Damning report calls for improvement of non-emergency patient transport service E-zec

An E-zec ambulance outside the Basepoint business centre on the Bournemouth airport site

Jane Pike, director of service delivery at NHS Dorset Clinical Commissioning Group

Cancer patient Nick Rennells

Simon Moss, Unison branch secretary for the South Western Ambulance Service

First published in News
Last updated
by , Chief Reporter

THE private firm that took over Dorset’s non-emergency patient transport last year has been told to improve in four out of five areas in a damning report.

E-zec Medical Transport Dorset was awarded the deal by the NHS Dorset Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) last June and began operating, replacing South Western Ambulance Service, in October.

It provides patient transport to more than 100 NHS treatment centres, including Bournemouth and Poole hospitals.

But a new report published by the Care Quality Commission (CQC) said that E-zec had “not been able to put in place sufficient staff and vehicles to deliver the service to the required standard”.

It also levelled criticism at the Dorset CCG, which awarded the contract, saying that it had not given E-zec accurate information on the workload.

The inspection was carried out in response to concerns from the public and health professionals, the CQC said.

The Daily Echo has previously reported patients’ worries.

Some said lives were being put at risk by E-zec being late or not turning up to transport people to crucial appointments for treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

E-zec declined the Daily Echo’s request for an interview and issued only a brief statement.

Paul Swann, managing director of E-zec Medical Transport Services Limited, said: “We fully accept the finding of the report and are working with NHS Dorset CCG to meet the CQC’s recommendations.”

The firm refused to comment any further.

Jane Pike, director of service delivery at NHS Dorset Clinical Commissioning Group, said: “We recognise the point raised in the Care Quality Commission report regarding incorrect information on the number of pick-ups given to E-zec Medical during the tender process.

“The data we used to inform the tender document was provided to us from various local health and transport organisations.

“Every effort was made to gather and check the information, however the inaccuracies happened because of inconsistencies in the way that data had been recorded by the organisations who supplied it to us and as a result, it under-estimated demand and need for the service.

“We apologise for this oversight and continue to work closely with E-zec Medical to make improvements to the service, including monitoring staffing levels and the delivery of new vehicles which are joining the fleet this week.”

 

•Report finds issues with four areas

THE CQC report said that E-zec had “significant issues regarding planning and delivering their patient transport service to people resulting in very late pick-ups, missed pick-ups and late and missed collections of vulnerable people who used the service”.

It also said there were concerns about E-zec’s recruitment processes, information technology security and its complaint process.

The inspection took two days and involved speaking with a variety of E-zec’s staff, from directors to call centre operators and ambulance crew members, as well as service users.

The report also remarked that E-zec had “not been given accurate information during the tendering process regarding the number of pick-ups required each day or the size of the service”, which meant that it “had not been able to put in place sufficient staff and vehicles to deliver the service to the required standard”.

Overall, E-zec was told to make improvements in four areas – care and welfare of people who use services, requirements relating to workers, staffing and complaints.

The only area where standards were met was in records.

 

• Patients unsurprised by the investigation

PATIENT William Bownes, known as Dennis, says he was not surprised by the damning report.

Dennis, who needs dialysis treatment three times a week after suffering kidney failure in 2008, was regularly kept waiting for the E-zec Medical Transport Services ambulance.

He said: “The service has improved lately and you do see more vans around now, but sometimes there are still delays.”

Just two weeks ago the 72-year-old, who suffered a stroke three years ago and struggles to speak, had to be taken by his family to the renal unit for treatment as the transport didn’t turn up.

He then had to wait for his family to arrange transport back to his home in Southbourne because the second ambulance had been cancelled.

Mr Bownes added: “I’m not surprised by the report, I’m only surprised it hasn’t come to light before now.”

Simon Moss, Unison branch secretary for the South Western Ambulance Service, said there were many areas of concern in the report: “One of the main areas was the lack of pre-employment checks. E-zec were using agency staff that hadn’t had criminal checks which is very concerning when they are picking up vulnerable patients.

“The other issue was the workload – crews were not given time to have breaks because E-zec seriously under-estimated the workload.

“Now they have gone cap in hand to the Dorset Clinical Commissioning Group for more money – paid for by local taxpayers – when the reason they won the contract in the first place was because they were the most competitively priced.”

Comments (14)

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12:17pm Wed 12 Mar 14

itsneverblackorwhite says...

Just the same as the Councils taking the cheapest tender with school transport, then the companies costs go up and they can no longer afford to operate! Why change a contract that was working well just to save a few quid never works in the long run!
Just the same as the Councils taking the cheapest tender with school transport, then the companies costs go up and they can no longer afford to operate! Why change a contract that was working well just to save a few quid never works in the long run! itsneverblackorwhite
  • Score: 17

12:33pm Wed 12 Mar 14

Hessenford says...

This is what happens when private companies are awarded these contracts by the management penpushers who do not fully understand how anything works.
Its typical of the NHS to go for the cheapest option without checking into the facts properly.
The Royal Bournemouth did this a few years ago with the catering department and it was a disaster, the difference this time is that they have put patients lives at risk by employing this bunch of cowboys.
This is what happens when private companies are awarded these contracts by the management penpushers who do not fully understand how anything works. Its typical of the NHS to go for the cheapest option without checking into the facts properly. The Royal Bournemouth did this a few years ago with the catering department and it was a disaster, the difference this time is that they have put patients lives at risk by employing this bunch of cowboys. Hessenford
  • Score: 9

12:33pm Wed 12 Mar 14

Tango Charlie says...

Not suprising. The PTS made a significant loss while with South West Amblance. Must be hard to turn that into a busines profit. I always hated the thought of accountants running a "care" organisation.
Not suprising. The PTS made a significant loss while with South West Amblance. Must be hard to turn that into a busines profit. I always hated the thought of accountants running a "care" organisation. Tango Charlie
  • Score: 6

12:47pm Wed 12 Mar 14

muscliffman says...

Hessenford wrote:
This is what happens when private companies are awarded these contracts by the management penpushers who do not fully understand how anything works.
Its typical of the NHS to go for the cheapest option without checking into the facts properly.
The Royal Bournemouth did this a few years ago with the catering department and it was a disaster, the difference this time is that they have put patients lives at risk by employing this bunch of cowboys.
Very true, especially when public Authorities 'kindly' index link payment for many of their longer term private road transport contracts to the rate of inflation - but then specifically EXCLUDE from their inflation rate calculation any rise in the cost of fuel!
[quote][p][bold]Hessenford[/bold] wrote: This is what happens when private companies are awarded these contracts by the management penpushers who do not fully understand how anything works. Its typical of the NHS to go for the cheapest option without checking into the facts properly. The Royal Bournemouth did this a few years ago with the catering department and it was a disaster, the difference this time is that they have put patients lives at risk by employing this bunch of cowboys.[/p][/quote]Very true, especially when public Authorities 'kindly' index link payment for many of their longer term private road transport contracts to the rate of inflation - but then specifically EXCLUDE from their inflation rate calculation any rise in the cost of fuel! muscliffman
  • Score: 6

2:05pm Wed 12 Mar 14

adspacebroker says...

You tried to be a clever little sausage didnt you Jane Pike, director of service delivery at NHS Dorset Clinical Commissioning Group........you thought you were being clever by trying to save a little bit of money....but you actually put lives at risk.....would you do that to your own family.....clearly you would. I hope you have a pen handy for your resignation letter......oh and your boss!!
You tried to be a clever little sausage didnt you Jane Pike, director of service delivery at NHS Dorset Clinical Commissioning Group........you thought you were being clever by trying to save a little bit of money....but you actually put lives at risk.....would you do that to your own family.....clearly you would. I hope you have a pen handy for your resignation letter......oh and your boss!! adspacebroker
  • Score: 13

2:26pm Wed 12 Mar 14

Abc1970 says...

How very interesting, I don't recall ever reading a story like this when the service was provided by the NHS ambulance service. Totally agree with what people are saying, "more efficient" is government speak for "cheap" if you pay for a cheap service you get rubbish service. I feel sorry for the poor patients and the staff, it's not their fault, it's the ridiculous management who thought that providing this service was an easy way to make money. Hopefully they will go bust and the CCG will go back cap in hand to the Ambulance Service to rectify. It is also interesting that if an NHS service is struggling they are shut down or merged, however when the private service is struggling, the CCG throws even more public money at this private enterprise.
How very interesting, I don't recall ever reading a story like this when the service was provided by the NHS ambulance service. Totally agree with what people are saying, "more efficient" is government speak for "cheap" if you pay for a cheap service you get rubbish service. I feel sorry for the poor patients and the staff, it's not their fault, it's the ridiculous management who thought that providing this service was an easy way to make money. Hopefully they will go bust and the CCG will go back cap in hand to the Ambulance Service to rectify. It is also interesting that if an NHS service is struggling they are shut down or merged, however when the private service is struggling, the CCG throws even more public money at this private enterprise. Abc1970
  • Score: 7

2:41pm Wed 12 Mar 14

richardcompton3 says...

Another example of profit before people. I wonder how many lives will be blighted or worst still lost before the services are taken back under the umbrella of the Ambulance Service.
Another example of profit before people. I wonder how many lives will be blighted or worst still lost before the services are taken back under the umbrella of the Ambulance Service. richardcompton3
  • Score: 8

5:53pm Wed 12 Mar 14

MuswellStar says...

This is the tip of a very large iceberg. The Tories health and social care act forces the NHS to put services out to tender with Any Qualified Provider such as E Zec. Sometimes the NHS wins the tender but increasingly private business and corporations are hiving off services. Check out the web to see what's really happening. And don't forget the NHS has to invest money which could have been used to treat you, on these legal/corporate battles. Private business can afford better legal teams to fight their battles, grinding the NHS in to submission. Another little bonus is that these new service provider contracts are commmercial in nature and thus exempt from Freedom of information requests from a concerned public. You don't have the right to know what's going on in the NHS with your money anymore. The old PTS run by SWAST wasn't perfect but who is. Human systems can be regulated effectively but not at the lowest cost denominator. A race to the bottom will destroy the values of the NHS as we know it. When a nationalised health service is treated as a business and health a commodity we will all suffer. I for one do not want the NHS to be a brand in name only with all services commissioned from the private sector rather than the NHS itself. It is also a matter of public record the astonishing numbers of MPs who have private health business associations. Apparently this does not constitute a conflict of interest when legislating on the biggest legal change in the NHS since its creation. I think Joni Mitchell once sang 'won't know what you've got till its gone'
This is the tip of a very large iceberg. The Tories health and social care act forces the NHS to put services out to tender with Any Qualified Provider such as E Zec. Sometimes the NHS wins the tender but increasingly private business and corporations are hiving off services. Check out the web to see what's really happening. And don't forget the NHS has to invest money which could have been used to treat you, on these legal/corporate battles. Private business can afford better legal teams to fight their battles, grinding the NHS in to submission. Another little bonus is that these new service provider contracts are commmercial in nature and thus exempt from Freedom of information requests from a concerned public. You don't have the right to know what's going on in the NHS with your money anymore. The old PTS run by SWAST wasn't perfect but who is. Human systems can be regulated effectively but not at the lowest cost denominator. A race to the bottom will destroy the values of the NHS as we know it. When a nationalised health service is treated as a business and health a commodity we will all suffer. I for one do not want the NHS to be a brand in name only with all services commissioned from the private sector rather than the NHS itself. It is also a matter of public record the astonishing numbers of MPs who have private health business associations. Apparently this does not constitute a conflict of interest when legislating on the biggest legal change in the NHS since its creation. I think Joni Mitchell once sang 'won't know what you've got till its gone' MuswellStar
  • Score: 2

7:49pm Wed 12 Mar 14

mjspoole says...

adspacebroker wrote:
You tried to be a clever little sausage didnt you Jane Pike, director of service delivery at NHS Dorset Clinical Commissioning Group........you thought you were being clever by trying to save a little bit of money....but you actually put lives at risk.....would you do that to your own family.....clearly you would. I hope you have a pen handy for your resignation letter......oh and your boss!!
There is a lot of truth in your comments a lot of managers should hang there heads in shame there a very grubby lot
[quote][p][bold]adspacebroker[/bold] wrote: You tried to be a clever little sausage didnt you Jane Pike, director of service delivery at NHS Dorset Clinical Commissioning Group........you thought you were being clever by trying to save a little bit of money....but you actually put lives at risk.....would you do that to your own family.....clearly you would. I hope you have a pen handy for your resignation letter......oh and your boss!![/p][/quote]There is a lot of truth in your comments a lot of managers should hang there heads in shame there a very grubby lot mjspoole
  • Score: 2

8:13pm Wed 12 Mar 14

mjspoole says...

I have friends working for the grubby E-zec company the CQC only touched the surface on there inspection E-zec management are a total bunch of amateurs ones just been pushed out. There allowing unqualified staff transporting patients that require trained staff i believe that that part of the service has returned to the professional ambulance service.
how many lives are going to be lost ???? patients.staff and hospital receptionist cant contact the call centre , vulnerable patients who need transport are being left waiting for " yes" hours on occasions about time they thought about sacking E-Zec and let the ambulance service run it again more tax payers money wasted Jane Pike, director of service delivery at NHS Dorset Clinical Commissioning Group wast of space and money
I have friends working for the grubby E-zec company the CQC only touched the surface on there inspection E-zec management are a total bunch of amateurs ones just been pushed out. There allowing unqualified staff transporting patients that require trained staff i believe that that part of the service has returned to the professional ambulance service. how many lives are going to be lost ???? patients.staff and hospital receptionist cant contact the call centre , vulnerable patients who need transport are being left waiting for " yes" hours on occasions about time they thought about sacking E-Zec and let the ambulance service run it again more tax payers money wasted Jane Pike, director of service delivery at NHS Dorset Clinical Commissioning Group wast of space and money mjspoole
  • Score: 5

8:34pm Wed 12 Mar 14

my own opinion says...

E-xec was not the cheapest tender by far, in fact it is expensive and won purely on corporate image and nice new vehicles. The CCG where given accurate but chose not to use them as they felt they where inaccurate and now finds itself giving E-xec FOUR MILLION POUNDS of NHS money and overpaying its bills by an extra 85% on top. The CCG is a newly formed quango who will not resign even though its there fault. Just to let you the public know E-xec have now lost the Staffordshire NHS very recently. E-xec have tried to improve its service by using taxi companies and charitable organisations who to date have not been paid, the company has a enormous overdraft with around the same figure for its turnover. Its also interesting how E-xec don't use the previous Taxi Company who worked well with all the local hospitals with a much better and planned service, they obviously had some sense and did not want to be dragged under with non payments
E-xec was not the cheapest tender by far, in fact it is expensive and won purely on corporate image and nice new vehicles. The CCG where given accurate but chose not to use them as they felt they where inaccurate and now finds itself giving E-xec FOUR MILLION POUNDS of NHS money and overpaying its bills by an extra 85% on top. The CCG is a newly formed quango who will not resign even though its there fault. Just to let you the public know E-xec have now lost the Staffordshire NHS very recently. E-xec have tried to improve its service by using taxi companies and charitable organisations who to date have not been paid, the company has a enormous overdraft with around the same figure for its turnover. Its also interesting how E-xec don't use the previous Taxi Company who worked well with all the local hospitals with a much better and planned service, they obviously had some sense and did not want to be dragged under with non payments my own opinion
  • Score: 9

9:37pm Wed 12 Mar 14

ifucantbeatemjoinem says...

abysmal company - call centre a joke - drivers who don't turn up and then get pick ups cancelled so patients are left in limbo. Sooner they go and service returned to SWAST the better
abysmal company - call centre a joke - drivers who don't turn up and then get pick ups cancelled so patients are left in limbo. Sooner they go and service returned to SWAST the better ifucantbeatemjoinem
  • Score: 6

1:42pm Thu 13 Mar 14

DWRK00 says...

Comments about the NHS being privatised are complete rubbish!

Where does the NHS get its MRI scanners from? Where does the operating theatre kit – everything from the scalpel to the computer monitoring your vital signs - come from when you have surgery?

Who researches, develops and manufactures the pills you need to keep you alive? Who made your father’s pacemaker or your grandmother’s wheelchair? Who employs your pharmacist?

Answer: Not the NHS, but private business. £1 in every £4 is spent in the independent sector and that doesn’t include personal spending in dentistry, optometry and pharmacy settings.

And has the sky fallen in? No, because for all of its life, the NHS has been a model of collaboration between the public and private sectors and of course, almost entirely free at the point of delivery.

For well over a year now there has been a vigorous public debate taking place about the NHS, the Health and Social Care Bill and the need for savings.

And shouting over the top of this debate have been those proclaiming that the NHS is being privatised!

The NHS is owned by government and is controlled by the Department of Health (who own the NHS logo and letters as registered trademarks) under the Secretary of State for Health.

It is essentially another government department, funded by income tax and national insurance.

For the NHS to be privatised, control would have to be handed over to a private organisation. This is not happening, or going to!

According to the OECD and the World Health Organisation, the term ‘privatisation’ can also include other policies such as ‘contracting out’ that is, the process by which activities, while publicly organised and financed, are carried out by private sector companies, e.g., street cleaning, rubbish collection, council housing.

This already happens in the NHS. Thousands of contracts are held by independent providers for everything from cleaning to CT scans, patient transport to Macmillan nurses, day surgery to complex mental health treatment.

These contractors are still accountable to the same standards and regulations as directly employed services, but do NOT have the benefits that come with NHS employment or ownership (e.g.an NHS pension).

This broader definition is what opponents of the Health Bill in the NHS are objecting to, claiming it will lead to a ‘US style’ health system in England.

Yet it isn’t privatisation because there is no cessation of control.

Contractors have to fulfil the terms of their agreement with the NHS and the NHS Trusts or Commissioners that have awarded the contract remain ultimately accountable.

The fundamental difference between the NHS and the U.S. healthcare system is how they are funded, and no one is suggesting that we move to a model of healthcare insurance to fund the NHS.

Politicians and campaign groups owe it to the public who fund the NHS to focus on determining the best way to provide services.

Continuing to demonise the private sector will just deter investors and damage the NHS – the debate needs to move on.
Comments about the NHS being privatised are complete rubbish! Where does the NHS get its MRI scanners from? Where does the operating theatre kit – everything from the scalpel to the computer monitoring your vital signs - come from when you have surgery? Who researches, develops and manufactures the pills you need to keep you alive? Who made your father’s pacemaker or your grandmother’s wheelchair? Who employs your pharmacist? Answer: Not the NHS, but private business. £1 in every £4 is spent in the independent sector and that doesn’t include personal spending in dentistry, optometry and pharmacy settings. And has the sky fallen in? No, because for all of its life, the NHS has been a model of collaboration between the public and private sectors and of course, almost entirely free at the point of delivery. For well over a year now there has been a vigorous public debate taking place about the NHS, the Health and Social Care Bill and the need for savings. And shouting over the top of this debate have been those proclaiming that the NHS is being privatised! The NHS is owned by government and is controlled by the Department of Health (who own the NHS logo and letters as registered trademarks) under the Secretary of State for Health. It is essentially another government department, funded by income tax and national insurance. For the NHS to be privatised, control would have to be handed over to a private organisation. This is not happening, or going to! According to the OECD and the World Health Organisation, the term ‘privatisation’ can also include other policies such as ‘contracting out’ that is, the process by which activities, while publicly organised and financed, are carried out by private sector companies, e.g., street cleaning, rubbish collection, council housing. This already happens in the NHS. Thousands of contracts are held by independent providers for everything from cleaning to CT scans, patient transport to Macmillan nurses, day surgery to complex mental health treatment. These contractors are still accountable to the same standards and regulations as directly employed services, but do NOT have the benefits that come with NHS employment or ownership (e.g.an NHS pension). This broader definition is what opponents of the Health Bill in the NHS are objecting to, claiming it will lead to a ‘US style’ health system in England. Yet it isn’t privatisation because there is no cessation of control. Contractors have to fulfil the terms of their agreement with the NHS and the NHS Trusts or Commissioners that have awarded the contract remain ultimately accountable. The fundamental difference between the NHS and the U.S. healthcare system is how they are funded, and no one is suggesting that we move to a model of healthcare insurance to fund the NHS. Politicians and campaign groups owe it to the public who fund the NHS to focus on determining the best way to provide services. Continuing to demonise the private sector will just deter investors and damage the NHS – the debate needs to move on. DWRK00
  • Score: -1

3:17pm Thu 13 Mar 14

Abc1970 says...

DWRK00 wrote:
Comments about the NHS being privatised are complete rubbish!

Where does the NHS get its MRI scanners from? Where does the operating theatre kit – everything from the scalpel to the computer monitoring your vital signs - come from when you have surgery?

Who researches, develops and manufactures the pills you need to keep you alive? Who made your father’s pacemaker or your grandmother’s wheelchair? Who employs your pharmacist?

Answer: Not the NHS, but private business. £1 in every £4 is spent in the independent sector and that doesn’t include personal spending in dentistry, optometry and pharmacy settings.

And has the sky fallen in? No, because for all of its life, the NHS has been a model of collaboration between the public and private sectors and of course, almost entirely free at the point of delivery.

For well over a year now there has been a vigorous public debate taking place about the NHS, the Health and Social Care Bill and the need for savings.

And shouting over the top of this debate have been those proclaiming that the NHS is being privatised!

The NHS is owned by government and is controlled by the Department of Health (who own the NHS logo and letters as registered trademarks) under the Secretary of State for Health.

It is essentially another government department, funded by income tax and national insurance.

For the NHS to be privatised, control would have to be handed over to a private organisation. This is not happening, or going to!

According to the OECD and the World Health Organisation, the term ‘privatisation’ can also include other policies such as ‘contracting out’ that is, the process by which activities, while publicly organised and financed, are carried out by private sector companies, e.g., street cleaning, rubbish collection, council housing.

This already happens in the NHS. Thousands of contracts are held by independent providers for everything from cleaning to CT scans, patient transport to Macmillan nurses, day surgery to complex mental health treatment.

These contractors are still accountable to the same standards and regulations as directly employed services, but do NOT have the benefits that come with NHS employment or ownership (e.g.an NHS pension).

This broader definition is what opponents of the Health Bill in the NHS are objecting to, claiming it will lead to a ‘US style’ health system in England.

Yet it isn’t privatisation because there is no cessation of control.

Contractors have to fulfil the terms of their agreement with the NHS and the NHS Trusts or Commissioners that have awarded the contract remain ultimately accountable.

The fundamental difference between the NHS and the U.S. healthcare system is how they are funded, and no one is suggesting that we move to a model of healthcare insurance to fund the NHS.

Politicians and campaign groups owe it to the public who fund the NHS to focus on determining the best way to provide services.

Continuing to demonise the private sector will just deter investors and damage the NHS – the debate needs to move on.
So what happens when all the services that currently operate under the NHS brand as you put it are run by private companies such as E-zec or Virgin Care, it won't be long until the government approach Richard Branson to ask him to operate ALL services not just the ones he has won at tender. Of course the NHS is being privatised and once these parasitic companies have the nation by the balls they will begin to charge for services in order to increase their revenue to make shareholders happy, oh and those shareholders are mainly our MPs who say that they are against NHS contracts being given to private industry, they are liars!
[quote][p][bold]DWRK00[/bold] wrote: Comments about the NHS being privatised are complete rubbish! Where does the NHS get its MRI scanners from? Where does the operating theatre kit – everything from the scalpel to the computer monitoring your vital signs - come from when you have surgery? Who researches, develops and manufactures the pills you need to keep you alive? Who made your father’s pacemaker or your grandmother’s wheelchair? Who employs your pharmacist? Answer: Not the NHS, but private business. £1 in every £4 is spent in the independent sector and that doesn’t include personal spending in dentistry, optometry and pharmacy settings. And has the sky fallen in? No, because for all of its life, the NHS has been a model of collaboration between the public and private sectors and of course, almost entirely free at the point of delivery. For well over a year now there has been a vigorous public debate taking place about the NHS, the Health and Social Care Bill and the need for savings. And shouting over the top of this debate have been those proclaiming that the NHS is being privatised! The NHS is owned by government and is controlled by the Department of Health (who own the NHS logo and letters as registered trademarks) under the Secretary of State for Health. It is essentially another government department, funded by income tax and national insurance. For the NHS to be privatised, control would have to be handed over to a private organisation. This is not happening, or going to! According to the OECD and the World Health Organisation, the term ‘privatisation’ can also include other policies such as ‘contracting out’ that is, the process by which activities, while publicly organised and financed, are carried out by private sector companies, e.g., street cleaning, rubbish collection, council housing. This already happens in the NHS. Thousands of contracts are held by independent providers for everything from cleaning to CT scans, patient transport to Macmillan nurses, day surgery to complex mental health treatment. These contractors are still accountable to the same standards and regulations as directly employed services, but do NOT have the benefits that come with NHS employment or ownership (e.g.an NHS pension). This broader definition is what opponents of the Health Bill in the NHS are objecting to, claiming it will lead to a ‘US style’ health system in England. Yet it isn’t privatisation because there is no cessation of control. Contractors have to fulfil the terms of their agreement with the NHS and the NHS Trusts or Commissioners that have awarded the contract remain ultimately accountable. The fundamental difference between the NHS and the U.S. healthcare system is how they are funded, and no one is suggesting that we move to a model of healthcare insurance to fund the NHS. Politicians and campaign groups owe it to the public who fund the NHS to focus on determining the best way to provide services. Continuing to demonise the private sector will just deter investors and damage the NHS – the debate needs to move on.[/p][/quote]So what happens when all the services that currently operate under the NHS brand as you put it are run by private companies such as E-zec or Virgin Care, it won't be long until the government approach Richard Branson to ask him to operate ALL services not just the ones he has won at tender. Of course the NHS is being privatised and once these parasitic companies have the nation by the balls they will begin to charge for services in order to increase their revenue to make shareholders happy, oh and those shareholders are mainly our MPs who say that they are against NHS contracts being given to private industry, they are liars! Abc1970
  • Score: 0

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