Dorset's new PCC lobbies government over police funding formula

RADICAL REVIEW: Chancellor George Osborne is being lobbied for change

RADICAL REVIEW: Chancellor George Osborne is being lobbied for change

First published in News by

DORSET’S Police and Crime Commissioner has lobbied the government calling for a radical review of the police funding formula.

Martyn Underhill has submitted a two-page letter to Chancellor George Osborne urging him to ensure Dorset stops becoming one of the lowest funded forces in the country.

The government is about to begin a review of the police funding formula and Mr Underhill says the existing one is not “fit for purpose”.

In his letter, Mr Underhill says some forces receive 80 per cent of their funding from government while forces like Dorset receive around half – with the remaining tab being picked up by residents.

He said: “Any funding formula must reflect the unique challenges and additional costs of rural policing.”

Mr Underhill says Dorset also needs recognition for the additional policing required for the millions of visitors.

“This increase in population occurs all year long, adding considerably to issues associated with the night time economy, an economy that should be recognised in its own right in any future formula.”

Mr Underhill told the Echo he has always insisted he will fight for rural policing and is very keen to sit on the Government's consultation group.

This is the second time Mr Underhill has written to the government since being elected as commissioner.

He made a plea to government before Christmas for an ending to spending cuts which he said could put public safety at risk and the county at “tipping point”.

Dorset needs to make another £13 million savings by 2014/15 on top of the £10 million already achieved.

  • Four people have applied to become the next chief constable of Dorset Police, including the current acting chief constable Debbie Simpson. The selection process is now underway and the successful candidate will be announced on February 7.

Comments (8)

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2:19pm Mon 7 Jan 13

muscliffman says...

Maybe a few savings could be made by reviewing the very early retirement profile in our Police Force.

This allows still youthful Officers to be re-employed, quite often directly or indirectly back within the Force, whilst also drawing a generous publicly funded 'retirement' pension.

In addition, perhaps a little less expense on 'politically' created evidently unpopular senior posts now with associated new 'media' jobs, would save some more funds.

Thats a fair sum which should be going back to the front line!
Maybe a few savings could be made by reviewing the very early retirement profile in our Police Force. This allows still youthful Officers to be re-employed, quite often directly or indirectly back within the Force, whilst also drawing a generous publicly funded 'retirement' pension. In addition, perhaps a little less expense on 'politically' created evidently unpopular senior posts now with associated new 'media' jobs, would save some more funds. Thats a fair sum which should be going back to the front line! muscliffman
  • Score: 0

4:50pm Mon 7 Jan 13

ajj-dorset says...

Perhaps we could cut costs by getting rid of PCC's?

Another example of Mr Underhill using the ever obliging/desperate echo to gain publicity to try and justify his role.

Man writes a second letter as part of his job is hardly news?
Perhaps we could cut costs by getting rid of PCC's? Another example of Mr Underhill using the ever obliging/desperate echo to gain publicity to try and justify his role. Man writes a second letter as part of his job is hardly news? ajj-dorset
  • Score: 0

5:43pm Mon 7 Jan 13

Azphreal says...

This man said he would release details of his backers after the election so why has the Echo not chased that up or has it been put somewhere else? How much does he cost and how much has he said he will save.
This man said he would release details of his backers after the election so why has the Echo not chased that up or has it been put somewhere else? How much does he cost and how much has he said he will save. Azphreal
  • Score: 0

5:55pm Mon 7 Jan 13

sea-gull says...

Muscliffman, think you are mistaken...as was I. As someone posted the other day, police officers do not enjoy a publicly-funded pension....they pay into it throughout their 30-year service. In fact, their conditions are changing and they will be working longer. Don't think I'd like to be rolling on the floor outside walkabout at sixty!
Muscliffman, think you are mistaken...as was I. As someone posted the other day, police officers do not enjoy a publicly-funded pension....they pay into it throughout their 30-year service. In fact, their conditions are changing and they will be working longer. Don't think I'd like to be rolling on the floor outside walkabout at sixty! sea-gull
  • Score: 0

6:09pm Mon 7 Jan 13

pete woodley says...

I was doing security,up to nearly 70
I was doing security,up to nearly 70 pete woodley
  • Score: 0

6:12pm Mon 7 Jan 13

pete woodley says...

I was doing security,up to nearly 69,and taking risks,so it should be easier for them.
I was doing security,up to nearly 69,and taking risks,so it should be easier for them. pete woodley
  • Score: 0

7:35pm Mon 7 Jan 13

muscliffman says...

sea-gull wrote:
Muscliffman, think you are mistaken...as was I. As someone posted the other day, police officers do not enjoy a publicly-funded pension....they pay into it throughout their 30-year service. In fact, their conditions are changing and they will be working longer. Don't think I'd like to be rolling on the floor outside walkabout at sixty!
I think we are splitting hairs here, the pension contributions may well be itemised from each employee (perfectly sound tax reasons no doubt) as is usual in the public-sector. But I understand they are an integral part of their default remuneration - all of which is paid for by the public purse, as indeed is any pension shortfall.

The practice I really query is not restricted to the Police, double-dipping - as it is called - is common throughout the public-sector and allows public employees to draw their 'retirement' pension whilst immediately resuming work (different job-title) back on the full appropriate salary.

And, no I do not expect a Police Officer to be on front-line duty at the age of sixty - although this does increasingly appear to be expected of us in the private sector!
[quote][p][bold]sea-gull[/bold] wrote: Muscliffman, think you are mistaken...as was I. As someone posted the other day, police officers do not enjoy a publicly-funded pension....they pay into it throughout their 30-year service. In fact, their conditions are changing and they will be working longer. Don't think I'd like to be rolling on the floor outside walkabout at sixty![/p][/quote]I think we are splitting hairs here, the pension contributions may well be itemised from each employee (perfectly sound tax reasons no doubt) as is usual in the public-sector. But I understand they are an integral part of their default remuneration - all of which is paid for by the public purse, as indeed is any pension shortfall. The practice I really query is not restricted to the Police, double-dipping - as it is called - is common throughout the public-sector and allows public employees to draw their 'retirement' pension whilst immediately resuming work (different job-title) back on the full appropriate salary. And, no I do not expect a Police Officer to be on front-line duty at the age of sixty - although this does increasingly appear to be expected of us in the private sector! muscliffman
  • Score: 0

9:36pm Mon 7 Jan 13

sea-gull says...

Ok, maybe I'm mistaken...you seem to know more than I do about it. I don't see a problem if they retire and then apply like everyone else for civilian jobs within the police. Getting the same job back is an interesting one.
Ok, maybe I'm mistaken...you seem to know more than I do about it. I don't see a problem if they retire and then apply like everyone else for civilian jobs within the police. Getting the same job back is an interesting one. sea-gull
  • Score: 0

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