to do. Hessenford
  • Score: 0

11:34pm Tue 15 Jan 13

big_afcb_fan says...

Stick to the dress code otherwise your daughter will be missing out on important schooling.

next :)
Stick to the dress code otherwise your daughter will be missing out on important schooling. next :) big_afcb_fan
  • Score: 0

11:38pm Tue 15 Jan 13

Sir Bagalot says...

Leah, firstly well done for coming on here and defending your actions.

Now Leah, please don't come on here claiming you didn't know the school rules as they're hard to find. You're not stupid, and neither is your daughter. Your daughter only started at the school 18 months ago, prior to starting with her offer letter she would of received a copy of the rules. I hope you both read them, and more so understood them.

Yes your daughter has had coloured hair for a year and 'got away' with it but let's face it, you over stepped the mark with the pink ends. You, and your daughter, need to learn that in life their are rules, some can be bent a little but there are limits.

Instead of working against the school perhaps work with them, remember that those governors are carrying out the role in their spare time and don't receive payment, so please don't rant and rave at them but ask some searching questions. Perhaps even look at the possibility of becoming a parent governor and give something back to society.
Leah, firstly well done for coming on here and defending your actions. Now Leah, please don't come on here claiming you didn't know the school rules as they're hard to find. You're not stupid, and neither is your daughter. Your daughter only started at the school 18 months ago, prior to starting with her offer letter she would of received a copy of the rules. I hope you both read them, and more so understood them. Yes your daughter has had coloured hair for a year and 'got away' with it but let's face it, you over stepped the mark with the pink ends. You, and your daughter, need to learn that in life their are rules, some can be bent a little but there are limits. Instead of working against the school perhaps work with them, remember that those governors are carrying out the role in their spare time and don't receive payment, so please don't rant and rave at them but ask some searching questions. Perhaps even look at the possibility of becoming a parent governor and give something back to society. Sir Bagalot
  • Score: 0

12:12am Wed 16 Jan 13

Louise-Bournemouth says...

Bit of perspective here:

* 25-150 species become extinct every day

* An estimated 5,500 children die in Eastern and Southern Africa every day

* 97.7 million children of primary school age in Africa cannot get access to schooling


And everyone is kicking off about a 13yr old dying the tips of her hair and breaking the school rules.

Yes individuality is good and yes school rules are there for a reason...but come on! This is not a story!

And Leah, be greatful that your daughter is alive, healthy and able to have an education. I wish mine was. Nothing else should be more important than that.
Bit of perspective here: * 25-150 species become extinct every day * An estimated 5,500 children die in Eastern and Southern Africa every day * 97.7 million children of primary school age in Africa cannot get access to schooling And everyone is kicking off about a 13yr old dying the tips of her hair and breaking the school rules. Yes individuality is good and yes school rules are there for a reason...but come on! This is not a story! And Leah, be greatful that your daughter is alive, healthy and able to have an education. I wish mine was. Nothing else should be more important than that. Louise-Bournemouth
  • Score: 0

8:30am Wed 16 Jan 13

JassyK says...

This makes me laugh, how many parents on here posting saying the schools is right but send their daughters to school wearing almost nothing and plastered with make up.

Hypocrites....
This makes me laugh, how many parents on here posting saying the schools is right but send their daughters to school wearing almost nothing and plastered with make up. Hypocrites.... JassyK
  • Score: 0

9:27am Wed 16 Jan 13

Dixi says...

JassyK wrote:
This makes me laugh, how many parents on here posting saying the schools is right but send their daughters to school wearing almost nothing and plastered with make up. Hypocrites....
Pointless comment, JassyK - and just an assumption on your part. obviously you haven't read the most of the comments on the subject.

Thankfully, it's the parents on here who DO agree with the school rules who thankfully happen to be the majority who have taken the trouble to write.
[quote][p][bold]JassyK[/bold] wrote: This makes me laugh, how many parents on here posting saying the schools is right but send their daughters to school wearing almost nothing and plastered with make up. Hypocrites....[/p][/quote]Pointless comment, JassyK - and just an assumption on your part. obviously you haven't read the most of the comments on the subject. Thankfully, it's the parents on here who DO agree with the school rules who thankfully happen to be the majority who have taken the trouble to write. Dixi
  • Score: 0

9:40am Wed 16 Jan 13

boscombewizard says...

There are a lot of comments here saying that 'rules are rules' and should always be obeyed. I disagree. If everyone obeyed all the rules all the time nothing would ever change. That said this Mother hasn't said that the rule is wrong, nor that it should be disobeyed. She has objected to the unfair application of this 'rule' and that the rule itself isn't stated or clear. From what I read there are other girls with dyed hair but not pink.

Schools will always try to make everyone comply and look the same. It's what they do, people have to tolerate it. To make everyone 'uniform' is the aim. There is this bizarre belief that the wearing of school uniform and being obedient is a pre requisite for good learning. If that is the case how come there is so much concern about attainment and behaviour? Funny how many countries seem to achieve good results in schools without school uniform.

The compliance culture in this country is now entrenched amongst the majority. It will change. I hope Bille and her mother can achieve some change even if it is just a discussion about how rules are agreed and stated.
There are a lot of comments here saying that 'rules are rules' and should always be obeyed. I disagree. If everyone obeyed all the rules all the time nothing would ever change. That said this Mother hasn't said that the rule is wrong, nor that it should be disobeyed. She has objected to the unfair application of this 'rule' and that the rule itself isn't stated or clear. From what I read there are other girls with dyed hair but not pink. Schools will always try to make everyone comply and look the same. It's what they do, people have to tolerate it. To make everyone 'uniform' is the aim. There is this bizarre belief that the wearing of school uniform and being obedient is a pre requisite for good learning. If that is the case how come there is so much concern about attainment and behaviour? Funny how many countries seem to achieve good results in schools without school uniform. The compliance culture in this country is now entrenched amongst the majority. It will change. I hope Bille and her mother can achieve some change even if it is just a discussion about how rules are agreed and stated. boscombewizard
  • Score: 0

9:43am Wed 16 Jan 13

boscombewizard says...

An interesting talk from Sir Ken Robinson on schools and creativity. This is not about pink hair. Warning: this may challenge entrenched views.

http://www.ted.com/t
alks/ken_robinson_sa
ys_schools_kill_crea
tivity.html?utm_expi
d=166907-14
An interesting talk from Sir Ken Robinson on schools and creativity. This is not about pink hair. Warning: this may challenge entrenched views. http://www.ted.com/t alks/ken_robinson_sa ys_schools_kill_crea tivity.html?utm_expi d=166907-14 boscombewizard
  • Score: 0

9:43am Wed 16 Jan 13

JassyK says...

Dixi wrote:
JassyK wrote:
This makes me laugh, how many parents on here posting saying the schools is right but send their daughters to school wearing almost nothing and plastered with make up. Hypocrites....
Pointless comment, JassyK - and just an assumption on your part. obviously you haven't read the most of the comments on the subject.

Thankfully, it's the parents on here who DO agree with the school rules who thankfully happen to be the majority who have taken the trouble to write.
If the parents DO agree with school rules why do they let them plaster themselves with make up, let them take mobile phones to school and let them wear almost nothing?....oh forgot about the packet of amber leaf.

And you all moan about a bit of pink in her hair...lol
[quote][p][bold]Dixi[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]JassyK[/bold] wrote: This makes me laugh, how many parents on here posting saying the schools is right but send their daughters to school wearing almost nothing and plastered with make up. Hypocrites....[/p][/quote]Pointless comment, JassyK - and just an assumption on your part. obviously you haven't read the most of the comments on the subject. Thankfully, it's the parents on here who DO agree with the school rules who thankfully happen to be the majority who have taken the trouble to write.[/p][/quote]If the parents DO agree with school rules why do they let them plaster themselves with make up, let them take mobile phones to school and let them wear almost nothing?....oh forgot about the packet of amber leaf. And you all moan about a bit of pink in her hair...lol JassyK
  • Score: 0

9:46am Wed 16 Jan 13

JassyK says...

Also forgot to mention, is it school rules for teachers to swear more than the kids?

And that's not an English lesson, it's science...lol
Also forgot to mention, is it school rules for teachers to swear more than the kids? And that's not an English lesson, it's science...lol JassyK
  • Score: 0

9:52am Wed 16 Jan 13

Dixi says...

Louise-Bournemouth wrote:
Bit of perspective here: * 25-150 species become extinct every day * An estimated 5,500 children die in Eastern and Southern Africa every day * 97.7 million children of primary school age in Africa cannot get access to schooling And everyone is kicking off about a 13yr old dying the tips of her hair and breaking the school rules. Yes individuality is good and yes school rules are there for a reason...but come on! This is not a story! And Leah, be greatful that your daughter is alive, healthy and able to have an education. I wish mine was. Nothing else should be more important than that.
Louise - Everyone is aware of the sufferings going on in the world, most of us feeling utterly helpless to being able to put it all right....

However, the article above, is about things we can possibly influence and you know as well as I, the story and ensuing debate is not about the pink hair, but about attitudes and what is going wrong in society ie. a decline in standards and the general lack of respect for authority.
[quote][p][bold]Louise-Bournemouth[/bold] wrote: Bit of perspective here: * 25-150 species become extinct every day * An estimated 5,500 children die in Eastern and Southern Africa every day * 97.7 million children of primary school age in Africa cannot get access to schooling And everyone is kicking off about a 13yr old dying the tips of her hair and breaking the school rules. Yes individuality is good and yes school rules are there for a reason...but come on! This is not a story! And Leah, be greatful that your daughter is alive, healthy and able to have an education. I wish mine was. Nothing else should be more important than that.[/p][/quote]Louise - Everyone is aware of the sufferings going on in the world, most of us feeling utterly helpless to being able to put it all right.... However, the article above, is about things we can possibly influence and you know as well as I, the story and ensuing debate is not about the pink hair, but about attitudes and what is going wrong in society ie. a decline in standards and the general lack of respect for authority. Dixi
  • Score: 0

9:56am Wed 16 Jan 13

staffylover84 says...

whilst i agree that rules are rules and we should be teaching our kids to stick to them, i think its terrible that the girl has been put in to isolation for having a bit of pink hair! to me it seems a bit cruel to punish her in such a severe way. isolation seems like a punishment more suitable for bullying or violent behaviour, not dying your hair the wrong colour! the punishment is not proportionate to the behaviour. and it hardly seems fair, especially as a lot of the other girls don't stick to the rules either! if i was the girls mother i too would be angry at my daughters treatment.
whilst i agree that rules are rules and we should be teaching our kids to stick to them, i think its terrible that the girl has been put in to isolation for having a bit of pink hair! to me it seems a bit cruel to punish her in such a severe way. isolation seems like a punishment more suitable for bullying or violent behaviour, not dying your hair the wrong colour! the punishment is not proportionate to the behaviour. and it hardly seems fair, especially as a lot of the other girls don't stick to the rules either! if i was the girls mother i too would be angry at my daughters treatment. staffylover84
  • Score: 0

10:04am Wed 16 Jan 13

silverskins says...

"She’s always had a cutting edge hair cut but never been in trouble for it before" How funny, it may have been cutting edge 20 years ago! that's Ringwood for you. I think the mum may still be over come by the fumes from the hair dye, according to her everyone that agrees with her has sense and is an all round good person, but those that don't are uneducated or narrow minded.
I don't care about the hair but I feel the mum is an attention seeker who's trying to re-live her youth through her daughter. The hair has been done many many times before thus making it a uniform also and about as far removed from individuality as you can be, it's all about the attention.
"She’s always had a cutting edge hair cut but never been in trouble for it before" How funny, it may have been cutting edge 20 years ago! that's Ringwood for you. I think the mum may still be over come by the fumes from the hair dye, according to her everyone that agrees with her has sense and is an all round good person, but those that don't are uneducated or narrow minded. I don't care about the hair but I feel the mum is an attention seeker who's trying to re-live her youth through her daughter. The hair has been done many many times before thus making it a uniform also and about as far removed from individuality as you can be, it's all about the attention. silverskins
  • Score: 0

10:22am Wed 16 Jan 13

TinyLegacy says...

I do love all these comments about 'Individuality' being stamped on. Tell you what, let every kid do what they want in school, see how far our society gets in 30 years...
I do love all these comments about 'Individuality' being stamped on. Tell you what, let every kid do what they want in school, see how far our society gets in 30 years... TinyLegacy
  • Score: 0

10:38am Wed 16 Jan 13

Buddles says...

Well the rules seem very clear to me but you always get someone who wants to kick them into touch.
The mother is not setting a good example for her daughter's future....there are many, sometimes seemingly petty, rules that we need to abide to in life in general and school is a good place to get used to them.

Before the school summer holidays I noticed lots of pots of Krazy Kolor at my hairdressers. The receptionist said that they had got them in for the inevitable rush of school age children who wanted to dye their hair a funky colour for the holidays so it had time to wash out before the new term. That is fair enough.
I was a massive fan of Krazy Kolor in the 70's when I was a bit of a punk but there again I worked in a trendy record shop so it was quite acceptable.
Well the rules seem very clear to me but you always get someone who wants to kick them into touch. The mother is not setting a good example for her daughter's future....there are many, sometimes seemingly petty, rules that we need to abide to in life in general and school is a good place to get used to them. Before the school summer holidays I noticed lots of pots of Krazy Kolor at my hairdressers. The receptionist said that they had got them in for the inevitable rush of school age children who wanted to dye their hair a funky colour for the holidays so it had time to wash out before the new term. That is fair enough. I was a massive fan of Krazy Kolor in the 70's when I was a bit of a punk but there again I worked in a trendy record shop so it was quite acceptable. Buddles
  • Score: 0

10:49am Wed 16 Jan 13

Dixi says...

JassyK wrote:
Also forgot to mention, is it school rules for teachers to swear more than the kids? And that's not an English lesson, it's science...lol
You still haven't read my previous response properly. Thankfully at our school, none of the above is allowed, except phones (which the girls can use to contact parents after school) Discipline and respect is nurtured, (as it should be at home) the majority of the girls and including my daughter, have gone on to excellent futures. I wouldn't say any have had their 'individuality' stifled in any way. We will just have to beg to differ. - On this subject, I am now over and out. Have a good day everyone :o)
[quote][p][bold]JassyK[/bold] wrote: Also forgot to mention, is it school rules for teachers to swear more than the kids? And that's not an English lesson, it's science...lol[/p][/quote]You still haven't read my previous response properly. Thankfully at our school, none of the above is allowed, except phones (which the girls can use to contact parents after school) Discipline and respect is nurtured, (as it should be at home) the majority of the girls and including my daughter, have gone on to excellent futures. I wouldn't say any have had their 'individuality' stifled in any way. We will just have to beg to differ. - On this subject, I am now over and out. Have a good day everyone :o) Dixi
  • Score: 0

11:26am Wed 16 Jan 13

Louise-Bournemouth says...

Dixi wrote:
Louise-Bournemouth wrote:
Bit of perspective here: * 25-150 species become extinct every day * An estimated 5,500 children die in Eastern and Southern Africa every day * 97.7 million children of primary school age in Africa cannot get access to schooling And everyone is kicking off about a 13yr old dying the tips of her hair and breaking the school rules. Yes individuality is good and yes school rules are there for a reason...but come on! This is not a story! And Leah, be greatful that your daughter is alive, healthy and able to have an education. I wish mine was. Nothing else should be more important than that.
Louise - Everyone is aware of the sufferings going on in the world, most of us feeling utterly helpless to being able to put it all right....

However, the article above, is about things we can possibly influence and you know as well as I, the story and ensuing debate is not about the pink hair, but about attitudes and what is going wrong in society ie. a decline in standards and the general lack of respect for authority.
Fair point :)
[quote][p][bold]Dixi[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Louise-Bournemouth[/bold] wrote: Bit of perspective here: * 25-150 species become extinct every day * An estimated 5,500 children die in Eastern and Southern Africa every day * 97.7 million children of primary school age in Africa cannot get access to schooling And everyone is kicking off about a 13yr old dying the tips of her hair and breaking the school rules. Yes individuality is good and yes school rules are there for a reason...but come on! This is not a story! And Leah, be greatful that your daughter is alive, healthy and able to have an education. I wish mine was. Nothing else should be more important than that.[/p][/quote]Louise - Everyone is aware of the sufferings going on in the world, most of us feeling utterly helpless to being able to put it all right.... However, the article above, is about things we can possibly influence and you know as well as I, the story and ensuing debate is not about the pink hair, but about attitudes and what is going wrong in society ie. a decline in standards and the general lack of respect for authority.[/p][/quote]Fair point :) Louise-Bournemouth
  • Score: 0

11:29am Wed 16 Jan 13

speedy231278 says...

Next week there'll be an article about some poor person barred from society and sent to prison for breaking the law. How utterly against their human right to express themselves against a background of 'sheep' obeying the law of the land. You MUST only obey rules that you think are right, after all.

As for the comment about woman not being able to vote. Well, they didn't go and vote anyway, they campaigned and were successfully awarded the right to vote. If hair colour is so important, why not lobby the school and see if the rule can be relaxed, changed or abolished rather than knowingly ignore it complain?
Next week there'll be an article about some poor person barred from society and sent to prison for breaking the law. How utterly against their human right to express themselves against a background of 'sheep' obeying the law of the land. You MUST only obey rules that you think are right, after all. As for the comment about woman not being able to vote. Well, they didn't go and vote anyway, they campaigned and were successfully awarded the right to vote. If hair colour is so important, why not lobby the school and see if the rule can be relaxed, changed or abolished rather than knowingly ignore it complain? speedy231278
  • Score: 0

11:37am Wed 16 Jan 13

BENNY7 says...

jeebuscripes wrote:
BENNY7 wrote:
Schools do not teach you how to learn they only teach the past facts... Teachers get paid to teach pupils how to pass tests... to be honest your daughter is best off in isolation. The comments on here are from the 95% brigade who's egos don't allow anything different into their lives.

Steve Jobs
Duncan Bannatyne
Benjamin Franklin
Richard Branson
Jay-Z
Michelle Mone
Aretha Franklin

Be creative & do not listen to others opinions just watch what successful people do & incorporate that into your own style...

The journey is the reward.

Good luck & Well done!
Good trolling.
wow jeebuscripes, great insight thank you...
[quote][p][bold]jeebuscripes[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BENNY7[/bold] wrote: Schools do not teach you how to learn they only teach the past facts... Teachers get paid to teach pupils how to pass tests... to be honest your daughter is best off in isolation. The comments on here are from the 95% brigade who's egos don't allow anything different into their lives. Steve Jobs Duncan Bannatyne Benjamin Franklin Richard Branson Jay-Z Michelle Mone Aretha Franklin Be creative & do not listen to others opinions just watch what successful people do & incorporate that into your own style... The journey is the reward. Good luck & Well done![/p][/quote]Good trolling.[/p][/quote]wow jeebuscripes, great insight thank you... BENNY7
  • Score: 0

12:36pm Wed 16 Jan 13

Ian_Steel says...

Despite that I feel that 13 is far too young for peroxide blonde hair (possible carcinogenic chemicals in hair dye) and that Billie with her hair like this looks more like 16-18 than 13.

It should not matter what color a person's hair is. It does not affect learning or concentration. Leah in my opinion has done the right thing. I have a feeling that Billie will more learn more that is of use outside of school than in school in isolation.
Despite that I feel that 13 is far too young for peroxide blonde hair (possible carcinogenic chemicals in hair dye) and that Billie with her hair like this looks more like 16-18 than 13. It should not matter what color a person's hair is. It does not affect learning or concentration. Leah in my opinion has done the right thing. I have a feeling that Billie will more learn more that is of use outside of school than in school in isolation. Ian_Steel
  • Score: 0

12:45pm Wed 16 Jan 13

85tromby says...

OFF WITH HER HEAD!... er i mean HAIR!
OFF WITH HER HEAD!... er i mean HAIR! 85tromby
  • Score: 0

12:57pm Wed 16 Jan 13

Letcommonsenseprevail says...

I've just had the slap-on-the-wrist message from The Echo because of the comments I posted on this story, I also see the comments have been removed. i thought the press was about freedom of speech - obviuosly not!!!! I stand by what I said, for those that can remember it!! Pink hair, I ask you.
I've just had the slap-on-the-wrist message from The Echo because of the comments I posted on this story, I also see the comments have been removed. i thought the press was about freedom of speech - obviuosly not!!!! I stand by what I said, for those that can remember it!! Pink hair, I ask you. Letcommonsenseprevail
  • Score: 0

1:00pm Wed 16 Jan 13

Letcommonsenseprevail says...

"No respect for the rules", "What is it with parents like this?", "They are there to LEARN, not to show off the latest hair style", "Learn some respect", "Most girls at this school go to school with skirts hitched up around their wastes and full makeup on, yet the teachers say NOTHING" - just a few quotes from the above. Can you guess which one is from the mother?
"No respect for the rules", "What is it with parents like this?", "They are there to LEARN, not to show off the latest hair style", "Learn some respect", "Most girls at this school go to school with skirts hitched up around their wastes and full makeup on, yet the teachers say NOTHING" - just a few quotes from the above. Can you guess which one is from the mother? Letcommonsenseprevail
  • Score: 0

5:57pm Wed 16 Jan 13

Arjay says...

Letcommonsenseprevai
l
wrote:
I've just had the slap-on-the-wrist message from The Echo because of the comments I posted on this story, I also see the comments have been removed. i thought the press was about freedom of speech - obviuosly not!!!! I stand by what I said, for those that can remember it!! Pink hair, I ask you.
I haven't received mine yet --although I imagine that, as my post was one of the couple of dozen messages on this thread that disappeared overnight, I'll probably get it soon.

I've seen a lot worse 'let through' though?....

Funny old world......
[quote][p][bold]Letcommonsenseprevai l[/bold] wrote: I've just had the slap-on-the-wrist message from The Echo because of the comments I posted on this story, I also see the comments have been removed. i thought the press was about freedom of speech - obviuosly not!!!! I stand by what I said, for those that can remember it!! Pink hair, I ask you.[/p][/quote]I haven't received mine yet --although I imagine that, as my post was one of the couple of dozen messages on this thread that disappeared overnight, I'll probably get it soon. I've seen a lot worse 'let through' though?.... Funny old world...... Arjay
  • Score: 0

7:15pm Wed 16 Jan 13

Carolyn43 says...

boscombewizard wrote:
There are a lot of comments here saying that 'rules are rules' and should always be obeyed. I disagree. If everyone obeyed all the rules all the time nothing would ever change. That said this Mother hasn't said that the rule is wrong, nor that it should be disobeyed. She has objected to the unfair application of this 'rule' and that the rule itself isn't stated or clear. From what I read there are other girls with dyed hair but not pink.

Schools will always try to make everyone comply and look the same. It's what they do, people have to tolerate it. To make everyone 'uniform' is the aim. There is this bizarre belief that the wearing of school uniform and being obedient is a pre requisite for good learning. If that is the case how come there is so much concern about attainment and behaviour? Funny how many countries seem to achieve good results in schools without school uniform.

The compliance culture in this country is now entrenched amongst the majority. It will change. I hope Bille and her mother can achieve some change even if it is just a discussion about how rules are agreed and stated.
There is no "To make everyone 'uniform' is the aim. There is this bizarre belief that the wearing of school uniform and being obedient is a pre requisite for good learning."
.....
The reason for having a uniform is so that there is no discrimination - a pupil from a very well off family will not be distinguishable from one where the family has to buy clothes from a charity shop.
......
Children can be very cruel to each other and if one hasn't got the latest designer whatever their lives can be made an ansolute misery by some of those who have. The school uniform is one attempt at stopping this.
[quote][p][bold]boscombewizard[/bold] wrote: There are a lot of comments here saying that 'rules are rules' and should always be obeyed. I disagree. If everyone obeyed all the rules all the time nothing would ever change. That said this Mother hasn't said that the rule is wrong, nor that it should be disobeyed. She has objected to the unfair application of this 'rule' and that the rule itself isn't stated or clear. From what I read there are other girls with dyed hair but not pink. Schools will always try to make everyone comply and look the same. It's what they do, people have to tolerate it. To make everyone 'uniform' is the aim. There is this bizarre belief that the wearing of school uniform and being obedient is a pre requisite for good learning. If that is the case how come there is so much concern about attainment and behaviour? Funny how many countries seem to achieve good results in schools without school uniform. The compliance culture in this country is now entrenched amongst the majority. It will change. I hope Bille and her mother can achieve some change even if it is just a discussion about how rules are agreed and stated.[/p][/quote]There is no "To make everyone 'uniform' is the aim. There is this bizarre belief that the wearing of school uniform and being obedient is a pre requisite for good learning." ..... The reason for having a uniform is so that there is no discrimination - a pupil from a very well off family will not be distinguishable from one where the family has to buy clothes from a charity shop. ...... Children can be very cruel to each other and if one hasn't got the latest designer whatever their lives can be made an ansolute misery by some of those who have. The school uniform is one attempt at stopping this. Carolyn43
  • Score: 0

7:17pm Wed 16 Jan 13

Carolyn43 says...

Oh, and it's also intended to make pupils proud to be a member of the school and the uniform helps to promote that membership and pride.
Oh, and it's also intended to make pupils proud to be a member of the school and the uniform helps to promote that membership and pride. Carolyn43
  • Score: 0

7:29am Thu 17 Jan 13

AdelaidePete says...

Please don't blame teachers. As an ex-teacher myself I know they are just employees, they don't make the rules, they are required to follow instructions made by others. In South Australia it's the government department, in independent schools it's the governors: that said this particular girl's hair would probably not rate a second glance at my last school...BUT if her mother wishes her to have the advantages of this school then acceptance of the rules is really a contract. Agree to it or go elsewhere.
Please don't blame teachers. As an ex-teacher myself I know they are just employees, they don't make the rules, they are required to follow instructions made by others. In South Australia it's the government department, in independent schools it's the governors: that said this particular girl's hair would probably not rate a second glance at my last school...BUT if her mother wishes her to have the advantages of this school then acceptance of the rules is really a contract. Agree to it or go elsewhere. AdelaidePete
  • Score: 0

7:56am Thu 17 Jan 13

Howdie says...

stevobath wrote:
speedy231278 wrote:
"they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality"

Correct. Hence the term school UNIFORM. All kids are supposed to wear the same clothes and aren't supposed to have excessive makeup, much if anything in the way of jewellry, and not have outlandish hairstyles. I would say bright pink tips counts as outlandish, and is going to be a breach of the school rules.

It looks like the mother dyes her hair too, so she's probably just trying to make some sort of silly point about being allowed to be different.
Schools want kids to be robots.Individuality is seen as some kind of sickness.

I was labelled an 'individualist' at school, because I was different.IE I had a 'Flat Top' & later got into the 'Goth' scene.I equate it to bullying by teachers.
I was an above average pupil,in the top grade for ALL subjects & I died my hair on regular occasions.I was also one of the best all round sportspersons at my school & went on to represent my school & town at athletics, this IN SPITE of being one of those awful INDIVIDUALIST..Why shouldnt a young person experiment & express themselves?...So what if a kid comes to school & proclaims, 'Im Gay'? That being 'Different' to some narrow minded types...Do you exclude them? Individuality should be encouraged, not stifled, as long as its not affecting school work.
Life is all about learning to follow rules, you have plenty of time after education to be individual. If you then are in a job that allows you to be an individualist its great but if not then you follow those rules. School doesn't just teach facts it's also preparing you for the outside real world! Great parenting, not.
PS I'm a parent and I ensure my daughter follows the school rules!
[quote][p][bold]stevobath[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]speedy231278[/bold] wrote: "they are saying their pupils can’t have individuality" Correct. Hence the term school UNIFORM. All kids are supposed to wear the same clothes and aren't supposed to have excessive makeup, much if anything in the way of jewellry, and not have outlandish hairstyles. I would say bright pink tips counts as outlandish, and is going to be a breach of the school rules. It looks like the mother dyes her hair too, so she's probably just trying to make some sort of silly point about being allowed to be different.[/p][/quote]Schools want kids to be robots.Individuality is seen as some kind of sickness. I was labelled an 'individualist' at school, because I was different.IE I had a 'Flat Top' & later got into the 'Goth' scene.I equate it to bullying by teachers. I was an above average pupil,in the top grade for ALL subjects & I died my hair on regular occasions.I was also one of the best all round sportspersons at my school & went on to represent my school & town at athletics, this IN SPITE of being one of those awful INDIVIDUALIST..Why shouldnt a young person experiment & express themselves?...So what if a kid comes to school & proclaims, 'Im Gay'? That being 'Different' to some narrow minded types...Do you exclude them? Individuality should be encouraged, not stifled, as long as its not affecting school work.[/p][/quote]Life is all about learning to follow rules, you have plenty of time after education to be individual. If you then are in a job that allows you to be an individualist its great but if not then you follow those rules. School doesn't just teach facts it's also preparing you for the outside real world! Great parenting, not. PS I'm a parent and I ensure my daughter follows the school rules! Howdie
  • Score: 0

8:02am Thu 17 Jan 13

boscombewizard says...

carolyn 43: The reason for having a uniform is so that there is no discrimination - a pupil from a very well off family will not be distinguishable from one where the family has to buy clothes from a charity shop.

I worked in schools for many years, wearing a uniform does not 'hide' the poor children. They are just as identifiable in uniform as not.

If the wearing of a uniform promotes membership and pride should staff not wear a uniform also?
carolyn 43: The reason for having a uniform is so that there is no discrimination - a pupil from a very well off family will not be distinguishable from one where the family has to buy clothes from a charity shop. I worked in schools for many years, wearing a uniform does not 'hide' the poor children. They are just as identifiable in uniform as not. If the wearing of a uniform promotes membership and pride should staff not wear a uniform also? boscombewizard
  • Score: 0

8:06am Thu 17 Jan 13

boscombewizard says...

Interesting article here about school uniform:

http://www.guardian.
co.uk/education/2011
/jan/18/school-unifo
rm-results
Interesting article here about school uniform: http://www.guardian. co.uk/education/2011 /jan/18/school-unifo rm-results boscombewizard
  • Score: 0

8:25am Thu 17 Jan 13

Carolyn43 says...

boscombewizard wrote:
carolyn 43: The reason for having a uniform is so that there is no discrimination - a pupil from a very well off family will not be distinguishable from one where the family has to buy clothes from a charity shop.

I worked in schools for many years, wearing a uniform does not 'hide' the poor children. They are just as identifiable in uniform as not.

If the wearing of a uniform promotes membership and pride should staff not wear a uniform also?
I too was a secondary school teacher for over 25 years. In the schools I taught in as much as possible was done to protect children from the bullying of others because of what some had an some had not, and uniform was just one way in which it was done. A lot depends on the attitude of the staff to doing this. Perhaps I was fortunate in where and when I worked.
.......
In my experience teachers do wear a "uniform". Those teaching PE wear suitable exercise clothes, those teaching science - lab coats, practical workshop skills - brown protective coats, English smart everyday clothes, etc.dressing appropriately as you would doing any other job.
[quote][p][bold]boscombewizard[/bold] wrote: carolyn 43: The reason for having a uniform is so that there is no discrimination - a pupil from a very well off family will not be distinguishable from one where the family has to buy clothes from a charity shop. I worked in schools for many years, wearing a uniform does not 'hide' the poor children. They are just as identifiable in uniform as not. If the wearing of a uniform promotes membership and pride should staff not wear a uniform also?[/p][/quote]I too was a secondary school teacher for over 25 years. In the schools I taught in as much as possible was done to protect children from the bullying of others because of what some had an some had not, and uniform was just one way in which it was done. A lot depends on the attitude of the staff to doing this. Perhaps I was fortunate in where and when I worked. ....... In my experience teachers do wear a "uniform". Those teaching PE wear suitable exercise clothes, those teaching science - lab coats, practical workshop skills - brown protective coats, English smart everyday clothes, etc.dressing appropriately as you would doing any other job. Carolyn43
  • Score: 0

8:58am Thu 17 Jan 13

boscombewizard says...

That isn't a uniform though, it's subject specific clothes, particularly PE.

If the point about non uniform and being identified as poor and picked on is true, surely non uniform days are a bully fest?

Many schools have a sixth form where puplis don't have a uniform. Maybe they aren't so proud of their school? Colleges do ok without uniform.
That isn't a uniform though, it's subject specific clothes, particularly PE. If the point about non uniform and being identified as poor and picked on is true, surely non uniform days are a bully fest? Many schools have a sixth form where puplis don't have a uniform. Maybe they aren't so proud of their school? Colleges do ok without uniform. boscombewizard
  • Score: 0

9:06am Thu 17 Jan 13

Hunter1234 says...

I can't get over why the echo bothered to print this waste of ink & paper
I can't get over why the echo bothered to print this waste of ink & paper Hunter1234
  • Score: 0

10:23am Thu 17 Jan 13

supafletch says...

Good luck to you Leah - you come across as a decent person in my eyes.
I can think of worse things than a bit of pink in your daughters hair (which looks nice anyway).
Good luck to you Leah - you come across as a decent person in my eyes. I can think of worse things than a bit of pink in your daughters hair (which looks nice anyway). supafletch
  • Score: 0

2:12pm Thu 17 Jan 13

Frogsporn says...

leah6153 wrote:
I always 'conform' to rules etc...There are NO clear rules set by the school for all to see..They make up the rules as they see fit!! But thank you for your educated insight!!!
Contrary to your statement the rules pertaining to hair colour, jewellery wearing etc are indeed published on the schools website.

It took me about five minutes to find them. Page 48 of the School's Prospectus is where they are all clearly laid out.

"Natural hair colour only"

HTH.
[quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: I always 'conform' to rules etc...There are NO clear rules set by the school for all to see..They make up the rules as they see fit!! But thank you for your educated insight!!![/p][/quote]Contrary to your statement the rules pertaining to hair colour, jewellery wearing etc are indeed published on the schools website. It took me about five minutes to find them. Page 48 of the School's Prospectus is where they are all clearly laid out. "Natural hair colour only" HTH. Frogsporn
  • Score: 0

3:15pm Thu 17 Jan 13

ashleycross says...

School is for learning how to get on with people. It means children who can't learn this from their parents will have a chance to learn it from school. In short, it means children whose parents are very attention seeking and inconsiderate and wanting to be the centre of attention will learn that this kind of behaviour is not acceptable as it inconveniences others.
School is for learning how to get on with people. It means children who can't learn this from their parents will have a chance to learn it from school. In short, it means children whose parents are very attention seeking and inconsiderate and wanting to be the centre of attention will learn that this kind of behaviour is not acceptable as it inconveniences others. ashleycross
  • Score: 0

5:54pm Thu 17 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

Frogsporn wrote:
leah6153 wrote:
I always 'conform' to rules etc...There are NO clear rules set by the school for all to see..They make up the rules as they see fit!! But thank you for your educated insight!!!
Contrary to your statement the rules pertaining to hair colour, jewellery wearing etc are indeed published on the schools website.

It took me about five minutes to find them. Page 48 of the School's Prospectus is where they are all clearly laid out.

"Natural hair colour only"

HTH.
Interesting, I know the school have been reading the comments.. I'm pleased they have added the rules to their website :)
[quote][p][bold]Frogsporn[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: I always 'conform' to rules etc...There are NO clear rules set by the school for all to see..They make up the rules as they see fit!! But thank you for your educated insight!!![/p][/quote]Contrary to your statement the rules pertaining to hair colour, jewellery wearing etc are indeed published on the schools website. It took me about five minutes to find them. Page 48 of the School's Prospectus is where they are all clearly laid out. "Natural hair colour only" HTH.[/p][/quote]Interesting, I know the school have been reading the comments.. I'm pleased they have added the rules to their website :) leah6153
  • Score: 0

6:14pm Thu 17 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

Letcommonsenseprevai
l
wrote:
"No respect for the rules", "What is it with parents like this?", "They are there to LEARN, not to show off the latest hair style", "Learn some respect", "Most girls at this school go to school with skirts hitched up around their wastes and full makeup on, yet the teachers say NOTHING" - just a few quotes from the above. Can you guess which one is from the mother?
So much anger towards my family whom you don't know? Why I ask? It appears to me that its okay for the public to rant and rave and bully their point across but it's not ok for me to stand up for my daughter because her hair is different and not liked by the majority? Which I may add does not affect her learning ability in the slightest. I'm all for rules so long as everyone abides by the same rules, in this school they don't. They like to single individuals out and I for one have had enough of it. If this makes me immature etc then so be it, I will put my hands up
[quote][p][bold]Letcommonsenseprevai l[/bold] wrote: "No respect for the rules", "What is it with parents like this?", "They are there to LEARN, not to show off the latest hair style", "Learn some respect", "Most girls at this school go to school with skirts hitched up around their wastes and full makeup on, yet the teachers say NOTHING" - just a few quotes from the above. Can you guess which one is from the mother?[/p][/quote]So much anger towards my family whom you don't know? Why I ask? It appears to me that its okay for the public to rant and rave and bully their point across but it's not ok for me to stand up for my daughter because her hair is different and not liked by the majority? Which I may add does not affect her learning ability in the slightest. I'm all for rules so long as everyone abides by the same rules, in this school they don't. They like to single individuals out and I for one have had enough of it. If this makes me immature etc then so be it, I will put my hands up leah6153
  • Score: 0

6:17pm Thu 17 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

supafletch wrote:
Good luck to you Leah - you come across as a decent person in my eyes.
I can think of worse things than a bit of pink in your daughters hair (which looks nice anyway).
Thank you x
[quote][p][bold]supafletch[/bold] wrote: Good luck to you Leah - you come across as a decent person in my eyes. I can think of worse things than a bit of pink in your daughters hair (which looks nice anyway).[/p][/quote]Thank you x leah6153
  • Score: 0

6:22pm Thu 17 Jan 13

leah6153 says...

BENNY7 wrote:
jeebuscripes wrote:
BENNY7 wrote:
Schools do not teach you how to learn they only teach the past facts... Teachers get paid to teach pupils how to pass tests... to be honest your daughter is best off in isolation. The comments on here are from the 95% brigade who's egos don't allow anything different into their lives.

Steve Jobs
Duncan Bannatyne
Benjamin Franklin
Richard Branson
Jay-Z
Michelle Mone
Aretha Franklin

Be creative & do not listen to others opinions just watch what successful people do & incorporate that into your own style...

The journey is the reward.

Good luck & Well done!
Good trolling.
wow jeebuscripes, great insight thank you...
Refreshing, thank you :)
[quote][p][bold]BENNY7[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jeebuscripes[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BENNY7[/bold] wrote: Schools do not teach you how to learn they only teach the past facts... Teachers get paid to teach pupils how to pass tests... to be honest your daughter is best off in isolation. The comments on here are from the 95% brigade who's egos don't allow anything different into their lives. Steve Jobs Duncan Bannatyne Benjamin Franklin Richard Branson Jay-Z Michelle Mone Aretha Franklin Be creative & do not listen to others opinions just watch what successful people do & incorporate that into your own style... The journey is the reward. Good luck & Well done![/p][/quote]Good trolling.[/p][/quote]wow jeebuscripes, great insight thank you...[/p][/quote]Refreshing, thank you :) leah6153
  • Score: 0

7:03pm Thu 17 Jan 13

SFF says...

All schools have these rules. How on earth can we opt out of them. I absolutely agree with Leah. But I would have allowed her to carry on in isolation until they got fed up with the hassle of keeping her in there.

Schools are all about image. League tables and uniform. This isn't the dark ages, this girl should be allowed to express herself. Time enough to conform when you are looking for work. You have 40, 50 and ever growing years of looking like a drudge.

Send her back with the whole lot coloured like a rainbow. Good luck and don't let the unimaginative, uncreative and uninspiring conformists drag you down :)
All schools have these rules. How on earth can we opt out of them. I absolutely agree with Leah. But I would have allowed her to carry on in isolation until they got fed up with the hassle of keeping her in there. Schools are all about image. League tables and uniform. This isn't the dark ages, this girl should be allowed to express herself. Time enough to conform when you are looking for work. You have 40, 50 and ever growing years of looking like a drudge. Send her back with the whole lot coloured like a rainbow. Good luck and don't let the unimaginative, uncreative and uninspiring conformists drag you down :) SFF
  • Score: 0

11:10pm Thu 17 Jan 13

tinkerbell101 says...

I'm stumped at the comment Leah made about "half the population" having bleach-blonde hair, and yet talks about "Individuality" in the next breath! No girls should be dying their hair while attending school, and they should all be made to wipe the cake they call "make-up" off their faces before they enter the classroom. There are rules, which must be adhered to, which I'm sure were in place when Leah was at school. How are children supposed to learn how to act like adults when the adults are still acting like spoilt kids!?
I'm stumped at the comment Leah made about "half the population" having bleach-blonde hair, and yet talks about "Individuality" in the next breath! No girls should be dying their hair while attending school, and they should all be made to wipe the cake they call "make-up" off their faces before they enter the classroom. There are rules, which must be adhered to, which I'm sure were in place when Leah was at school. How are children supposed to learn how to act like adults when the adults are still acting like spoilt kids!? tinkerbell101
  • Score: 0

3:07pm Fri 18 Jan 13

Frogsporn says...

leah6153 wrote:
Frogsporn wrote:
leah6153 wrote:
I always 'conform' to rules etc...There are NO clear rules set by the school for all to see..They make up the rules as they see fit!! But thank you for your educated insight!!!
Contrary to your statement the rules pertaining to hair colour, jewellery wearing etc are indeed published on the schools website.

It took me about five minutes to find them. Page 48 of the School's Prospectus is where they are all clearly laid out.

"Natural hair colour only"

HTH.
Interesting, I know the school have been reading the comments.. I'm pleased they have added the rules to their website :)
The school haven't added anything as a result of the Bournemouth Echo article and these associated comments.

The schools prospectus was already on that site before this article was published.

That was the point I was making, the rules were available on the School's website which is contrary to what you stated on here.

If you are basing any part of your argument on the lack of publication of the relevant rules then you were wrong. You may not have seen them when you looked but they were there.
[quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Frogsporn[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]leah6153[/bold] wrote: I always 'conform' to rules etc...There are NO clear rules set by the school for all to see..They make up the rules as they see fit!! But thank you for your educated insight!!![/p][/quote]Contrary to your statement the rules pertaining to hair colour, jewellery wearing etc are indeed published on the schools website. It took me about five minutes to find them. Page 48 of the School's Prospectus is where they are all clearly laid out. "Natural hair colour only" HTH.[/p][/quote]Interesting, I know the school have been reading the comments.. I'm pleased they have added the rules to their website :)[/p][/quote]The school haven't added anything as a result of the Bournemouth Echo article and these associated comments. The schools prospectus was already on that site before this article was published. That was the point I was making, the rules were available on the School's website which is contrary to what you stated on here. If you are basing any part of your argument on the lack of publication of the relevant rules then you were wrong. You may not have seen them when you looked but they were there. Frogsporn
  • Score: 0

6:08pm Fri 18 Jan 13

bucksteacher says...

"She’s lucky this isn’t a particularly important year."

A quote from the mum that says everything about her views of education.

She is abusing the attitude of her daughter by taking this stance. Any other form of abuse and Social Care would be involved.

There will be places available in less high-performing schools in the area, no doubt.
"She’s lucky this isn’t a particularly important year." A quote from the mum that says everything about her views of education. She is abusing the attitude of her daughter by taking this stance. Any other form of abuse and Social Care would be involved. There will be places available in less high-performing schools in the area, no doubt. bucksteacher
  • Score: 0

7:29pm Fri 18 Jan 13

Boscomite says...

I think that most of the posters here are missing the point. Putting a 13 year old girl into isolation, is a very cruel thing to do and equates to child abuse. If the school thought that this was such a heinous offence, then they should have suspended her and sent her home. Her mother has taken her out of school thereby achieving the same results. Good for her.
I think that most of the posters here are missing the point. Putting a 13 year old girl into isolation, is a very cruel thing to do and equates to child abuse. If the school thought that this was such a heinous offence, then they should have suspended her and sent her home. Her mother has taken her out of school thereby achieving the same results. Good for her. Boscomite
  • Score: 0

7:35pm Fri 18 Jan 13

bucksteacher says...

Boscomite wrote:
I think that most of the posters here are missing the point. Putting a 13 year old girl into isolation, is a very cruel thing to do and equates to child abuse. If the school thought that this was such a heinous offence, then they should have suspended her and sent her home. Her mother has taken her out of school thereby achieving the same results. Good for her.
No - excluding her and sending her home would go permanently on her school record, would involve the governors, would be reported to the local authority and is a more serious sanction than isolation in school. I am an Assistant Headteacher responsible for this area of a different school. I would advise caution before you imply that Ringwood School is commiting child abuse!
[quote][p][bold]Boscomite[/bold] wrote: I think that most of the posters here are missing the point. Putting a 13 year old girl into isolation, is a very cruel thing to do and equates to child abuse. If the school thought that this was such a heinous offence, then they should have suspended her and sent her home. Her mother has taken her out of school thereby achieving the same results. Good for her.[/p][/quote]No - excluding her and sending her home would go permanently on her school record, would involve the governors, would be reported to the local authority and is a more serious sanction than isolation in school. I am an Assistant Headteacher responsible for this area of a different school. I would advise caution before you imply that Ringwood School is commiting child abuse! bucksteacher
  • Score: 0

8:11pm Fri 18 Jan 13

Boscomite says...

bucksteacher wrote:
Boscomite wrote:
I think that most of the posters here are missing the point. Putting a 13 year old girl into isolation, is a very cruel thing to do and equates to child abuse. If the school thought that this was such a heinous offence, then they should have suspended her and sent her home. Her mother has taken her out of school thereby achieving the same results. Good for her.
No - excluding her and sending her home would go permanently on her school record, would involve the governors, would be reported to the local authority and is a more serious sanction than isolation in school. I am an Assistant Headteacher responsible for this area of a different school. I would advise caution before you imply that Ringwood School is commiting child abuse!
Perhaps the governors should be involved. It seems from reading the story, that no-one was prepared to discuss the matter, (as in we were only following orders). I did not imply that Ringwood School is commiting child abuse. I simply said that putting a 13 year old girl in isolation equates to child abuse. You may draw your own conclusions. Sorry if I didn't feel suitably threatened by your last sentence, but I'm not a 13 year old girl.
[quote][p][bold]bucksteacher[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Boscomite[/bold] wrote: I think that most of the posters here are missing the point. Putting a 13 year old girl into isolation, is a very cruel thing to do and equates to child abuse. If the school thought that this was such a heinous offence, then they should have suspended her and sent her home. Her mother has taken her out of school thereby achieving the same results. Good for her.[/p][/quote]No - excluding her and sending her home would go permanently on her school record, would involve the governors, would be reported to the local authority and is a more serious sanction than isolation in school. I am an Assistant Headteacher responsible for this area of a different school. I would advise caution before you imply that Ringwood School is commiting child abuse![/p][/quote]Perhaps the governors should be involved. It seems from reading the story, that no-one was prepared to discuss the matter, (as in we were only following orders). I did not imply that Ringwood School is commiting child abuse. I simply said that putting a 13 year old girl in isolation equates to child abuse. You may draw your own conclusions. Sorry if I didn't feel suitably threatened by your last sentence, but I'm not a 13 year old girl. Boscomite
  • Score: 0

8:21pm Fri 18 Jan 13

bucksteacher says...

Blimey, if not accusing the school then implying that I would threaten a 13-year-old girl!

It is you who are missing the point. The lack of respect that SOME children display today is wholly due to the attitudes of their parents. Schools do their best to mitigate the attitudinal damage that some parents cause, but there is a limit to their effectiveness, as kids spend 6 hours at school and 18 hours with their parents each day.

This story is a case in point - a parent who would rather kick up a fuss and jeopordise the education of her daughter, going to the media and then compalining about the negative attention that she courted in the first place.

Whilst all the while leaving her daughter thinking this is the way to handle authority and get by in life.

As said previously, if she does not like the rules in place at Ringwood School (that she signed up for on entry), there are other less-than-outstandin
g schools in the vicinity that will likely have school places for her daughter.
Blimey, if not accusing the school then implying that I would threaten a 13-year-old girl! It is you who are missing the point. The lack of respect that SOME children display today is wholly due to the attitudes of their parents. Schools do their best to mitigate the attitudinal damage that some parents cause, but there is a limit to their effectiveness, as kids spend 6 hours at school and 18 hours with their parents each day. This story is a case in point - a parent who would rather kick up a fuss and jeopordise the education of her daughter, going to the media and then compalining about the negative attention that she courted in the first place. Whilst all the while leaving her daughter thinking this is the way to handle authority and get by in life. As said previously, if she does not like the rules in place at Ringwood School (that she signed up for on entry), there are other less-than-outstandin g schools in the vicinity that will likely have school places for her daughter. bucksteacher
  • Score: 0

11:49pm Fri 18 Jan 13

guisselle says...

Why ruin your natural hair with bleach
there are lots of less damaging hair
products on the market. I think 13 is
too young to be using dye! I do think
that the school could have just had a
word with the parent and daughter
rather than put her in isolation.
Why ruin your natural hair with bleach there are lots of less damaging hair products on the market. I think 13 is too young to be using dye! I do think that the school could have just had a word with the parent and daughter rather than put her in isolation. guisselle
  • Score: 0

10:21am Sat 19 Jan 13

LAC96x says...

As a 16 year old school pupil, I'm totally against this. Why DOES dying my hair affect my education? Is it stopping my classmates from learning? No it's not, and if it does affect my classmates attention, then they should be paying more attention in class and less on my hair. I was put in isolation for having a nose stud and made to pull it out which resulted in bleeding, however there are teachers at my school with bleached-white hair, piercings and wear excessive make-up. It's ridiculous. I went into school with dark purple hair and none of the teachers even mentioned it, however a teacher with bleached white hair criticized a student for having brown hair with blonde highlights. Sure, rules are fine - I get that. School has to have rules that students have to obey. But make the teachers follow them too - after all, they're supposed to be setting an example for pupils. If teachers can have individuality, why can't we?
As a 16 year old school pupil, I'm totally against this. Why DOES dying my hair affect my education? Is it stopping my classmates from learning? No it's not, and if it does affect my classmates attention, then they should be paying more attention in class and less on my hair. I was put in isolation for having a nose stud and made to pull it out which resulted in bleeding, however there are teachers at my school with bleached-white hair, piercings and wear excessive make-up. It's ridiculous. I went into school with dark purple hair and none of the teachers even mentioned it, however a teacher with bleached white hair criticized a student for having brown hair with blonde highlights. Sure, rules are fine - I get that. School has to have rules that students have to obey. But make the teachers follow them too - after all, they're supposed to be setting an example for pupils. If teachers can have individuality, why can't we? LAC96x
  • Score: 0

10:35am Sat 19 Jan 13

bucksteacher says...

LAC96x... There is one key difference though. You are at the school as a pupil to learn and to prepare you for life.

For the teachers, the school is their workplace and the rules and expectations can be different.

Once you leave school, you may end up working somewhere where you are allowed total freedom in your appearance, or you may not. If you do have a dispute with your future employer over appearance, he/she may sack you. Depending on the job you get, there will be different rules/expectations for people at different levels in the company; that is life.

School is trying to prepare you for the real world. As mentioned previously, if you want to go to a school that has less tight standards for appearance, go there - but I bet their results aren't as good as your current school!
LAC96x... There is one key difference though. You are at the school as a pupil to learn and to prepare you for life. For the teachers, the school is their workplace and the rules and expectations can be different. Once you leave school, you may end up working somewhere where you are allowed total freedom in your appearance, or you may not. If you do have a dispute with your future employer over appearance, he/she may sack you. Depending on the job you get, there will be different rules/expectations for people at different levels in the company; that is life. School is trying to prepare you for the real world. As mentioned previously, if you want to go to a school that has less tight standards for appearance, go there - but I bet their results aren't as good as your current school! bucksteacher
  • Score: 0

11:13am Sat 19 Jan 13

Boscomite says...

"For the teachers, the school is their workplace and the rules and expectations can be different."

It's the same school. The difference is the teachers are in authority, so they don't have to obey the school rules. In the same way as polititions are in authority and so are allowed to fiddle their expenses and keep their money in off shore tax havens. Is that the point you're making?
"For the teachers, the school is their workplace and the rules and expectations can be different." It's the same school. The difference is the teachers are in authority, so they don't have to obey the school rules. In the same way as polititions are in authority and so are allowed to fiddle their expenses and keep their money in off shore tax havens. Is that the point you're making? Boscomite
  • Score: 0

2:49pm Sat 19 Jan 13

sammmymac says...

I think you will find that schools all have a dress code for staff which is pretty formal especially in secondary ( men in ties etc) . Obviously teachers are allowed to wear make up, jewellery etc...even shock horror dye thier hair ( which must go prematurely grey dealing with the likes of these people) . the reason being....they are adults! Some jobs do have very strict appearance rules and you wouldn't last long in them if you flouted them so be prepared! Just spotted these glory hunters in the Daily Mail too!
I think you will find that schools all have a dress code for staff which is pretty formal especially in secondary ( men in ties etc) . Obviously teachers are allowed to wear make up, jewellery etc...even shock horror dye thier hair ( which must go prematurely grey dealing with the likes of these people) . the reason being....they are adults! Some jobs do have very strict appearance rules and you wouldn't last long in them if you flouted them so be prepared! Just spotted these glory hunters in the Daily Mail too! sammmymac
  • Score: 0

5:26pm Sat 19 Jan 13

bucksteacher says...

Boscomite - what actually is your problem with teachers? Perhaps you need to focus your anger and frustration on the politicians you refer to. Leave the job of educating the next generation to the professionals in the classroom.
Boscomite - what actually is your problem with teachers? Perhaps you need to focus your anger and frustration on the politicians you refer to. Leave the job of educating the next generation to the professionals in the classroom. bucksteacher
  • Score: 0

6:35pm Sat 19 Jan 13

Boscomite says...

bucksteacher wrote:
Boscomite - what actually is your problem with teachers? Perhaps you need to focus your anger and frustration on the politicians you refer to. Leave the job of educating the next generation to the professionals in the classroom.
I have no problem with teachers. In fact my daughter is a teacher. The problem I have is with bad teachers and bullies.
[quote][p][bold]bucksteacher[/bold] wrote: Boscomite - what actually is your problem with teachers? Perhaps you need to focus your anger and frustration on the politicians you refer to. Leave the job of educating the next generation to the professionals in the classroom.[/p][/quote]I have no problem with teachers. In fact my daughter is a teacher. The problem I have is with bad teachers and bullies. Boscomite
  • Score: 0

8:42pm Sat 19 Jan 13

bucksteacher says...

So you'll understand that one of the main reasons for strict guidlines over uniform and other appearance-related issues (such as hair styling/colouring) is to mitigate the chance of bullying in schools.

A quote from Childline...

"Sometimes people who bully others pick up on a small thing that makes someone stand out and they use it to hurt them. This might be the way someone looks, the things they like doing or even what kinds of clothes they wear."

So Ringwood School were acting to reduce the chance that this girl would be bullied.
So you'll understand that one of the main reasons for strict guidlines over uniform and other appearance-related issues (such as hair styling/colouring) is to mitigate the chance of bullying in schools. A quote from Childline... "Sometimes people who bully others pick up on a small thing that makes someone stand out and they use it to hurt them. This might be the way someone looks, the things they like doing or even what kinds of clothes they wear." So Ringwood School were acting to reduce the chance that this girl would be bullied. bucksteacher
  • Score: 0

9:58pm Sat 19 Jan 13

Boscomite says...

Or they could pick on the fact that a child is being kept in isolation. Surely if as the article suggests, this girl has not been in trouble in the past. The first move should have been to discuss the matter with the parents, and agree that the dye should be washed out as soon as possible, and that it would not happen again.
Or they could pick on the fact that a child is being kept in isolation. Surely if as the article suggests, this girl has not been in trouble in the past. The first move should have been to discuss the matter with the parents, and agree that the dye should be washed out as soon as possible, and that it would not happen again. Boscomite
  • Score: 0

10:04pm Sat 19 Jan 13

Boscomite says...

Given the very rapid response to this article, all in defence of the school, by a lot of people who seem to be new to these forums, I can't help wondering if there has been some orchestration involved. Another form of bullying.
Given the very rapid response to this article, all in defence of the school, by a lot of people who seem to be new to these forums, I can't help wondering if there has been some orchestration involved. Another form of bullying. Boscomite
  • Score: 0

10:12pm Sat 19 Jan 13

sammmymac says...

conspiracy theories and paranoia now!!
I think it's just a case of the sensible majority feeling the need to put their support where it should be...with the school. Years ago, I told my children it was illegal to dye their hair until 16 and they fell for it!
conspiracy theories and paranoia now!! I think it's just a case of the sensible majority feeling the need to put their support where it should be...with the school. Years ago, I told my children it was illegal to dye their hair until 16 and they fell for it! sammmymac
  • Score: 0

7:53am Sun 20 Jan 13

retry69 says...

Boscomite wrote:
Given the very rapid response to this article, all in defence of the school, by a lot of people who seem to be new to these forums, I can't help wondering if there has been some orchestration involved. Another form of bullying.
The worrying thing about your comments is the fact you seem to be serious and may even belive what you write
[quote][p][bold]Boscomite[/bold] wrote: Given the very rapid response to this article, all in defence of the school, by a lot of people who seem to be new to these forums, I can't help wondering if there has been some orchestration involved. Another form of bullying.[/p][/quote]The worrying thing about your comments is the fact you seem to be serious and may even belive what you write retry69
  • Score: 0

10:34am Sun 20 Jan 13

Boscomite says...

@sammymac:
I'm not suggesting a conspiracy. I'm suggesting the possibility that knowing they're about to receive some publicity, the school may have contacted other parents and asked for their support. A conspiracy would have been planned better and not resulted in everyone responding whithin a few minutes of the article first being published.
@retry69:
If you have nothing constructive to add, then you're just a distraction and run the risk of being placed into isolation.
@sammymac: I'm not suggesting a conspiracy. I'm suggesting the possibility that knowing they're about to receive some publicity, the school may have contacted other parents and asked for their support. A conspiracy would have been planned better and not resulted in everyone responding whithin a few minutes of the article first being published. @retry69: If you have nothing constructive to add, then you're just a distraction and run the risk of being placed into isolation. Boscomite
  • Score: 0

11:02am Sun 20 Jan 13

retry69 says...

Not for the first time, but my comment is constructive and my opinion is that i would be concerned for my safety and my familys sharing space with you.
Not for the first time, but my comment is constructive and my opinion is that i would be concerned for my safety and my familys sharing space with you. retry69
  • Score: 0

11:25am Sun 20 Jan 13

Boscomite says...

retry69 wrote:
Not for the first time, but my comment is constructive and my opinion is that i would be concerned for my safety and my familys sharing space with you.
Which is relevant to this story how exactly?
[quote][p][bold]retry69[/bold] wrote: Not for the first time, but my comment is constructive and my opinion is that i would be concerned for my safety and my familys sharing space with you.[/p][/quote]Which is relevant to this story how exactly? Boscomite
  • Score: 0

11:38am Sun 20 Jan 13

retry69 says...

Boscomite wrote:
retry69 wrote:
Not for the first time, but my comment is constructive and my opinion is that i would be concerned for my safety and my familys sharing space with you.
Which is relevant to this story how exactly?
its relevant to your comments that includes politicians,child abuse,conspiracy theories etc, etc, that has nothing to do really with a child going to school with coloured hair.Just for research purposes would you disclose your age group?
[quote][p][bold]Boscomite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]retry69[/bold] wrote: Not for the first time, but my comment is constructive and my opinion is that i would be concerned for my safety and my familys sharing space with you.[/p][/quote]Which is relevant to this story how exactly?[/p][/quote]its relevant to your comments that includes politicians,child abuse,conspiracy theories etc, etc, that has nothing to do really with a child going to school with coloured hair.Just for research purposes would you disclose your age group? retry69
  • Score: 0

12:13pm Sun 20 Jan 13

Boscomite says...

My comment concerning politicians was about people in authority, (in this case teachers), holding themselves above the rules. I equated holding a child in isolation to child abuse. The only mention I made of a conspiracy, was to say that I'm not suggesting there was one. This article was not about a child going to school with coloured hair, it was about the reaction of the school and the mothers response. If you had paid a little more attention, then you would have known these things. My age group is irrelevant, but just to satisfy your curiosity, mid 50s.
My comment concerning politicians was about people in authority, (in this case teachers), holding themselves above the rules. I equated holding a child in isolation to child abuse. The only mention I made of a conspiracy, was to say that I'm not suggesting there was one. This article was not about a child going to school with coloured hair, it was about the reaction of the school and the mothers response. If you had paid a little more attention, then you would have known these things. My age group is irrelevant, but just to satisfy your curiosity, mid 50s. Boscomite
  • Score: 0

12:36pm Sun 20 Jan 13

bucksteacher says...

...but the more important discussion to be having is how some parents' attitudes to education/society are shaping the attitudes of their children, making it more and more difficult for schools to do their bit in educating children to be positive members of society in the future.

ASBOs, riots, soaring youth crime rates all stem from inappropriate attitudes to authority being instilled in some children/young people by their parents (not the schools).

The child had to be isolated to send a clear message to other students and prevent a tidal wave of hair colour the following day; I have no doubt that the school would then have engaged in a dialogue with the parent swiftly afterwards (this is how it works in my school).

Just to reiterate, the school rules are in place for the pupils. Teachers are adults in a workplace and do follow their own strict guidelines, but you are naive if you think the rules must be identical in this situation. By way of a comparison, boscomite - would you suggest that prisoners should be allowed to carry keys to the jail in the way that prison officers are?
...but the more important discussion to be having is how some parents' attitudes to education/society are shaping the attitudes of their children, making it more and more difficult for schools to do their bit in educating children to be positive members of society in the future. ASBOs, riots, soaring youth crime rates all stem from inappropriate attitudes to authority being instilled in some children/young people by their parents (not the schools). The child had to be isolated to send a clear message to other students and prevent a tidal wave of hair colour the following day; I have no doubt that the school would then have engaged in a dialogue with the parent swiftly afterwards (this is how it works in my school). Just to reiterate, the school rules are in place for the pupils. Teachers are adults in a workplace and do follow their own strict guidelines, but you are naive if you think the rules must be identical in this situation. By way of a comparison, boscomite - would you suggest that prisoners should be allowed to carry keys to the jail in the way that prison officers are? bucksteacher
  • Score: 0

12:56pm Sun 20 Jan 13

retry69 says...

Boscomite do you drive, if so how long and any fines etc?
Boscomite do you drive, if so how long and any fines etc? retry69
  • Score: 0

1:29pm Sun 20 Jan 13

Boscomite says...

bucksteacher:
It has been mentioned that this pupil has been bleaching her hair for some time and nothing has been said. This shows that there is some flexibility within the rules. This was one person making a decision. Nothing to do with the rules being strictly adhered to. In my opinion it was an over reaction and the mother was quite right to remove her from the situation. To single out one pupil in order to send a message to the rest of the school, is to draw attention to her and increase the likelyhood of bullying. It's also been said that the school refused to engage in any dialogue with the parents. I'm pleased to hear that your school would have done things differently. I agree that society has been going down hill for some time. I suspect this may be because schools are more interested in their position in the league tables then encouraging their pupils to want to learn. Your comparison is interesting because many children see school as some sort of punishment.
retry69:
Are you hitting on me?
bucksteacher: It has been mentioned that this pupil has been bleaching her hair for some time and nothing has been said. This shows that there is some flexibility within the rules. This was one person making a decision. Nothing to do with the rules being strictly adhered to. In my opinion it was an over reaction and the mother was quite right to remove her from the situation. To single out one pupil in order to send a message to the rest of the school, is to draw attention to her and increase the likelyhood of bullying. It's also been said that the school refused to engage in any dialogue with the parents. I'm pleased to hear that your school would have done things differently. I agree that society has been going down hill for some time. I suspect this may be because schools are more interested in their position in the league tables then encouraging their pupils to want to learn. Your comparison is interesting because many children see school as some sort of punishment. retry69: Are you hitting on me? Boscomite
  • Score: 0

2:14pm Sun 20 Jan 13

bucksteacher says...

boscomite - some sensible points in your latest, but I must pick you up on one thing...

Schools have had to focus on their positions in league tables. Successive governments have created a situation where this is everything and the school stands or falls on these positions, in the eyes of parents. Believe me, the schools are as frustrated by this as you, but it needs education to be detached from politics for this situation to improve.

Schools (and hard working and dedicated teachers in them) are doing what they can to counteract the harm being done to the attitudes of a porportion of children by bad parenting and the media.

To return to this story, in my view this school followed the correct protocol, but perhaps should have picked up on the bleaching sooner. However, by pulling her daughter out of school and then going to the media, I fear that this mum could have significantly impacted on her daughter's attitude to authority. She still has the option of moving her daughter to a school with looser rules (but no doubt lower standards of teaching too).
boscomite - some sensible points in your latest, but I must pick you up on one thing... Schools have had to focus on their positions in league tables. Successive governments have created a situation where this is everything and the school stands or falls on these positions, in the eyes of parents. Believe me, the schools are as frustrated by this as you, but it needs education to be detached from politics for this situation to improve. Schools (and hard working and dedicated teachers in them) are doing what they can to counteract the harm being done to the attitudes of a porportion of children by bad parenting and the media. To return to this story, in my view this school followed the correct protocol, but perhaps should have picked up on the bleaching sooner. However, by pulling her daughter out of school and then going to the media, I fear that this mum could have significantly impacted on her daughter's attitude to authority. She still has the option of moving her daughter to a school with looser rules (but no doubt lower standards of teaching too). bucksteacher
  • Score: 0

3:08pm Sun 20 Jan 13

Boscomite says...

bucksteacher wrote:
boscomite - some sensible points in your latest, but I must pick you up on one thing...

Schools have had to focus on their positions in league tables. Successive governments have created a situation where this is everything and the school stands or falls on these positions, in the eyes of parents. Believe me, the schools are as frustrated by this as you, but it needs education to be detached from politics for this situation to improve.

Schools (and hard working and dedicated teachers in them) are doing what they can to counteract the harm being done to the attitudes of a porportion of children by bad parenting and the media.

To return to this story, in my view this school followed the correct protocol, but perhaps should have picked up on the bleaching sooner. However, by pulling her daughter out of school and then going to the media, I fear that this mum could have significantly impacted on her daughter's attitude to authority. She still has the option of moving her daughter to a school with looser rules (but no doubt lower standards of teaching too).
We may be finding some common ground here. I know my daughter gets frustrated by constantly having to reach government targets and not being able to get on with her job teaching. But that's a different discussion. I feel in this instance, by refusing to enter into any dialouge with the parents, the school left the mother no other option but to highlight the situation in the media. What mother is going to stand back and allow her child to be singled out in this way?
[quote][p][bold]bucksteacher[/bold] wrote: boscomite - some sensible points in your latest, but I must pick you up on one thing... Schools have had to focus on their positions in league tables. Successive governments have created a situation where this is everything and the school stands or falls on these positions, in the eyes of parents. Believe me, the schools are as frustrated by this as you, but it needs education to be detached from politics for this situation to improve. Schools (and hard working and dedicated teachers in them) are doing what they can to counteract the harm being done to the attitudes of a porportion of children by bad parenting and the media. To return to this story, in my view this school followed the correct protocol, but perhaps should have picked up on the bleaching sooner. However, by pulling her daughter out of school and then going to the media, I fear that this mum could have significantly impacted on her daughter's attitude to authority. She still has the option of moving her daughter to a school with looser rules (but no doubt lower standards of teaching too).[/p][/quote]We may be finding some common ground here. I know my daughter gets frustrated by constantly having to reach government targets and not being able to get on with her job teaching. But that's a different discussion. I feel in this instance, by refusing to enter into any dialouge with the parents, the school left the mother no other option but to highlight the situation in the media. What mother is going to stand back and allow her child to be singled out in this way? Boscomite
  • Score: 0

4:34pm Sun 20 Jan 13

bucksteacher says...

Boscomite wrote:
bucksteacher wrote:
boscomite - some sensible points in your latest, but I must pick you up on one thing...

Schools have had to focus on their positions in league tables. Successive governments have created a situation where this is everything and the school stands or falls on these positions, in the eyes of parents. Believe me, the schools are as frustrated by this as you, but it needs education to be detached from politics for this situation to improve.

Schools (and hard working and dedicated teachers in them) are doing what they can to counteract the harm being done to the attitudes of a porportion of children by bad parenting and the media.

To return to this story, in my view this school followed the correct protocol, but perhaps should have picked up on the bleaching sooner. However, by pulling her daughter out of school and then going to the media, I fear that this mum could have significantly impacted on her daughter's attitude to authority. She still has the option of moving her daughter to a school with looser rules (but no doubt lower standards of teaching too).
We may be finding some common ground here. I know my daughter gets frustrated by constantly having to reach government targets and not being able to get on with her job teaching. But that's a different discussion. I feel in this instance, by refusing to enter into any dialouge with the parents, the school left the mother no other option but to highlight the situation in the media. What mother is going to stand back and allow her child to be singled out in this way?
I would agree that it is essential that the school maintain a dialogue with the parent, but I don't think the article suggests that this was the case. I think we will have to agree to disagree on this - in my view, this mum allowed her child to 'single herself out' via her hairstyle and has then further singled her out by going to the media.

I also agree that the government meddling in education is a different discussion, but it is not a discussion that is happening enough in the mainstream media - it should be; the current government are making sweeping changes behind the public's back and getting away with it at present - we will look back in 5 year's time and say 'why did we let that happen?'

I just wish the media would focus more of their attention on this bigger picture, instead of such 'school/teacher-bash
ing' articles as this one. They are doing the government's dirty work for them by stirring up public anger over relatively trivial issues affecting a tiny minority of students, whilst ignoring the issues in education that will affect the thousand-or-so other students at schools like this.
[quote][p][bold]Boscomite[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]bucksteacher[/bold] wrote: boscomite - some sensible points in your latest, but I must pick you up on one thing... Schools have had to focus on their positions in league tables. Successive governments have created a situation where this is everything and the school stands or falls on these positions, in the eyes of parents. Believe me, the schools are as frustrated by this as you, but it needs education to be detached from politics for this situation to improve. Schools (and hard working and dedicated teachers in them) are doing what they can to counteract the harm being done to the attitudes of a porportion of children by bad parenting and the media. To return to this story, in my view this school followed the correct protocol, but perhaps should have picked up on the bleaching sooner. However, by pulling her daughter out of school and then going to the media, I fear that this mum could have significantly impacted on her daughter's attitude to authority. She still has the option of moving her daughter to a school with looser rules (but no doubt lower standards of teaching too).[/p][/quote]We may be finding some common ground here. I know my daughter gets frustrated by constantly having to reach government targets and not being able to get on with her job teaching. But that's a different discussion. I feel in this instance, by refusing to enter into any dialouge with the parents, the school left the mother no other option but to highlight the situation in the media. What mother is going to stand back and allow her child to be singled out in this way?[/p][/quote]I would agree that it is essential that the school maintain a dialogue with the parent, but I don't think the article suggests that this was the case. I think we will have to agree to disagree on this - in my view, this mum allowed her child to 'single herself out' via her hairstyle and has then further singled her out by going to the media. I also agree that the government meddling in education is a different discussion, but it is not a discussion that is happening enough in the mainstream media - it should be; the current government are making sweeping changes behind the public's back and getting away with it at present - we will look back in 5 year's time and say 'why did we let that happen?' I just wish the media would focus more of their attention on this bigger picture, instead of such 'school/teacher-bash ing' articles as this one. They are doing the government's dirty work for them by stirring up public anger over relatively trivial issues affecting a tiny minority of students, whilst ignoring the issues in education that will affect the thousand-or-so other students at schools like this. bucksteacher
  • Score: 0

4:35pm Sun 20 Jan 13

bucksteacher says...

Sorry - meant to say 'I don't think the article suggests that the school did NOT maintain a dialogue'.
Sorry - meant to say 'I don't think the article suggests that the school did NOT maintain a dialogue'. bucksteacher
  • Score: 0

4:59pm Sun 20 Jan 13

Boscomite says...

bucksteacher wrote:
Sorry - meant to say 'I don't think the article suggests that the school did NOT maintain a dialogue'.
I'm just going by a post that the mother made on this thread herself.

" My anger from all of this is the way the teachers handled the situation and were not even willing to discuss 'the rules' with me."
[quote][p][bold]bucksteacher[/bold] wrote: Sorry - meant to say 'I don't think the article suggests that the school did NOT maintain a dialogue'.[/p][/quote]I'm just going by a post that the mother made on this thread herself. " My anger from all of this is the way the teachers handled the situation and were not even willing to discuss 'the rules' with me." Boscomite
  • Score: 0

5:46pm Sun 20 Jan 13

bucksteacher says...

I'd be surprised if a school with the reputation of Ringwood wouldn't even enter into a dialogue.

However, there is little to discuss regarding 'the rules'. They are the rules that the parent/child signed up to on joining the school. As said before, there are other schools available.

Neither of us know the wider story regarding the existing relationship that this parent had with the school beforehand. I know from my own experience (as Assistant Head in a Dorset school) that there are parents you can engage with and those you cannot.
I'd be surprised if a school with the reputation of Ringwood wouldn't even enter into a dialogue. However, there is little to discuss regarding 'the rules'. They are the rules that the parent/child signed up to on joining the school. As said before, there are other schools available. Neither of us know the wider story regarding the existing relationship that this parent had with the school beforehand. I know from my own experience (as Assistant Head in a Dorset school) that there are parents you can engage with and those you cannot. bucksteacher
  • Score: 0

6:51pm Sun 20 Jan 13

Boscomite says...

Just as an aside, but on the subject of signing up to rules. Did you know that at least one major software company and several on-line service providers, (ie Email accounts etc.), include in their terms and conditions, a line that says you give consent for them to take one of your kidneys at any time. They do this because they know full well that people will just tick the box that says "I have read and agree to the terms and conditions" without reading them. Probably not relevant but interesting.
Just as an aside, but on the subject of signing up to rules. Did you know that at least one major software company and several on-line service providers, (ie Email accounts etc.), include in their terms and conditions, a line that says you give consent for them to take one of your kidneys at any time. They do this because they know full well that people will just tick the box that says "I have read and agree to the terms and conditions" without reading them. Probably not relevant but interesting. Boscomite
  • Score: 0

7:41pm Sun 20 Jan 13

bucksteacher says...

...might include that in next years rules printed in the homework diaries at my own school. I have enjoyed our chat, boscomite!
...might include that in next years rules printed in the homework diaries at my own school. I have enjoyed our chat, boscomite! bucksteacher
  • Score: 0

9:29pm Mon 21 Jan 13

keith milton says...

we have become a nation of cloned slaves,
you are not missing anything by being taken out of school,
everything being taught in schools is what the establishment want you to learn about and nothing more,and most of what is being taught is propaganda and lies.schools are nothing but indoctrination camps.
home schooling is the only way you will learn anything
we have become a nation of cloned slaves, you are not missing anything by being taken out of school, everything being taught in schools is what the establishment want you to learn about and nothing more,and most of what is being taught is propaganda and lies.schools are nothing but indoctrination camps. home schooling is the only way you will learn anything keith milton
  • Score: 0

7:50am Fri 25 Jan 13

bucksteacher says...

keith milton wrote:
we have become a nation of cloned slaves,
you are not missing anything by being taken out of school,
everything being taught in schools is what the establishment want you to learn about and nothing more,and most of what is being taught is propaganda and lies.schools are nothing but indoctrination camps.
home schooling is the only way you will learn anything
When did you last visit a school Keith? I encourage my students every day to challenge the establishment, not trust politicians and to learn to think for themselves. So do most of my colleagues.
[quote][p][bold]keith milton[/bold] wrote: we have become a nation of cloned slaves, you are not missing anything by being taken out of school, everything being taught in schools is what the establishment want you to learn about and nothing more,and most of what is being taught is propaganda and lies.schools are nothing but indoctrination camps. home schooling is the only way you will learn anything[/p][/quote]When did you last visit a school Keith? I encourage my students every day to challenge the establishment, not trust politicians and to learn to think for themselves. So do most of my colleagues. bucksteacher
  • Score: 0

12:45pm Fri 1 Feb 13

Boscomite says...

Hello again Bucky. Just out of interest, do you also encourage them to challenge what their teachers tell them?
Hello again Bucky. Just out of interest, do you also encourage them to challenge what their teachers tell them? Boscomite
  • Score: 0

11:20pm Wed 6 Feb 13

pd7 says...

Pink hair so what ?

My daughters both in private schools in Dorset .as I gave up with the state system.It could not listen or develop kids with attitude, motivation .

You are looking at a young girl who may have found a fashion or other point to make.

Dont control them guide them find out what they are doing and why .

Rules are to be challenged , and in some cases broken , that is why women now have the vote.

Teaching is a 2 way system or there is no progression.

Are you ( school and teachers ) trying to preserve a timmy the dog girls have skirts , boys play rugger attitude ?.

Young ones are our future , fresh ideas and with some luck bring some inventions and ethos back to UK so listen and see and adapt .

In simple words to the "system" ... look at what is underneath , it is only skin deep . Pink hair ends .... So what .next week it could be blue or ,orange . If the young girl worn a burga would you raise the same events ?
.




.
Pink hair so what ? My daughters both in private schools in Dorset .as I gave up with the state system.It could not listen or develop kids with attitude, motivation . You are looking at a young girl who may have found a fashion or other point to make. Dont control them guide them find out what they are doing and why . Rules are to be challenged , and in some cases broken , that is why women now have the vote. Teaching is a 2 way system or there is no progression. Are you ( school and teachers ) trying to preserve a timmy the dog girls have skirts , boys play rugger attitude ?. Young ones are our future , fresh ideas and with some luck bring some inventions and ethos back to UK so listen and see and adapt . In simple words to the "system" ... look at what is underneath , it is only skin deep . Pink hair ends .... So what .next week it could be blue or ,orange . If the young girl worn a burga would you raise the same events ? . . pd7
  • Score: 0

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