Electrical fault in engine believed to be cause of double decker bus blaze on A338 Spur Road

ELECTRICAL FAULT: Fire fighters at the scene of the double decker bus fire on the A338 northbound

ELECTRICAL FAULT: Fire fighters at the scene of the double decker bus fire on the A338 northbound

First published in News by

A BLAZE on a bus that closed one of Bournemouth’s busiest routes is believed to have been caused by an electrical fault in the engine.

Five passengers and the driver escaped the fire on the northbound carriageway of the A338 on Wednesday.

But there were major tailbacks along the route throughout the afternoon as a result and the road closed once again during rush-hour to allow the bus to be recovered.

Firefighters from Ferndown, Christchurch and Ringwood attended the blaze at 1.20pm after the double-decker operated by Morebus, formerly Wilts and Dorset, burst into flames.

A spokesman from Dorset Fire and Rescue Service said: “The cause of the fire is currently believed to be an electric fault in the engine.”

The bus was destroyed in the fire, but no injuries have been reported. Passengers were picked up from the roadside by kind-hearted passing motorists.

Ed Wills, operations manager for Morebus, praised the driver for his quick response when he heard a noise coming from the vehicle. He also attempted to tackle the flames himself with a fire extinguisher after helping the passengers to safety. Mr Wills said the bus is currently undergoing a full investigation together with the manufacturer.

No other buses owned by the company have been taken off the road as a result of the ongoing investigation.

Comments (21)

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7:28am Sat 22 Feb 14

yourbard says...

Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this.
I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.
Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later. yourbard
  • Score: -51

8:13am Sat 22 Feb 14

BIGTONE says...

An electrical fault?
I would never have guessed that

Wow.....and there's me thinking it was the BBQ a passenger was having while smoking that Havana cigar.
An electrical fault? I would never have guessed that Wow.....and there's me thinking it was the BBQ a passenger was having while smoking that Havana cigar. BIGTONE
  • Score: 3

8:24am Sat 22 Feb 14

arthur1948 says...

profit befor safety....privatisat
ion policy
profit befor safety....privatisat ion policy arthur1948
  • Score: -32

8:56am Sat 22 Feb 14

Chris the plumber says...

an electrical fault in the engine, the engine is in the rear is it not?
but the rear of the bus seems the least burned out when I saw pictures
of the bus ablaze the fire was at the front. ah well whatever it will take a
good panel beater the put that one back on the road.!
an electrical fault in the engine, the engine is in the rear is it not? but the rear of the bus seems the least burned out when I saw pictures of the bus ablaze the fire was at the front. ah well whatever it will take a good panel beater the put that one back on the road.! Chris the plumber
  • Score: 21

9:04am Sat 22 Feb 14

RM says...

Good on the driver getting all the passengers out safely.
Good on the driver getting all the passengers out safely. RM
  • Score: 27

9:05am Sat 22 Feb 14

mac340v8 says...

yourbard wrote:
Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.
Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that.
[quote][p][bold]yourbard[/bold] wrote: Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.[/p][/quote]Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that. mac340v8
  • Score: 42

12:30pm Sat 22 Feb 14

yourbard says...

mac340v8 wrote:
yourbard wrote:
Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.
Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that.
C**t!
I'm well aware of the speed limit, but I'm a regular user of the Spur Road and have often followed these buses doing a lot more than that, hence my original comment.
[quote][p][bold]mac340v8[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]yourbard[/bold] wrote: Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.[/p][/quote]Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that.[/p][/quote]C**t! I'm well aware of the speed limit, but I'm a regular user of the Spur Road and have often followed these buses doing a lot more than that, hence my original comment. yourbard
  • Score: -38

12:35pm Sat 22 Feb 14

BIGTONE says...

yourbard wrote:
mac340v8 wrote:
yourbard wrote:
Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.
Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that.
C**t!
I'm well aware of the speed limit, but I'm a regular user of the Spur Road and have often followed these buses doing a lot more than that, hence my original comment.
Haaaaaaaaaa

Now then girlies....put your bags away....
[quote][p][bold]yourbard[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mac340v8[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]yourbard[/bold] wrote: Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.[/p][/quote]Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that.[/p][/quote]C**t! I'm well aware of the speed limit, but I'm a regular user of the Spur Road and have often followed these buses doing a lot more than that, hence my original comment.[/p][/quote]Haaaaaaaaaa Now then girlies....put your bags away.... BIGTONE
  • Score: 2

1:55pm Sat 22 Feb 14

muscliffman says...

yourbard wrote:
mac340v8 wrote:
yourbard wrote:
Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.
Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that.
C**t!
I'm well aware of the speed limit, but I'm a regular user of the Spur Road and have often followed these buses doing a lot more than that, hence my original comment.
'mac340v8' is of course absolutely correct.

All modern large passenger carrying vehicles which by original design could possibly exceed 60mph, be they double-decker buses, single-deck buses or coaches, have an electronic/mechanica
l speed-limiter incorporated into the engine management system that prevents them being driven above 60mph.

There are no exceptions and this statutory requirement has been in place for many years, the device cannot be turned off and it is regularly inspected by the Authorities, tamperproof, calibrated and sealed - to indicate any attempt at unauthorised interference. The only time such a vehicle can creep slightly above 60mph would be under gravity downhill and certainly not whilst being 'driven' under it's own power.

So it would be impossible for such a bus or coach to be normally 'driven' above 60mph on the A338/Spur Road or anywhere else, any 'observation' from another vehicle that one is very probably indicates an issue with the 'observer's' own speedo!
[quote][p][bold]yourbard[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mac340v8[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]yourbard[/bold] wrote: Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.[/p][/quote]Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that.[/p][/quote]C**t! I'm well aware of the speed limit, but I'm a regular user of the Spur Road and have often followed these buses doing a lot more than that, hence my original comment.[/p][/quote]'mac340v8' is of course absolutely correct. All modern large passenger carrying vehicles which by original design could possibly exceed 60mph, be they double-decker buses, single-deck buses or coaches, have an electronic/mechanica l speed-limiter incorporated into the engine management system that prevents them being driven above 60mph. There are no exceptions and this statutory requirement has been in place for many years, the device cannot be turned off and it is regularly inspected by the Authorities, tamperproof, calibrated and sealed - to indicate any attempt at unauthorised interference. The only time such a vehicle can creep slightly above 60mph would be under gravity downhill and certainly not whilst being 'driven' under it's own power. So it would be impossible for such a bus or coach to be normally 'driven' above 60mph on the A338/Spur Road or anywhere else, any 'observation' from another vehicle that one is very probably indicates an issue with the 'observer's' own speedo! muscliffman
  • Score: 17

3:45pm Sat 22 Feb 14

Bournemouth Ohec says...

arthur1948 wrote:
profit befor safety....privatisat

ion policy
Although I have not seen which service this is, I reckon that it is the X3 that runs to Salisbury.

The bus company have recently bought brand new buses for this route that were massively expensive and even had features like WiFi.

So much for privatisation eh?
[quote][p][bold]arthur1948[/bold] wrote: profit befor safety....privatisat ion policy[/p][/quote]Although I have not seen which service this is, I reckon that it is the X3 that runs to Salisbury. The bus company have recently bought brand new buses for this route that were massively expensive and even had features like WiFi. So much for privatisation eh? Bournemouth Ohec
  • Score: 2

5:18pm Sat 22 Feb 14

djd says...

Bournemouth Ohec wrote:
arthur1948 wrote:
profit befor safety....privatisat


ion policy
Although I have not seen which service this is, I reckon that it is the X3 that runs to Salisbury.

The bus company have recently bought brand new buses for this route that were massively expensive and even had features like WiFi.

So much for privatisation eh?
Wrong!!, it was the X6 service. See previous Echo story.
[quote][p][bold]Bournemouth Ohec[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]arthur1948[/bold] wrote: profit befor safety....privatisat ion policy[/p][/quote]Although I have not seen which service this is, I reckon that it is the X3 that runs to Salisbury. The bus company have recently bought brand new buses for this route that were massively expensive and even had features like WiFi. So much for privatisation eh?[/p][/quote]Wrong!!, it was the X6 service. See previous Echo story. djd
  • Score: 0

6:51pm Sat 22 Feb 14

scrumpyjack says...

yourbard wrote:
mac340v8 wrote:
yourbard wrote:
Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.
Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that.
C**t!
I'm well aware of the speed limit, but I'm a regular user of the Spur Road and have often followed these buses doing a lot more than that, hence my original comment.
Snigger, guess we know who the c>>t is now,,,,,
[quote][p][bold]yourbard[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mac340v8[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]yourbard[/bold] wrote: Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.[/p][/quote]Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that.[/p][/quote]C**t! I'm well aware of the speed limit, but I'm a regular user of the Spur Road and have often followed these buses doing a lot more than that, hence my original comment.[/p][/quote]Snigger, guess we know who the c>>t is now,,,,, scrumpyjack
  • Score: 6

10:21pm Sat 22 Feb 14

Turtlebay says...

It wasn't an engine fault at all. The battery which is at the front of those vehicles, exploded and caused the fire.
It wasn't an engine fault at all. The battery which is at the front of those vehicles, exploded and caused the fire. Turtlebay
  • Score: 3

11:55pm Sat 22 Feb 14

Yankee1 says...

Great maintenance work, Wilts&Dorset/MoreBus
.
Great maintenance work, Wilts&Dorset/MoreBus . Yankee1
  • Score: -7

4:51am Sun 23 Feb 14

Huey says...

muscliffman wrote:
yourbard wrote:
mac340v8 wrote:
yourbard wrote:
Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.
Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that.
C**t!
I'm well aware of the speed limit, but I'm a regular user of the Spur Road and have often followed these buses doing a lot more than that, hence my original comment.
'mac340v8' is of course absolutely correct.

All modern large passenger carrying vehicles which by original design could possibly exceed 60mph, be they double-decker buses, single-deck buses or coaches, have an electronic/mechanica

l speed-limiter incorporated into the engine management system that prevents them being driven above 60mph.

There are no exceptions and this statutory requirement has been in place for many years, the device cannot be turned off and it is regularly inspected by the Authorities, tamperproof, calibrated and sealed - to indicate any attempt at unauthorised interference. The only time such a vehicle can creep slightly above 60mph would be under gravity downhill and certainly not whilst being 'driven' under it's own power.

So it would be impossible for such a bus or coach to be normally 'driven' above 60mph on the A338/Spur Road or anywhere else, any 'observation' from another vehicle that one is very probably indicates an issue with the 'observer's' own speedo!
So how come national express coaches travel at 70mph? And they do....
[quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]yourbard[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mac340v8[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]yourbard[/bold] wrote: Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.[/p][/quote]Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that.[/p][/quote]C**t! I'm well aware of the speed limit, but I'm a regular user of the Spur Road and have often followed these buses doing a lot more than that, hence my original comment.[/p][/quote]'mac340v8' is of course absolutely correct. All modern large passenger carrying vehicles which by original design could possibly exceed 60mph, be they double-decker buses, single-deck buses or coaches, have an electronic/mechanica l speed-limiter incorporated into the engine management system that prevents them being driven above 60mph. There are no exceptions and this statutory requirement has been in place for many years, the device cannot be turned off and it is regularly inspected by the Authorities, tamperproof, calibrated and sealed - to indicate any attempt at unauthorised interference. The only time such a vehicle can creep slightly above 60mph would be under gravity downhill and certainly not whilst being 'driven' under it's own power. So it would be impossible for such a bus or coach to be normally 'driven' above 60mph on the A338/Spur Road or anywhere else, any 'observation' from another vehicle that one is very probably indicates an issue with the 'observer's' own speedo![/p][/quote]So how come national express coaches travel at 70mph? And they do.... Huey
  • Score: -4

10:50am Sun 23 Feb 14

Broomers2003 says...

Huey wrote:
muscliffman wrote:
yourbard wrote:
mac340v8 wrote:
yourbard wrote:
Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.
Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that.
C**t!
I'm well aware of the speed limit, but I'm a regular user of the Spur Road and have often followed these buses doing a lot more than that, hence my original comment.
'mac340v8' is of course absolutely correct.

All modern large passenger carrying vehicles which by original design could possibly exceed 60mph, be they double-decker buses, single-deck buses or coaches, have an electronic/mechanica


l speed-limiter incorporated into the engine management system that prevents them being driven above 60mph.

There are no exceptions and this statutory requirement has been in place for many years, the device cannot be turned off and it is regularly inspected by the Authorities, tamperproof, calibrated and sealed - to indicate any attempt at unauthorised interference. The only time such a vehicle can creep slightly above 60mph would be under gravity downhill and certainly not whilst being 'driven' under it's own power.

So it would be impossible for such a bus or coach to be normally 'driven' above 60mph on the A338/Spur Road or anywhere else, any 'observation' from another vehicle that one is very probably indicates an issue with the 'observer's' own speedo!
So how come national express coaches travel at 70mph? And they do....
muscliffeman & mac340v8 are both partly-correct with their comments, and Huey is spot-on.

Vehicles used on local bus services (ie the kind of bus services operated by Morebus & Yellow buses in the area) are - by law - required to have speed limiters fitted, which limit the vehicle to 50mph (regardless of the road they're on), although they may go up to 3 or 4mph faster on a downhill slope - there is absolutely no way that yourbard will have seen those vehicles exceed that, as there are no exceptions and the speed limiter cannot be over-ridden.

Other PCVs that are not local,eg those operated by National Express, or tour companies are - by law - allowed to travel at up to 70mph.

It was an X6 service, and it wasn't one of the brand new buses. Electrical faults can happen on any vehicle at any time, and inspections (which are carried out far more thoroughly and regularly on PCVs than Joe Blogg's car) won't necessarily show these faults.
[quote][p][bold]Huey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]yourbard[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mac340v8[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]yourbard[/bold] wrote: Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.[/p][/quote]Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that.[/p][/quote]C**t! I'm well aware of the speed limit, but I'm a regular user of the Spur Road and have often followed these buses doing a lot more than that, hence my original comment.[/p][/quote]'mac340v8' is of course absolutely correct. All modern large passenger carrying vehicles which by original design could possibly exceed 60mph, be they double-decker buses, single-deck buses or coaches, have an electronic/mechanica l speed-limiter incorporated into the engine management system that prevents them being driven above 60mph. There are no exceptions and this statutory requirement has been in place for many years, the device cannot be turned off and it is regularly inspected by the Authorities, tamperproof, calibrated and sealed - to indicate any attempt at unauthorised interference. The only time such a vehicle can creep slightly above 60mph would be under gravity downhill and certainly not whilst being 'driven' under it's own power. So it would be impossible for such a bus or coach to be normally 'driven' above 60mph on the A338/Spur Road or anywhere else, any 'observation' from another vehicle that one is very probably indicates an issue with the 'observer's' own speedo![/p][/quote]So how come national express coaches travel at 70mph? And they do....[/p][/quote]muscliffeman & mac340v8 are both partly-correct with their comments, and Huey is spot-on. Vehicles used on local bus services (ie the kind of bus services operated by Morebus & Yellow buses in the area) are - by law - required to have speed limiters fitted, which limit the vehicle to 50mph (regardless of the road they're on), although they may go up to 3 or 4mph faster on a downhill slope - there is absolutely no way that yourbard will have seen those vehicles exceed that, as there are no exceptions and the speed limiter cannot be over-ridden. Other PCVs that are not local,eg those operated by National Express, or tour companies are - by law - allowed to travel at up to 70mph. It was an X6 service, and it wasn't one of the brand new buses. Electrical faults can happen on any vehicle at any time, and inspections (which are carried out far more thoroughly and regularly on PCVs than Joe Blogg's car) won't necessarily show these faults. Broomers2003
  • Score: 4

12:00pm Sun 23 Feb 14

muscliffman says...

Huey wrote:
muscliffman wrote:
yourbard wrote:
mac340v8 wrote:
yourbard wrote:
Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.
Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that.
C**t!
I'm well aware of the speed limit, but I'm a regular user of the Spur Road and have often followed these buses doing a lot more than that, hence my original comment.
'mac340v8' is of course absolutely correct.

All modern large passenger carrying vehicles which by original design could possibly exceed 60mph, be they double-decker buses, single-deck buses or coaches, have an electronic/mechanica


l speed-limiter incorporated into the engine management system that prevents them being driven above 60mph.

There are no exceptions and this statutory requirement has been in place for many years, the device cannot be turned off and it is regularly inspected by the Authorities, tamperproof, calibrated and sealed - to indicate any attempt at unauthorised interference. The only time such a vehicle can creep slightly above 60mph would be under gravity downhill and certainly not whilst being 'driven' under it's own power.

So it would be impossible for such a bus or coach to be normally 'driven' above 60mph on the A338/Spur Road or anywhere else, any 'observation' from another vehicle that one is very probably indicates an issue with the 'observer's' own speedo!
So how come national express coaches travel at 70mph? And they do....
Not sure how to put this, but they don't do 70mph - simply because they can't. Popular perception is not fact, all coaches have their speed recorders/limiters regularly calibrated, how often are private car speedos checked and calibrated? Additionally all coach driver's have a (manual/digital) tachograph recording their every move, these records are frequently inspected by the Operator and the Authorities and would cause a huge problem for all concerned if any speeds significantly above 60mph (E.G. 70mph) were ever indicated on them.

Twenty-five years and more ago coaches could quite legally travel at 70mph without speed limiters and indeed some coaches were specially designed to travel at up to 100mph on the MI in the early sixties. But there has not been a National Express (or any) coach in the UK for many years that is capable of being driven above 60mph whatever other motorists may think they are observing.
[quote][p][bold]Huey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]yourbard[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mac340v8[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]yourbard[/bold] wrote: Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.[/p][/quote]Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that.[/p][/quote]C**t! I'm well aware of the speed limit, but I'm a regular user of the Spur Road and have often followed these buses doing a lot more than that, hence my original comment.[/p][/quote]'mac340v8' is of course absolutely correct. All modern large passenger carrying vehicles which by original design could possibly exceed 60mph, be they double-decker buses, single-deck buses or coaches, have an electronic/mechanica l speed-limiter incorporated into the engine management system that prevents them being driven above 60mph. There are no exceptions and this statutory requirement has been in place for many years, the device cannot be turned off and it is regularly inspected by the Authorities, tamperproof, calibrated and sealed - to indicate any attempt at unauthorised interference. The only time such a vehicle can creep slightly above 60mph would be under gravity downhill and certainly not whilst being 'driven' under it's own power. So it would be impossible for such a bus or coach to be normally 'driven' above 60mph on the A338/Spur Road or anywhere else, any 'observation' from another vehicle that one is very probably indicates an issue with the 'observer's' own speedo![/p][/quote]So how come national express coaches travel at 70mph? And they do....[/p][/quote]Not sure how to put this, but they don't do 70mph - simply because they can't. Popular perception is not fact, all coaches have their speed recorders/limiters regularly calibrated, how often are private car speedos checked and calibrated? Additionally all coach driver's have a (manual/digital) tachograph recording their every move, these records are frequently inspected by the Operator and the Authorities and would cause a huge problem for all concerned if any speeds significantly above 60mph (E.G. 70mph) were ever indicated on them. Twenty-five years and more ago coaches could quite legally travel at 70mph without speed limiters and indeed some coaches were specially designed to travel at up to 100mph on the MI in the early sixties. But there has not been a National Express (or any) coach in the UK for many years that is capable of being driven above 60mph whatever other motorists may think they are observing. muscliffman
  • Score: 0

12:33pm Sun 23 Feb 14

wh1sp3r says...

Huey wrote:
muscliffman wrote:
yourbard wrote:
mac340v8 wrote:
yourbard wrote:
Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.
Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that.
C**t!
I'm well aware of the speed limit, but I'm a regular user of the Spur Road and have often followed these buses doing a lot more than that, hence my original comment.
'mac340v8' is of course absolutely correct.

All modern large passenger carrying vehicles which by original design could possibly exceed 60mph, be they double-decker buses, single-deck buses or coaches, have an electronic/mechanica


l speed-limiter incorporated into the engine management system that prevents them being driven above 60mph.

There are no exceptions and this statutory requirement has been in place for many years, the device cannot be turned off and it is regularly inspected by the Authorities, tamperproof, calibrated and sealed - to indicate any attempt at unauthorised interference. The only time such a vehicle can creep slightly above 60mph would be under gravity downhill and certainly not whilst being 'driven' under it's own power.

So it would be impossible for such a bus or coach to be normally 'driven' above 60mph on the A338/Spur Road or anywhere else, any 'observation' from another vehicle that one is very probably indicates an issue with the 'observer's' own speedo!
So how come national express coaches travel at 70mph? And they do....
Guys!
All PSV be them coaches or buses a speed limiter fitted them are restricted to 62.5 mph or 1000m there is a permitted tolerance as defined in the PSV Inspection Manual. If an overview speed is encountered (can occur when going down a hill) this is recorded on the Tachograph where used. (Bus services under 500m don't require a tacho).
[quote][p][bold]Huey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]yourbard[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mac340v8[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]yourbard[/bold] wrote: Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.[/p][/quote]Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that.[/p][/quote]C**t! I'm well aware of the speed limit, but I'm a regular user of the Spur Road and have often followed these buses doing a lot more than that, hence my original comment.[/p][/quote]'mac340v8' is of course absolutely correct. All modern large passenger carrying vehicles which by original design could possibly exceed 60mph, be they double-decker buses, single-deck buses or coaches, have an electronic/mechanica l speed-limiter incorporated into the engine management system that prevents them being driven above 60mph. There are no exceptions and this statutory requirement has been in place for many years, the device cannot be turned off and it is regularly inspected by the Authorities, tamperproof, calibrated and sealed - to indicate any attempt at unauthorised interference. The only time such a vehicle can creep slightly above 60mph would be under gravity downhill and certainly not whilst being 'driven' under it's own power. So it would be impossible for such a bus or coach to be normally 'driven' above 60mph on the A338/Spur Road or anywhere else, any 'observation' from another vehicle that one is very probably indicates an issue with the 'observer's' own speedo![/p][/quote]So how come national express coaches travel at 70mph? And they do....[/p][/quote]Guys! All PSV be them coaches or buses a speed limiter fitted them are restricted to 62.5 mph or 1000m there is a permitted tolerance as defined in the PSV Inspection Manual. If an overview speed is encountered (can occur when going down a hill) this is recorded on the Tachograph where used. (Bus services under 500m don't require a tacho). wh1sp3r
  • Score: 2

12:38pm Sun 23 Feb 14

muscliffman says...

Broomers2003 wrote:
Huey wrote:
muscliffman wrote:
yourbard wrote:
mac340v8 wrote:
yourbard wrote:
Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.
Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that.
C**t!
I'm well aware of the speed limit, but I'm a regular user of the Spur Road and have often followed these buses doing a lot more than that, hence my original comment.
'mac340v8' is of course absolutely correct.

All modern large passenger carrying vehicles which by original design could possibly exceed 60mph, be they double-decker buses, single-deck buses or coaches, have an electronic/mechanica



l speed-limiter incorporated into the engine management system that prevents them being driven above 60mph.

There are no exceptions and this statutory requirement has been in place for many years, the device cannot be turned off and it is regularly inspected by the Authorities, tamperproof, calibrated and sealed - to indicate any attempt at unauthorised interference. The only time such a vehicle can creep slightly above 60mph would be under gravity downhill and certainly not whilst being 'driven' under it's own power.

So it would be impossible for such a bus or coach to be normally 'driven' above 60mph on the A338/Spur Road or anywhere else, any 'observation' from another vehicle that one is very probably indicates an issue with the 'observer's' own speedo!
So how come national express coaches travel at 70mph? And they do....
muscliffeman & mac340v8 are both partly-correct with their comments, and Huey is spot-on.

Vehicles used on local bus services (ie the kind of bus services operated by Morebus & Yellow buses in the area) are - by law - required to have speed limiters fitted, which limit the vehicle to 50mph (regardless of the road they're on), although they may go up to 3 or 4mph faster on a downhill slope - there is absolutely no way that yourbard will have seen those vehicles exceed that, as there are no exceptions and the speed limiter cannot be over-ridden.

Other PCVs that are not local,eg those operated by National Express, or tour companies are - by law - allowed to travel at up to 70mph.

It was an X6 service, and it wasn't one of the brand new buses. Electrical faults can happen on any vehicle at any time, and inspections (which are carried out far more thoroughly and regularly on PCVs than Joe Blogg's car) won't necessarily show these faults.
Like me you are probably also right and a bit wrong, so I will attempt some clarification because this topic is very complex. E.G. Some long distance National Express services locally are (at least were) in part operated as local bus services, so where does that leave us with the vehicle's speed limiter requirements based upon your comments?

The legally required speed limiter settings on all buses and coaches built since 2009 means that regardless of the historic 70mph UK motorways (only - not including dual carriageways) limit for coaches no modern UK coaches are actually capable of reaching it, so I stand by that part of my point.
[quote][p][bold]Broomers2003[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Huey[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]muscliffman[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]yourbard[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mac340v8[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]yourbard[/bold] wrote: Perhaps if Morebus reminded its drivers of the national non-motorway speed limit there would be fewer break-downs and incidents like this. I'm sure its passengers would have preferred to have arrived a few minutes later than what must have been at least an hour later.[/p][/quote]Prat! For your information a PCV is allowed to do 60 on a national speed limit dual carriageway, and that particular vehicle would have had a governor on the engine, rendering it incapable of exceeding that.[/p][/quote]C**t! I'm well aware of the speed limit, but I'm a regular user of the Spur Road and have often followed these buses doing a lot more than that, hence my original comment.[/p][/quote]'mac340v8' is of course absolutely correct. All modern large passenger carrying vehicles which by original design could possibly exceed 60mph, be they double-decker buses, single-deck buses or coaches, have an electronic/mechanica l speed-limiter incorporated into the engine management system that prevents them being driven above 60mph. There are no exceptions and this statutory requirement has been in place for many years, the device cannot be turned off and it is regularly inspected by the Authorities, tamperproof, calibrated and sealed - to indicate any attempt at unauthorised interference. The only time such a vehicle can creep slightly above 60mph would be under gravity downhill and certainly not whilst being 'driven' under it's own power. So it would be impossible for such a bus or coach to be normally 'driven' above 60mph on the A338/Spur Road or anywhere else, any 'observation' from another vehicle that one is very probably indicates an issue with the 'observer's' own speedo![/p][/quote]So how come national express coaches travel at 70mph? And they do....[/p][/quote]muscliffeman & mac340v8 are both partly-correct with their comments, and Huey is spot-on. Vehicles used on local bus services (ie the kind of bus services operated by Morebus & Yellow buses in the area) are - by law - required to have speed limiters fitted, which limit the vehicle to 50mph (regardless of the road they're on), although they may go up to 3 or 4mph faster on a downhill slope - there is absolutely no way that yourbard will have seen those vehicles exceed that, as there are no exceptions and the speed limiter cannot be over-ridden. Other PCVs that are not local,eg those operated by National Express, or tour companies are - by law - allowed to travel at up to 70mph. It was an X6 service, and it wasn't one of the brand new buses. Electrical faults can happen on any vehicle at any time, and inspections (which are carried out far more thoroughly and regularly on PCVs than Joe Blogg's car) won't necessarily show these faults.[/p][/quote]Like me you are probably also right and a bit wrong, so I will attempt some clarification because this topic is very complex. E.G. Some long distance National Express services locally are (at least were) in part operated as local bus services, so where does that leave us with the vehicle's speed limiter requirements based upon your comments? The legally required speed limiter settings on all buses and coaches built since 2009 means that regardless of the historic 70mph UK motorways (only - not including dual carriageways) limit for coaches no modern UK coaches are actually capable of reaching it, so I stand by that part of my point. muscliffman
  • Score: 1

12:44pm Sun 23 Feb 14

alasdair1967 says...

Yankee1 wrote:
Great maintenance work, Wilts&Dorset/Mor
eBus
.
Absolute rubbish all buses and goods vehicles have to be inspected every six weeks to a strict standard laid down by vosa if the bus and haulage companies fail to comply with these guidelines there operators licence can be removed by vosa ,this fire could have been down to a multitude of reasons failure of an electrical component in the engine compartment causing a short circuit consequently burning out the wiring loom being one judging to the extent of the fire it will be very difficult to assertion the true cause
[quote][p][bold]Yankee1[/bold] wrote: Great maintenance work, Wilts&Dorset/Mor eBus .[/p][/quote]Absolute rubbish all buses and goods vehicles have to be inspected every six weeks to a strict standard laid down by vosa if the bus and haulage companies fail to comply with these guidelines there operators licence can be removed by vosa ,this fire could have been down to a multitude of reasons failure of an electrical component in the engine compartment causing a short circuit consequently burning out the wiring loom being one judging to the extent of the fire it will be very difficult to assertion the true cause alasdair1967
  • Score: 3

5:25pm Mon 24 Feb 14

essexmanclone says...

Bournemouth Ohec wrote:
arthur1948 wrote:
profit befor safety....privatisat


ion policy
Although I have not seen which service this is, I reckon that it is the X3 that runs to Salisbury.

The bus company have recently bought brand new buses for this route that were massively expensive and even had features like WiFi.

So much for privatisation eh?
It would be strange if that bus were on X3, as it is not even the immediate predecessor for the type now used on that route. The serial number on the right rear gives it away. By the timing it was more likely an X6.
[quote][p][bold]Bournemouth Ohec[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]arthur1948[/bold] wrote: profit befor safety....privatisat ion policy[/p][/quote]Although I have not seen which service this is, I reckon that it is the X3 that runs to Salisbury. The bus company have recently bought brand new buses for this route that were massively expensive and even had features like WiFi. So much for privatisation eh?[/p][/quote]It would be strange if that bus were on X3, as it is not even the immediate predecessor for the type now used on that route. The serial number on the right rear gives it away. By the timing it was more likely an X6. essexmanclone
  • Score: 0

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