Benefits cheat who claimed £4,000 caught trying to board plane to Florida

Benefits cheat who claimed £4,000 caught as he boarded plane to Florida

Benefits cheat who claimed £4,000 caught as he boarded plane to Florida

First published in News
Last updated

A BENEFIT fraudster who falsely claimed nearly £4,000 was caught while trying to go to Florida.

Duncan Charles Oliver had $7,000 in cash when he was arrested at Gatwick Airport by Sussex Police on May 28, just before he boarded a flight to Orlando.

The 48-year-old pleaded guilty at Bournemouth Magistrates’ Court the next day to falsely claiming £3,730 from Purbeck District Council in benefit for bed and breakfast accommodation in Upton.

His claim dated back to May 2011, but he had left the property after just one month. After he was first caught at a job centre in Reading, he was due to appear in court in February but failed to attend, leading to a warrant being issued.

Oliver, of no fixed abode, was ordered to repay the money and given a 12 month conditional discharge. He was also ordered to pay £85 costs.

To report suspected benefit fraud, contact 01305 211938.

Comments (18)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

8:41am Thu 12 Jun 14

ben1982 says...

Benefit fraud average costs 31 times lower than MP expense over claims.
After George Osborne was accused by churches of exaggerating the scale of benefit fraud in October 2010, this latest move has led to renewed charges from charities that the government is “using unusual fraud cases to support changes which could have a serious and negative impact on the lives of hundreds of thousands of disabled people.”

Perhaps Iain Duncan Smith and his DWP spinners would benefit from some context. The £1.1 billion cost of fraud (a modest 0.7% of the total benefits spend) averages out to £59 across 18.5 million claimants.* In contrast, MPs were ordered to pay back £1.2 million in the wake of Thomas Legg’s inquiry into expenses, an average of £1,858 for the 646 members of the Commons.

benefit_fraud_vs_exp
enses1Looking for offenders to castigate in press releases, the DWP ministerial team need not look beyond their own ranks: Chris Grayling claimed thousands to renovate a flat in central London – bought with a mortgage funded at taxpayers’ expense – even though his constituency home is less than 17 miles from the House of Commons; Steve Webb claimed for £8,400 in stamp duty after he sold his Westminster flat and bought anotherjust 100 yards down the road.

Can the “quiet man” please turn down the volume on these smears?
Benefit fraud average costs 31 times lower than MP expense over claims. After George Osborne was accused by churches of exaggerating the scale of benefit fraud in October 2010, this latest move has led to renewed charges from charities that the government is “using unusual fraud cases to support changes which could have a serious and negative impact on the lives of hundreds of thousands of disabled people.” Perhaps Iain Duncan Smith and his DWP spinners would benefit from some context. The £1.1 billion cost of fraud (a modest 0.7% of the total benefits spend) averages out to £59 across 18.5 million claimants.* In contrast, MPs were ordered to pay back £1.2 million in the wake of Thomas Legg’s inquiry into expenses, an average of £1,858 for the 646 members of the Commons. benefit_fraud_vs_exp enses1Looking for offenders to castigate in press releases, the DWP ministerial team need not look beyond their own ranks: Chris Grayling claimed thousands to renovate a flat in central London – bought with a mortgage funded at taxpayers’ expense – even though his constituency home is less than 17 miles from the House of Commons; Steve Webb claimed for £8,400 in stamp duty after he sold his Westminster flat and bought anotherjust 100 yards down the road. Can the “quiet man” please turn down the volume on these smears? ben1982
  • Score: 50

9:19am Thu 12 Jun 14

High Treason says...

No fixed abode. In reality he will pay back nothing.
No fixed abode. In reality he will pay back nothing. High Treason
  • Score: -21

10:32am Thu 12 Jun 14

BournemouthMum says...

ben1982 wrote:
Benefit fraud average costs 31 times lower than MP expense over claims.
After George Osborne was accused by churches of exaggerating the scale of benefit fraud in October 2010, this latest move has led to renewed charges from charities that the government is “using unusual fraud cases to support changes which could have a serious and negative impact on the lives of hundreds of thousands of disabled people.”

Perhaps Iain Duncan Smith and his DWP spinners would benefit from some context. The £1.1 billion cost of fraud (a modest 0.7% of the total benefits spend) averages out to £59 across 18.5 million claimants.* In contrast, MPs were ordered to pay back £1.2 million in the wake of Thomas Legg’s inquiry into expenses, an average of £1,858 for the 646 members of the Commons.

benefit_fraud_vs_exp

enses1Looking for offenders to castigate in press releases, the DWP ministerial team need not look beyond their own ranks: Chris Grayling claimed thousands to renovate a flat in central London – bought with a mortgage funded at taxpayers’ expense – even though his constituency home is less than 17 miles from the House of Commons; Steve Webb claimed for £8,400 in stamp duty after he sold his Westminster flat and bought anotherjust 100 yards down the road.

Can the “quiet man” please turn down the volume on these smears?
Any fool can see that the strategic use of press releases has been used to turn us into a nation of 'benefit haters' - and attempting to create the impression that people claiming benefits are thieves or scroungers. Pretty obvious really.
[quote][p][bold]ben1982[/bold] wrote: Benefit fraud average costs 31 times lower than MP expense over claims. After George Osborne was accused by churches of exaggerating the scale of benefit fraud in October 2010, this latest move has led to renewed charges from charities that the government is “using unusual fraud cases to support changes which could have a serious and negative impact on the lives of hundreds of thousands of disabled people.” Perhaps Iain Duncan Smith and his DWP spinners would benefit from some context. The £1.1 billion cost of fraud (a modest 0.7% of the total benefits spend) averages out to £59 across 18.5 million claimants.* In contrast, MPs were ordered to pay back £1.2 million in the wake of Thomas Legg’s inquiry into expenses, an average of £1,858 for the 646 members of the Commons. benefit_fraud_vs_exp enses1Looking for offenders to castigate in press releases, the DWP ministerial team need not look beyond their own ranks: Chris Grayling claimed thousands to renovate a flat in central London – bought with a mortgage funded at taxpayers’ expense – even though his constituency home is less than 17 miles from the House of Commons; Steve Webb claimed for £8,400 in stamp duty after he sold his Westminster flat and bought anotherjust 100 yards down the road. Can the “quiet man” please turn down the volume on these smears?[/p][/quote]Any fool can see that the strategic use of press releases has been used to turn us into a nation of 'benefit haters' - and attempting to create the impression that people claiming benefits are thieves or scroungers. Pretty obvious really. BournemouthMum
  • Score: 40

10:32am Thu 12 Jun 14

BmthNewshound says...

ben1982 wrote:
Benefit fraud average costs 31 times lower than MP expense over claims.
After George Osborne was accused by churches of exaggerating the scale of benefit fraud in October 2010, this latest move has led to renewed charges from charities that the government is “using unusual fraud cases to support changes which could have a serious and negative impact on the lives of hundreds of thousands of disabled people.”

Perhaps Iain Duncan Smith and his DWP spinners would benefit from some context. The £1.1 billion cost of fraud (a modest 0.7% of the total benefits spend) averages out to £59 across 18.5 million claimants.* In contrast, MPs were ordered to pay back £1.2 million in the wake of Thomas Legg’s inquiry into expenses, an average of £1,858 for the 646 members of the Commons.

benefit_fraud_vs_exp

enses1Looking for offenders to castigate in press releases, the DWP ministerial team need not look beyond their own ranks: Chris Grayling claimed thousands to renovate a flat in central London – bought with a mortgage funded at taxpayers’ expense – even though his constituency home is less than 17 miles from the House of Commons; Steve Webb claimed for £8,400 in stamp duty after he sold his Westminster flat and bought anotherjust 100 yards down the road.

Can the “quiet man” please turn down the volume on these smears?
From the number of thumbs up it seems that there must be a lot of people in Bournemouth who think that benefits fraud is acceptable...... speaks volumes about the people of Bournemouth.
[quote][p][bold]ben1982[/bold] wrote: Benefit fraud average costs 31 times lower than MP expense over claims. After George Osborne was accused by churches of exaggerating the scale of benefit fraud in October 2010, this latest move has led to renewed charges from charities that the government is “using unusual fraud cases to support changes which could have a serious and negative impact on the lives of hundreds of thousands of disabled people.” Perhaps Iain Duncan Smith and his DWP spinners would benefit from some context. The £1.1 billion cost of fraud (a modest 0.7% of the total benefits spend) averages out to £59 across 18.5 million claimants.* In contrast, MPs were ordered to pay back £1.2 million in the wake of Thomas Legg’s inquiry into expenses, an average of £1,858 for the 646 members of the Commons. benefit_fraud_vs_exp enses1Looking for offenders to castigate in press releases, the DWP ministerial team need not look beyond their own ranks: Chris Grayling claimed thousands to renovate a flat in central London – bought with a mortgage funded at taxpayers’ expense – even though his constituency home is less than 17 miles from the House of Commons; Steve Webb claimed for £8,400 in stamp duty after he sold his Westminster flat and bought anotherjust 100 yards down the road. Can the “quiet man” please turn down the volume on these smears?[/p][/quote]From the number of thumbs up it seems that there must be a lot of people in Bournemouth who think that benefits fraud is acceptable...... speaks volumes about the people of Bournemouth. BmthNewshound
  • Score: -6

10:46am Thu 12 Jun 14

MrPitiful says...

BmthNewshound wrote:
ben1982 wrote:
Benefit fraud average costs 31 times lower than MP expense over claims.
After George Osborne was accused by churches of exaggerating the scale of benefit fraud in October 2010, this latest move has led to renewed charges from charities that the government is “using unusual fraud cases to support changes which could have a serious and negative impact on the lives of hundreds of thousands of disabled people.”

Perhaps Iain Duncan Smith and his DWP spinners would benefit from some context. The £1.1 billion cost of fraud (a modest 0.7% of the total benefits spend) averages out to £59 across 18.5 million claimants.* In contrast, MPs were ordered to pay back £1.2 million in the wake of Thomas Legg’s inquiry into expenses, an average of £1,858 for the 646 members of the Commons.

benefit_fraud_vs_exp


enses1Looking for offenders to castigate in press releases, the DWP ministerial team need not look beyond their own ranks: Chris Grayling claimed thousands to renovate a flat in central London – bought with a mortgage funded at taxpayers’ expense – even though his constituency home is less than 17 miles from the House of Commons; Steve Webb claimed for £8,400 in stamp duty after he sold his Westminster flat and bought anotherjust 100 yards down the road.

Can the “quiet man” please turn down the volume on these smears?
From the number of thumbs up it seems that there must be a lot of people in Bournemouth who think that benefits fraud is acceptable...... speaks volumes about the people of Bournemouth.
I'm not sure it's a case that the people of Bournemouth consider benefit fraud to be acceptable.

I really think it is more a case of the readers of this article have an idea of the context of the cost of benefit fraud to the taxpayer in comparison to the cost of fraudulent expenses claims made by our already over-paid and under-worked MP's.

As well as this, the pressing of the thumbs down thingymajig is posssibly a simple way of relieving their frustration of the fact that while benefit fraudsters are endlessly pursued for what sometimes amounts to a few hundred quid, the fraudulent MP's get away scott-free by just issuing in some cases a quick apology on a Thursday afternoon in the House of Commons.

Terrible ain't it?
[quote][p][bold]BmthNewshound[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ben1982[/bold] wrote: Benefit fraud average costs 31 times lower than MP expense over claims. After George Osborne was accused by churches of exaggerating the scale of benefit fraud in October 2010, this latest move has led to renewed charges from charities that the government is “using unusual fraud cases to support changes which could have a serious and negative impact on the lives of hundreds of thousands of disabled people.” Perhaps Iain Duncan Smith and his DWP spinners would benefit from some context. The £1.1 billion cost of fraud (a modest 0.7% of the total benefits spend) averages out to £59 across 18.5 million claimants.* In contrast, MPs were ordered to pay back £1.2 million in the wake of Thomas Legg’s inquiry into expenses, an average of £1,858 for the 646 members of the Commons. benefit_fraud_vs_exp enses1Looking for offenders to castigate in press releases, the DWP ministerial team need not look beyond their own ranks: Chris Grayling claimed thousands to renovate a flat in central London – bought with a mortgage funded at taxpayers’ expense – even though his constituency home is less than 17 miles from the House of Commons; Steve Webb claimed for £8,400 in stamp duty after he sold his Westminster flat and bought anotherjust 100 yards down the road. Can the “quiet man” please turn down the volume on these smears?[/p][/quote]From the number of thumbs up it seems that there must be a lot of people in Bournemouth who think that benefits fraud is acceptable...... speaks volumes about the people of Bournemouth.[/p][/quote]I'm not sure it's a case that the people of Bournemouth consider benefit fraud to be acceptable. I really think it is more a case of the readers of this article have an idea of the context of the cost of benefit fraud to the taxpayer in comparison to the cost of fraudulent expenses claims made by our already over-paid and under-worked MP's. As well as this, the pressing of the thumbs down thingymajig is posssibly a simple way of relieving their frustration of the fact that while benefit fraudsters are endlessly pursued for what sometimes amounts to a few hundred quid, the fraudulent MP's get away scott-free by just issuing in some cases a quick apology on a Thursday afternoon in the House of Commons. Terrible ain't it? MrPitiful
  • Score: 60

1:09pm Thu 12 Jun 14

ragj195 says...

BmthNewshound wrote:
ben1982 wrote:
Benefit fraud average costs 31 times lower than MP expense over claims.
After George Osborne was accused by churches of exaggerating the scale of benefit fraud in October 2010, this latest move has led to renewed charges from charities that the government is “using unusual fraud cases to support changes which could have a serious and negative impact on the lives of hundreds of thousands of disabled people.”

Perhaps Iain Duncan Smith and his DWP spinners would benefit from some context. The £1.1 billion cost of fraud (a modest 0.7% of the total benefits spend) averages out to £59 across 18.5 million claimants.* In contrast, MPs were ordered to pay back £1.2 million in the wake of Thomas Legg’s inquiry into expenses, an average of £1,858 for the 646 members of the Commons.

benefit_fraud_vs_exp


enses1Looking for offenders to castigate in press releases, the DWP ministerial team need not look beyond their own ranks: Chris Grayling claimed thousands to renovate a flat in central London – bought with a mortgage funded at taxpayers’ expense – even though his constituency home is less than 17 miles from the House of Commons; Steve Webb claimed for £8,400 in stamp duty after he sold his Westminster flat and bought anotherjust 100 yards down the road.

Can the “quiet man” please turn down the volume on these smears?
From the number of thumbs up it seems that there must be a lot of people in Bournemouth who think that benefits fraud is acceptable...... speaks volumes about the people of Bournemouth.
In that case from the number of thumbs down it seems you're wrong.
[quote][p][bold]BmthNewshound[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ben1982[/bold] wrote: Benefit fraud average costs 31 times lower than MP expense over claims. After George Osborne was accused by churches of exaggerating the scale of benefit fraud in October 2010, this latest move has led to renewed charges from charities that the government is “using unusual fraud cases to support changes which could have a serious and negative impact on the lives of hundreds of thousands of disabled people.” Perhaps Iain Duncan Smith and his DWP spinners would benefit from some context. The £1.1 billion cost of fraud (a modest 0.7% of the total benefits spend) averages out to £59 across 18.5 million claimants.* In contrast, MPs were ordered to pay back £1.2 million in the wake of Thomas Legg’s inquiry into expenses, an average of £1,858 for the 646 members of the Commons. benefit_fraud_vs_exp enses1Looking for offenders to castigate in press releases, the DWP ministerial team need not look beyond their own ranks: Chris Grayling claimed thousands to renovate a flat in central London – bought with a mortgage funded at taxpayers’ expense – even though his constituency home is less than 17 miles from the House of Commons; Steve Webb claimed for £8,400 in stamp duty after he sold his Westminster flat and bought anotherjust 100 yards down the road. Can the “quiet man” please turn down the volume on these smears?[/p][/quote]From the number of thumbs up it seems that there must be a lot of people in Bournemouth who think that benefits fraud is acceptable...... speaks volumes about the people of Bournemouth.[/p][/quote]In that case from the number of thumbs down it seems you're wrong. ragj195
  • Score: -17

1:41pm Thu 12 Jun 14

joeinpoole says...

ben1982 wrote:
Benefit fraud average costs 31 times lower than MP expense over claims.
After George Osborne was accused by churches of exaggerating the scale of benefit fraud in October 2010, this latest move has led to renewed charges from charities that the government is “using unusual fraud cases to support changes which could have a serious and negative impact on the lives of hundreds of thousands of disabled people.”

Perhaps Iain Duncan Smith and his DWP spinners would benefit from some context. The £1.1 billion cost of fraud (a modest 0.7% of the total benefits spend) averages out to £59 across 18.5 million claimants.* In contrast, MPs were ordered to pay back £1.2 million in the wake of Thomas Legg’s inquiry into expenses, an average of £1,858 for the 646 members of the Commons.

benefit_fraud_vs_exp

enses1Looking for offenders to castigate in press releases, the DWP ministerial team need not look beyond their own ranks: Chris Grayling claimed thousands to renovate a flat in central London – bought with a mortgage funded at taxpayers’ expense – even though his constituency home is less than 17 miles from the House of Commons; Steve Webb claimed for £8,400 in stamp duty after he sold his Westminster flat and bought anotherjust 100 yards down the road.

Can the “quiet man” please turn down the volume on these smears?
You are being very selective in your use of statistics. For example the 18.5M "claimants" you quote includes everyone drawing their well-earned state pension. They are hardly 'benefits claimants' and anyway have little or no opportunity to make fraudulent claims because their situation does not change.

The fact that some MPs fiddled their expenses (and more of them should have been sent to jail) does not make it "ok" for anyone on benefits to cheat the system with impunity, as you appear to suggest.
[quote][p][bold]ben1982[/bold] wrote: Benefit fraud average costs 31 times lower than MP expense over claims. After George Osborne was accused by churches of exaggerating the scale of benefit fraud in October 2010, this latest move has led to renewed charges from charities that the government is “using unusual fraud cases to support changes which could have a serious and negative impact on the lives of hundreds of thousands of disabled people.” Perhaps Iain Duncan Smith and his DWP spinners would benefit from some context. The £1.1 billion cost of fraud (a modest 0.7% of the total benefits spend) averages out to £59 across 18.5 million claimants.* In contrast, MPs were ordered to pay back £1.2 million in the wake of Thomas Legg’s inquiry into expenses, an average of £1,858 for the 646 members of the Commons. benefit_fraud_vs_exp enses1Looking for offenders to castigate in press releases, the DWP ministerial team need not look beyond their own ranks: Chris Grayling claimed thousands to renovate a flat in central London – bought with a mortgage funded at taxpayers’ expense – even though his constituency home is less than 17 miles from the House of Commons; Steve Webb claimed for £8,400 in stamp duty after he sold his Westminster flat and bought anotherjust 100 yards down the road. Can the “quiet man” please turn down the volume on these smears?[/p][/quote]You are being very selective in your use of statistics. For example the 18.5M "claimants" you quote includes everyone drawing their well-earned state pension. They are hardly 'benefits claimants' and anyway have little or no opportunity to make fraudulent claims because their situation does not change. The fact that some MPs fiddled their expenses (and more of them should have been sent to jail) does not make it "ok" for anyone on benefits to cheat the system with impunity, as you appear to suggest. joeinpoole
  • Score: -26

3:51pm Thu 12 Jun 14

bobskin123 says...

Pretty sure the 4 grand didn't pay for this holiday have you seen the prices of holidays to America.
Pretty sure the 4 grand didn't pay for this holiday have you seen the prices of holidays to America. bobskin123
  • Score: -30

3:54pm Thu 12 Jun 14

crazybird says...

It is never acceptable to defraud the benefits system. Us taxpayers are paying tax and NIi on our salaries and tax on everything else so that we can fund people that aren't prepared to work. Don't get me wrong, not everyone on benefits is lazy or work shy by any means. But we have a disproportionate amount of people sat on their backsides doing naff all and now the summer is here they will reap the rewards of benefits whilst sunbathing and doing even less. If they are prepared to work they should be out in the community helping with rubbish collection, grafitti removal and other tasks just so that they are doing something for the money they are receiving. Wait, people will now start waffling about human rights and that they can't be made to do this kind of thing - if you want to take the money the government are handing out then you should be prepared to do something to earn it!
It is never acceptable to defraud the benefits system. Us taxpayers are paying tax and NIi on our salaries and tax on everything else so that we can fund people that aren't prepared to work. Don't get me wrong, not everyone on benefits is lazy or work shy by any means. But we have a disproportionate amount of people sat on their backsides doing naff all and now the summer is here they will reap the rewards of benefits whilst sunbathing and doing even less. If they are prepared to work they should be out in the community helping with rubbish collection, grafitti removal and other tasks just so that they are doing something for the money they are receiving. Wait, people will now start waffling about human rights and that they can't be made to do this kind of thing - if you want to take the money the government are handing out then you should be prepared to do something to earn it! crazybird
  • Score: -26

5:01pm Thu 12 Jun 14

rubberbandman5 says...

The best bit was giving out the telephone number for reporting the scumbags.
The best bit was giving out the telephone number for reporting the scumbags. rubberbandman5
  • Score: -28

8:50pm Thu 12 Jun 14

kalebmoledirt says...

Missed a trick there should have let him out and refused entry
Missed a trick there should have let him out and refused entry kalebmoledirt
  • Score: -40

10:08pm Thu 12 Jun 14

golfer33 says...

Oliver, of no fixed abode, was ordered to repay the money and given a 12 month conditional discharge. He was also ordered to pay £85 costs.

So he only got fined 85 quid, not bad, it will surely encourage others to try benefit fraud.
Oliver, of no fixed abode, was ordered to repay the money and given a 12 month conditional discharge. He was also ordered to pay £85 costs. So he only got fined 85 quid, not bad, it will surely encourage others to try benefit fraud. golfer33
  • Score: -35

4:22pm Fri 13 Jun 14

ben1982 says...

joeinpoole wrote:
ben1982 wrote:
Benefit fraud average costs 31 times lower than MP expense over claims.
After George Osborne was accused by churches of exaggerating the scale of benefit fraud in October 2010, this latest move has led to renewed charges from charities that the government is “using unusual fraud cases to support changes which could have a serious and negative impact on the lives of hundreds of thousands of disabled people.”

Perhaps Iain Duncan Smith and his DWP spinners would benefit from some context. The £1.1 billion cost of fraud (a modest 0.7% of the total benefits spend) averages out to £59 across 18.5 million claimants.* In contrast, MPs were ordered to pay back £1.2 million in the wake of Thomas Legg’s inquiry into expenses, an average of £1,858 for the 646 members of the Commons.

benefit_fraud_vs_exp


enses1Looking for offenders to castigate in press releases, the DWP ministerial team need not look beyond their own ranks: Chris Grayling claimed thousands to renovate a flat in central London – bought with a mortgage funded at taxpayers’ expense – even though his constituency home is less than 17 miles from the House of Commons; Steve Webb claimed for £8,400 in stamp duty after he sold his Westminster flat and bought anotherjust 100 yards down the road.

Can the “quiet man” please turn down the volume on these smears?
You are being very selective in your use of statistics. For example the 18.5M "claimants" you quote includes everyone drawing their well-earned state pension. They are hardly 'benefits claimants' and anyway have little or no opportunity to make fraudulent claims because their situation does not change.

The fact that some MPs fiddled their expenses (and more of them should have been sent to jail) does not make it "ok" for anyone on benefits to cheat the system with impunity, as you appear to suggest.
The REAL welfare queens; the ultimate parasites who are draining the life blood out of the UK economy so they can add it to their hoard.

These are the people who make money out of the wars in which our children fight and die. They are the ones who benefit when UK jobs and UK industry are shipped overseas. They buy almost every election. They control the majority of the elected officials in all parties. Our government functions for them. It has become government of the corporation, by the corporation and for the corporation.
[quote][p][bold]joeinpoole[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]ben1982[/bold] wrote: Benefit fraud average costs 31 times lower than MP expense over claims. After George Osborne was accused by churches of exaggerating the scale of benefit fraud in October 2010, this latest move has led to renewed charges from charities that the government is “using unusual fraud cases to support changes which could have a serious and negative impact on the lives of hundreds of thousands of disabled people.” Perhaps Iain Duncan Smith and his DWP spinners would benefit from some context. The £1.1 billion cost of fraud (a modest 0.7% of the total benefits spend) averages out to £59 across 18.5 million claimants.* In contrast, MPs were ordered to pay back £1.2 million in the wake of Thomas Legg’s inquiry into expenses, an average of £1,858 for the 646 members of the Commons. benefit_fraud_vs_exp enses1Looking for offenders to castigate in press releases, the DWP ministerial team need not look beyond their own ranks: Chris Grayling claimed thousands to renovate a flat in central London – bought with a mortgage funded at taxpayers’ expense – even though his constituency home is less than 17 miles from the House of Commons; Steve Webb claimed for £8,400 in stamp duty after he sold his Westminster flat and bought anotherjust 100 yards down the road. Can the “quiet man” please turn down the volume on these smears?[/p][/quote]You are being very selective in your use of statistics. For example the 18.5M "claimants" you quote includes everyone drawing their well-earned state pension. They are hardly 'benefits claimants' and anyway have little or no opportunity to make fraudulent claims because their situation does not change. The fact that some MPs fiddled their expenses (and more of them should have been sent to jail) does not make it "ok" for anyone on benefits to cheat the system with impunity, as you appear to suggest.[/p][/quote]The REAL welfare queens; the ultimate parasites who are draining the life blood out of the UK economy so they can add it to their hoard. These are the people who make money out of the wars in which our children fight and die. They are the ones who benefit when UK jobs and UK industry are shipped overseas. They buy almost every election. They control the majority of the elected officials in all parties. Our government functions for them. It has become government of the corporation, by the corporation and for the corporation. ben1982
  • Score: 28

8:03pm Fri 13 Jun 14

rubberbandman5 says...

O'h dear me, looks like the welfare cheating scumbags around Dorset don't like my comment. Hope every last one of them gets caught and we get to hurl some insults at them for cheating the system.
O'h dear me, looks like the welfare cheating scumbags around Dorset don't like my comment. Hope every last one of them gets caught and we get to hurl some insults at them for cheating the system. rubberbandman5
  • Score: -19

8:38pm Fri 13 Jun 14

ben1982 says...

The public have an increasingly negative opinion to benefit claimants. A study suggested that 1 in 5 people believe a majority of claims are false, while 14% believe a majority of claims are fraudulent. “In 2010 an estimated £16 billion in benefits and tax credits were unclaimed.

By comparison to benefit fraud, lost revenues from tax avoidance and tax evasion seems much greater. Using some measures of tax evasion and tax avoidance.
◦£70 billion of tax evasion,
◦£25 billion tax avoidance
◦£25 billion of unpaid tax
what would you like to see to happen to those people????
Oh do tell !!!!
The public have an increasingly negative opinion to benefit claimants. A study suggested that 1 in 5 people believe a majority of claims are false, while 14% believe a majority of claims are fraudulent. “In 2010 an estimated £16 billion in benefits and tax credits were unclaimed. By comparison to benefit fraud, lost revenues from tax avoidance and tax evasion seems much greater. Using some measures of tax evasion and tax avoidance. ◦£70 billion of tax evasion, ◦£25 billion tax avoidance ◦£25 billion of unpaid tax what would you like to see to happen to those people???? Oh do tell !!!! ben1982
  • Score: 24

8:39pm Fri 13 Jun 14

ben1982 says...

rubberbandman5 wrote:
O'h dear me, looks like the welfare cheating scumbags around Dorset don't like my comment. Hope every last one of them gets caught and we get to hurl some insults at them for cheating the system.
The public have an increasingly negative opinion to benefit claimants. A study suggested that 1 in 5 people believe a majority of claims are false, while 14% believe a majority of claims are fraudulent. “In 2010 an estimated £16 billion in benefits and tax credits were unclaimed.

By comparison to benefit fraud, lost revenues from tax avoidance and tax evasion seems much greater. Using some measures of tax evasion and tax avoidance.
◦£70 billion of tax evasion,
◦£25 billion tax avoidance
◦£25 billion of unpaid tax
what would you like to see to happen to those people????
Oh do tell !!!!
[quote][p][bold]rubberbandman5[/bold] wrote: O'h dear me, looks like the welfare cheating scumbags around Dorset don't like my comment. Hope every last one of them gets caught and we get to hurl some insults at them for cheating the system.[/p][/quote]The public have an increasingly negative opinion to benefit claimants. A study suggested that 1 in 5 people believe a majority of claims are false, while 14% believe a majority of claims are fraudulent. “In 2010 an estimated £16 billion in benefits and tax credits were unclaimed. By comparison to benefit fraud, lost revenues from tax avoidance and tax evasion seems much greater. Using some measures of tax evasion and tax avoidance. ◦£70 billion of tax evasion, ◦£25 billion tax avoidance ◦£25 billion of unpaid tax what would you like to see to happen to those people???? Oh do tell !!!! ben1982
  • Score: 19

8:58pm Fri 13 Jun 14

ben1982 says...

High Treason wrote:
No fixed abode. In reality he will pay back nothing.
•There are many reasons why people end up homeless - redundancy, a relationship breakdown, poor mental health, alcohol/substance addiction, domestic abuse.
•The streets are a dangerous place to be - homeless people are 13 times more likely to be a victim of violent crime than the general public, and 47 times more likely to be a victim of theft.
•Homeless people have a right to being treated with the same respect as anyone else. In a recent study though, almost two thirds of rough sleepers said they had been insulted by a member of the public, and shockingly, one in ten said that they had been urinated on.
•Homelessness affects many more people than simply those sleeping rough. There are around 400,000 ‘hidden homeless’ in the UK, living out of sight in hostels, B&Bs, ‘sofa-surfing’ or squatting.

Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.
[quote][p][bold]High Treason[/bold] wrote: No fixed abode. In reality he will pay back nothing.[/p][/quote]•There are many reasons why people end up homeless - redundancy, a relationship breakdown, poor mental health, alcohol/substance addiction, domestic abuse. •The streets are a dangerous place to be - homeless people are 13 times more likely to be a victim of violent crime than the general public, and 47 times more likely to be a victim of theft. •Homeless people have a right to being treated with the same respect as anyone else. In a recent study though, almost two thirds of rough sleepers said they had been insulted by a member of the public, and shockingly, one in ten said that they had been urinated on. •Homelessness affects many more people than simply those sleeping rough. There are around 400,000 ‘hidden homeless’ in the UK, living out of sight in hostels, B&Bs, ‘sofa-surfing’ or squatting. Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity. ben1982
  • Score: 16

9:04pm Fri 13 Jun 14

martinsim34 says...

wat they got one i fink wen its 13,000 they write it off
wat they got one i fink wen its 13,000 they write it off martinsim34
  • Score: -8

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree