Infant school celebrates after becoming first in Poole to be granted academy status

Bournemouth Echo: FIRST: Stanley Green head teacher Angela Malanczuk with pupils FIRST: Stanley Green head teacher Angela Malanczuk with pupils

A POOLE infant school is celebrating becoming the first in the town to be granted academy status.

Stanley Green Infant School at Oakdale is now Stanley Green Infant Academy after the DfE approved its application to become a stand-alone academy.

Governors have worked with staff, parents and the local community in coming to the decision to leave the umbrella of the local education authority – the first infant school in the town to do so.

“This is a very exciting time for our school,” said head teacher Angela Malanczuk. “Over the years we have worked hard, in partnership with other providers, to build a provision at our school to serve our local community, including an outreach children’s centre on site and a breakfast and after school club.

“Becoming an academy will give us the freedom to move forward and further build on past initiatives to continue to provide the very best for our children.”

Rated good by Ofsted in July 2012, with the capacity to become outstanding, the 270-pupil infant school for four to seven-year-olds is due to expand in September with four forms of admission in reception.

As an academy it will have control of its budget and be able to allocate money to areas of most need. And the school has pledged to continue to work closely with other local schools and the local authority and share its good practice to achieve the best for its pupils.

Vicki Wales, head of children, young people and learning, Borough of Poole, said: “Government guidance states that schools can become academies to gain greater flexibility and freedoms to innovate.

The management of Stanley Green Infant School has decided to take advantage of this opportunity.

“In common with all other academies Stanley Green will hold the land and premises on a 125 year lease, will employ staff directly and be freed from the requirements of the National Curriculum.”

Comments (5)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

7:17pm Sat 25 Jan 14

Townee says...

What's all the fuss about becoming an academy ? A school is a school no matter what you call it. What counts is the quality of the teaching , the discipline and leadership not what it's called.
What's all the fuss about becoming an academy ? A school is a school no matter what you call it. What counts is the quality of the teaching , the discipline and leadership not what it's called. Townee

7:53pm Sat 25 Jan 14

Kevin_123 says...

I am not too sure how an academy differs from a school? I believe it is over how the curriculum is taught etc? I found this useful link below;

http://www.bbc.co.uk
/news/10161371
I am not too sure how an academy differs from a school? I believe it is over how the curriculum is taught etc? I found this useful link below; http://www.bbc.co.uk /news/10161371 Kevin_123

8:05pm Sat 25 Jan 14

sea poole says...

An academy is free from local authority control and can set its own pay and conditions of service. Its governors often become trustees. It can develop its own curriculum too. All is ok-as long as everything is progressing well, but who monitors the school's performance, apart from Ofsted?
An academy is free from local authority control and can set its own pay and conditions of service. Its governors often become trustees. It can develop its own curriculum too. All is ok-as long as everything is progressing well, but who monitors the school's performance, apart from Ofsted? sea poole

11:20am Sun 26 Jan 14

High Treason says...

All part of the grand plan to privatise education as they are slowly doing with the NHS.
All part of the grand plan to privatise education as they are slowly doing with the NHS. High Treason

12:32pm Sun 26 Jan 14

sammmymac says...

Not so long ago, poorly performing schools were forced to become academies. Now it's something to celebrate! How times change. No need to employ qualified teachers or follow the national curriculum. Privatisation by the back door and education on the cheap.
Not so long ago, poorly performing schools were forced to become academies. Now it's something to celebrate! How times change. No need to employ qualified teachers or follow the national curriculum. Privatisation by the back door and education on the cheap. sammmymac

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree