Council sick leave shock: time off double the national average - and union says stress is to blame

Council sick leave shock: time off double the national average - and union says stress is to blame

Bournemouth Town Hall

County Hall in Dorchester

Poole Civic Centre

First published in News

STAFF sickness rates at Bournemouth, Poole and Dorset councils have risen to more than nine days a year, official figures show.

That figure is more than double the national average for all working people of 4.5 sick days a year.

And increased stress levels due to staffing cuts and increased workloads may be a key factor, it is claimed.

The latest statistics for Bournemouth show that between last September and the end of August this year, employees took an average of 9.11 sick days a year.

This is an increase in last year’s figure of 8.86 and considerably more than the council’s target of 6.5 days. The figure is for workers at all council departments but excluding schools.

In Dorset, 9.15 working days were lost per full-time employee, excluding staff employed by schools or the Dorset Waste Partnership. However, this is below the county council’s target of 9.41 working days.

And the figures were even higher at the Dorset Waste Partner-ship, where 15.93 working days were lost per full-time employee over the course of a year.

In Poole, as of September the average number of sick days, excluding school staff, stood at 9.15 a year, against last year’s figure of 8.58.

Their target is a maximum of eight working days per employee per year.

The rates represent more than double the 4.5 days national average for public and private sector workers, recorded by the Office for National Statistics in their most recent study showing absences for 2011.

Dorset County Council employs around 9,000 staff, Bournemouth just over 2,498 and Poole 1,800, excluding schools.

David Higgins, of Bournemouth Unison, said high levels of stress amongst staff could be a key factor. “I think that’s part of it and also the fact that there’s been such a reduction in staffing levels that staff are now working under greater pressure than ever before,” he said.

“In order to make reductions, the council has not been replacing staff when they have left. That is obviously preferable to making redundancies but it does mean that the remaining staff have bigger and bigger workloads to cope with.

“Plus, in this climate of cuts and reductions, you never know what is coming next and there is a lot of stress and anxiety out there.

“It does not surprise me that sickness rates have gone up.”

'Figures distorted'

SPENCER Flower, Dorset County Council’s spokesman for corporate resources, said the physical work carried out in adult social care can cause injury and absences which ‘distort the figures’.

He said: “In adult social care with lots of lifting there’s a much higher case of absenteeism.

“Without that the averages would be quite a lot lower.”

Cllr Flower said he hopes stress and sickness rates are not linked to staff cuts.

He said: “We are not asking less people to do the same work.

“We are trying to redesign the business so we’ve got less work to do.”

Comments (117)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

9:14am Wed 21 Nov 12

Eddie's dog says...

Stress..............
... + maybe living near the beach...
Stress.............. ... + maybe living near the beach... Eddie's dog
  • Score: 0

9:21am Wed 21 Nov 12

live-and-let-live says...

its easier to be sick when on full pay. if i dont work, i dont get paid, so i dont get ill.
its easier to be sick when on full pay. if i dont work, i dont get paid, so i dont get ill. live-and-let-live
  • Score: 0

9:25am Wed 21 Nov 12

Daffodil2 says...

Might have something to do with the fact that the departments that have been outsourced to Mouchel are traditionally low sickenss scorers consequently skewing the average figures for Bournemouth. Cant say the same for Dorset or Poole tho.
Might have something to do with the fact that the departments that have been outsourced to Mouchel are traditionally low sickenss scorers consequently skewing the average figures for Bournemouth. Cant say the same for Dorset or Poole tho. Daffodil2
  • Score: 0

9:29am Wed 21 Nov 12

HRH of Boscombe says...

I don't think 9 days a year is that excessive.
.
Some woman in my office seems to be off each week for something or other.
I don't think 9 days a year is that excessive. . Some woman in my office seems to be off each week for something or other. HRH of Boscombe
  • Score: 0

9:36am Wed 21 Nov 12

goodoldecho says...

Could I be as cynical as to suggest a request went in to a number of organisations and the one that came out worst got the headlines?
Could I be as cynical as to suggest a request went in to a number of organisations and the one that came out worst got the headlines? goodoldecho
  • Score: 0

9:40am Wed 21 Nov 12

jeebuscripes says...

9 days is the average. There'll be some staff with huge sickness periods.
9 days is the average. There'll be some staff with huge sickness periods. jeebuscripes
  • Score: 0

10:06am Wed 21 Nov 12

whitestripe2000 says...

live-and-let-live wrote:
its easier to be sick when on full pay. if i dont work, i dont get paid, so i dont get ill.
same as me, i work with dcc employees and over the last couple of years the number of staff taking time off sick seems to be on rise. because i'm not on the dcc payroll i don't get the same generous benefits, so i have to be really ill to take time off. i've taken about 4 days off sick in the last 5 years...
[quote][p][bold]live-and-let-live[/bold] wrote: its easier to be sick when on full pay. if i dont work, i dont get paid, so i dont get ill.[/p][/quote]same as me, i work with dcc employees and over the last couple of years the number of staff taking time off sick seems to be on rise. because i'm not on the dcc payroll i don't get the same generous benefits, so i have to be really ill to take time off. i've taken about 4 days off sick in the last 5 years... whitestripe2000
  • Score: 0

10:18am Wed 21 Nov 12

jobsworthwatch says...

In the private sector you don't go sick because you want to keep your job.
As for stress at the town hall I suspect that's purely down to the drive into the town centre each morning.
In the private sector you don't go sick because you want to keep your job. As for stress at the town hall I suspect that's purely down to the drive into the town centre each morning. jobsworthwatch
  • Score: 0

10:19am Wed 21 Nov 12

aerolover says...

Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days.
It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.
Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days. aerolover
  • Score: 0

10:30am Wed 21 Nov 12

georgina dean says...

THE OTHER SIDE IF THE STORY PLEASE..........just check how many staff have been released and the work loads increased and staffing halved...my grand daughter had 11 in their office....they are down to 6 now with the same work load.......so stressful and the abuse from the poublic is unbelieveable.......
....blaming the staff when they are under stress as well...........so please give both sides of a story........mind you the guy with council van near me is home more than at work.............tha
t goes unnoticed....
THE OTHER SIDE IF THE STORY PLEASE..........just check how many staff have been released and the work loads increased and staffing halved...my grand daughter had 11 in their office....they are down to 6 now with the same work load.......so stressful and the abuse from the poublic is unbelieveable....... ....blaming the staff when they are under stress as well...........so please give both sides of a story........mind you the guy with council van near me is home more than at work.............tha t goes unnoticed.... georgina dean
  • Score: 0

10:38am Wed 21 Nov 12

HRH of Boscombe says...

aerolover wrote:
Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.
Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.
[quote][p][bold]aerolover[/bold] wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.[/p][/quote]Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route. HRH of Boscombe
  • Score: 0

10:45am Wed 21 Nov 12

geoffro says...

stress they don't know the meaning of the word
stress they don't know the meaning of the word geoffro
  • Score: 0

10:48am Wed 21 Nov 12

step up says...

Think less likely to be stress causing sickness than knowing youll get paid anyway, unlike the private sector in msny cases. Surely if council employees think their jobs are under threat not very intelligent game plan to take more days off sick eh? Bournemouth unlike Poole have not reduced staffing levels to balance the books prefering to target the weakest sick and disabled for massive up to 70% cuts in their funding. Poole in contrast have reducing staffing number in order to reduce such an impact on the most vulnerable. All started under the brutal 'leadership' of Peter Charon when they asked the electorate what their priorities were and stopping cycling on the pavement came out top ! Social care didnt figure in their concerns. Great Tory borough
Think less likely to be stress causing sickness than knowing youll get paid anyway, unlike the private sector in msny cases. Surely if council employees think their jobs are under threat not very intelligent game plan to take more days off sick eh? Bournemouth unlike Poole have not reduced staffing levels to balance the books prefering to target the weakest sick and disabled for massive up to 70% cuts in their funding. Poole in contrast have reducing staffing number in order to reduce such an impact on the most vulnerable. All started under the brutal 'leadership' of Peter Charon when they asked the electorate what their priorities were and stopping cycling on the pavement came out top ! Social care didnt figure in their concerns. Great Tory borough step up
  • Score: 0

10:48am Wed 21 Nov 12

BBC Escapee says...

Bournemouth Council makes me feel sick when I think of all the money that has been wasted on the Surf Reef and all the other white elephant pie in the sky schemes.

Can I claim 9 days sick pay from them please!
Bournemouth Council makes me feel sick when I think of all the money that has been wasted on the Surf Reef and all the other white elephant pie in the sky schemes. Can I claim 9 days sick pay from them please! BBC Escapee
  • Score: 0

10:57am Wed 21 Nov 12

a.g.o.g. says...

One workers absence is anothers stress, and we know what too much stress causes don`t we......
One workers absence is anothers stress, and we know what too much stress causes don`t we...... a.g.o.g.
  • Score: 0

10:59am Wed 21 Nov 12

rayc says...

Just like most statistics these are meaningless without the human story behind them. Is it saying that every employee is off sick for 9 days every year or that perhaps one person has a serious illness and off for months thereby skewing the average?
Employees, whether they are in public or private employment, are people not machines.
Just like most statistics these are meaningless without the human story behind them. Is it saying that every employee is off sick for 9 days every year or that perhaps one person has a serious illness and off for months thereby skewing the average? Employees, whether they are in public or private employment, are people not machines. rayc
  • Score: 0

11:03am Wed 21 Nov 12

BarrHumbug says...

HRH of Boscombe wrote:
aerolover wrote:
Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.
Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.
Do you work in the public sector?

Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders"
It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays.
Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?
[quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]aerolover[/bold] wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.[/p][/quote]Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.[/p][/quote]Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often? BarrHumbug
  • Score: 0

11:05am Wed 21 Nov 12

John T says...

It would be interesting to know what the corresponding sickness rates at the Echo's Richmond Towers are, but that might involve some investigative reporting.
Judging by their general standard of reporting and proof reading, it would seem that there is at least one member of staff that is AWOL every day at the Echo newsdesk!
It would be interesting to know what the corresponding sickness rates at the Echo's Richmond Towers are, but that might involve some investigative reporting. Judging by their general standard of reporting and proof reading, it would seem that there is at least one member of staff that is AWOL every day at the Echo newsdesk! John T
  • Score: 0

11:15am Wed 21 Nov 12

HRH of Boscombe says...

BarrHumbug wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
aerolover wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.
Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.
Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?
No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month.
.
I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.
[quote][p][bold]BarrHumbug[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]aerolover[/bold] wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.[/p][/quote]Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.[/p][/quote]Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?[/p][/quote]No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs. HRH of Boscombe
  • Score: 0

11:22am Wed 21 Nov 12

Sue001 says...

Just reading what the echo reporters say in this paper, and the feedback from readers is enough to undermine all council worker and cause them to feel hugely undervalued, The vast majority of council employees put in 110% and are abused by the public on a daily basis. Stress is enormous, and stress attacks the immune system so wherever there is a weakness, that's where it'll strike resulting in sick leave.
Just reading what the echo reporters say in this paper, and the feedback from readers is enough to undermine all council worker and cause them to feel hugely undervalued, The vast majority of council employees put in 110% and are abused by the public on a daily basis. Stress is enormous, and stress attacks the immune system so wherever there is a weakness, that's where it'll strike resulting in sick leave. Sue001
  • Score: 0

11:30am Wed 21 Nov 12

freedom for pokesdown says...

As a contractor I like working in the relaxed atmosphere of the public sector. The staff have got much more time to be friendly and are noticeably less performance-driven than the private sector. Whether that's a good or a bad thing I don't know.
Perhaps things have changed since my last public sector contract but the only people I met that I would call stressed were one or two front-line social services people.
As a contractor I like working in the relaxed atmosphere of the public sector. The staff have got much more time to be friendly and are noticeably less performance-driven than the private sector. Whether that's a good or a bad thing I don't know. Perhaps things have changed since my last public sector contract but the only people I met that I would call stressed were one or two front-line social services people. freedom for pokesdown
  • Score: 0

11:47am Wed 21 Nov 12

Jetwasher says...

If I worked for the council I'd take time off as well, i hear sick pay is nice little earner.
If I worked for the council I'd take time off as well, i hear sick pay is nice little earner. Jetwasher
  • Score: 0

11:55am Wed 21 Nov 12

John T says...

Jetwasher wrote:
If I worked for the council I'd take time off as well, i hear sick pay is nice little earner.
With your grammar and punctuation skills, you would stand a better chance of getting a job down the road at Echo Towers ( or even Fawlty Towers)!
[quote][p][bold]Jetwasher[/bold] wrote: If I worked for the council I'd take time off as well, i hear sick pay is nice little earner.[/p][/quote]With your grammar and punctuation skills, you would stand a better chance of getting a job down the road at Echo Towers ( or even Fawlty Towers)! John T
  • Score: 0

12:05pm Wed 21 Nov 12

Jetwasher says...

John T wrote:
Jetwasher wrote:
If I worked for the council I'd take time off as well, i hear sick pay is nice little earner.
With your grammar and punctuation skills, you would stand a better chance of getting a job down the road at Echo Towers ( or even Fawlty Towers)!
Think you should look at your own punctuation first wordsworth.
[quote][p][bold]John T[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Jetwasher[/bold] wrote: If I worked for the council I'd take time off as well, i hear sick pay is nice little earner.[/p][/quote]With your grammar and punctuation skills, you would stand a better chance of getting a job down the road at Echo Towers ( or even Fawlty Towers)![/p][/quote]Think you should look at your own punctuation first wordsworth. Jetwasher
  • Score: 0

12:22pm Wed 21 Nov 12

miketheplumb says...

Another classic from the council.
Quote "I think that’s part of it and also the fact that there’s been such a reduction in staffing levels that staff are now working under greater pressure than ever before,”
Sooo.... what's unique, tell me of any company that has not cut back over the same period, with the same effect, APART from the fact the national average is STILL LOWER THAN COUNCIL STAFF.
Another classic from the council. Quote "I think that’s part of it and also the fact that there’s been such a reduction in staffing levels that staff are now working under greater pressure than ever before,” Sooo.... what's unique, tell me of any company that has not cut back over the same period, with the same effect, APART from the fact the national average is STILL LOWER THAN COUNCIL STAFF. miketheplumb
  • Score: 0

12:26pm Wed 21 Nov 12

ctrewyou says...

jeebuscripes wrote:
9 days is the average. There'll be some staff with huge sickness periods.
Exactly. Which means that the vast majority of staff dont take any time off sick at all.
[quote][p][bold]jeebuscripes[/bold] wrote: 9 days is the average. There'll be some staff with huge sickness periods.[/p][/quote]Exactly. Which means that the vast majority of staff dont take any time off sick at all. ctrewyou
  • Score: 0

12:32pm Wed 21 Nov 12

goodoldecho says...

miketheplumb wrote:
Another classic from the council.
Quote "I think that’s part of it and also the fact that there’s been such a reduction in staffing levels that staff are now working under greater pressure than ever before,”
Sooo.... what's unique, tell me of any company that has not cut back over the same period, with the same effect, APART from the fact the national average is STILL LOWER THAN COUNCIL STAFF.
... and the statement from the council should be 'fewer' people not 'less'
[quote][p][bold]miketheplumb[/bold] wrote: Another classic from the council. Quote "I think that’s part of it and also the fact that there’s been such a reduction in staffing levels that staff are now working under greater pressure than ever before,” Sooo.... what's unique, tell me of any company that has not cut back over the same period, with the same effect, APART from the fact the national average is STILL LOWER THAN COUNCIL STAFF.[/p][/quote]... and the statement from the council should be 'fewer' people not 'less' goodoldecho
  • Score: 0

12:33pm Wed 21 Nov 12

ctrewyou says...

freedom for pokesdown wrote:
As a contractor I like working in the relaxed atmosphere of the public sector. The staff have got much more time to be friendly and are noticeably less performance-driven than the private sector. Whether that's a good or a bad thing I don't know. Perhaps things have changed since my last public sector contract but the only people I met that I would call stressed were one or two front-line social services people.
Quite right too. It is very relaxing caring for sick and disabled people, looking after children and getting such positive feedback every day from the public. There are no performance targets, no threat of redundancy and of course the gold-plated pension (average: £3,000 a year) to look forward to.
[quote][p][bold]freedom for pokesdown[/bold] wrote: As a contractor I like working in the relaxed atmosphere of the public sector. The staff have got much more time to be friendly and are noticeably less performance-driven than the private sector. Whether that's a good or a bad thing I don't know. Perhaps things have changed since my last public sector contract but the only people I met that I would call stressed were one or two front-line social services people.[/p][/quote]Quite right too. It is very relaxing caring for sick and disabled people, looking after children and getting such positive feedback every day from the public. There are no performance targets, no threat of redundancy and of course the gold-plated pension (average: £3,000 a year) to look forward to. ctrewyou
  • Score: 0

12:37pm Wed 21 Nov 12

scoooobles says...

HRH of Boscombe wrote:
BarrHumbug wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
aerolover wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.
Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.
Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?
No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.
I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness.

I would also only get statutory maternity pay.

Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract.
[quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BarrHumbug[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]aerolover[/bold] wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.[/p][/quote]Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.[/p][/quote]Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?[/p][/quote]No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.[/p][/quote]I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness. I would also only get statutory maternity pay. Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract. scoooobles
  • Score: 0

12:48pm Wed 21 Nov 12

crispy_pants says...

One of the biggest issues here is that Local government, National government and NHS will seemingly never sack anyone for abusing the sickness benefit. That, along with always spending their budgets (our money) before the end of March is why they cost us so much.
One of the biggest issues here is that Local government, National government and NHS will seemingly never sack anyone for abusing the sickness benefit. That, along with always spending their budgets (our money) before the end of March is why they cost us so much. crispy_pants
  • Score: 0

1:01pm Wed 21 Nov 12

scrumpyjack says...

georgina dean wrote:
THE OTHER SIDE IF THE STORY PLEASE..........just check how many staff have been released and the work loads increased and staffing halved...my grand daughter had 11 in their office....they are down to 6 now with the same work load.......so stressful and the abuse from the poublic is unbelieveable.......

....blaming the staff when they are under stress as well...........so please give both sides of a story........mind you the guy with council van near me is home more than at work.............tha

t goes unnoticed....
Don't be so blind and naive.

What this actually means is that for years 11 people were doing the work of 4 and they have now been reduced to 6. (they'll keep the extra two on to cover 'sickness').
[quote][p][bold]georgina dean[/bold] wrote: THE OTHER SIDE IF THE STORY PLEASE..........just check how many staff have been released and the work loads increased and staffing halved...my grand daughter had 11 in their office....they are down to 6 now with the same work load.......so stressful and the abuse from the poublic is unbelieveable....... ....blaming the staff when they are under stress as well...........so please give both sides of a story........mind you the guy with council van near me is home more than at work.............tha t goes unnoticed....[/p][/quote]Don't be so blind and naive. What this actually means is that for years 11 people were doing the work of 4 and they have now been reduced to 6. (they'll keep the extra two on to cover 'sickness'). scrumpyjack
  • Score: 0

1:04pm Wed 21 Nov 12

loftusrod says...

crispy_pants wrote:
One of the biggest issues here is that Local government, National government and NHS will seemingly never sack anyone for abusing the sickness benefit. That, along with always spending their budgets (our money) before the end of March is why they cost us so much.
I'm looking forward to the annual roadworks in the Spring; perhaps this time they'll actually do the roads that need it....
[quote][p][bold]crispy_pants[/bold] wrote: One of the biggest issues here is that Local government, National government and NHS will seemingly never sack anyone for abusing the sickness benefit. That, along with always spending their budgets (our money) before the end of March is why they cost us so much.[/p][/quote]I'm looking forward to the annual roadworks in the Spring; perhaps this time they'll actually do the roads that need it.... loftusrod
  • Score: 0

1:05pm Wed 21 Nov 12

scrumpyjack says...

Sue001 wrote:
Just reading what the echo reporters say in this paper, and the feedback from readers is enough to undermine all council worker and cause them to feel hugely undervalued, The vast majority of council employees put in 110% and are abused by the public on a daily basis. Stress is enormous, and stress attacks the immune system so wherever there is a weakness, that's where it'll strike resulting in sick leave.
They're not 'undervalued' the abuse is because people in the real world are aware of these 'workers' and their actual 'worth'.
[quote][p][bold]Sue001[/bold] wrote: Just reading what the echo reporters say in this paper, and the feedback from readers is enough to undermine all council worker and cause them to feel hugely undervalued, The vast majority of council employees put in 110% and are abused by the public on a daily basis. Stress is enormous, and stress attacks the immune system so wherever there is a weakness, that's where it'll strike resulting in sick leave.[/p][/quote]They're not 'undervalued' the abuse is because people in the real world are aware of these 'workers' and their actual 'worth'. scrumpyjack
  • Score: 0

1:17pm Wed 21 Nov 12

David Hayes says...

Sadly 'stress' is the proverbial cop out. I know of many council employees who have taken advantage of the six months full pay when 'sick'.

As most in the private sector don't get sick pay full stop why should we fund that luxury for the public sector.
Sadly 'stress' is the proverbial cop out. I know of many council employees who have taken advantage of the six months full pay when 'sick'. As most in the private sector don't get sick pay full stop why should we fund that luxury for the public sector. David Hayes
  • Score: 0

1:21pm Wed 21 Nov 12

Phixer says...

georgina dean wrote:
THE OTHER SIDE IF THE STORY PLEASE..........just check how many staff have been released and the work loads increased and staffing halved...my grand daughter had 11 in their office....they are down to 6 now with the same work load.......so stressful and the abuse from the poublic is unbelieveable.......

....blaming the staff when they are under stress as well...........so please give both sides of a story........mind you the guy with council van near me is home more than at work.............tha

t goes unnoticed....
If you cared to pull your head out of the sand you would find that our illustrious public sector workers don't know when they are well-off. All of your comments apply equally to private sector workers - you know, those of us that pay council workers salaries, pensions and sickness benefit.

Do you seriously think that private sector workers take nearly as much time off sick or do not have to suffer abuse from the public?
[quote][p][bold]georgina dean[/bold] wrote: THE OTHER SIDE IF THE STORY PLEASE..........just check how many staff have been released and the work loads increased and staffing halved...my grand daughter had 11 in their office....they are down to 6 now with the same work load.......so stressful and the abuse from the poublic is unbelieveable....... ....blaming the staff when they are under stress as well...........so please give both sides of a story........mind you the guy with council van near me is home more than at work.............tha t goes unnoticed....[/p][/quote]If you cared to pull your head out of the sand you would find that our illustrious public sector workers don't know when they are well-off. All of your comments apply equally to private sector workers - you know, those of us that pay council workers salaries, pensions and sickness benefit. Do you seriously think that private sector workers take nearly as much time off sick or do not have to suffer abuse from the public? Phixer
  • Score: 0

1:27pm Wed 21 Nov 12

Phixer says...

Sue001 wrote:
Just reading what the echo reporters say in this paper, and the feedback from readers is enough to undermine all council worker and cause them to feel hugely undervalued, The vast majority of council employees put in 110% and are abused by the public on a daily basis. Stress is enormous, and stress attacks the immune system so wherever there is a weakness, that's where it'll strike resulting in sick leave.
And how is that different to many workers in the private sector? Salary reductions, higher tax payments, longer hours - and they still have to fund a bloated public sector that doesn't suffer the same stress.

"The vast majority of council employees .... are abused by the public on a daily basis."

That is a serious allegation; I presume you are able to justify your comments, perhaps in a court of law if a member of the public chooses to sue.
[quote][p][bold]Sue001[/bold] wrote: Just reading what the echo reporters say in this paper, and the feedback from readers is enough to undermine all council worker and cause them to feel hugely undervalued, The vast majority of council employees put in 110% and are abused by the public on a daily basis. Stress is enormous, and stress attacks the immune system so wherever there is a weakness, that's where it'll strike resulting in sick leave.[/p][/quote]And how is that different to many workers in the private sector? Salary reductions, higher tax payments, longer hours - and they still have to fund a bloated public sector that doesn't suffer the same stress. "The vast majority of council employees .... are abused by the public on a daily basis." That is a serious allegation; I presume you are able to justify your comments, perhaps in a court of law if a member of the public chooses to sue. Phixer
  • Score: 0

1:57pm Wed 21 Nov 12

coster says...

Sorry Sue 001, stress is a personal problem, if you are not up to the job then relieve it by changing to another. Abused on a daily basis? difficult to believe, you must really look into your interface with those you meet.
Sorry Sue 001, stress is a personal problem, if you are not up to the job then relieve it by changing to another. Abused on a daily basis? difficult to believe, you must really look into your interface with those you meet. coster
  • Score: 0

2:10pm Wed 21 Nov 12

HRH of Boscombe says...

scoooobles wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
BarrHumbug wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
aerolover wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.
Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.
Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?
No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.
I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness. I would also only get statutory maternity pay. Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract.
I would look for a better employer if I were you or negotiate a little better when offered a position. It's a lot easier to do in skilled roles.
.
I really am gobsmacked by some of the entitlements people have commented here. I've always seen it as standard that you're paid when off sick on a perm salary position in the private sector.
.
The handsome pay is when you temp or contract and forfeit holiday and sick pay. I would tell your employer it's one or the other Jack.
[quote][p][bold]scoooobles[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BarrHumbug[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]aerolover[/bold] wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.[/p][/quote]Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.[/p][/quote]Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?[/p][/quote]No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.[/p][/quote]I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness. I would also only get statutory maternity pay. Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract.[/p][/quote]I would look for a better employer if I were you or negotiate a little better when offered a position. It's a lot easier to do in skilled roles. . I really am gobsmacked by some of the entitlements people have commented here. I've always seen it as standard that you're paid when off sick on a perm salary position in the private sector. . The handsome pay is when you temp or contract and forfeit holiday and sick pay. I would tell your employer it's one or the other Jack. HRH of Boscombe
  • Score: 0

2:26pm Wed 21 Nov 12

iampuzzled says...

Amusing, an article, almost word for word with only names changed 'to protect the innocent' appeared today on the Dorset Echo website at http://www.dorsetech
o.co.uk/news/1006093
4.Sick_days_shocker_
as_county_council_is
_almost_twice_nation
al_average/?action=s
uccess
Amusing, an article, almost word for word with only names changed 'to protect the innocent' appeared today on the Dorset Echo website at http://www.dorsetech o.co.uk/news/1006093 4.Sick_days_shocker_ as_county_council_is _almost_twice_nation al_average/?action=s uccess iampuzzled
  • Score: 0

2:38pm Wed 21 Nov 12

Imaximus says...

georgina dean wrote:
THE OTHER SIDE IF THE STORY PLEASE..........just check how many staff have been released and the work loads increased and staffing halved...my grand daughter had 11 in their office....they are down to 6 now with the same work load.......so stressful and the abuse from the poublic is unbelieveable.......

....blaming the staff when they are under stress as well...........so please give both sides of a story........mind you the guy with council van near me is home more than at work.............tha

t goes unnoticed....
How........many.....
.....dots........can
....................
.....I.....get......
.in......here.......
............?
[quote][p][bold]georgina dean[/bold] wrote: THE OTHER SIDE IF THE STORY PLEASE..........just check how many staff have been released and the work loads increased and staffing halved...my grand daughter had 11 in their office....they are down to 6 now with the same work load.......so stressful and the abuse from the poublic is unbelieveable....... ....blaming the staff when they are under stress as well...........so please give both sides of a story........mind you the guy with council van near me is home more than at work.............tha t goes unnoticed....[/p][/quote]How........many..... .....dots........can .................... .....I.....get...... .in......here....... ............? Imaximus
  • Score: 0

2:55pm Wed 21 Nov 12

BmthNewshound says...

Public sector workers have had it easy for years, now they're being expected to put in a full days work for a full days pay they're complaining of stress. Whenever I have had dealings with town hall staff in Bournemouth the standard of service provided has been pretty poor - emails go unanswered, phone calls more often than not go to voicemail and messages go unanswered. If my business treated our clients with such contempt we'd be out of business in no time.
.
Question is if public sector sick pay wasn't so generous would the levels of sickness by so high - highly unlikely.
.
People working in the public sector are fortunate to have a greater level of job security than in the private sector, all though we were told that public sector workers would have a wage freeze pay rises have continued to be paid due to long standing agreements, and public sector workers receive very generous pensions compared to their private sector counterparts.
.
Stress isn't a bigger workload. Stress is knowing that if you don't win that next contract you won't be able to pay your staff or your mortgage - or getting to the end of the month and realising that once you've handed over money to HMRC, suppliers, and paid your staff theres nothing left in the pot to pay yourself.
.
Public sector moaning minnies make me sick.
Public sector workers have had it easy for years, now they're being expected to put in a full days work for a full days pay they're complaining of stress. Whenever I have had dealings with town hall staff in Bournemouth the standard of service provided has been pretty poor - emails go unanswered, phone calls more often than not go to voicemail and messages go unanswered. If my business treated our clients with such contempt we'd be out of business in no time. . Question is if public sector sick pay wasn't so generous would the levels of sickness by so high - highly unlikely. . People working in the public sector are fortunate to have a greater level of job security than in the private sector, all though we were told that public sector workers would have a wage freeze pay rises have continued to be paid due to long standing agreements, and public sector workers receive very generous pensions compared to their private sector counterparts. . Stress isn't a bigger workload. Stress is knowing that if you don't win that next contract you won't be able to pay your staff or your mortgage - or getting to the end of the month and realising that once you've handed over money to HMRC, suppliers, and paid your staff theres nothing left in the pot to pay yourself. . Public sector moaning minnies make me sick. BmthNewshound
  • Score: 1

3:17pm Wed 21 Nov 12

HRH of Boscombe says...

David Hayes wrote:
Sadly 'stress' is the proverbial cop out. I know of many council employees who have taken advantage of the six months full pay when 'sick'. As most in the private sector don't get sick pay full stop why should we fund that luxury for the public sector.
So wrong. As I've said; I've worked in the private sector over 20yrs and full sick pay has always been standard.
.
I think far too many here are confused with casual labour jobs. They may be fulltime and payed monthly but if you look at the employment status it'll probably be casual.
[quote][p][bold]David Hayes[/bold] wrote: Sadly 'stress' is the proverbial cop out. I know of many council employees who have taken advantage of the six months full pay when 'sick'. As most in the private sector don't get sick pay full stop why should we fund that luxury for the public sector.[/p][/quote]So wrong. As I've said; I've worked in the private sector over 20yrs and full sick pay has always been standard. . I think far too many here are confused with casual labour jobs. They may be fulltime and payed monthly but if you look at the employment status it'll probably be casual. HRH of Boscombe
  • Score: 0

3:21pm Wed 21 Nov 12

scoooobles says...

HRH of Boscombe wrote:
scoooobles wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
BarrHumbug wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
aerolover wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.
Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.
Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?
No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.
I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness. I would also only get statutory maternity pay. Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract.
I would look for a better employer if I were you or negotiate a little better when offered a position. It's a lot easier to do in skilled roles. . I really am gobsmacked by some of the entitlements people have commented here. I've always seen it as standard that you're paid when off sick on a perm salary position in the private sector. . The handsome pay is when you temp or contract and forfeit holiday and sick pay. I would tell your employer it's one or the other Jack.
or I could keep my job which I really need.
[quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scoooobles[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BarrHumbug[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]aerolover[/bold] wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.[/p][/quote]Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.[/p][/quote]Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?[/p][/quote]No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.[/p][/quote]I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness. I would also only get statutory maternity pay. Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract.[/p][/quote]I would look for a better employer if I were you or negotiate a little better when offered a position. It's a lot easier to do in skilled roles. . I really am gobsmacked by some of the entitlements people have commented here. I've always seen it as standard that you're paid when off sick on a perm salary position in the private sector. . The handsome pay is when you temp or contract and forfeit holiday and sick pay. I would tell your employer it's one or the other Jack.[/p][/quote]or I could keep my job which I really need. scoooobles
  • Score: 0

3:22pm Wed 21 Nov 12

4FoxAche says...

Slackers, the lot of 'em. What a bunch of idle good for nothing layabouts. Shame on them all.
Slackers, the lot of 'em. What a bunch of idle good for nothing layabouts. Shame on them all. 4FoxAche
  • Score: 0

3:30pm Wed 21 Nov 12

Daffodil2 says...

Having worked in both the public and private sectors, I think its safe to say there are workers and shirkers in both! The problem for the public sector is that rules and regulations handed down from above makes it very difficult to 'punish' those with bad sickness record (stress or otherwise).
Having worked in both the public and private sectors, I think its safe to say there are workers and shirkers in both! The problem for the public sector is that rules and regulations handed down from above makes it very difficult to 'punish' those with bad sickness record (stress or otherwise). Daffodil2
  • Score: 0

3:34pm Wed 21 Nov 12

HRH of Boscombe says...

scoooobles wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
scoooobles wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
BarrHumbug wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
aerolover wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.
Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.
Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?
No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.
I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness. I would also only get statutory maternity pay. Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract.
I would look for a better employer if I were you or negotiate a little better when offered a position. It's a lot easier to do in skilled roles. . I really am gobsmacked by some of the entitlements people have commented here. I've always seen it as standard that you're paid when off sick on a perm salary position in the private sector. . The handsome pay is when you temp or contract and forfeit holiday and sick pay. I would tell your employer it's one or the other Jack.
or I could keep my job which I really need.
Then I have no sympathy. So naive. You wouldn't quit then look. If you're not getting the benefits you deserve from a job start applying for others quietly. Too many people on this site moan about how hard they have it but won't bother to look for something better.
[quote][p][bold]scoooobles[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scoooobles[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BarrHumbug[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]aerolover[/bold] wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.[/p][/quote]Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.[/p][/quote]Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?[/p][/quote]No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.[/p][/quote]I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness. I would also only get statutory maternity pay. Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract.[/p][/quote]I would look for a better employer if I were you or negotiate a little better when offered a position. It's a lot easier to do in skilled roles. . I really am gobsmacked by some of the entitlements people have commented here. I've always seen it as standard that you're paid when off sick on a perm salary position in the private sector. . The handsome pay is when you temp or contract and forfeit holiday and sick pay. I would tell your employer it's one or the other Jack.[/p][/quote]or I could keep my job which I really need.[/p][/quote]Then I have no sympathy. So naive. You wouldn't quit then look. If you're not getting the benefits you deserve from a job start applying for others quietly. Too many people on this site moan about how hard they have it but won't bother to look for something better. HRH of Boscombe
  • Score: 0

3:57pm Wed 21 Nov 12

justsayithowitis says...

HRH of Boscombe wrote:
scoooobles wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
scoooobles wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
BarrHumbug wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
aerolover wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.
Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.
Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?
No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.
I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness. I would also only get statutory maternity pay. Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract.
I would look for a better employer if I were you or negotiate a little better when offered a position. It's a lot easier to do in skilled roles. . I really am gobsmacked by some of the entitlements people have commented here. I've always seen it as standard that you're paid when off sick on a perm salary position in the private sector. . The handsome pay is when you temp or contract and forfeit holiday and sick pay. I would tell your employer it's one or the other Jack.
or I could keep my job which I really need.
Then I have no sympathy. So naive. You wouldn't quit then look. If you're not getting the benefits you deserve from a job start applying for others quietly. Too many people on this site moan about how hard they have it but won't bother to look for something better.
There are not many jobs out there and certainly not full time ones. Life is not quite as easy as you think
[quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scoooobles[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scoooobles[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BarrHumbug[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]aerolover[/bold] wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.[/p][/quote]Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.[/p][/quote]Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?[/p][/quote]No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.[/p][/quote]I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness. I would also only get statutory maternity pay. Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract.[/p][/quote]I would look for a better employer if I were you or negotiate a little better when offered a position. It's a lot easier to do in skilled roles. . I really am gobsmacked by some of the entitlements people have commented here. I've always seen it as standard that you're paid when off sick on a perm salary position in the private sector. . The handsome pay is when you temp or contract and forfeit holiday and sick pay. I would tell your employer it's one or the other Jack.[/p][/quote]or I could keep my job which I really need.[/p][/quote]Then I have no sympathy. So naive. You wouldn't quit then look. If you're not getting the benefits you deserve from a job start applying for others quietly. Too many people on this site moan about how hard they have it but won't bother to look for something better.[/p][/quote]There are not many jobs out there and certainly not full time ones. Life is not quite as easy as you think justsayithowitis
  • Score: 0

4:00pm Wed 21 Nov 12

muscliffman says...

In my experience full pay when off sick is increasingly unusual in the private-sector - certainly post 1990s. Very few new contracts for lower/mid level staff will have full or indeed any sick pay (outside SSP) within the contracts.

The public sector enjoys strong Union representation and this inevtiably creates favourable links with one 'flavour' of Government for these employees - hence full sick pay and those 'barking mad' pensions. The present national administration is not their sort of course.

In respect of the local Town Hall, is it not a shame some staff were not 'stressed' about the quality of Council contract discharge in respect of several recent projects including that 'b' reef, Boscombe Pier, the shingle sand etc etc. But maybe they were just off sick on full pay at the time - would explain a lot!
In my experience full pay when off sick is increasingly unusual in the private-sector - certainly post 1990s. Very few new contracts for lower/mid level staff will have full or indeed any sick pay (outside SSP) within the contracts. The public sector enjoys strong Union representation and this inevtiably creates favourable links with one 'flavour' of Government for these employees - hence full sick pay and those 'barking mad' pensions. The present national administration is not their sort of course. In respect of the local Town Hall, is it not a shame some staff were not 'stressed' about the quality of Council contract discharge in respect of several recent projects including that 'b' reef, Boscombe Pier, the shingle sand etc etc. But maybe they were just off sick on full pay at the time - would explain a lot! muscliffman
  • Score: 0

4:14pm Wed 21 Nov 12

s-pb2 says...

geoffro wrote:
stress they don't know the meaning of the word
I think those in the two social cares and having to keep their clients safe and even alive, with constant cuts and lack of facilities, have a pretty fair idea of what the word means more than most of us do.
[quote][p][bold]geoffro[/bold] wrote: stress they don't know the meaning of the word[/p][/quote]I think those in the two social cares and having to keep their clients safe and even alive, with constant cuts and lack of facilities, have a pretty fair idea of what the word means more than most of us do. s-pb2
  • Score: 0

4:16pm Wed 21 Nov 12

s-pb2 says...

ctrewyou wrote:
jeebuscripes wrote:
9 days is the average. There'll be some staff with huge sickness periods.
Exactly. Which means that the vast majority of staff dont take any time off sick at all.
And some in a large organisation will always have very long periods of sickness sometimes due to debilitating illnesses or even sadly terminal illnesses
[quote][p][bold]ctrewyou[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]jeebuscripes[/bold] wrote: 9 days is the average. There'll be some staff with huge sickness periods.[/p][/quote]Exactly. Which means that the vast majority of staff dont take any time off sick at all.[/p][/quote]And some in a large organisation will always have very long periods of sickness sometimes due to debilitating illnesses or even sadly terminal illnesses s-pb2
  • Score: 0

4:17pm Wed 21 Nov 12

username is already in use says...

its one big gravy train, easiest jobs going
its one big gravy train, easiest jobs going username is already in use
  • Score: 0

4:22pm Wed 21 Nov 12

Boredofthiscountry says...

georgina dean wrote:
THE OTHER SIDE IF THE STORY PLEASE..........just check how many staff have been released and the work loads increased and staffing halved...my grand daughter had 11 in their office....they are down to 6 now with the same work load.......so stressful and the abuse from the poublic is unbelieveable.......

....blaming the staff when they are under stress as well...........so please give both sides of a story........mind you the guy with council van near me is home more than at work.............tha

t goes unnoticed....
I work in a supermarket and the abuse from the public is just as bad, they constantly send people home because they have to save hours, but employ people to make it look good, My job is unbelievably stressful, but I don't take time off sick because I can't afford to, I don't get paid for the 1st 3 day's off sick!
[quote][p][bold]georgina dean[/bold] wrote: THE OTHER SIDE IF THE STORY PLEASE..........just check how many staff have been released and the work loads increased and staffing halved...my grand daughter had 11 in their office....they are down to 6 now with the same work load.......so stressful and the abuse from the poublic is unbelieveable....... ....blaming the staff when they are under stress as well...........so please give both sides of a story........mind you the guy with council van near me is home more than at work.............tha t goes unnoticed....[/p][/quote]I work in a supermarket and the abuse from the public is just as bad, they constantly send people home because they have to save hours, but employ people to make it look good, My job is unbelievably stressful, but I don't take time off sick because I can't afford to, I don't get paid for the 1st 3 day's off sick! Boredofthiscountry
  • Score: 0

4:38pm Wed 21 Nov 12

s-pb2 says...

Lets get one thing straight here. Its the union who are SPECULATING that illnesses COULD BE stress related. In other words the union are trying to score points off or get one up on their employers.

From what I can see there is no evidence in this article to suggest that stress is the main cause of sickness here. There can be all sorts of factors at work here as to why sickness levels are at this level. I can speculate just as much as the unions and suggest that maybe there are a number of people within the council suffering from long term illnesses, anything from depression or physical injuries, through to terminal illnesses. There is no evidence here to say why its gone up, but lets that not get in the way of the Echo doing an anti-council story, yet when the council does achieve something very impressive the Echo does not report it.

For the record i have worked in the public sector before but now work in the private sector, and recognise the incredible dedication from people in both sectors of work.
Lets get one thing straight here. Its the union who are SPECULATING that illnesses COULD BE stress related. In other words the union are trying to score points off or get one up on their employers. From what I can see there is no evidence in this article to suggest that stress is the main cause of sickness here. There can be all sorts of factors at work here as to why sickness levels are at this level. I can speculate just as much as the unions and suggest that maybe there are a number of people within the council suffering from long term illnesses, anything from depression or physical injuries, through to terminal illnesses. There is no evidence here to say why its gone up, but lets that not get in the way of the Echo doing an anti-council story, yet when the council does achieve something very impressive the Echo does not report it. For the record i have worked in the public sector before but now work in the private sector, and recognise the incredible dedication from people in both sectors of work. s-pb2
  • Score: 0

4:40pm Wed 21 Nov 12

David Hayes says...

HRH of Boscombe wrote:
David Hayes wrote:
Sadly 'stress' is the proverbial cop out. I know of many council employees who have taken advantage of the six months full pay when 'sick'. As most in the private sector don't get sick pay full stop why should we fund that luxury for the public sector.
So wrong. As I've said; I've worked in the private sector over 20yrs and full sick pay has always been standard.
.
I think far too many here are confused with casual labour jobs. They may be fulltime and payed monthly but if you look at the employment status it'll probably be casual.
I m not confused ..I can state what I see from friends and family....the majority do NOT get sick pay!!!

I appreciate some companies offer sick pay but I work for a company that does not. I dont mind as I am not sick very often plus understand being a family firm that they could not afford to pay people when sick...

its part of life which a few public sector workers do NOT understand
[quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]David Hayes[/bold] wrote: Sadly 'stress' is the proverbial cop out. I know of many council employees who have taken advantage of the six months full pay when 'sick'. As most in the private sector don't get sick pay full stop why should we fund that luxury for the public sector.[/p][/quote]So wrong. As I've said; I've worked in the private sector over 20yrs and full sick pay has always been standard. . I think far too many here are confused with casual labour jobs. They may be fulltime and payed monthly but if you look at the employment status it'll probably be casual.[/p][/quote]I m not confused ..I can state what I see from friends and family....the majority do NOT get sick pay!!! I appreciate some companies offer sick pay but I work for a company that does not. I dont mind as I am not sick very often plus understand being a family firm that they could not afford to pay people when sick... its part of life which a few public sector workers do NOT understand David Hayes
  • Score: 0

5:15pm Wed 21 Nov 12

s-pb2 says...

David Hayes wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
David Hayes wrote:
Sadly 'stress' is the proverbial cop out. I know of many council employees who have taken advantage of the six months full pay when 'sick'. As most in the private sector don't get sick pay full stop why should we fund that luxury for the public sector.
So wrong. As I've said; I've worked in the private sector over 20yrs and full sick pay has always been standard.
.
I think far too many here are confused with casual labour jobs. They may be fulltime and payed monthly but if you look at the employment status it'll probably be casual.
I m not confused ..I can state what I see from friends and family....the majority do NOT get sick pay!!!

I appreciate some companies offer sick pay but I work for a company that does not. I dont mind as I am not sick very often plus understand being a family firm that they could not afford to pay people when sick...

its part of life which a few public sector workers do NOT understand
Its the unions speculating illness levels are due to stress. There is no evidence in the article to say that stress is a factor. In fact Ive never heard of anyone public sector or private sector take time off and admit its because of stress
[quote][p][bold]David Hayes[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]David Hayes[/bold] wrote: Sadly 'stress' is the proverbial cop out. I know of many council employees who have taken advantage of the six months full pay when 'sick'. As most in the private sector don't get sick pay full stop why should we fund that luxury for the public sector.[/p][/quote]So wrong. As I've said; I've worked in the private sector over 20yrs and full sick pay has always been standard. . I think far too many here are confused with casual labour jobs. They may be fulltime and payed monthly but if you look at the employment status it'll probably be casual.[/p][/quote]I m not confused ..I can state what I see from friends and family....the majority do NOT get sick pay!!! I appreciate some companies offer sick pay but I work for a company that does not. I dont mind as I am not sick very often plus understand being a family firm that they could not afford to pay people when sick... its part of life which a few public sector workers do NOT understand[/p][/quote]Its the unions speculating illness levels are due to stress. There is no evidence in the article to say that stress is a factor. In fact Ive never heard of anyone public sector or private sector take time off and admit its because of stress s-pb2
  • Score: 0

6:06pm Wed 21 Nov 12

Yankee1 says...

'Surf reef'

'IMAX'

'Twin Sails Bridge'

'Iconic'

'Portfolio Holder'

I think we have what can be termed a '****-take' going on here.

And we pay for it, and buy their 'surfreefIMAXIconicT
winSailBridgePortfol
ioHolde' tripe.

Vote the elected ones out, and demand work from the others.
'Surf reef' 'IMAX' 'Twin Sails Bridge' 'Iconic' 'Portfolio Holder' I think we have what can be termed a '****-take' going on here. And we pay for it, and buy their 'surfreefIMAXIconicT winSailBridgePortfol ioHolde' tripe. Vote the elected ones out, and demand work from the others. Yankee1
  • Score: 0

7:58pm Wed 21 Nov 12

AnastasiaB says...

Now many of the above comments are so way off the mark it is untrue. Unless you have ever suffered from stress you do not know how much of your life is destroyed. It can build slowly and crash suddenly. So s-pb2 I would get out more as there a very large number who will tell you different. This situation has been buliding up for years and BBCouncil did nothing about it. Now is crunch time. Staff turnover has been enormous which very telling. Much that is going on in the Pubic Sector has already happened in the Private Sector.
Now many of the above comments are so way off the mark it is untrue. Unless you have ever suffered from stress you do not know how much of your life is destroyed. It can build slowly and crash suddenly. So s-pb2 I would get out more as there a very large number who will tell you different. This situation has been buliding up for years and BBCouncil did nothing about it. Now is crunch time. Staff turnover has been enormous which very telling. Much that is going on in the Pubic Sector has already happened in the Private Sector. AnastasiaB
  • Score: 0

8:50pm Wed 21 Nov 12

pete woodley says...

just what has been going on in the "pubic" sector.
just what has been going on in the "pubic" sector. pete woodley
  • Score: 0

9:45pm Wed 21 Nov 12

Bomo JP says...

See the usual i dont get it you shouldn't brigade are on here. grow a pair stand up for yourself or join a union. Let employers take the **** and they will bite your hand off
See the usual i dont get it you shouldn't brigade are on here. grow a pair stand up for yourself or join a union. Let employers take the **** and they will bite your hand off Bomo JP
  • Score: 0

9:46pm Wed 21 Nov 12

Dont drop litter says...

HRH of Boscombe wrote:
scoooobles wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
scoooobles wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
BarrHumbug wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
aerolover wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.
Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.
Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?
No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.
I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness. I would also only get statutory maternity pay. Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract.
I would look for a better employer if I were you or negotiate a little better when offered a position. It's a lot easier to do in skilled roles. . I really am gobsmacked by some of the entitlements people have commented here. I've always seen it as standard that you're paid when off sick on a perm salary position in the private sector. . The handsome pay is when you temp or contract and forfeit holiday and sick pay. I would tell your employer it's one or the other Jack.
or I could keep my job which I really need.
Then I have no sympathy. So naive. You wouldn't quit then look. If you're not getting the benefits you deserve from a job start applying for others quietly. Too many people on this site moan about how hard they have it but won't bother to look for something better.
HRH, I am not sure which dream world you live in, but life's not currently like that.
I have never had paid sick leave since I started working 25years ago.
In fact, aside from 5 days off to recover from an operation I have never had a day off through illness. If you don't get paid, you go to work.
I could try 'renegotiating' with my employer but somehow I feel I may end up with me being considered 'unreliable'.
I've also applied for and had interviews for other positions. Unfortunately with so many unemployed or graduates willing to work for less, those jobs aren't that forthcoming.
[quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scoooobles[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scoooobles[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BarrHumbug[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]aerolover[/bold] wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.[/p][/quote]Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.[/p][/quote]Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?[/p][/quote]No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.[/p][/quote]I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness. I would also only get statutory maternity pay. Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract.[/p][/quote]I would look for a better employer if I were you or negotiate a little better when offered a position. It's a lot easier to do in skilled roles. . I really am gobsmacked by some of the entitlements people have commented here. I've always seen it as standard that you're paid when off sick on a perm salary position in the private sector. . The handsome pay is when you temp or contract and forfeit holiday and sick pay. I would tell your employer it's one or the other Jack.[/p][/quote]or I could keep my job which I really need.[/p][/quote]Then I have no sympathy. So naive. You wouldn't quit then look. If you're not getting the benefits you deserve from a job start applying for others quietly. Too many people on this site moan about how hard they have it but won't bother to look for something better.[/p][/quote]HRH, I am not sure which dream world you live in, but life's not currently like that. I have never had paid sick leave since I started working 25years ago. In fact, aside from 5 days off to recover from an operation I have never had a day off through illness. If you don't get paid, you go to work. I could try 'renegotiating' with my employer but somehow I feel I may end up with me being considered 'unreliable'. I've also applied for and had interviews for other positions. Unfortunately with so many unemployed or graduates willing to work for less, those jobs aren't that forthcoming. Dont drop litter
  • Score: 0

9:51pm Wed 21 Nov 12

Wintonian says...

There is an awful lot of missing information in this story, and a lot of rubbish as usual from the commenters.

For a start, we are not told if it was a bad year for colds and flu, in which case every organisation would have increased absence, or if it was an average or 'good' year for sickness across the board, in which case the councils' performance would appear questionable.

However, in any case, those of us who do work at the Town Hall can easily see how it all happens. In services where a 'job evaluation' exercise was carried out a few years ago resulting in many people's salaries being lowered sometimes by a few grand, a lot of those staff left and many posts were not refilled. This has resulted in the reamining staff reguarly working with next to no slack in the system whatsoever. That makes it difficult to manage hours (we are not supposed to carry forward more than 20 hours flexi per month but many people do, because otherwise the work doesn't get done, and of course then there's less and less time to get the hours back) and, yes, people will get stressed.

In times of very low morale which is quite tangible in the Town Hall, people will I'm sure be less worried about taking time off sick where previously they might have battled it out.

Add to that a third year of pay-freeze with ever spiralling outgoings (which I know is the same for all sectors) particularly the high cost of travelling to or parking in a town centre location, and people will be even less loyal to their employer.

I'm sure in every office or building site or wherever, there are those truly dedicated to their work and those who will do the minimum required to stay in their job, and everything in between. Drop morale sufficiently and you will see more people veer towards the latter end of that scale.

In summary, it doesn't surprise me, although nowhere in the article does it state whether this was due to some flu epidemic or whatever and in fact was felt in all walks of employment.
There is an awful lot of missing information in this story, and a lot of rubbish as usual from the commenters. For a start, we are not told if it was a bad year for colds and flu, in which case every organisation would have increased absence, or if it was an average or 'good' year for sickness across the board, in which case the councils' performance would appear questionable. However, in any case, those of us who do work at the Town Hall can easily see how it all happens. In services where a 'job evaluation' exercise was carried out a few years ago resulting in many people's salaries being lowered sometimes by a few grand, a lot of those staff left and many posts were not refilled. This has resulted in the reamining staff reguarly working with next to no slack in the system whatsoever. That makes it difficult to manage hours (we are not supposed to carry forward more than 20 hours flexi per month but many people do, because otherwise the work doesn't get done, and of course then there's less and less time to get the hours back) and, yes, people will get stressed. In times of very low morale which is quite tangible in the Town Hall, people will I'm sure be less worried about taking time off sick where previously they might have battled it out. Add to that a third year of pay-freeze with ever spiralling outgoings (which I know is the same for all sectors) particularly the high cost of travelling to or parking in a town centre location, and people will be even less loyal to their employer. I'm sure in every office or building site or wherever, there are those truly dedicated to their work and those who will do the minimum required to stay in their job, and everything in between. Drop morale sufficiently and you will see more people veer towards the latter end of that scale. In summary, it doesn't surprise me, although nowhere in the article does it state whether this was due to some flu epidemic or whatever and in fact was felt in all walks of employment. Wintonian
  • Score: 0

10:19pm Wed 21 Nov 12

HRH of Boscombe says...

David Hayes wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
David Hayes wrote:
Sadly 'stress' is the proverbial cop out. I know of many council employees who have taken advantage of the six months full pay when 'sick'. As most in the private sector don't get sick pay full stop why should we fund that luxury for the public sector.
So wrong. As I've said; I've worked in the private sector over 20yrs and full sick pay has always been standard.
.
I think far too many here are confused with casual labour jobs. They may be fulltime and payed monthly but if you look at the employment status it'll probably be casual.
I m not confused ..I can state what I see from friends and family....the majority do NOT get sick pay!!!

I appreciate some companies offer sick pay but I work for a company that does not. I dont mind as I am not sick very often plus understand being a family firm that they could not afford to pay people when sick...

its part of life which a few public sector workers do NOT understand
Missed the point entirely!! Ask them to look at their employment status. It'll be casual I'm sure.
[quote][p][bold]David Hayes[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]David Hayes[/bold] wrote: Sadly 'stress' is the proverbial cop out. I know of many council employees who have taken advantage of the six months full pay when 'sick'. As most in the private sector don't get sick pay full stop why should we fund that luxury for the public sector.[/p][/quote]So wrong. As I've said; I've worked in the private sector over 20yrs and full sick pay has always been standard. . I think far too many here are confused with casual labour jobs. They may be fulltime and payed monthly but if you look at the employment status it'll probably be casual.[/p][/quote]I m not confused ..I can state what I see from friends and family....the majority do NOT get sick pay!!! I appreciate some companies offer sick pay but I work for a company that does not. I dont mind as I am not sick very often plus understand being a family firm that they could not afford to pay people when sick... its part of life which a few public sector workers do NOT understand[/p][/quote]Missed the point entirely!! Ask them to look at their employment status. It'll be casual I'm sure. HRH of Boscombe
  • Score: 0

10:39pm Wed 21 Nov 12

HRH of Boscombe says...

justsayithowitis wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
scoooobles wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
scoooobles wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
BarrHumbug wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
aerolover wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.
Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.
Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?
No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.
I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness. I would also only get statutory maternity pay. Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract.
I would look for a better employer if I were you or negotiate a little better when offered a position. It's a lot easier to do in skilled roles. . I really am gobsmacked by some of the entitlements people have commented here. I've always seen it as standard that you're paid when off sick on a perm salary position in the private sector. . The handsome pay is when you temp or contract and forfeit holiday and sick pay. I would tell your employer it's one or the other Jack.
or I could keep my job which I really need.
Then I have no sympathy. So naive. You wouldn't quit then look. If you're not getting the benefits you deserve from a job start applying for others quietly. Too many people on this site moan about how hard they have it but won't bother to look for something better.
There are not many jobs out there and certainly not full time ones. Life is not quite as easy as you think
Quite right. That's why I work further afield.
.
Grow up. There's no decent jobs in Bournemouth. You're like wannabe hunters scared to go out of the back garden.
.
I know life isn't easy. I love Bournemouth. It's home and where I grew up and I have to do a lot of traveling and pay for a second home to be able to live here nicely.
[quote][p][bold]justsayithowitis[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scoooobles[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scoooobles[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BarrHumbug[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]aerolover[/bold] wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.[/p][/quote]Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.[/p][/quote]Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?[/p][/quote]No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.[/p][/quote]I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness. I would also only get statutory maternity pay. Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract.[/p][/quote]I would look for a better employer if I were you or negotiate a little better when offered a position. It's a lot easier to do in skilled roles. . I really am gobsmacked by some of the entitlements people have commented here. I've always seen it as standard that you're paid when off sick on a perm salary position in the private sector. . The handsome pay is when you temp or contract and forfeit holiday and sick pay. I would tell your employer it's one or the other Jack.[/p][/quote]or I could keep my job which I really need.[/p][/quote]Then I have no sympathy. So naive. You wouldn't quit then look. If you're not getting the benefits you deserve from a job start applying for others quietly. Too many people on this site moan about how hard they have it but won't bother to look for something better.[/p][/quote]There are not many jobs out there and certainly not full time ones. Life is not quite as easy as you think[/p][/quote]Quite right. That's why I work further afield. . Grow up. There's no decent jobs in Bournemouth. You're like wannabe hunters scared to go out of the back garden. . I know life isn't easy. I love Bournemouth. It's home and where I grew up and I have to do a lot of traveling and pay for a second home to be able to live here nicely. HRH of Boscombe
  • Score: 0

10:44pm Wed 21 Nov 12

HRH of Boscombe says...

Dont drop litter wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
scoooobles wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
scoooobles wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
BarrHumbug wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
aerolover wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.
Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.
Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?
No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.
I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness. I would also only get statutory maternity pay. Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract.
I would look for a better employer if I were you or negotiate a little better when offered a position. It's a lot easier to do in skilled roles. . I really am gobsmacked by some of the entitlements people have commented here. I've always seen it as standard that you're paid when off sick on a perm salary position in the private sector. . The handsome pay is when you temp or contract and forfeit holiday and sick pay. I would tell your employer it's one or the other Jack.
or I could keep my job which I really need.
Then I have no sympathy. So naive. You wouldn't quit then look. If you're not getting the benefits you deserve from a job start applying for others quietly. Too many people on this site moan about how hard they have it but won't bother to look for something better.
HRH, I am not sure which dream world you live in, but life's not currently like that.
I have never had paid sick leave since I started working 25years ago.
In fact, aside from 5 days off to recover from an operation I have never had a day off through illness. If you don't get paid, you go to work.
I could try 'renegotiating' with my employer but somehow I feel I may end up with me being considered 'unreliable'.
I've also applied for and had interviews for other positions. Unfortunately with so many unemployed or graduates willing to work for less, those jobs aren't that forthcoming.
Look at my previous comment just above. You're really not worth the effort.
[quote][p][bold]Dont drop litter[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scoooobles[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scoooobles[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BarrHumbug[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]aerolover[/bold] wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.[/p][/quote]Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.[/p][/quote]Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?[/p][/quote]No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.[/p][/quote]I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness. I would also only get statutory maternity pay. Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract.[/p][/quote]I would look for a better employer if I were you or negotiate a little better when offered a position. It's a lot easier to do in skilled roles. . I really am gobsmacked by some of the entitlements people have commented here. I've always seen it as standard that you're paid when off sick on a perm salary position in the private sector. . The handsome pay is when you temp or contract and forfeit holiday and sick pay. I would tell your employer it's one or the other Jack.[/p][/quote]or I could keep my job which I really need.[/p][/quote]Then I have no sympathy. So naive. You wouldn't quit then look. If you're not getting the benefits you deserve from a job start applying for others quietly. Too many people on this site moan about how hard they have it but won't bother to look for something better.[/p][/quote]HRH, I am not sure which dream world you live in, but life's not currently like that. I have never had paid sick leave since I started working 25years ago. In fact, aside from 5 days off to recover from an operation I have never had a day off through illness. If you don't get paid, you go to work. I could try 'renegotiating' with my employer but somehow I feel I may end up with me being considered 'unreliable'. I've also applied for and had interviews for other positions. Unfortunately with so many unemployed or graduates willing to work for less, those jobs aren't that forthcoming.[/p][/quote]Look at my previous comment just above. You're really not worth the effort. HRH of Boscombe
  • Score: 0

10:52pm Wed 21 Nov 12

dider1954 says...

I have a small firm with 10 employees, and all are full time.

If they are off sick they only get SSP.
I have a small firm with 10 employees, and all are full time. If they are off sick they only get SSP. dider1954
  • Score: 0

11:03pm Wed 21 Nov 12

David Hayes says...

dider1954 wrote:
I have a small firm with 10 employees, and all are full time.

If they are off sick they only get SSP.
Thats right Dider !!!

HRH of boscombe beleives they must all be on casual contracts

I work for small firm with 7 employees and we dont get paid for being sick...why because it adds another level of cost in a competitive environment...

I dont moan about not getting sick pay but it gets my goat when i see people at the town hall get six months full pay for having 'stress' or scared of spaces being paid for from my £120 month council tax!!!
[quote][p][bold]dider1954[/bold] wrote: I have a small firm with 10 employees, and all are full time. If they are off sick they only get SSP.[/p][/quote]Thats right Dider !!! HRH of boscombe beleives they must all be on casual contracts I work for small firm with 7 employees and we dont get paid for being sick...why because it adds another level of cost in a competitive environment... I dont moan about not getting sick pay but it gets my goat when i see people at the town hall get six months full pay for having 'stress' or scared of spaces being paid for from my £120 month council tax!!! David Hayes
  • Score: 0

11:05pm Wed 21 Nov 12

David Hayes says...

another quality excuse for time off paid is the council 'quiet time' for some employees - housing cough cough

working from home apparently catching up on paperwork lol
another quality excuse for time off paid is the council 'quiet time' for some employees - housing cough cough working from home apparently catching up on paperwork lol David Hayes
  • Score: 0

11:18pm Wed 21 Nov 12

pete woodley says...

Council staff stand by each other.
Council staff stand by each other. pete woodley
  • Score: 0

11:25pm Wed 21 Nov 12

s-pb2 says...

David Hayes wrote:
another quality excuse for time off paid is the council 'quiet time' for some employees - housing cough cough

working from home apparently catching up on paperwork lol
Yes its a disgrace that workers should spend time at home in catching up on paperwork to prepare reports for say court cases that will hugely effect peoples lives forever. They should be made to stay in noisy offices, answering the phone every 5 minutes!

Just get a grip you sound like a petulant child constantly whinging about you arent allowed to do it coz its not fair!
[quote][p][bold]David Hayes[/bold] wrote: another quality excuse for time off paid is the council 'quiet time' for some employees - housing cough cough working from home apparently catching up on paperwork lol[/p][/quote]Yes its a disgrace that workers should spend time at home in catching up on paperwork to prepare reports for say court cases that will hugely effect peoples lives forever. They should be made to stay in noisy offices, answering the phone every 5 minutes! Just get a grip you sound like a petulant child constantly whinging about you arent allowed to do it coz its not fair! s-pb2
  • Score: 0

11:47pm Wed 21 Nov 12

HRH of Boscombe says...

David Hayes wrote:
dider1954 wrote:
I have a small firm with 10 employees, and all are full time.

If they are off sick they only get SSP.
Thats right Dider !!!

HRH of boscombe beleives they must all be on casual contracts

I work for small firm with 7 employees and we dont get paid for being sick...why because it adds another level of cost in a competitive environment...

I dont moan about not getting sick pay but it gets my goat when i see people at the town hall get six months full pay for having 'stress' or scared of spaces being paid for from my £120 month council tax!!!
Wow can't believe you defend being an abused employee. What's the pension like? Private medical/dental? Share incentive scheme? Bonus?
[quote][p][bold]David Hayes[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]dider1954[/bold] wrote: I have a small firm with 10 employees, and all are full time. If they are off sick they only get SSP.[/p][/quote]Thats right Dider !!! HRH of boscombe beleives they must all be on casual contracts I work for small firm with 7 employees and we dont get paid for being sick...why because it adds another level of cost in a competitive environment... I dont moan about not getting sick pay but it gets my goat when i see people at the town hall get six months full pay for having 'stress' or scared of spaces being paid for from my £120 month council tax!!![/p][/quote]Wow can't believe you defend being an abused employee. What's the pension like? Private medical/dental? Share incentive scheme? Bonus? HRH of Boscombe
  • Score: 0

8:12am Thu 22 Nov 12

Lord Spring says...

Does Maternity Leave count as sick pay ?.


Also noted that one big regular one liner poster has not tuned into this debate.
Does Maternity Leave count as sick pay ?. Also noted that one big regular one liner poster has not tuned into this debate. Lord Spring
  • Score: 0

8:23am Thu 22 Nov 12

Eddie's dog says...

HRH of Boscombe wrote:
Dont drop litter wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
scoooobles wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
scoooobles wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
BarrHumbug wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
aerolover wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.
Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.
Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?
No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.
I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness. I would also only get statutory maternity pay. Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract.
I would look for a better employer if I were you or negotiate a little better when offered a position. It's a lot easier to do in skilled roles. . I really am gobsmacked by some of the entitlements people have commented here. I've always seen it as standard that you're paid when off sick on a perm salary position in the private sector. . The handsome pay is when you temp or contract and forfeit holiday and sick pay. I would tell your employer it's one or the other Jack.
or I could keep my job which I really need.
Then I have no sympathy. So naive. You wouldn't quit then look. If you're not getting the benefits you deserve from a job start applying for others quietly. Too many people on this site moan about how hard they have it but won't bother to look for something better.
HRH, I am not sure which dream world you live in, but life's not currently like that.
I have never had paid sick leave since I started working 25years ago.
In fact, aside from 5 days off to recover from an operation I have never had a day off through illness. If you don't get paid, you go to work.
I could try 'renegotiating' with my employer but somehow I feel I may end up with me being considered 'unreliable'.
I've also applied for and had interviews for other positions. Unfortunately with so many unemployed or graduates willing to work for less, those jobs aren't that forthcoming.
Look at my previous comment just above. You're really not worth the effort.
Please keep your 'discussions' going, emotive as they are - I want to know how the bordered quote thingy works when too many to illustrate..........
[quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dont drop litter[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scoooobles[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scoooobles[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BarrHumbug[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]aerolover[/bold] wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.[/p][/quote]Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.[/p][/quote]Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?[/p][/quote]No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.[/p][/quote]I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness. I would also only get statutory maternity pay. Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract.[/p][/quote]I would look for a better employer if I were you or negotiate a little better when offered a position. It's a lot easier to do in skilled roles. . I really am gobsmacked by some of the entitlements people have commented here. I've always seen it as standard that you're paid when off sick on a perm salary position in the private sector. . The handsome pay is when you temp or contract and forfeit holiday and sick pay. I would tell your employer it's one or the other Jack.[/p][/quote]or I could keep my job which I really need.[/p][/quote]Then I have no sympathy. So naive. You wouldn't quit then look. If you're not getting the benefits you deserve from a job start applying for others quietly. Too many people on this site moan about how hard they have it but won't bother to look for something better.[/p][/quote]HRH, I am not sure which dream world you live in, but life's not currently like that. I have never had paid sick leave since I started working 25years ago. In fact, aside from 5 days off to recover from an operation I have never had a day off through illness. If you don't get paid, you go to work. I could try 'renegotiating' with my employer but somehow I feel I may end up with me being considered 'unreliable'. I've also applied for and had interviews for other positions. Unfortunately with so many unemployed or graduates willing to work for less, those jobs aren't that forthcoming.[/p][/quote]Look at my previous comment just above. You're really not worth the effort.[/p][/quote]Please keep your 'discussions' going, emotive as they are - I want to know how the bordered quote thingy works when too many to illustrate.......... Eddie's dog
  • Score: 0

8:37am Thu 22 Nov 12

Was Charlie says...

This article is incomplete. It doesn't say how many single days were taken off sick, how many were 2 or 3 days, how many were a week or more and how many were long-term absences.
........
You get very misleading figures if you just count the total days. Those quoted are a complete nonsense and reveal absolutely nothing.
This article is incomplete. It doesn't say how many single days were taken off sick, how many were 2 or 3 days, how many were a week or more and how many were long-term absences. ........ You get very misleading figures if you just count the total days. Those quoted are a complete nonsense and reveal absolutely nothing. Was Charlie
  • Score: 0

9:09am Thu 22 Nov 12

onetimeapathetic says...

Suggest you all check HMRC regulations on SSP. An emloyer can claim this if you are off sick for 4 days or more then you are paid SSP.
If you choose to work for an employer that doesnt have its own sickness scheme then both you and the employer belong in the dark ages.
Decent HR departments (public and private sector) recognise that to achieve competitive advantage through its staff you need to treat them as Human Capital and hence pay them if they are sick. Equally however, they will also have systems in place to monitor sickness and offer 'support to those who 'abuse' the system.
Unfortunately in this country, we do not see the advantage we gain from our staff. Employers need to make work more attractive thus staff dont take sickness.
Those of you who say its what you make it are slightly deluded. The employer should try to recruit the best people possible to work for them and this will create competitive advantage, more committed staff and more profit for the organisation.
Suggest you all check HMRC regulations on SSP. An emloyer can claim this if you are off sick for 4 days or more then you are paid SSP. If you choose to work for an employer that doesnt have its own sickness scheme then both you and the employer belong in the dark ages. Decent HR departments (public and private sector) recognise that to achieve competitive advantage through its staff you need to treat them as Human Capital and hence pay them if they are sick. Equally however, they will also have systems in place to monitor sickness and offer 'support to those who 'abuse' the system. Unfortunately in this country, we do not see the advantage we gain from our staff. Employers need to make work more attractive thus staff dont take sickness. Those of you who say its what you make it are slightly deluded. The employer should try to recruit the best people possible to work for them and this will create competitive advantage, more committed staff and more profit for the organisation. onetimeapathetic
  • Score: 0

9:18am Thu 22 Nov 12

scrumpyjack says...

Wintonian wrote:
There is an awful lot of missing information in this story, and a lot of rubbish as usual from the commenters.

For a start, we are not told if it was a bad year for colds and flu, in which case every organisation would have increased absence, or if it was an average or 'good' year for sickness across the board, in which case the councils' performance would appear questionable.

However, in any case, those of us who do work at the Town Hall can easily see how it all happens. In services where a 'job evaluation' exercise was carried out a few years ago resulting in many people's salaries being lowered sometimes by a few grand, a lot of those staff left and many posts were not refilled. This has resulted in the reamining staff reguarly working with next to no slack in the system whatsoever. That makes it difficult to manage hours (we are not supposed to carry forward more than 20 hours flexi per month but many people do, because otherwise the work doesn't get done, and of course then there's less and less time to get the hours back) and, yes, people will get stressed.

In times of very low morale which is quite tangible in the Town Hall, people will I'm sure be less worried about taking time off sick where previously they might have battled it out.

Add to that a third year of pay-freeze with ever spiralling outgoings (which I know is the same for all sectors) particularly the high cost of travelling to or parking in a town centre location, and people will be even less loyal to their employer.

I'm sure in every office or building site or wherever, there are those truly dedicated to their work and those who will do the minimum required to stay in their job, and everything in between. Drop morale sufficiently and you will see more people veer towards the latter end of that scale.

In summary, it doesn't surprise me, although nowhere in the article does it state whether this was due to some flu epidemic or whatever and in fact was felt in all walks of employment.
3rd year of pay freeze?
Lot's of colds going around?
Flexi time??

Oh you poor sausage.

I wish you lot could spend a couple of months in the real world.

I know a few people who over the years have done the reverse and temped within Local Authority/Council jobs and to a man they all say exactly the same thing; that public sector workers have no idea and are a lazy, pampered, useless bunch who are too busy working out their entitlements and dealing with office politics to actually do a decent job. They have all been gobsmacked and disgusted in equal measures.
[quote][p][bold]Wintonian[/bold] wrote: There is an awful lot of missing information in this story, and a lot of rubbish as usual from the commenters. For a start, we are not told if it was a bad year for colds and flu, in which case every organisation would have increased absence, or if it was an average or 'good' year for sickness across the board, in which case the councils' performance would appear questionable. However, in any case, those of us who do work at the Town Hall can easily see how it all happens. In services where a 'job evaluation' exercise was carried out a few years ago resulting in many people's salaries being lowered sometimes by a few grand, a lot of those staff left and many posts were not refilled. This has resulted in the reamining staff reguarly working with next to no slack in the system whatsoever. That makes it difficult to manage hours (we are not supposed to carry forward more than 20 hours flexi per month but many people do, because otherwise the work doesn't get done, and of course then there's less and less time to get the hours back) and, yes, people will get stressed. In times of very low morale which is quite tangible in the Town Hall, people will I'm sure be less worried about taking time off sick where previously they might have battled it out. Add to that a third year of pay-freeze with ever spiralling outgoings (which I know is the same for all sectors) particularly the high cost of travelling to or parking in a town centre location, and people will be even less loyal to their employer. I'm sure in every office or building site or wherever, there are those truly dedicated to their work and those who will do the minimum required to stay in their job, and everything in between. Drop morale sufficiently and you will see more people veer towards the latter end of that scale. In summary, it doesn't surprise me, although nowhere in the article does it state whether this was due to some flu epidemic or whatever and in fact was felt in all walks of employment.[/p][/quote]3rd year of pay freeze? Lot's of colds going around? Flexi time?? Oh you poor sausage. I wish you lot could spend a couple of months in the real world. I know a few people who over the years have done the reverse and temped within Local Authority/Council jobs and to a man they all say exactly the same thing; that public sector workers have no idea and are a lazy, pampered, useless bunch who are too busy working out their entitlements and dealing with office politics to actually do a decent job. They have all been gobsmacked and disgusted in equal measures. scrumpyjack
  • Score: 0

9:33am Thu 22 Nov 12

Wintonian says...

scrumpyjack wrote:
Wintonian wrote:
There is an awful lot of missing information in this story, and a lot of rubbish as usual from the commenters.

For a start, we are not told if it was a bad year for colds and flu, in which case every organisation would have increased absence, or if it was an average or 'good' year for sickness across the board, in which case the councils' performance would appear questionable.

However, in any case, those of us who do work at the Town Hall can easily see how it all happens. In services where a 'job evaluation' exercise was carried out a few years ago resulting in many people's salaries being lowered sometimes by a few grand, a lot of those staff left and many posts were not refilled. This has resulted in the reamining staff reguarly working with next to no slack in the system whatsoever. That makes it difficult to manage hours (we are not supposed to carry forward more than 20 hours flexi per month but many people do, because otherwise the work doesn't get done, and of course then there's less and less time to get the hours back) and, yes, people will get stressed.

In times of very low morale which is quite tangible in the Town Hall, people will I'm sure be less worried about taking time off sick where previously they might have battled it out.

Add to that a third year of pay-freeze with ever spiralling outgoings (which I know is the same for all sectors) particularly the high cost of travelling to or parking in a town centre location, and people will be even less loyal to their employer.

I'm sure in every office or building site or wherever, there are those truly dedicated to their work and those who will do the minimum required to stay in their job, and everything in between. Drop morale sufficiently and you will see more people veer towards the latter end of that scale.

In summary, it doesn't surprise me, although nowhere in the article does it state whether this was due to some flu epidemic or whatever and in fact was felt in all walks of employment.
3rd year of pay freeze?
Lot's of colds going around?
Flexi time??

Oh you poor sausage.

I wish you lot could spend a couple of months in the real world.

I know a few people who over the years have done the reverse and temped within Local Authority/Council jobs and to a man they all say exactly the same thing; that public sector workers have no idea and are a lazy, pampered, useless bunch who are too busy working out their entitlements and dealing with office politics to actually do a decent job. They have all been gobsmacked and disgusted in equal measures.
What a stupid comment. I don't recall asking for sympathy!

Are you seriously suggesting that every person who has ever worked in both sectors, suddenly becomes lazy or unlazy depending on where their current job is?
[quote][p][bold]scrumpyjack[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Wintonian[/bold] wrote: There is an awful lot of missing information in this story, and a lot of rubbish as usual from the commenters. For a start, we are not told if it was a bad year for colds and flu, in which case every organisation would have increased absence, or if it was an average or 'good' year for sickness across the board, in which case the councils' performance would appear questionable. However, in any case, those of us who do work at the Town Hall can easily see how it all happens. In services where a 'job evaluation' exercise was carried out a few years ago resulting in many people's salaries being lowered sometimes by a few grand, a lot of those staff left and many posts were not refilled. This has resulted in the reamining staff reguarly working with next to no slack in the system whatsoever. That makes it difficult to manage hours (we are not supposed to carry forward more than 20 hours flexi per month but many people do, because otherwise the work doesn't get done, and of course then there's less and less time to get the hours back) and, yes, people will get stressed. In times of very low morale which is quite tangible in the Town Hall, people will I'm sure be less worried about taking time off sick where previously they might have battled it out. Add to that a third year of pay-freeze with ever spiralling outgoings (which I know is the same for all sectors) particularly the high cost of travelling to or parking in a town centre location, and people will be even less loyal to their employer. I'm sure in every office or building site or wherever, there are those truly dedicated to their work and those who will do the minimum required to stay in their job, and everything in between. Drop morale sufficiently and you will see more people veer towards the latter end of that scale. In summary, it doesn't surprise me, although nowhere in the article does it state whether this was due to some flu epidemic or whatever and in fact was felt in all walks of employment.[/p][/quote]3rd year of pay freeze? Lot's of colds going around? Flexi time?? Oh you poor sausage. I wish you lot could spend a couple of months in the real world. I know a few people who over the years have done the reverse and temped within Local Authority/Council jobs and to a man they all say exactly the same thing; that public sector workers have no idea and are a lazy, pampered, useless bunch who are too busy working out their entitlements and dealing with office politics to actually do a decent job. They have all been gobsmacked and disgusted in equal measures.[/p][/quote]What a stupid comment. I don't recall asking for sympathy! Are you seriously suggesting that every person who has ever worked in both sectors, suddenly becomes lazy or unlazy depending on where their current job is? Wintonian
  • Score: 0

9:34am Thu 22 Nov 12

Wintonian says...

scrumpyjack wrote:
Wintonian wrote:
There is an awful lot of missing information in this story, and a lot of rubbish as usual from the commenters.

For a start, we are not told if it was a bad year for colds and flu, in which case every organisation would have increased absence, or if it was an average or 'good' year for sickness across the board, in which case the councils' performance would appear questionable.

However, in any case, those of us who do work at the Town Hall can easily see how it all happens. In services where a 'job evaluation' exercise was carried out a few years ago resulting in many people's salaries being lowered sometimes by a few grand, a lot of those staff left and many posts were not refilled. This has resulted in the reamining staff reguarly working with next to no slack in the system whatsoever. That makes it difficult to manage hours (we are not supposed to carry forward more than 20 hours flexi per month but many people do, because otherwise the work doesn't get done, and of course then there's less and less time to get the hours back) and, yes, people will get stressed.

In times of very low morale which is quite tangible in the Town Hall, people will I'm sure be less worried about taking time off sick where previously they might have battled it out.

Add to that a third year of pay-freeze with ever spiralling outgoings (which I know is the same for all sectors) particularly the high cost of travelling to or parking in a town centre location, and people will be even less loyal to their employer.

I'm sure in every office or building site or wherever, there are those truly dedicated to their work and those who will do the minimum required to stay in their job, and everything in between. Drop morale sufficiently and you will see more people veer towards the latter end of that scale.

In summary, it doesn't surprise me, although nowhere in the article does it state whether this was due to some flu epidemic or whatever and in fact was felt in all walks of employment.
3rd year of pay freeze?
Lot's of colds going around?
Flexi time??

Oh you poor sausage.

I wish you lot could spend a couple of months in the real world.

I know a few people who over the years have done the reverse and temped within Local Authority/Council jobs and to a man they all say exactly the same thing; that public sector workers have no idea and are a lazy, pampered, useless bunch who are too busy working out their entitlements and dealing with office politics to actually do a decent job. They have all been gobsmacked and disgusted in equal measures.
What a stupid comment. I don't recall asking for sympathy!

Are you seriously suggesting that every person who has ever worked in both sectors, suddenly becomes lazy or unlazy depending on where their current job is?
[quote][p][bold]scrumpyjack[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Wintonian[/bold] wrote: There is an awful lot of missing information in this story, and a lot of rubbish as usual from the commenters. For a start, we are not told if it was a bad year for colds and flu, in which case every organisation would have increased absence, or if it was an average or 'good' year for sickness across the board, in which case the councils' performance would appear questionable. However, in any case, those of us who do work at the Town Hall can easily see how it all happens. In services where a 'job evaluation' exercise was carried out a few years ago resulting in many people's salaries being lowered sometimes by a few grand, a lot of those staff left and many posts were not refilled. This has resulted in the reamining staff reguarly working with next to no slack in the system whatsoever. That makes it difficult to manage hours (we are not supposed to carry forward more than 20 hours flexi per month but many people do, because otherwise the work doesn't get done, and of course then there's less and less time to get the hours back) and, yes, people will get stressed. In times of very low morale which is quite tangible in the Town Hall, people will I'm sure be less worried about taking time off sick where previously they might have battled it out. Add to that a third year of pay-freeze with ever spiralling outgoings (which I know is the same for all sectors) particularly the high cost of travelling to or parking in a town centre location, and people will be even less loyal to their employer. I'm sure in every office or building site or wherever, there are those truly dedicated to their work and those who will do the minimum required to stay in their job, and everything in between. Drop morale sufficiently and you will see more people veer towards the latter end of that scale. In summary, it doesn't surprise me, although nowhere in the article does it state whether this was due to some flu epidemic or whatever and in fact was felt in all walks of employment.[/p][/quote]3rd year of pay freeze? Lot's of colds going around? Flexi time?? Oh you poor sausage. I wish you lot could spend a couple of months in the real world. I know a few people who over the years have done the reverse and temped within Local Authority/Council jobs and to a man they all say exactly the same thing; that public sector workers have no idea and are a lazy, pampered, useless bunch who are too busy working out their entitlements and dealing with office politics to actually do a decent job. They have all been gobsmacked and disgusted in equal measures.[/p][/quote]What a stupid comment. I don't recall asking for sympathy! Are you seriously suggesting that every person who has ever worked in both sectors, suddenly becomes lazy or unlazy depending on where their current job is? Wintonian
  • Score: 0

9:38am Thu 22 Nov 12

David Hayes says...

HRH.......wow you really are clueless!!!

we get bonuses when the business does well hence low sickness...

however like all business they need to ensure they are not lumbered with costs they cant afford i.e. six months full pay when sick which council workers are entitled to!!
HRH.......wow you really are clueless!!! we get bonuses when the business does well hence low sickness... however like all business they need to ensure they are not lumbered with costs they cant afford i.e. six months full pay when sick which council workers are entitled to!! David Hayes
  • Score: 0

9:52am Thu 22 Nov 12

HRH of Boscombe says...

David Hayes wrote:
HRH.......wow you really are clueless!!! we get bonuses when the business does well hence low sickness... however like all business they need to ensure they are not lumbered with costs they cant afford i.e. six months full pay when sick which council workers are entitled to!!
Yes really clueless with full sick pay, private medical & dental, share incentive scheme, Xmas bonus and annual bonus. Check your employment status. I bet it's casual.
[quote][p][bold]David Hayes[/bold] wrote: HRH.......wow you really are clueless!!! we get bonuses when the business does well hence low sickness... however like all business they need to ensure they are not lumbered with costs they cant afford i.e. six months full pay when sick which council workers are entitled to!![/p][/quote]Yes really clueless with full sick pay, private medical & dental, share incentive scheme, Xmas bonus and annual bonus. Check your employment status. I bet it's casual. HRH of Boscombe
  • Score: 0

10:14am Thu 22 Nov 12

scrumpyjack says...

Wintonian wrote:
scrumpyjack wrote:
Wintonian wrote:
There is an awful lot of missing information in this story, and a lot of rubbish as usual from the commenters.

For a start, we are not told if it was a bad year for colds and flu, in which case every organisation would have increased absence, or if it was an average or 'good' year for sickness across the board, in which case the councils' performance would appear questionable.

However, in any case, those of us who do work at the Town Hall can easily see how it all happens. In services where a 'job evaluation' exercise was carried out a few years ago resulting in many people's salaries being lowered sometimes by a few grand, a lot of those staff left and many posts were not refilled. This has resulted in the reamining staff reguarly working with next to no slack in the system whatsoever. That makes it difficult to manage hours (we are not supposed to carry forward more than 20 hours flexi per month but many people do, because otherwise the work doesn't get done, and of course then there's less and less time to get the hours back) and, yes, people will get stressed.

In times of very low morale which is quite tangible in the Town Hall, people will I'm sure be less worried about taking time off sick where previously they might have battled it out.

Add to that a third year of pay-freeze with ever spiralling outgoings (which I know is the same for all sectors) particularly the high cost of travelling to or parking in a town centre location, and people will be even less loyal to their employer.

I'm sure in every office or building site or wherever, there are those truly dedicated to their work and those who will do the minimum required to stay in their job, and everything in between. Drop morale sufficiently and you will see more people veer towards the latter end of that scale.

In summary, it doesn't surprise me, although nowhere in the article does it state whether this was due to some flu epidemic or whatever and in fact was felt in all walks of employment.
3rd year of pay freeze?
Lot's of colds going around?
Flexi time??

Oh you poor sausage.

I wish you lot could spend a couple of months in the real world.

I know a few people who over the years have done the reverse and temped within Local Authority/Council jobs and to a man they all say exactly the same thing; that public sector workers have no idea and are a lazy, pampered, useless bunch who are too busy working out their entitlements and dealing with office politics to actually do a decent job. They have all been gobsmacked and disgusted in equal measures.
What a stupid comment. I don't recall asking for sympathy!

Are you seriously suggesting that every person who has ever worked in both sectors, suddenly becomes lazy or unlazy depending on where their current job is?
So you comments weren't "oh woe is us, we have to endure so much and its so, so tough for us"?

I beg to differ.

There is no suddenly. They went, they saw, they left. The people recounting their experiences in the public sector did not become like their co-workers.

In fact TWO people I know who did temp - one at a school office and another for the Tourist Centre were both told to "slow down" as they would make the others look bad. I kid you not.
[quote][p][bold]Wintonian[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scrumpyjack[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Wintonian[/bold] wrote: There is an awful lot of missing information in this story, and a lot of rubbish as usual from the commenters. For a start, we are not told if it was a bad year for colds and flu, in which case every organisation would have increased absence, or if it was an average or 'good' year for sickness across the board, in which case the councils' performance would appear questionable. However, in any case, those of us who do work at the Town Hall can easily see how it all happens. In services where a 'job evaluation' exercise was carried out a few years ago resulting in many people's salaries being lowered sometimes by a few grand, a lot of those staff left and many posts were not refilled. This has resulted in the reamining staff reguarly working with next to no slack in the system whatsoever. That makes it difficult to manage hours (we are not supposed to carry forward more than 20 hours flexi per month but many people do, because otherwise the work doesn't get done, and of course then there's less and less time to get the hours back) and, yes, people will get stressed. In times of very low morale which is quite tangible in the Town Hall, people will I'm sure be less worried about taking time off sick where previously they might have battled it out. Add to that a third year of pay-freeze with ever spiralling outgoings (which I know is the same for all sectors) particularly the high cost of travelling to or parking in a town centre location, and people will be even less loyal to their employer. I'm sure in every office or building site or wherever, there are those truly dedicated to their work and those who will do the minimum required to stay in their job, and everything in between. Drop morale sufficiently and you will see more people veer towards the latter end of that scale. In summary, it doesn't surprise me, although nowhere in the article does it state whether this was due to some flu epidemic or whatever and in fact was felt in all walks of employment.[/p][/quote]3rd year of pay freeze? Lot's of colds going around? Flexi time?? Oh you poor sausage. I wish you lot could spend a couple of months in the real world. I know a few people who over the years have done the reverse and temped within Local Authority/Council jobs and to a man they all say exactly the same thing; that public sector workers have no idea and are a lazy, pampered, useless bunch who are too busy working out their entitlements and dealing with office politics to actually do a decent job. They have all been gobsmacked and disgusted in equal measures.[/p][/quote]What a stupid comment. I don't recall asking for sympathy! Are you seriously suggesting that every person who has ever worked in both sectors, suddenly becomes lazy or unlazy depending on where their current job is?[/p][/quote]So you comments weren't "oh woe is us, we have to endure so much and its so, so tough for us"? I beg to differ. There is no suddenly. They went, they saw, they left. The people recounting their experiences in the public sector did not become like their co-workers. In fact TWO people I know who did temp - one at a school office and another for the Tourist Centre were both told to "slow down" as they would make the others look bad. I kid you not. scrumpyjack
  • Score: 0

10:30am Thu 22 Nov 12

pete woodley says...

Many of us get stress from waiting to talk to someone at the town hall and being told,they are out of the office,on holiday,at a meeting,not at their desk at the moment,off sick,not in yet,and on and on.
Many of us get stress from waiting to talk to someone at the town hall and being told,they are out of the office,on holiday,at a meeting,not at their desk at the moment,off sick,not in yet,and on and on. pete woodley
  • Score: 0

10:34am Thu 22 Nov 12

Wintonian says...

scrumpyjack wrote:
Wintonian wrote:
scrumpyjack wrote:
Wintonian wrote:
There is an awful lot of missing information in this story, and a lot of rubbish as usual from the commenters.

For a start, we are not told if it was a bad year for colds and flu, in which case every organisation would have increased absence, or if it was an average or 'good' year for sickness across the board, in which case the councils' performance would appear questionable.

However, in any case, those of us who do work at the Town Hall can easily see how it all happens. In services where a 'job evaluation' exercise was carried out a few years ago resulting in many people's salaries being lowered sometimes by a few grand, a lot of those staff left and many posts were not refilled. This has resulted in the reamining staff reguarly working with next to no slack in the system whatsoever. That makes it difficult to manage hours (we are not supposed to carry forward more than 20 hours flexi per month but many people do, because otherwise the work doesn't get done, and of course then there's less and less time to get the hours back) and, yes, people will get stressed.

In times of very low morale which is quite tangible in the Town Hall, people will I'm sure be less worried about taking time off sick where previously they might have battled it out.

Add to that a third year of pay-freeze with ever spiralling outgoings (which I know is the same for all sectors) particularly the high cost of travelling to or parking in a town centre location, and people will be even less loyal to their employer.

I'm sure in every office or building site or wherever, there are those truly dedicated to their work and those who will do the minimum required to stay in their job, and everything in between. Drop morale sufficiently and you will see more people veer towards the latter end of that scale.

In summary, it doesn't surprise me, although nowhere in the article does it state whether this was due to some flu epidemic or whatever and in fact was felt in all walks of employment.
3rd year of pay freeze?
Lot's of colds going around?
Flexi time??

Oh you poor sausage.

I wish you lot could spend a couple of months in the real world.

I know a few people who over the years have done the reverse and temped within Local Authority/Council jobs and to a man they all say exactly the same thing; that public sector workers have no idea and are a lazy, pampered, useless bunch who are too busy working out their entitlements and dealing with office politics to actually do a decent job. They have all been gobsmacked and disgusted in equal measures.
What a stupid comment. I don't recall asking for sympathy!

Are you seriously suggesting that every person who has ever worked in both sectors, suddenly becomes lazy or unlazy depending on where their current job is?
So you comments weren't "oh woe is us, we have to endure so much and its so, so tough for us"?

I beg to differ.

There is no suddenly. They went, they saw, they left. The people recounting their experiences in the public sector did not become like their co-workers.

In fact TWO people I know who did temp - one at a school office and another for the Tourist Centre were both told to "slow down" as they would make the others look bad. I kid you not.
No, I don't believe I did.

I have a job which has advantages and disadvantages like every other job.

Flexitime is definitely an advantage (don't think it's unique to the public sector), it allows me on occasion to arrive at 7:30 or 8 if I want to leave early, or miss the traffic and get in at 9:30 and work till 7. It also allows me to manage my time by building up a surplus at particularly busy times or a shortfall at less busy times to be reconciled at other times.

Sick pay is an advantage I suppose, but I can't see that people suddenly think to themselves "I'm gonna get paid anyway, I just won't go in today". Sorry but I just don't believe that, I'm pretty sure most people, wherever they work, have a pretty good idea whether they are fit for work or not.

Having not had a day off sick in 7 years before having a serious road accident which resulted in 2 months in hospital and over 10 months off sick, I think I can see it from both sides.
[quote][p][bold]scrumpyjack[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Wintonian[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scrumpyjack[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Wintonian[/bold] wrote: There is an awful lot of missing information in this story, and a lot of rubbish as usual from the commenters. For a start, we are not told if it was a bad year for colds and flu, in which case every organisation would have increased absence, or if it was an average or 'good' year for sickness across the board, in which case the councils' performance would appear questionable. However, in any case, those of us who do work at the Town Hall can easily see how it all happens. In services where a 'job evaluation' exercise was carried out a few years ago resulting in many people's salaries being lowered sometimes by a few grand, a lot of those staff left and many posts were not refilled. This has resulted in the reamining staff reguarly working with next to no slack in the system whatsoever. That makes it difficult to manage hours (we are not supposed to carry forward more than 20 hours flexi per month but many people do, because otherwise the work doesn't get done, and of course then there's less and less time to get the hours back) and, yes, people will get stressed. In times of very low morale which is quite tangible in the Town Hall, people will I'm sure be less worried about taking time off sick where previously they might have battled it out. Add to that a third year of pay-freeze with ever spiralling outgoings (which I know is the same for all sectors) particularly the high cost of travelling to or parking in a town centre location, and people will be even less loyal to their employer. I'm sure in every office or building site or wherever, there are those truly dedicated to their work and those who will do the minimum required to stay in their job, and everything in between. Drop morale sufficiently and you will see more people veer towards the latter end of that scale. In summary, it doesn't surprise me, although nowhere in the article does it state whether this was due to some flu epidemic or whatever and in fact was felt in all walks of employment.[/p][/quote]3rd year of pay freeze? Lot's of colds going around? Flexi time?? Oh you poor sausage. I wish you lot could spend a couple of months in the real world. I know a few people who over the years have done the reverse and temped within Local Authority/Council jobs and to a man they all say exactly the same thing; that public sector workers have no idea and are a lazy, pampered, useless bunch who are too busy working out their entitlements and dealing with office politics to actually do a decent job. They have all been gobsmacked and disgusted in equal measures.[/p][/quote]What a stupid comment. I don't recall asking for sympathy! Are you seriously suggesting that every person who has ever worked in both sectors, suddenly becomes lazy or unlazy depending on where their current job is?[/p][/quote]So you comments weren't "oh woe is us, we have to endure so much and its so, so tough for us"? I beg to differ. There is no suddenly. They went, they saw, they left. The people recounting their experiences in the public sector did not become like their co-workers. In fact TWO people I know who did temp - one at a school office and another for the Tourist Centre were both told to "slow down" as they would make the others look bad. I kid you not.[/p][/quote]No, I don't believe I did. I have a job which has advantages and disadvantages like every other job. Flexitime is definitely an advantage (don't think it's unique to the public sector), it allows me on occasion to arrive at 7:30 or 8 if I want to leave early, or miss the traffic and get in at 9:30 and work till 7. It also allows me to manage my time by building up a surplus at particularly busy times or a shortfall at less busy times to be reconciled at other times. Sick pay is an advantage I suppose, but I can't see that people suddenly think to themselves "I'm gonna get paid anyway, I just won't go in today". Sorry but I just don't believe that, I'm pretty sure most people, wherever they work, have a pretty good idea whether they are fit for work or not. Having not had a day off sick in 7 years before having a serious road accident which resulted in 2 months in hospital and over 10 months off sick, I think I can see it from both sides. Wintonian
  • Score: 0

10:40am Thu 22 Nov 12

scrumpyjack says...

Wintonian wrote:
scrumpyjack wrote:
Wintonian wrote:
scrumpyjack wrote:
Wintonian wrote:
There is an awful lot of missing information in this story, and a lot of rubbish as usual from the commenters.

For a start, we are not told if it was a bad year for colds and flu, in which case every organisation would have increased absence, or if it was an average or 'good' year for sickness across the board, in which case the councils' performance would appear questionable.

However, in any case, those of us who do work at the Town Hall can easily see how it all happens. In services where a 'job evaluation' exercise was carried out a few years ago resulting in many people's salaries being lowered sometimes by a few grand, a lot of those staff left and many posts were not refilled. This has resulted in the reamining staff reguarly working with next to no slack in the system whatsoever. That makes it difficult to manage hours (we are not supposed to carry forward more than 20 hours flexi per month but many people do, because otherwise the work doesn't get done, and of course then there's less and less time to get the hours back) and, yes, people will get stressed.

In times of very low morale which is quite tangible in the Town Hall, people will I'm sure be less worried about taking time off sick where previously they might have battled it out.

Add to that a third year of pay-freeze with ever spiralling outgoings (which I know is the same for all sectors) particularly the high cost of travelling to or parking in a town centre location, and people will be even less loyal to their employer.

I'm sure in every office or building site or wherever, there are those truly dedicated to their work and those who will do the minimum required to stay in their job, and everything in between. Drop morale sufficiently and you will see more people veer towards the latter end of that scale.

In summary, it doesn't surprise me, although nowhere in the article does it state whether this was due to some flu epidemic or whatever and in fact was felt in all walks of employment.
3rd year of pay freeze?
Lot's of colds going around?
Flexi time??

Oh you poor sausage.

I wish you lot could spend a couple of months in the real world.

I know a few people who over the years have done the reverse and temped within Local Authority/Council jobs and to a man they all say exactly the same thing; that public sector workers have no idea and are a lazy, pampered, useless bunch who are too busy working out their entitlements and dealing with office politics to actually do a decent job. They have all been gobsmacked and disgusted in equal measures.
What a stupid comment. I don't recall asking for sympathy!

Are you seriously suggesting that every person who has ever worked in both sectors, suddenly becomes lazy or unlazy depending on where their current job is?
So you comments weren't "oh woe is us, we have to endure so much and its so, so tough for us"?

I beg to differ.

There is no suddenly. They went, they saw, they left. The people recounting their experiences in the public sector did not become like their co-workers.

In fact TWO people I know who did temp - one at a school office and another for the Tourist Centre were both told to "slow down" as they would make the others look bad. I kid you not.
No, I don't believe I did.

I have a job which has advantages and disadvantages like every other job.

Flexitime is definitely an advantage (don't think it's unique to the public sector), it allows me on occasion to arrive at 7:30 or 8 if I want to leave early, or miss the traffic and get in at 9:30 and work till 7. It also allows me to manage my time by building up a surplus at particularly busy times or a shortfall at less busy times to be reconciled at other times.

Sick pay is an advantage I suppose, but I can't see that people suddenly think to themselves "I'm gonna get paid anyway, I just won't go in today". Sorry but I just don't believe that, I'm pretty sure most people, wherever they work, have a pretty good idea whether they are fit for work or not.

Having not had a day off sick in 7 years before having a serious road accident which resulted in 2 months in hospital and over 10 months off sick, I think I can see it from both sides.
Flexi time?

Most of us work way over our contracted hours and it is not even noted.

your cushioned little world means you get paid for every minute.

There are often articles about how millions do not use up their full holiday allowance because of work loads. Can't imagine a public sector employee not getting their full quota in.
[quote][p][bold]Wintonian[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scrumpyjack[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Wintonian[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scrumpyjack[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Wintonian[/bold] wrote: There is an awful lot of missing information in this story, and a lot of rubbish as usual from the commenters. For a start, we are not told if it was a bad year for colds and flu, in which case every organisation would have increased absence, or if it was an average or 'good' year for sickness across the board, in which case the councils' performance would appear questionable. However, in any case, those of us who do work at the Town Hall can easily see how it all happens. In services where a 'job evaluation' exercise was carried out a few years ago resulting in many people's salaries being lowered sometimes by a few grand, a lot of those staff left and many posts were not refilled. This has resulted in the reamining staff reguarly working with next to no slack in the system whatsoever. That makes it difficult to manage hours (we are not supposed to carry forward more than 20 hours flexi per month but many people do, because otherwise the work doesn't get done, and of course then there's less and less time to get the hours back) and, yes, people will get stressed. In times of very low morale which is quite tangible in the Town Hall, people will I'm sure be less worried about taking time off sick where previously they might have battled it out. Add to that a third year of pay-freeze with ever spiralling outgoings (which I know is the same for all sectors) particularly the high cost of travelling to or parking in a town centre location, and people will be even less loyal to their employer. I'm sure in every office or building site or wherever, there are those truly dedicated to their work and those who will do the minimum required to stay in their job, and everything in between. Drop morale sufficiently and you will see more people veer towards the latter end of that scale. In summary, it doesn't surprise me, although nowhere in the article does it state whether this was due to some flu epidemic or whatever and in fact was felt in all walks of employment.[/p][/quote]3rd year of pay freeze? Lot's of colds going around? Flexi time?? Oh you poor sausage. I wish you lot could spend a couple of months in the real world. I know a few people who over the years have done the reverse and temped within Local Authority/Council jobs and to a man they all say exactly the same thing; that public sector workers have no idea and are a lazy, pampered, useless bunch who are too busy working out their entitlements and dealing with office politics to actually do a decent job. They have all been gobsmacked and disgusted in equal measures.[/p][/quote]What a stupid comment. I don't recall asking for sympathy! Are you seriously suggesting that every person who has ever worked in both sectors, suddenly becomes lazy or unlazy depending on where their current job is?[/p][/quote]So you comments weren't "oh woe is us, we have to endure so much and its so, so tough for us"? I beg to differ. There is no suddenly. They went, they saw, they left. The people recounting their experiences in the public sector did not become like their co-workers. In fact TWO people I know who did temp - one at a school office and another for the Tourist Centre were both told to "slow down" as they would make the others look bad. I kid you not.[/p][/quote]No, I don't believe I did. I have a job which has advantages and disadvantages like every other job. Flexitime is definitely an advantage (don't think it's unique to the public sector), it allows me on occasion to arrive at 7:30 or 8 if I want to leave early, or miss the traffic and get in at 9:30 and work till 7. It also allows me to manage my time by building up a surplus at particularly busy times or a shortfall at less busy times to be reconciled at other times. Sick pay is an advantage I suppose, but I can't see that people suddenly think to themselves "I'm gonna get paid anyway, I just won't go in today". Sorry but I just don't believe that, I'm pretty sure most people, wherever they work, have a pretty good idea whether they are fit for work or not. Having not had a day off sick in 7 years before having a serious road accident which resulted in 2 months in hospital and over 10 months off sick, I think I can see it from both sides.[/p][/quote]Flexi time? Most of us work way over our contracted hours and it is not even noted. your cushioned little world means you get paid for every minute. There are often articles about how millions do not use up their full holiday allowance because of work loads. Can't imagine a public sector employee not getting their full quota in. scrumpyjack
  • Score: 0

11:39am Thu 22 Nov 12

Eddie's dog says...

Sorry to be pedantic - but how do you all find the time for these 'in depth' discussions on the internet during your contracted / not contracted / flexitime working day?
Sorry to be pedantic - but how do you all find the time for these 'in depth' discussions on the internet during your contracted / not contracted / flexitime working day? Eddie's dog
  • Score: 0

12:20pm Thu 22 Nov 12

portia6 says...

Must be their lunch break/tea break!
Must be their lunch break/tea break! portia6
  • Score: 0

12:20pm Thu 22 Nov 12

portia6 says...

Must be their lunch break/tea break!
Must be their lunch break/tea break! portia6
  • Score: 0

12:31pm Thu 22 Nov 12

Wintonian says...

I had a doctor's appointment this morning so I am on a half day's leave, since you ask!
I had a doctor's appointment this morning so I am on a half day's leave, since you ask! Wintonian
  • Score: 0

12:33pm Thu 22 Nov 12

scoooobles says...

HRH of Boscombe wrote:
scoooobles wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
scoooobles wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
BarrHumbug wrote:
HRH of Boscombe wrote:
aerolover wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.
Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.
Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?
No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.
I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness. I would also only get statutory maternity pay. Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract.
I would look for a better employer if I were you or negotiate a little better when offered a position. It's a lot easier to do in skilled roles. . I really am gobsmacked by some of the entitlements people have commented here. I've always seen it as standard that you're paid when off sick on a perm salary position in the private sector. . The handsome pay is when you temp or contract and forfeit holiday and sick pay. I would tell your employer it's one or the other Jack.
or I could keep my job which I really need.
Then I have no sympathy. So naive. You wouldn't quit then look. If you're not getting the benefits you deserve from a job start applying for others quietly. Too many people on this site moan about how hard they have it but won't bother to look for something better.
Excuse me? I wasn't moaning or asking for sympathy was I??

I was just letting you know the rules about sick pay as you didn't seem to understand them.

For your info I'm perfectly happy in my job ... I just don't pull sickies! I actually really enjoy it and get a lot of perks that I didn't get in my last job that did pay well with pay sick pay but I hated!
[quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scoooobles[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scoooobles[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]BarrHumbug[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]aerolover[/bold] wrote: Perhaps the staff get paid from day 1 if they are sick. My company only pay after the first 3 days, that cuts down on hangover days. It's always been the same with government jobs over paid and loads of sick days.[/p][/quote]Is that even legal? If you're on a salary you get the same each month regardless. If it's casual labour, contracting or temping you may not get sick pay but benefit from a higher hourly rate. No-one's forced down either route.[/p][/quote]Do you work in the public sector? Non payment in the first three days is common practice in the private sector and is legal, it is something that is mostly introduced in companies where they have persistent "long weekenders" It was introduced in the place I used to work at over 10yrs ago, almost overnight they were back to a full complimentary of staff on Fridays and Mondays. Perhaps its something they should introduce at your employers if "some women" are off so often?[/p][/quote]No I've never worked in the public sector. Everywhere I've worked for the past 20 yrs in permanent employment has always paid full salary if you're sick. Some places however may not let you claim overtime if you've been sick that month. . I've done a lot of contract work too where you don't get sick or holiday pay but get paid handsomely for the work you do. Swings and roundabouts. I think the people moaning here about not getting sick pay do casual labour jobs.[/p][/quote]I work a regular job with a salary (certainly not a handsome one though!)and I dont get sick pay. I get statutory sick pay after the first 3 days of sickness. I would also only get statutory maternity pay. Companies dont have to pay normal sick pay, it's whatever they put in your contract.[/p][/quote]I would look for a better employer if I were you or negotiate a little better when offered a position. It's a lot easier to do in skilled roles. . I really am gobsmacked by some of the entitlements people have commented here. I've always seen it as standard that you're paid when off sick on a perm salary position in the private sector. . The handsome pay is when you temp or contract and forfeit holiday and sick pay. I would tell your employer it's one or the other Jack.[/p][/quote]or I could keep my job which I really need.[/p][/quote]Then I have no sympathy. So naive. You wouldn't quit then look. If you're not getting the benefits you deserve from a job start applying for others quietly. Too many people on this site moan about how hard they have it but won't bother to look for something better.[/p][/quote]Excuse me? I wasn't moaning or asking for sympathy was I?? I was just letting you know the rules about sick pay as you didn't seem to understand them. For your info I'm perfectly happy in my job ... I just don't pull sickies! I actually really enjoy it and get a lot of perks that I didn't get in my last job that did pay well with pay sick pay but I hated! scoooobles
  • Score: 0

1:19pm Thu 22 Nov 12

HRH of Boscombe says...

Eddie's dog wrote:
Sorry to be pedantic - but how do you all find the time for these 'in depth' discussions on the internet during your contracted / not contracted / flexitime working day?
Hahaha some of us don't work in McDonalds types jobs where you have to work every minute of your day.
.
People with real jobs are paid for there responsibilities and completing a job. Some days are quiet, some days are busy.
[quote][p][bold]Eddie's dog[/bold] wrote: Sorry to be pedantic - but how do you all find the time for these 'in depth' discussions on the internet during your contracted / not contracted / flexitime working day?[/p][/quote]Hahaha some of us don't work in McDonalds types jobs where you have to work every minute of your day. . People with real jobs are paid for there responsibilities and completing a job. Some days are quiet, some days are busy. HRH of Boscombe
  • Score: 0

1:32pm Thu 22 Nov 12

Frogsporn says...

Those figures equate to around 511 man years of missed work in a year! Assuming an average salary of 20k that's a cool £10,000,000+ of wastage a year.

Unbelievable!
Those figures equate to around 511 man years of missed work in a year! Assuming an average salary of 20k that's a cool £10,000,000+ of wastage a year. Unbelievable! Frogsporn
  • Score: 0

2:20pm Thu 22 Nov 12

Wintonian says...

One other point - I don't know if this is standard practice so perhaps someone could confirm. Here at the Town Hall, if I go off sick on a Thursday and do not return until the Tuesday, I am marked as having 5 days off sick even though I don't work on Saturdays and Sundays.
One other point - I don't know if this is standard practice so perhaps someone could confirm. Here at the Town Hall, if I go off sick on a Thursday and do not return until the Tuesday, I am marked as having 5 days off sick even though I don't work on Saturdays and Sundays. Wintonian
  • Score: 0

8:58pm Thu 22 Nov 12

HRH of Boscombe says...

Wintonian wrote:
One other point - I don't know if this is standard practice so perhaps someone could confirm. Here at the Town Hall, if I go off sick on a Thursday and do not return until the Tuesday, I am marked as having 5 days off sick even though I don't work on Saturdays and Sundays.
That's crazy. Only work days should be counted.
[quote][p][bold]Wintonian[/bold] wrote: One other point - I don't know if this is standard practice so perhaps someone could confirm. Here at the Town Hall, if I go off sick on a Thursday and do not return until the Tuesday, I am marked as having 5 days off sick even though I don't work on Saturdays and Sundays.[/p][/quote]That's crazy. Only work days should be counted. HRH of Boscombe
  • Score: 0

10:11pm Thu 22 Nov 12

Wintonian says...

HRH of Boscombe wrote:
Wintonian wrote:
One other point - I don't know if this is standard practice so perhaps someone could confirm. Here at the Town Hall, if I go off sick on a Thursday and do not return until the Tuesday, I am marked as having 5 days off sick even though I don't work on Saturdays and Sundays.
That's crazy. Only work days should be counted.
I did wonder! It potentially makes a difference to those averages - when I had my car accident I was off for 11 months and I'm sure it was something like 330 days.
[quote][p][bold]HRH of Boscombe[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Wintonian[/bold] wrote: One other point - I don't know if this is standard practice so perhaps someone could confirm. Here at the Town Hall, if I go off sick on a Thursday and do not return until the Tuesday, I am marked as having 5 days off sick even though I don't work on Saturdays and Sundays.[/p][/quote]That's crazy. Only work days should be counted.[/p][/quote]I did wonder! It potentially makes a difference to those averages - when I had my car accident I was off for 11 months and I'm sure it was something like 330 days. Wintonian
  • Score: 0

11:34pm Thu 22 Nov 12

s-pb2 says...

scrumpyjack wrote:
Wintonian wrote:
scrumpyjack wrote:
Wintonian wrote:
scrumpyjack wrote:
Wintonian wrote:
There is an awful lot of missing information in this story, and a lot of rubbish as usual from the commenters.

For a start, we are not told if it was a bad year for colds and flu, in which case every organisation would have increased absence, or if it was an average or 'good' year for sickness across the board, in which case the councils' performance would appear questionable.

However, in any case, those of us who do work at the Town Hall can easily see how it all happens. In services where a 'job evaluation' exercise was carried out a few years ago resulting in many people's salaries being lowered sometimes by a few grand, a lot of those staff left and many posts were not refilled. This has resulted in the reamining staff reguarly working with next to no slack in the system whatsoever. That makes it difficult to manage hours (we are not supposed to carry forward more than 20 hours flexi per month but many people do, because otherwise the work doesn't get done, and of course then there's less and less time to get the hours back) and, yes, people will get stressed.

In times of very low morale which is quite tangible in the Town Hall, people will I'm sure be less worried about taking time off sick where previously they might have battled it out.

Add to that a third year of pay-freeze with ever spiralling outgoings (which I know is the same for all sectors) particularly the high cost of travelling to or parking in a town centre location, and people will be even less loyal to their employer.

I'm sure in every office or building site or wherever, there are those truly dedicated to their work and those who will do the minimum required to stay in their job, and everything in between. Drop morale sufficiently and you will see more people veer towards the latter end of that scale.

In summary, it doesn't surprise me, although nowhere in the article does it state whether this was due to some flu epidemic or whatever and in fact was felt in all walks of employment.
3rd year of pay freeze?
Lot's of colds going around?
Flexi time??

Oh you poor sausage.

I wish you lot could spend a couple of months in the real world.

I know a few people who over the years have done the reverse and temped within Local Authority/Council jobs and to a man they all say exactly the same thing; that public sector workers have no idea and are a lazy, pampered, useless bunch who are too busy working out their entitlements and dealing with office politics to actually do a decent job. They have all been gobsmacked and disgusted in equal measures.
What a stupid comment. I don't recall asking for sympathy!

Are you seriously suggesting that every person who has ever worked in both sectors, suddenly becomes lazy or unlazy depending on where their current job is?
So you comments weren't "oh woe is us, we have to endure so much and its so, so tough for us"?

I beg to differ.

There is no suddenly. They went, they saw, they left. The people recounting their experiences in the public sector did not become like their co-workers.

In fact TWO people I know who did temp - one at a school office and another for the Tourist Centre were both told to "slow down" as they would make the others look bad. I kid you not.
No, I don't believe I did.

I have a job which has advantages and disadvantages like every other job.

Flexitime is definitely an advantage (don't think it's unique to the public sector), it allows me on occasion to arrive at 7:30 or 8 if I want to leave early, or miss the traffic and get in at 9:30 and work till 7. It also allows me to manage my time by building up a surplus at particularly busy times or a shortfall at less busy times to be reconciled at other times.

Sick pay is an advantage I suppose, but I can't see that people suddenly think to themselves "I'm gonna get paid anyway, I just won't go in today". Sorry but I just don't believe that, I'm pretty sure most people, wherever they work, have a pretty good idea whether they are fit for work or not.

Having not had a day off sick in 7 years before having a serious road accident which resulted in 2 months in hospital and over 10 months off sick, I think I can see it from both sides.
Flexi time?

Most of us work way over our contracted hours and it is not even noted.

your cushioned little world means you get paid for every minute.

There are often articles about how millions do not use up their full holiday allowance because of work loads. Can't imagine a public sector employee not getting their full quota in.
I have known and still know plenty of public sector employees who work beyond their hours, and into the night, without claiming for it, because they care about the people they are asked to look after and make sure they stay safe.
[quote][p][bold]scrumpyjack[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Wintonian[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scrumpyjack[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Wintonian[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]scrumpyjack[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Wintonian[/bold] wrote: There is an awful lot of missing information in this story, and a lot of rubbish as usual from the commenters. For a start, we are not told if it was a bad year for colds and flu, in which case every organisation would have increased absence, or if it was an average or 'good' year for sickness across the board, in which case the councils' performance would appear questionable. However, in any case, those of us who do work at the Town Hall can easily see how it all happens. In services where a 'job evaluation' exercise was carried out a few years ago resulting in many people's salaries being lowered sometimes by a few grand, a lot of those staff left and many posts were not refilled. This has resulted in the reamining staff reguarly working with next to no slack in the system whatsoever. That makes it difficult to manage hours (we are not supposed to carry forward more than 20 hours flexi per month but many people do, because otherwise the work doesn't get done, and of course then there's less and less time to get the hours back) and, yes, people will get stressed. In times of very low morale which is quite tangible in the Town Hall, people will I'm sure be less worried about taking time off sick where previously they might have battled it out. Add to that a third year of pay-freeze with ever spiralling outgoings (which I know is the same for all sectors) particularly the high cost of travelling to or parking in a town centre location, and people will be even less loyal to their employer. I'm sure in every office or building site or wherever, there are those truly dedicated to their work and those who will do the minimum required to stay in their job, and everything in between. Drop morale sufficiently and you will see more people veer towards the latter end of that scale. In summary, it doesn't surprise me, although nowhere in the article does it state whether this was due to some flu epidemic or whatever and in fact was felt in all walks of employment.[/p][/quote]3rd year of pay freeze? Lot's of colds going around? Flexi time?? Oh you poor sausage. I wish you lot could spend a couple of months in the real world. I know a few people who over the years have done the reverse and temped within Local Authority/Council jobs and to a man they all say exactly the same thing; that public sector workers have no idea and are a lazy, pampered, useless bunch who are too busy working out their entitlements and dealing with office politics to actually do a decent job. They have all been gobsmacked and disgusted in equal measures.[/p][/quote]What a stupid comment. I don't recall asking for sympathy! Are you seriously suggesting that every person who has ever worked in both sectors, suddenly becomes lazy or unlazy depending on where their current job is?[/p][/quote]So you comments weren't "oh woe is us, we have to endure so much and its so, so tough for us"? I beg to differ. There is no suddenly. They went, they saw, they left. The people recounting their experiences in the public sector did not become like their co-workers. In fact TWO people I know who did temp - one at a school office and another for the Tourist Centre were both told to "slow down" as they would make the others look bad. I kid you not.[/p][/quote]No, I don't believe I did. I have a job which has advantages and disadvantages like every other job. Flexitime is definitely an advantage (don't think it's unique to the public sector), it allows me on occasion to arrive at 7:30 or 8 if I want to leave early, or miss the traffic and get in at 9:30 and work till 7. It also allows me to manage my time by building up a surplus at particularly busy times or a shortfall at less busy times to be reconciled at other times. Sick pay is an advantage I suppose, but I can't see that people suddenly think to themselves "I'm gonna get paid anyway, I just won't go in today". Sorry but I just don't believe that, I'm pretty sure most people, wherever they work, have a pretty good idea whether they are fit for work or not. Having not had a day off sick in 7 years before having a serious road accident which resulted in 2 months in hospital and over 10 months off sick, I think I can see it from both sides.[/p][/quote]Flexi time? Most of us work way over our contracted hours and it is not even noted. your cushioned little world means you get paid for every minute. There are often articles about how millions do not use up their full holiday allowance because of work loads. Can't imagine a public sector employee not getting their full quota in.[/p][/quote]I have known and still know plenty of public sector employees who work beyond their hours, and into the night, without claiming for it, because they care about the people they are asked to look after and make sure they stay safe. s-pb2
  • Score: 0

11:37am Fri 23 Nov 12

afcbian-inexile says...

stress ?? stress ?? don't make me laugh. If most DCC employees spent a week in the private sector they wouldn't know if they were inside or out.
In the words of Jim Royale.........."Str
ess my a***"
stress ?? stress ?? don't make me laugh. If most DCC employees spent a week in the private sector they wouldn't know if they were inside or out. In the words of Jim Royale.........."Str ess my a***" afcbian-inexile
  • Score: 0

6:56am Sat 24 Nov 12

manyogie says...

This, by the way, is the same Union that paid and claimed expenses of one of it`s officials that lived in Parkstone for a weekend in the Royal Bath in Bournemouth to attend it`s conference.
Plus, of course, travelling expenses.
Reality, grip, getta, springs to mind.
This, by the way, is the same Union that paid and claimed expenses of one of it`s officials that lived in Parkstone for a weekend in the Royal Bath in Bournemouth to attend it`s conference. Plus, of course, travelling expenses. Reality, grip, getta, springs to mind. manyogie
  • Score: 0

12:07pm Sat 24 Nov 12

spooki says...

I was overworked where I used to work. That was in retail where we actually worked on Saturdays! We also worked on Bank holidays! AND SUNDAY'S!!! Can you believe it? We also worked after five o'clock Mondays to Saturdays. The private sector workers would soon moan if the shops, garages, pubs and restaurants worked the same hours they did. I do sympathise with those who are GENUINELY ill from anything but try doing a physically and mentally demanding retail job and see how you get on.
I was overworked where I used to work. That was in retail where we actually worked on Saturdays! We also worked on Bank holidays! AND SUNDAY'S!!! Can you believe it? We also worked after five o'clock Mondays to Saturdays. The private sector workers would soon moan if the shops, garages, pubs and restaurants worked the same hours they did. I do sympathise with those who are GENUINELY ill from anything but try doing a physically and mentally demanding retail job and see how you get on. spooki
  • Score: 0

12:13pm Sat 24 Nov 12

spooki says...

Sorry, I meant public sector, Council, Doctors and whatnot.
Sorry, I meant public sector, Council, Doctors and whatnot. spooki
  • Score: 0

1:47pm Sat 24 Nov 12

ILoveBoscombe says...

What makes you think public sector workers only work 9-5 Monday-Friday? There are a great many who work outside these hours.
What makes you think public sector workers only work 9-5 Monday-Friday? There are a great many who work outside these hours. ILoveBoscombe
  • Score: 0

2:57pm Sat 24 Nov 12

i hate do-gooders says...

if we were all as lucky to get paid for being sick !!!!!!!
if we were all as lucky to get paid for being sick !!!!!!! i hate do-gooders
  • Score: 0

12:37am Sun 25 Nov 12

s-pb2 says...

afcbian-inexile wrote:
stress ?? stress ?? don't make me laugh. If most DCC employees spent a week in the private sector they wouldn't know if they were inside or out.
In the words of Jim Royale..........&quo
t;Str
ess my a***"
If you read the article, it is the union speculating that stress is the main cause for absences. There is no substance to this claim, just the union stirring.
[quote][p][bold]afcbian-inexile[/bold] wrote: stress ?? stress ?? don't make me laugh. If most DCC employees spent a week in the private sector they wouldn't know if they were inside or out. In the words of Jim Royale..........&quo t;Str ess my a***"[/p][/quote]If you read the article, it is the union speculating that stress is the main cause for absences. There is no substance to this claim, just the union stirring. s-pb2
  • Score: 0

5:03pm Sun 25 Nov 12

Kernow2008 says...

spooki wrote:
I was overworked where I used to work. That was in retail where we actually worked on Saturdays! We also worked on Bank holidays! AND SUNDAY'S!!! Can you believe it? We also worked after five o'clock Mondays to Saturdays. The private sector workers would soon moan if the shops, garages, pubs and restaurants worked the same hours they did. I do sympathise with those who are GENUINELY ill from anything but try doing a physically and mentally demanding retail job and see how you get on.
Great comment, you need to educate yourself on public sector hours of work.
I work in the public sector, NHS, and work rotational shifts, earlies, lates and nights, I also work 3 weekends out of four and all bank holidays, where else in the private sector are these hours worked.
If it wasn't for nurses, cleaners, porters and many others the hospitals would come to a standstill.
You should also know that there are many stressful incidents involved with working in the NHS, so don't knock it before you try it, most private sector workers wouldn't last five minutes in some public sector jobs.
[quote][p][bold]spooki[/bold] wrote: I was overworked where I used to work. That was in retail where we actually worked on Saturdays! We also worked on Bank holidays! AND SUNDAY'S!!! Can you believe it? We also worked after five o'clock Mondays to Saturdays. The private sector workers would soon moan if the shops, garages, pubs and restaurants worked the same hours they did. I do sympathise with those who are GENUINELY ill from anything but try doing a physically and mentally demanding retail job and see how you get on.[/p][/quote]Great comment, you need to educate yourself on public sector hours of work. I work in the public sector, NHS, and work rotational shifts, earlies, lates and nights, I also work 3 weekends out of four and all bank holidays, where else in the private sector are these hours worked. If it wasn't for nurses, cleaners, porters and many others the hospitals would come to a standstill. You should also know that there are many stressful incidents involved with working in the NHS, so don't knock it before you try it, most private sector workers wouldn't last five minutes in some public sector jobs. Kernow2008
  • Score: 0

2:53am Mon 26 Nov 12

portia6 says...

Too many social climbers getting on
band wagons gerrymandering.
Too many social climbers getting on band wagons gerrymandering. portia6
  • Score: 0

6:29am Mon 26 Nov 12

Bomo JP says...

Kernow2008 wrote:
spooki wrote:
I was overworked where I used to work. That was in retail where we actually worked on Saturdays! We also worked on Bank holidays! AND SUNDAY'S!!! Can you believe it? We also worked after five o'clock Mondays to Saturdays. The private sector workers would soon moan if the shops, garages, pubs and restaurants worked the same hours they did. I do sympathise with those who are GENUINELY ill from anything but try doing a physically and mentally demanding retail job and see how you get on.
Great comment, you need to educate yourself on public sector hours of work.
I work in the public sector, NHS, and work rotational shifts, earlies, lates and nights, I also work 3 weekends out of four and all bank holidays, where else in the private sector are these hours worked.
If it wasn't for nurses, cleaners, porters and many others the hospitals would come to a standstill.
You should also know that there are many stressful incidents involved with working in the NHS, so don't knock it before you try it, most private sector workers wouldn't last five minutes in some public sector jobs.
I work in the private sector and have to work all those hours etc but then i get well paid for it, have a better final salary pension as well. So not complaining like some of the selfish ones on here. Keep up the good work. Some of us appreciate you!
[quote][p][bold]Kernow2008[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]spooki[/bold] wrote: I was overworked where I used to work. That was in retail where we actually worked on Saturdays! We also worked on Bank holidays! AND SUNDAY'S!!! Can you believe it? We also worked after five o'clock Mondays to Saturdays. The private sector workers would soon moan if the shops, garages, pubs and restaurants worked the same hours they did. I do sympathise with those who are GENUINELY ill from anything but try doing a physically and mentally demanding retail job and see how you get on.[/p][/quote]Great comment, you need to educate yourself on public sector hours of work. I work in the public sector, NHS, and work rotational shifts, earlies, lates and nights, I also work 3 weekends out of four and all bank holidays, where else in the private sector are these hours worked. If it wasn't for nurses, cleaners, porters and many others the hospitals would come to a standstill. You should also know that there are many stressful incidents involved with working in the NHS, so don't knock it before you try it, most private sector workers wouldn't last five minutes in some public sector jobs.[/p][/quote]I work in the private sector and have to work all those hours etc but then i get well paid for it, have a better final salary pension as well. So not complaining like some of the selfish ones on here. Keep up the good work. Some of us appreciate you! Bomo JP
  • Score: 0

7:37am Mon 26 Nov 12

bobthedestroyer says...

I'm sorry, but the Union are just making noises. Bmth council employees aren't the only ones with increased work load. Everyone who can be bothered to work is under more pressure. Maybe they have high sickness because staff are bored as they don't have enough to do. Stress works both ways.
I'm sorry, but the Union are just making noises. Bmth council employees aren't the only ones with increased work load. Everyone who can be bothered to work is under more pressure. Maybe they have high sickness because staff are bored as they don't have enough to do. Stress works both ways. bobthedestroyer
  • Score: 0

7:37am Mon 26 Nov 12

bobthedestroyer says...

I'm sorry, but the Union are just making noises. Bmth council employees aren't the only ones with increased work load. Everyone who can be bothered to work is under more pressure. Maybe they have high sickness because staff are bored as they don't have enough to do. Stress works both ways.
I'm sorry, but the Union are just making noises. Bmth council employees aren't the only ones with increased work load. Everyone who can be bothered to work is under more pressure. Maybe they have high sickness because staff are bored as they don't have enough to do. Stress works both ways. bobthedestroyer
  • Score: 0

9:20am Mon 26 Nov 12

Kernow2008 says...

Bomo JP wrote:
Kernow2008 wrote:
spooki wrote:
I was overworked where I used to work. That was in retail where we actually worked on Saturdays! We also worked on Bank holidays! AND SUNDAY'S!!! Can you believe it? We also worked after five o'clock Mondays to Saturdays. The private sector workers would soon moan if the shops, garages, pubs and restaurants worked the same hours they did. I do sympathise with those who are GENUINELY ill from anything but try doing a physically and mentally demanding retail job and see how you get on.
Great comment, you need to educate yourself on public sector hours of work.
I work in the public sector, NHS, and work rotational shifts, earlies, lates and nights, I also work 3 weekends out of four and all bank holidays, where else in the private sector are these hours worked.
If it wasn't for nurses, cleaners, porters and many others the hospitals would come to a standstill.
You should also know that there are many stressful incidents involved with working in the NHS, so don't knock it before you try it, most private sector workers wouldn't last five minutes in some public sector jobs.
I work in the private sector and have to work all those hours etc but then i get well paid for it, have a better final salary pension as well. So not complaining like some of the selfish ones on here. Keep up the good work. Some of us appreciate you!
Thank you for your kind words, I suspect that not many people would work my hours on such a measly wage, people on benefits have more take home pay than myself and they don't have to put up with the violence and aggression we suffer at the hand of drunks and drugged up patients but It's my choice to work in a worthwhile profession and I get much satisfaction knowing that I have helped so many people in need, not all public sector employees are on vast incomes and stress and depression can creep in at times within the council as well as the NHS.
[quote][p][bold]Bomo JP[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Kernow2008[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]spooki[/bold] wrote: I was overworked where I used to work. That was in retail where we actually worked on Saturdays! We also worked on Bank holidays! AND SUNDAY'S!!! Can you believe it? We also worked after five o'clock Mondays to Saturdays. The private sector workers would soon moan if the shops, garages, pubs and restaurants worked the same hours they did. I do sympathise with those who are GENUINELY ill from anything but try doing a physically and mentally demanding retail job and see how you get on.[/p][/quote]Great comment, you need to educate yourself on public sector hours of work. I work in the public sector, NHS, and work rotational shifts, earlies, lates and nights, I also work 3 weekends out of four and all bank holidays, where else in the private sector are these hours worked. If it wasn't for nurses, cleaners, porters and many others the hospitals would come to a standstill. You should also know that there are many stressful incidents involved with working in the NHS, so don't knock it before you try it, most private sector workers wouldn't last five minutes in some public sector jobs.[/p][/quote]I work in the private sector and have to work all those hours etc but then i get well paid for it, have a better final salary pension as well. So not complaining like some of the selfish ones on here. Keep up the good work. Some of us appreciate you![/p][/quote]Thank you for your kind words, I suspect that not many people would work my hours on such a measly wage, people on benefits have more take home pay than myself and they don't have to put up with the violence and aggression we suffer at the hand of drunks and drugged up patients but It's my choice to work in a worthwhile profession and I get much satisfaction knowing that I have helped so many people in need, not all public sector employees are on vast incomes and stress and depression can creep in at times within the council as well as the NHS. Kernow2008
  • Score: 0

11:20am Mon 26 Nov 12

Wintonian says...

It says the average for all working people is 4½ days a year, but I wonder where the local councils sit in the averages, in terms of how hard-labour orientated the organisation is.

If I have a slightly sprained ankle or somesuch, it isn't going to stop me from working as I am office-based. But I would imagine it could cause a couple of weeks' absence for a road maintenance guy or a binman or a gardener.

If the 'average' firm is pretty much office based, then it is not surprising that councils will have higher sickness rates, but if the 'average' firm has a fair bit of manual work, then the figures for councils are perhaps worse than reflected in the article.
It says the average for all working people is 4½ days a year, but I wonder where the local councils sit in the averages, in terms of how hard-labour orientated the organisation is. If I have a slightly sprained ankle or somesuch, it isn't going to stop me from working as I am office-based. But I would imagine it could cause a couple of weeks' absence for a road maintenance guy or a binman or a gardener. If the 'average' firm is pretty much office based, then it is not surprising that councils will have higher sickness rates, but if the 'average' firm has a fair bit of manual work, then the figures for councils are perhaps worse than reflected in the article. Wintonian
  • Score: 0

12:24pm Mon 26 Nov 12

Gary Sherborne says...

Bournemouth Borough Council. as sick as its secrets.
Bournemouth Borough Council. as sick as its secrets. Gary Sherborne
  • Score: 0

2:31pm Mon 26 Nov 12

portia6 says...

Spare a thought for the mothers left
to bring up children on their own
due to heartless husbands walking out
and leaving a trail of heart-break and
financial ruin behind.
Spare a thought for the mothers left to bring up children on their own due to heartless husbands walking out and leaving a trail of heart-break and financial ruin behind. portia6
  • Score: 0

5:07pm Mon 26 Nov 12

countrycherry says...

Unbelievable ! Although perhaps not . They really don't know what a stressful job is .Just as well they don't have to worry about their pension scheme like everyone else ! Sounds like we can get rid of another 2% at least if my maths is correct, based on the extra 5 days per year.
Unbelievable ! Although perhaps not . They really don't know what a stressful job is .Just as well they don't have to worry about their pension scheme like everyone else ! Sounds like we can get rid of another 2% at least if my maths is correct, based on the extra 5 days per year. countrycherry
  • Score: 0

9:53am Tue 27 Nov 12

Hector2004 says...

I’ve worked down here for a year now and have noticed this trend myself; people do appear to be incredibly sickly down here. I can count on one hand how many sick days I’ve had in the last five years and I’m pretty sure I’ve not had one in the last couple of years; however, there are people in my department who spend probably 20% of their time sick with snifflers. It all seems a bit odd, certainly nothing I’m used to.
I’ve worked down here for a year now and have noticed this trend myself; people do appear to be incredibly sickly down here. I can count on one hand how many sick days I’ve had in the last five years and I’m pretty sure I’ve not had one in the last couple of years; however, there are people in my department who spend probably 20% of their time sick with snifflers. It all seems a bit odd, certainly nothing I’m used to. Hector2004
  • Score: 0

11:26am Tue 27 Nov 12

Dorset Logic says...

lightweights
lightweights Dorset Logic
  • Score: 0

2:46pm Tue 27 Nov 12

portia6 says...

Poor health is a result of not taking
care of one's self. I would bet that
the people who have lots of colds and
coughs are smokers, most likely are
not eating properly and suffer with
depression. Don't quote me on that
its a sweeping statement of course!
There is also the problem of bullying in
the workplace that can take its toll.
Poor health is a result of not taking care of one's self. I would bet that the people who have lots of colds and coughs are smokers, most likely are not eating properly and suffer with depression. Don't quote me on that its a sweeping statement of course! There is also the problem of bullying in the workplace that can take its toll. portia6
  • Score: 0

2:52pm Tue 27 Nov 12

portia6 says...

Lord Spring wrote:
Does Maternity Leave count as sick pay ?.


Also noted that one big regular one liner poster has not tuned into this debate.
I hear there is going to be a baby boom
anytime soon!
[quote][p][bold]Lord Spring[/bold] wrote: Does Maternity Leave count as sick pay ?. Also noted that one big regular one liner poster has not tuned into this debate.[/p][/quote]I hear there is going to be a baby boom anytime soon! portia6
  • Score: 0

3:21pm Tue 27 Nov 12

portia6 says...

Hector2004 wrote:
I’ve worked down here for a year now and have noticed this trend myself; people do appear to be incredibly sickly down here. I can count on one hand how many sick days I’ve had in the last five years and I’m pretty sure I’ve not had one in the last couple of years; however, there are people in my department who spend probably 20% of their time sick with snifflers. It all seems a bit odd, certainly nothing I’m used to.
Perhaps they need to bring in the
industrial nurse to give medical check-
ups. Maybe stock up on vitamins and
bring in Jamie Oliver to cook for the
employees who don't eat properly!
[quote][p][bold]Hector2004[/bold] wrote: I’ve worked down here for a year now and have noticed this trend myself; people do appear to be incredibly sickly down here. I can count on one hand how many sick days I’ve had in the last five years and I’m pretty sure I’ve not had one in the last couple of years; however, there are people in my department who spend probably 20% of their time sick with snifflers. It all seems a bit odd, certainly nothing I’m used to.[/p][/quote]Perhaps they need to bring in the industrial nurse to give medical check- ups. Maybe stock up on vitamins and bring in Jamie Oliver to cook for the employees who don't eat properly! portia6
  • Score: 0

3:51pm Tue 27 Nov 12

portia6 says...

Lord Spring wrote:
Does Maternity Leave count as sick pay ?.


Also noted that one big regular one liner poster has not tuned into this debate.
Baby boomers they are everywhere!
[quote][p][bold]Lord Spring[/bold] wrote: Does Maternity Leave count as sick pay ?. Also noted that one big regular one liner poster has not tuned into this debate.[/p][/quote]Baby boomers they are everywhere! portia6
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree